Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Hydrodynamic Performance of a Sloping Floating Breakwater with and Without Chain-Net

Chain-Net이 있거나 없는 경사 부유식 방파제의 유체역학적 성능에 대한 실험 및 수치적 조사

Keywords

  • Sloping floating breakwater
  • Chain net
  • Anchorage system
  • Hydrodynamic performance

Abstract

두 개의 부유체 사이에 간격이 있는 경사진 부유식 방파제(FB)에 대한 새로운 연구가 제안되었습니다. 구조물의 기울기는 파동 에너지 소산을 유발할 수 있습니다. 경사진 구조물의 문제는 파도가 넘친다는 것입니다. 이 문제를 해결하기 위해 두 플로터 사이의 간격을 고려합니다. 

오버 토핑이 발생하면 마루를 통과하는 물이 두 플로터 사이의 틈으로 쏟아지며 결과적으로 파도 에너지가 감쇠됩니다. 체인 네트가 모델에 추가되고 전송 계수에 대한 영향이 연구됩니다. 또한, 구조물의 유체역학적 성능에 대한 자유도의 영향을 조사하기 위해 말뚝으로 고정된(1 자유도) 계류 라인으로 고정된(3도의 자유도) 두 가지 고정 시스템에서 자유 모델을 연구했습니다.

게다가, 실험은 5개의 다른 파도 주기와 4개의 다른 파도 높이를 가진 규칙파에서 수행됩니다. 실험 결과, 경사형 부유식 방파제가 직사각형 상자형보다 최대 15% 성능이 우수한 것으로 나타났다. 말뚝에 의해 고정된 FB에 대한 투과계수는 단파에서 케이블에 의해 고정된 FB보다 최대값으로 약 14% 낮고 장파에서 약 4-10% 더 높다. 흘수가 증가함에 따라 전송 계수는 감소하지만 건현은 허용 비율의 초과를 제한하기 위한 최소 요구 사항을 충족해야 합니다. 

체인 그물이 있는 모델은 없는 모델에 비해 전달 계수가 최대 14% 감소하여 더 나은 성능을 나타냅니다. 실험 결과, 경사형 부유식 방파제가 직사각형 상자형보다 최대 15% 성능이 우수한 것으로 나타났다. 말뚝에 의해 고정된 FB에 대한 투과계수는 단파에서 케이블에 의해 고정된 FB보다 최대값으로 약 14% 낮고 장파에서 약 4-10% 더 높다. 흘수가 증가함에 따라 전송 계수는 감소하지만 건현은 허용 비율의 초과를 제한하기 위한 최소 요구 사항을 충족해야 합니다. 

체인 그물이 있는 모델은 없는 모델에 비해 전달 계수가 최대 14% 감소하여 더 나은 성능을 나타냅니다. 실험 결과, 경사형 부유식 방파제가 직사각형 상자형보다 최대 15% 성능이 우수한 것으로 나타났다. 말뚝에 의해 고정된 FB에 대한 투과계수는 단파에서 케이블에 의해 고정된 FB보다 최대값으로 약 14% 낮고 장파에서 약 4-10% 더 높다. 흘수가 증가함에 따라 전송 계수는 감소하지만 건현은 허용 비율의 초과를 제한하기 위한 최소 요구 사항을 충족해야 합니다.

체인 그물이 있는 모델은 없는 모델에 비해 전달 계수가 최대 14% 감소하여 더 나은 성능을 나타냅니다. 말뚝에 의해 고정된 FB에 대한 투과계수는 단파에서 케이블에 의해 고정된 FB보다 최대값으로 약 14% 낮고 장파에서 약 4-10% 더 높다. 흘수가 증가함에 따라 전송 계수는 감소하지만 건현은 허용 비율의 초과를 제한하기 위한 최소 요구 사항을 충족해야 합니다. 

체인 그물이 있는 모델은 없는 모델에 비해 전달 계수가 최대 14% 감소하여 더 나은 성능을 나타냅니다. 말뚝에 의해 고정된 FB에 대한 투과계수는 단파에서 케이블에 의해 고정된 FB보다 최대값으로 약 14% 낮고 장파에서 약 4-10% 더 높다. 

흘수가 증가함에 따라 전송 계수는 감소하지만 건현은 허용 비율의 초과를 제한하기 위한 최소 요구 사항을 충족해야 합니다. 체인 그물이 있는 모델은 없는 모델에 비해 전달 계수가 최대 14% 감소하여 더 나은 성능을 나타냅니다.

A novel study of sloping floating breakwater (FB) that has a gap between two floaters is proposed. The slope of a structure can cause wave energy dissipation. A problem with sloping structures is wave overtopping. To solve this problem, a gap is considered between the two floaters. If overtopping occurs, water passing the crest will pour into the gap between the two floaters, as a result wave energy will be attenuated. A chain net is added to the model and its effect on the transmission coefficient is studied. Furthermore, in order to investigate the effects of the degree of freedom on the hydrodynamic performance of the structure, the model is studied in the two anchorage systems which are anchored by pile (1 degree of freedom) and anchored by mooring lines (3 degree of freedom). Moreover, the experiments are performed under regular waves with five different wave periods and four different wave heights. The results of the experiments show a sloping floating breakwater that has a better performance than that of rectangular box type by 15% as maximum value. The transmission coefficients for the FB anchored by pile are lower about 14% as maximum value than that of the FB anchored by cable in shorter waves and are higher about 4–10% in longer waves. With increasing the draft, the transmission coefficient decreases but the freeboard should meet the minimum requirements to restrict overtopping in the allowable rate. The model with a chain net exhibits a better performance as compared with the model without it by a maximum 14% reduction in the transmission coefficients.

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Figure 15. Localized deformations on revetment due to run-down and sliding of armor from body laboratory model (left) and numerical modeling (right).

지속 가능한 해안 보호 구조로서 굴절식 콘크리트 블록 매트리스의 손상 메커니즘의 수치적 모델링

Numerical Modeling of Failure Mechanisms in Articulated Concrete Block Mattress as a Sustainable Coastal Protection Structure

Author

Ramin Safari Ghaleh(Department of Civil Engineering, K. N. Toosi University of Technology, Tehran 19967-15433, Iran)

Omid Aminoroayaie Yamini(Department of Civil Engineering, K. N. Toosi University of Technology, Tehran 19967-15433, Iran)

S. Hooman Mousavi(Department of Civil Engineering, K. N. Toosi University of Technology, Tehran 19967-15433, Iran)

Mohammad Reza Kavianpour(Department of Civil Engineering, K. N. Toosi University of Technology, Tehran 19967-15433, Iran)

Abstract

해안선 보호는 전 세계적인 우선 순위로 남아 있습니다. 일반적으로 해안 지역은 석회암과 같은 단단하고 비자연적이며 지속 불가능한 재료로 보호됩니다. 시공 속도와 환경 친화성을 높이고 개별 콘크리트 블록 및 보강재의 중량을 줄이기 위해 콘크리트 블록을 ACB 매트(Articulated Concrete Block Mattress)로 설계 및 구현할 수 있습니다. 이 구조물은 필수적인 부분으로 작용하며 방파제 또는 해안선 보호의 둑으로 사용할 수 있습니다. 물리적 모델은 해안 구조물의 현상을 추정하고 조사하는 핵심 도구 중 하나입니다. 그러나 한계와 장애물이 있습니다. 결과적으로, 본 연구에서는 이러한 구조물에 대한 파도의 수치 모델링을 활용하여 방파제에서의 파도 전파를 시뮬레이션하고, VOF가 있는 Flow-3D 소프트웨어를 통해 ACB Mat의 불안정성에 영향을 미치는 요인으로는 파괴파동, 옹벽의 흔들림, 파손으로 인한 인양력으로 인한 장갑의 변위 등이 있다. 본 연구의 가장 중요한 목적은 수치 Flow-3D 모델이 연안 호안의 유체역학적 매개변수를 모사하는 능력을 조사하는 것입니다. 콘크리트 블록 장갑에 대한 파동의 상승 값은 파단 매개변수( 0.5 < ξ m – 1 , 0 < 3.3 )가 증가할 때까지(R u 2 % H m 0 = 1.6) ) 최대값에 도달합니다. 따라서 차단파라미터를 증가시키고 파괴파(ξ m − 1 , 0 > 3.3 ) 유형을 붕괴파/해일파로 변경함으로써 콘크리트 블록 호안의 상대파 상승 변화 경향이 점차 증가합니다. 파동(0.5 < ξ m − 1 , 0 < 3.3 )의 경우 차단기 지수(표면 유사성 매개변수)를 높이면 상대파 런다운의 낮은 값이 크게 감소합니다. 또한, 천이영역에서는 파단파동이 쇄도파에서 붕괴/서징으로의 변화( 3.3 < ξ m – 1 , 0 < 5.0 )에서 상대적 런다운 과정이 더 적은 강도로 발생합니다.

Shoreline protection remains a global priority. Typically, coastal areas are protected by armoring them with hard, non-native, and non-sustainable materials such as limestone. To increase the execution speed and environmental friendliness and reduce the weight of individual concrete blocks and reinforcements, concrete blocks can be designed and implemented as Articulated Concrete Block Mattress (ACB Mat). These structures act as an integral part and can be used as a revetment on the breakwater body or shoreline protection. Physical models are one of the key tools for estimating and investigating the phenomena in coastal structures. However, it does have limitations and obstacles; consequently, in this study, numerical modeling of waves on these structures has been utilized to simulate wave propagation on the breakwater, via Flow-3D software with VOF. Among the factors affecting the instability of ACB Mat are breaking waves as well as the shaking of the revetment and the displacement of the armor due to the uplift force resulting from the failure. The most important purpose of the present study is to investigate the ability of numerical Flow-3D model to simulate hydrodynamic parameters in coastal revetment. The run-up values of the waves on the concrete block armoring will multiply with increasing break parameter ( 0.5 < ξ m − 1 , 0 < 3.3 ) due to the existence of plunging waves until it ( R u 2 % H m 0 = 1.6 ) reaches maximum. Hence, by increasing the breaker parameter and changing breaking waves ( ξ m − 1 , 0 > 3.3 ) type to collapsing waves/surging waves, the trend of relative wave run-up changes on concrete block revetment increases gradually. By increasing the breaker index (surf similarity parameter) in the case of plunging waves ( 0.5 < ξ m − 1 , 0 < 3.3 ), the low values on the relative wave run-down are greatly reduced. Additionally, in the transition region, the change of breaking waves from plunging waves to collapsing/surging ( 3.3 < ξ m − 1 , 0 < 5.0 ), the relative run-down process occurs with less intensity.

Figure 1.  Armor  geometric  characteristics  and  drawing  three-dimensional  geometry  of  a  breakwater section  in SolidWorks software.
Figure 1. Armor geometric characteristics and drawing three-dimensional geometry of a breakwater section in SolidWorks software.
Figure  5.  Wave  overtopping on  concrete block  mattress in (a)  laboratory  and (b)  numerical  model.
Figure 5. Wave overtopping on concrete block mattress in (a) laboratory and (b) numerical model.
Figure  7.  Mesh  block  for  calibrated  numerical  model  with  686,625  cells  and  utilization  of  FAVOR  tab to assess figure geometry.
Figure 7. Mesh block for calibrated numerical model with 686,625 cells and utilization of FAVOR tab to assess figure geometry.
Figure  10.  How to place different layers  (core, filter,  and revetment)  of the structure on slope.
Figure 10. How to place different layers (core, filter, and revetment) of the structure on slope.

Suggested Citation

Figure 11. Wave run-up on ACB Mat blocks in (a) laboratory model and (b) numerical modeling.
Figure 11. Wave run-up on ACB Mat blocks in (a) laboratory model and (b) numerical modeling.
Figure  15.  Localized  deformations  on  revetment  due  to  run-down  and  sliding  of  armor  from  body  laboratory  model  (left) and  numerical  modeling (right).
Figure 15. Localized deformations on revetment due to run-down and sliding of armor from body laboratory model (left) and numerical modeling (right).

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Hydraulic Analysis of Submerged Spillway Flows and Performance Evaluation of Chute Aerator Using CFD Modeling: A Case Study of Mangla Dam Spillway

CFD 모델링을 이용한 침수 배수로 흐름의 수리학적 해석 및 슈트 폭기장치 성능 평가: Mangla Dam 배수로 사례 연구

Hydraulic Analysis of Submerged Spillway Flows and Performance Evaluation of Chute Aerator Using CFD Modeling: A Case Study of Mangla Dam Spillway

Muhammad Kaleem SarwarZohaib NisarGhulam NabiFaraz ul HaqIjaz AhmadMuhammad Masood & Noor Muhammad Khan 

Abstract

대용량 배출구가 있는 수중 여수로는 일반적으로 홍수 처리 및 침전물 세척의 이중 기능을 수행하기 위해 댐 정상 아래에 제공됩니다. 이 방수로를 통과하는 홍수 물은 난류 거동을 나타냅니다. 

게다가 이러한 난류의 수력학적 분석은 어려운 작업입니다. 

따라서 본 연구는 파키스탄 Mangla Dam에 건설된 수중 여수로의 수리학적 거동을 수치해석을 통해 조사하는 것을 목적으로 한다. 또한 다양한 작동 조건에서 화기의 유압 성능을 평가했습니다. 

Mangla Spillway의 흐름을 수치적으로 모델링하는 데 전산 유체 역학 코드 FLOW 3D가 사용되었습니다. 레이놀즈 평균 Navier-Stokes 방정식은 난류 흐름을 수치적으로 모델링하기 위해 FLOW 3D에서 사용됩니다. 

연구 결과에 따르면 개발된 모델은 최대 6%의 허용 오차로 흐름 매개변수를 계산하므로 수중 여수로 흐름을 시뮬레이션할 수 있습니다. 

또한, 여수로 슈트 베드 주변 모델에 의해 계산된 공기 농도는 폭기 장치에 램프를 설치한 후 6% 이상으로 상승한 3%로 개발된 모델도 침수형 폭기 장치의 성능을 평가할 수 있음을 보여주었습니다.

Submerged spillways with large capacity outlets are generally provided below the dam crest to perform the dual functions of flood disposal and sediment flushing. Flood water passing through these spillways exhibits turbulent behavior. Moreover; hydraulic analysis of such turbulent flows is a challenging task. Therefore, the present study aims to use numerical simulations to examine the hydraulic behavior of submerged spillways constructed at Mangla Dam, Pakistan. Besides, the hydraulic performance of aerator was also evaluated at different operating conditions. Computational fluid dynamics code FLOW 3D was used to numerically model the flows of Mangla Spillway. Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes equations are used in FLOW 3D to numerically model the turbulent flows. The study results indicated that the developed model can simulate the submerged spillway flows as it computed the flow parameters with an acceptable error of up to 6%. Moreover, air concentration computed by model near spillway chute bed was 3% which raised to more than 6% after the installation of ramp on aerator which showed that developed model is also capable of evaluating the performance of submerged spillway aerator.

Keywords

  • Aerator
  • CFD
  • FLOW 3D
  • Froude number
  • Submerged spillway
  • Fig. 1extended data figure 1Fig. 2extended data figure 2Fig. 3extended data figure 3Fig. 4extended data figure 4Fig. 5extended data figure 5Fig. 6extended data figure 6Fig. 7extended data figure 7Fig. 8

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그림 3. 수중 4차 횡파 영향

Validation of Sloshing Simulations in Narrow Tanks

This case study was contributed by Peter Arnold, Minerva Dynamics.

이 작업의 목적은 FLOW-3D  를 검증하는 것입니다. 밀폐된 좁은 스팬 직사각형 탱크의 출렁거림 문제에 대비하여 탱크의 내부 파동 공명 주기에 가깝거나 같은 주기로 롤 운동을 하여 측면 및 지붕 파동 충격 이벤트가 발생합니다.

탱크는 물이나 해바라기 기름으로 두 가지 다른 수준으로 채워졌고 위의 공간은 공기로 채워졌습니다. 압력 센서는 여러 장소의 벽에 설치되었으며 처음 4개의 출렁이는 기간 동안 기록된 롤 각도와 시간 이력이 있습니다. 오일을 사용하는 경우의 흐름은 레이놀즈 수가 1748인 층류인 반면, 물로 채워진 경우의 흐름은 레이놀즈 수가 97546인 난류입니다. 

CFD 시뮬레이션은 탱크의 고조파 롤 운동을 복제하기 위해 본체력 방법을 사용했으며, 난류 및 공기 압축성을 설명하기 위해 다른 모델링 가정과 함께 그리드 의존성 테스트를 수행했습니다.

The objective of this work is to validate FLOW-3D against a sloshing problem in a sealed narrow span rectangular tank, subjected to roll motion at periods close to or equal to the tank’s internal wave resonance period, such that side and roof wave impact events occur. The tank was filled to two different levels with water or sunflower oil, with the space above filled by air. Pressure sensors were installed in the walls at several places and their time histories, along with the roll angle, recorded for the first four sloshing periods. For the cases using oil, the flow is laminar with a Reynolds number of 1748, while for the cases filled with water the flow is turbulent with a Reynolds number of 97546. The CFD simulations used the body force method to replicate the harmonic roll motion of the tank, while grid dependence tests were performed along with different modelling assumptions to account for turbulence and air compressibility.

Experimental Problem Setup

원래 실험은 Souto-Iglesias 및 Botia-Vera[1]에 의해 수행되었으며 모든 실험 데이터 파일은 문제 설명, 비디오 및 불확실성 분석과 함께 사용할 수 있습니다. 그림 1에 표시된 형상은 길이 900mm, 높이 508mm, 스팬 62mm의 직사각형 탱크로 구성되어 있으며 물이나 해바라기 기름으로 93mm 또는 355.3mm로 채워져 있으므로 4가지 경우가 고려됩니다. 탱크 벽과 같은 높이로 설치된 압력 센서의 위치도 표시됩니다. 탱크 회전 중심은 수평에 대한 회전 각도와 함께 그림 1에 나와 있습니다. 각 실험 실행은 반복성을 평가할 수 있도록 100번 수행되었습니다.

The original experiment was performed by Souto-Iglesias and Botia-Vera [1] and all experimental data files are available along with problem description, videos and an uncertainty analysis. The geometry shown in Fig. 1 consists of a rectangular tank of 900mm length, 508mm height and 62mm span, filled to either 93mm or 355.3 mm with either water or sunflower oil, hence four cases are considered. The locations of the pressure sensors that were installed flush with the tank walls are also shown. The tank rotation center is shown in Fig. 1, along with the rotation angle relative to the horizontal. Each of the experimental runs was performed 100 times to enable their repeatability to be assessed.

Tank dimensions and locations of pressure sensors
Figure 1. Tank dimensions and locations of pressure sensors

Numerical Simulation

문제는 FLOW-3D 내에서 비관성 기준 좌표계 모델을 사용하여 비교적 간단하게 설정할 수 있으며  , 이는 로컬 기준 좌표계의 가속도에 따라 유체에 체력 을 적용합니다. Z축 회전 속도는 탱크의 롤 운동을 시뮬레이션하기 위한 주기 함수로 정의되었으며 음의 수직 방향으로 작용하는 일정한 중력이 가해졌습니다.

메쉬 미세화, 운동량 이류에 대한 수치 근사 순서, 층류 대 난류 모델 및 탱크 내 공기에 대한 세 가지 다른 처리(즉, 일정 압력, 압축성 기체 및 비압축성 기체)와 같은 것을 조사하기 위해 여러 시뮬레이션을 수행했습니다.

93mm 깊이로 채워진 모든 케이스에 대해 압력은 압력 센서 P1에서만 실험 값과 비교되었으며, 355.3mm 깊이로 채워진 모든 케이스에서는 P3 센서의 데이터만 비교되었습니다.

The problem was relatively simple to set up using the non-inertial reference frame model within FLOW-3D, which applies a body force to the fluid depending on the acceleration of the local reference frame. The Z axis rotational velocity was defined as a periodic function to simulate a roll motion of the tank, and a constant gravity force acting in the negative vertical direction was applied.

Multiple simulations were performed to investigate such things as mesh refinement, the numerical approximation order for momentum advection, laminar versus turbulent models and three different treatments for the air in the tank (i.e., constant pressure, compressible gas and incompressible gas).

For all 93mm depth-filled cases, the pressure was compared to the experimental values at pressure sensor P1 only, while for all 355.3mm depth-filled cases, only data at the P3 sensor was compared.

Results

P1에서 측정된 측면 워터 슬로싱에 대한 메쉬 해상도의 영향은 그림 2에서 볼 수 있습니다. 피크 값 예측 측면에서 특별한 편향을 보이지 않습니다. 모든 측면 사례에서 초기 피크 직후의 압력은 시뮬레이션에서 일관되게 과대 평가되었습니다. 모든 메쉬는 피크의 타이밍 측면에서 우수한 일치를 보입니다. 100회 실행에서 보고된 실험 시간 기록은 평균 값에 가장 가까운 최고 압력을 가진 기록입니다.

The effect of mesh resolution on lateral water sloshing measured at P1 is seen in Fig. 2. It shows no particular bias in terms of the prediction of peak values. In all the Lateral cases, the pressures immediately after the initial peaks are consistently over estimated in the simulations. All meshes have excellent agreement in terms of the timing of the peaks. The experimental time histories reported from the 100 runs made are those with peak pressures closest to the average values.

Lateral water case
Figure 2. Tank dimensions and locations of pressure sensors

실험 결과의 반복성은 Souto-Iglesias & Elkin Botia-Vera[1]에 의해 각 테스트를 100번 실행하고 처음 4개의 피크 압력의 평균 및 표준 편차를 측정하여 평가했습니다. CFD 실행이 다른 실험 실행으로 간주되는 경우 오류 막대 내에 있을 확률이 95%입니다. 그러나 CFD 결과의 16개 피크 압력 중 9개만 실험 결과의 2 표준 편차 내에 있으므로 CFD 모델이 실험을 대표하지 않거나 피크 압력이 정규 분포를 따르지 않는다는 결론을 내려야 합니다.

어쨌든 표준 편차는 피크 자체에 비해 상당히 크며, 수성 케이스와 측면 오일의 비율이 가장 작은 피크 값에 대한 표준 편차의 비율이 가장 큰 것으로 나타났습니다. 이러한 결과는 그림 1과 2에서 볼 수 있는 벽 충격 역학의 복잡성을 고려할 때 그리 놀라운 일이 아닙니다. 3,4.

The repeatability of the experimental results was assessed by Souto-Iglesias & Elkin Botia-Vera [1] running each test 100 times and measuring the average and standard deviation of the first four peak pressures. If a CFD run is considered to be another experimental run there is a 95% chance it will lie within the error bars. However, only nine of the 16 peak pressures from the CFD results fall within two standard deviations of the experimental results, so we must conclude that either the CFD model is not representative of the experiment or that the peak pressures are not normally distributed.

In any event, the standard deviations are quite large compared to the peaks themselves, with the largest ratio of standard deviation to peak values occurring for the water-based cases and the lateral oil having the smallest ratio. These results are perhaps not too surprising when one considers the complexity of the wall impact dynamics as seen in Figs. 3,4.

Lateral Wave Impact in Water
Figure 3. 4th Lateral Wave Impact in Water
Wave Impact of Water on Roof
Figure 4. 4th Wave Impact of Water on Roof

Conclusions

좁은 탱크 슬로싱 문제의 네 가지 구성은 자유 표면 흐름을 위해 설계된 상용 CFD 코드를 사용하여 수치적으로 시뮬레이션되었습니다. 대략 2 X 10 3  및 1 X 10 5 의 Reynolds 수에 해당하는 두 가지 다른 유체  와 두 가지 유체 깊이가 네 가지 경우를 정의하는 데 사용되었습니다. 4가지 경우 모두에 대해 메쉬 셀 크기 독립성 테스트를 수행했지만 메쉬 해상도가 증가함에 따라 실험 결과에 대해 약한 수렴만 발견되었습니다. 조사는 또한 두 가지 다른 운동량 이류 수치 차분 계획을 테스트했으며 두 번째 방법을 사용하여 더 가까운 일치를 발견했습니다 1차 체계를 사용하는 것보다 차수 단조성 보존 체계. 기본 층류 흐름을 포함한 세 가지 난류 모델이 테스트되었지만 더 낮은 계산 비용으로 인해 층류 이외의 모델에 대한 선호도가 발견되지 않았습니다. 실험 데이터와 공기 감소 일치의 압축성을 포함하여 그 이유는 불분명합니다.

실험 압력 프로브 시간 이력 데이터 세트에는 100회 반복 테스트에서 파생된 각 압력 피크에 대해 100개의 값이 포함되어 있으므로 CFD 시뮬레이션과의 일치의 통계적 유의성을 조사할 수 있었습니다. 수치 시뮬레이션과 실험 모두 출렁이는 파동 충격에 해당하는 매우 가파른 압력 펄스를 발생시켰고 실험 결과는 피크 값에서 높은 정도의 자연적 변동성을 갖는 것으로 나타났습니다. CFD 시뮬레이션의 감도 테스트(예: 약간 다른 초기 시작 조건 사용)는 공식적으로 수행되지 않았지만 수치 솔루션은 또한 다른 메쉬, 차분 체계 및 난류 모델,

모든 경우에 압력 피크가 발생하는 수치해의 타이밍은 매우 정확함을 알 수 있었다. 그러나 가장 난이도가 낮은 Lateral Oil의 경우에도 압력 피크와 바로 뒤따르는 압력 값이 과대 평가되어 수치 모델링의 단점이 나타났습니다. 실험적 피크 압력 변동성을 고려할 때 CFD 생성 값은 CFD 솔루션이 통계적 유의성을 나타내기 위해 필요한 15개 이상이 아니라 16개 피크 중 9개에서 2개의 표준편차 한계 내에 떨어졌습니다. 실험을 대표했다. 이것은 피크가 정규 분포를 따르지 않거나 CFD 모델이 피크를 예측하는 데 어떤 식으로든 결함이 있음을 나타냅니다.

Four configurations of a narrow tank sloshing problem were numerically simulated using a commercial CFD code designed for free surface flow. Two different fluids corresponding to Reynolds numbers of approximately 2 X 103 and 1 X 105 and two fluid depths were used to define the four cases. Mesh cell size independence tests were conducted for all four cases, but only a weak convergence towards the experimental results with increasing mesh resolution was found. The investigation also tested two different momentum advection numerical differencing schemes and found closer agreement using the 2nd order monotonicity preserving scheme than by using a first order scheme. Three turbulence models, including the default laminar flow, were tested but no preference was found for any model other than the laminar by virtue of its lower computational cost. Including the compressibility of the air-reduced agreement with the experimental data, the reasons for this are unclear.

The experimental pressure probe time history data sets included 100 values for each of the pressure peaks derived from 100 repeat tests, and thus we were able to examine the statistical significance of the agreement with the CFD simulations. Both the numerical simulations and the experiments gave rise to very steep pressure pulses corresponding to the sloshing wave impacts, and the experimental results were found to have a high degree of natural variability in the peak values. Although sensitivity tests of the CFD simulations (using, for example, slightly different initial starting conditions) were not formally conducted, the numerical solutions also showed a high degree of variability in the pressure peak magnitudes resulting from the use of different meshes, differencing schemes and turbulence models, which could be considered to show that the numerical solution also had a high degree of natural variability.

In all cases, the numerical solutions’ timing of the occurrence of the pressure peaks were found to be very accurate. However, even for the least challenging Lateral Oil case, the pressure peaks and the immediately following pressure values were overestimated, which indicated a shortcoming in the numerical modelling. When the experimental peak pressure variability was taken into account, the CFD-generated values fell inside the two Standard Deviation margin in nine of the 16 peaks rather than the 15 or more that would be required to show statistical significance in the sense that the CFD solution was representative of the experiment. This indicates that either the peaks are not normally distributed and/or the CFD model is in some way deficient at predicting them. Further work is required to establish how the peak pressures are distributed and/or to establish the physical reasons why the CFD model is overestimating the pressure peaks for even the least challenging Lateral Oil configuration.

References

  1. Spheric Benchmark Test Case, Sloshing Wave Impact Problem, Antonio Souto-Iglesias & Elkin Botia-Vera, https://wiki.manchester.ac.uk/spheric/index.php/Test10
  2. Peregrine DH (1993). Water-wave impact on walls. Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics. Vol 35, pp 23-43.

Editor’s Note

The complete document from which this note was extracted and the related data and input files are available on our Users Site. Readers are encouraged to read the original validation to get a full appreciation of the detail in this work investigating comparisons between simulation and experimental data. This study is especially noteworthy since it deals with highly non-linear sloshing of fluids interacting with the boundaries of a confining tank.

With regard to the author’s conclusions, it should be mentioned that the over prediction of fluid impact pressures in simulations could be the result of not allowing for sufficient compressibility effects in the liquids. For instance, in Fig. 3, it appears that there has been some air entrained in the liquid near the side wall. Also, negative pressures (i.e., below atmospheric) recorded experimentally might result from liquid drops remaining on the pressure sensors after the main body of liquid has drained away. Such details, which may be hard to quantify, only emphasize the difficulties involved in undertaking detailed validation studies. The author is commended for his excellent work.

Solved Aging Dam Dilemma

노후 댐 대책

How Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling Solved Aging Dam Dilemma

By AyresApril 6, 2021No Comments

Solved Aging Dam Dilemma
Solved Aging Dam Dilemma

Keyword : 3D Hydraulic Modeling,CFD, CFD Model, Computational Fluid Dynamics, Dam Hydraulics, Hydrology structure damage

급격한 변화나 예기치 못한 노후화로 인해 댐에서 복잡한 문제가 발생하는 경우 20세기에 개발된 산업 표준 설계 방정식과 방법론이 많은 경우 올바른 솔루션을 제공할 수는 없습니다. 다행스럽게도 엔지니어들은 적절한 조치나 수리를 적용할 수 있도록 유압 상황을 확인하기 위해 전산유체역학(CFD) 모델을 사용할 수 있게 되었습니다.

About the Expert:

Matthew Hickox, PE, brings civil engineering expertise in stormwater and river design, planning, and construction phase services. His experience is founded on a solid understanding of hydrologic modeling, 1- and 2-dimensional hydraulic modeling, in-stream hydraulic structures, scour protection measures, culvert and bridge hydraulics, and the regulatory environment for stormwater projects.

How Does CFD Work in Practice?

최근의 한 사례에서 하천 수문학 및 지형학은 낮은 수두 전환 댐 주변에서 변경되었습니다. 지난 수십 년 동안 빠르게 발전해 온 도시 지역의 하류에 있는 모래 바닥 하천 시스템에 위치한 댐의 문제는 주변 하천 시스템에서 일어나는 여러 가지 일들로 인해 복잡해졌습니다. 증가하는 도시화는 배출 빈도를 증가시켰을 뿐만 아니라 기본 흐름을 증가시켰습니다. 수리학적으로 가파른 시스템은 일시적인 지류에서 연간 베이스 흐름으로의 변화가 상류가 침식됨에 따라 퇴적물 부하도 증가했음을 의미했습니다.

이 조합은 전환 댐의 하류 수로가 지난 15년 동안 3-4피트 감소했고, 배수가 감소된 정수장 apron에서 속도가 증가했으며 구조물 표면에 마모를 유발하는 퇴적물 하중이 감소했음을 의미합니다. 이러한 문제 중 어느 것도 전환 댐의 원래 설계의 잘못이 아니었지만 변화하는 하천 수문 및 지형학으로 인해 원래 설계자가 예상하지 못한 조건이 발생했습니다.

기존 구조물의 단위 너비 CFD 모델은 기존 현장 조건으로 인해 정수기 계류장에 수압 점프가 형성되지 않았다는 현장 관찰을 확인했습니다. 1).

Figure 1. Existing conditions unit width CFD model results showing velocity, cross section view of structure.
Figure 1. Existing conditions unit width CFD model results showing velocity, cross section view of structure.

설계 표고(열화 전)에서 하류 하류 바닥 표고와 함께 개발된 유사한 단위 너비 CFD 모델은 원래 설계가 정수 유역 계류장과 배수로 전면 근처에서 수압 점프를 생성한다는 것을 보여주었습니다. 이 단위 너비 CFD 모델은 구조에 영향을 미치는 수력학의 가치 있는 검증을 제공하지만 구조 손상이 구조 중간에서 매우 뚜렷하고 다른 영역에서는 거의 손대지 않았기 때문에 이것만으로는 충분하지 않습니다. (그림 2)

Figure 2. Original design conditions unit width CFD model results showing velocity, cross section view of structure. The only difference with Figure 1 is the downstream bed elevation.
Figure 2. Original design conditions unit width CFD model results showing velocity, cross section view of structure. The only difference with Figure 1 is the downstream bed elevation.

전체 기존 조건 CFD 모델은 정수조 앞치마 마모의 범위와 그에 따른 손상을 확인했습니다. (그림 3 및 4)

Figure 3. Existing conditions CFD model results showing velocity streamlines at 2-year event discharge. High velocities are areas of significant abrasion damage, low velocity areas have little or no abrasion damage.
Figure 3. Existing conditions CFD model results showing velocity streamlines at 2-year event discharge. High velocities are areas of significant abrasion damage, low velocity areas have little or no abrasion damage.
Figure 4. Existing conditions shows rebar exposed from significant abrasion damage to stilling basin apron in high velocity areas
Figure 4. Existing conditions shows rebar exposed from significant abrasion damage to stilling basin apron in high velocity areas

이 구조물에 대한 수리를 위한 예비 설계 동안 간단한 분석에 따르면 구조물의 미수를 높이는 것이 방수로 토우 근처의 구조물에 수력학적 점프를 만드는 데 도움이 될 것이며, 이는 정수 유역 계류장과 계류장을 가로지르는 극한 속도를 감소시킬 것입니다. 따라서 구조의 마모를 크게 줄입니다(그림 5 참조). 이 예비 제안 조건 CFD 모델은 엔드 실 높이만 높였습니다. 구조물 하류의 하천 시스템의 상태와 지형은 나머지 설계 수명 동안 구조물의 안정성을 보장하기 위해 모든 최종 설계 조건에 대해 평가되어야 합니다.

Figure 5. Preliminary design check to verify velocities under a raised tailwater condition at a 2-year event discharge. Velocity cross section slices shown.
Figure 5. Preliminary design check to verify velocities under a raised tailwater condition at a 2-year event discharge. Velocity cross section slices shown.

CFD 모델은 설계 상황이 확립된 설계 방정식 및 절차의 한계 내에 깔끔하게 속하지 않을 때 유압을 확인하는 또 다른 도구를 제공합니다. 구조와 유역의 개요에 대해 자세히 설명하는 전체적인 관점은 프로젝트 현장의 현재와 미래의 상태를 평가하는 데 필요합니다. 이 예에서 구조의 설계 및 작동은 원래 설계와 매우 유사하게 유지됩니다. 구조 주변에서 변경된 것은 하천 시스템입니다. CFD는 현장 조건 변경으로 인해 예기치 않은 수리력 및 구조 손상이 발생할 때 복잡한 수리력을 분석할 수 있는 도구 상자의 또 다른 도구를 제공합니다.

CFD 또는 여기 Ayres에서 제공하는 유압 엔지니어링 서비스에 대한 자세한 내용은 Matthew Hickox, PE에게 문의하십시오.

Fig. 6. Configuration of Johnson (1958) hydraulic experiment.

전체 수심 범위에서 선박 파고에 대한 방정식

Equation for ship wave crests in the entire range of water depths

Byeong Wook Lee a
, Changhoon Lee b,
*a Coastal Development and Ocean Energy Research Center, Korea Institute of Ocean Science & Technology, 385 Haeyang-ro, Busan, 49111, Republic of Korea
b Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Sejong University, 209 Neungdong-ro, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul, 05006, Republic of Korea

ABSTRACT

An equation for ship wave crests y/x in the entire range of water depths is developed using the linear dispersion relation. In deep water, the developed equation is reduced to the equation of Kelvin (1906). The locations of ship wave crests in the x – and y -directions are obtained using a dimensionless constant C. The wave ray angle θc at the cusp locus is determined using the condition that θc is maximal at the cusp locus and the cusp locus angle is determined as αc=−tan−1(y/x)max. Numerical experiments are conducted using the FLOW-3D to simulate ship wave propagation. The cusp locus angles of the FLOW-3D are similar to both those of the present theory and Havelock (1908) theory in the entire range of the Froude number. Both the present theory and the FLOW-3D yield that, with the increase of ship speed, the Froude number increases and does the wavelength. For the Froude number equal to or greater than unity, the wavelength becomes infinitely large and the transverse waves disappear. The wavelengths of the FLOW-3D are slightly smaller than those of the present theory because the FLOW-3D considers the decrease of wavelength due to energy dissipation which happens because of viscosity of water and turbulence of high-speed particle velocities.

Fig. 6. Configuration of Johnson (1958) hydraulic experiment.
Fig. 6. Configuration of Johnson (1958) hydraulic experiment.
Fig. 8. Comparison of ship wave crest patterns: (a) Fr ¼ 0:66 (Us ¼ 6:5m=s,  kh � 0:724π), (b) Fr ¼ 0:86 (Us ¼ 8:5m=s, kh � 0:342π), (c) Fr ¼ 1:21 (Us ¼ 12:0m=s, kh � 0:003π). Line definition: red solid line ¼ present theory; yellow  dashed line ¼ Kelvin theory; white dot ¼ FLOW-3D solution. (For interpretation  of the references to colour in this figure legend, the reader is referred to the  Web version of this article.)
Fig. 8. Comparison of ship wave crest patterns: (a) Fr ¼ 0:66 (Us ¼ 6:5m=s, kh >= 0:724π), (b) Fr ¼ 0:86 (Us ¼ 8:5m=s, kh >= 0:342π), (c) Fr ¼ 1:21 (Us ¼ 12:0m=s, kh >= 0:003π). Line definition: red solid line ¼ present theory; yellow dashed line ¼ Kelvin theory; white dot ¼ FLOW-3D solution. (For interpretation of the references to colour in this figure legend, the reader is referred to the Web version of this article.)

Keywords

Ship wave crests
Cusp locus angle
Entire range of water depths
Theoretical solution
Numerical experiment

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Fig. 11. Velocity vectors along x-direction through the center of the box culvert for B0, B30, B50, and B70 respectively.

Numerical investigation of scour characteristics downstream of blocked culverts

막힌 암거 하류의 세굴 특성 수치 조사

NesreenTahabMaged M.El-FekyaAtef A.El-SaiadaIsmailFathya
aDepartment of Water and Water Structures Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Zagazig University, Zagazig 44519, Egypt
bLab Manager, Faculty of Engineering, Zagazig University, Zagazig 44519, Egypt

Abstract

횡단 구조물을 통한 막힘은 안정성을 위협하는 위험한 문제 중 하나입니다. 암거의 막힘 형상 및 하류 세굴 특성에 미치는 영향에 관한 연구는 거의 없습니다.

이 연구의 목적은 수면과 세굴 모두에서 상자 암거를 통한 막힘의 작용을 수치적으로 논의하는 것입니다. 이를 위해 FLOW 3D v11.1.0을 사용하여 퇴적물 수송 모델을 조사했습니다.

상자 암거를 통한 다양한 차단 비율이 연구되었습니다. FLOW 3D 모델은 실험 데이터로 보정되었습니다. 결과는 FLOW 3D 프로그램이 세굴 다운스트림 상자 암거를 정확하게 시뮬레이션할 수 있음을 나타냅니다.

막힌 경우에 대한 속도 분포, 최대 세굴 깊이 및 수심을 플롯하고 비차단된 사례(기본 사례)와 비교했습니다.

그 결과 암거 높이의 70% 차단율은 상류의 수심을 암거 높이의 2.3배 증가시키고 평균 유속은 기본 경우보다 3배 더 증가시키는 것으로 입증되었다. 막힘 비율의 함수로 상대 최대 세굴 깊이를 추정하는 방정식이 만들어졌습니다.

Blockage through crossing structures is one of the dangerous problems that threaten its stability. There are few researches concerned with blockage shape in culverts and its effect on characteristics of scour downstream it.

The study’s purpose is to discuss the action of blockage through box culvert on both water surface and scour numerically. A sediment transport model has been investigated for this purpose using FLOW 3D v11.1.0. Different ratios of blockage through box culvert have been studied. The FLOW 3D model was calibrated with experimental data.

The results present that the FLOW 3D program was capable to simulate accurately the scour downstream box culvert. The velocity distribution, maximum scour depth and water depths for blocked cases have been plotted and compared with the non-blocked case (base case).

The results proved that the blockage ratio 70% of culvert height makes the water depth upstream increases by 2.3 times of culvert height and mean velocity increases by 3 times more than in the base case. An equation has been created to estimate the relative maximum scour depth as a function of blockage ratio.

1. Introduction

Local scour is the removal of granular bed material by the action of hydrodynamic forces. As the depth of scour hole increases, the stability of the foundation of the structure may be endangered, with a consequent risk of damage and failure [1]. So the prediction and control of scour is considered to be very important for protecting the water structures from failure. Most previous studies were designed to study the different factors that impact on scour and their relationship with scour hole dimensions like fluid characteristics, flow conditions, bed properties, and culvert geometry. Many previous researches studied the effect of flow rate on scour hole by information Froude number or modified Froude number [2][3][4][5][6]. Cesar Mendoza [6] found a good correlation between the scour depth and the discharge Intensity (Qg−.5D−2.5). Breusers and Raudkiv [7] used shear velocity in the outlet-scour prediction procedure. Ali and Lim [8] used the densimetric Froude number in estimation of the scour depth [1][8][9][10][11][12][13][14]. “The densimetric Froude number presents the ratio of the tractive force on sediment particle to the submerged specific weight of the sediment” [15](1)Fd=uρsρ-1gD50

Ali and Lim [8] pointed to the consequence of tailwater depth on scour behavior [1][2][8][13]. Abida and Townsend [2] indicated that the maximum depth of local scour downstream culvert was varying with the tailwater depth in three ways: first, for very shallow tailwater depths, local scouring decreases with a decrease in tailwater depth; second, when the ratio of tailwater depth to culvert height ranged between 0.2 and 0.7, the scour depth increases with decreasing tailwater depth; and third for a submerged outlet condition. The tailwater depth has only a marginal effect on the maximum depth of scour [2]. Ruff et al. [16] observed that for materials having similar mean grain sizes (d50) but different standard deviations (σ). As (σ) increased, the maximum scour hole depth decreased. Abt et al. [4] mentioned to role of soil type of maximum scour depth. It was noticed that local scour was more dangerous for uniform sands than for well-graded mixtures [1][2][4][9][17][18]. Abt et al [3][19] studied the culvert shape effect on scour hole. The results evidenced that the culvert shape has a limited effect on outlet scour. Under equivalent discharge conditions, it was noted that a square culvert with height equal to the diameter of a circular culvert would reduce scour [16][20]. The scour hole dimension was also effected by the culvert slope. Abt et al. [3][21] showed that the culvert slope is a key element in estimating the culvert flow velocity, the discharge capacity, and sediment transport capability. Abt et al. [21][22] tested experimentally culvert drop height effect on maximum scour depth. It was observed that as the drop height was increasing, the depth of scour was also increasing. From the previous studies, it could have noticed that the most scour prediction formula downstream unblocked culvert was the function of densimetric Froude number, soil properties (d50, σ), tailwater depth and culvert opening size. Blockage is the phenomenon of plugging water structures due to the movement of water flow loaded with sediment and debris. Water structures blockage has a bad effect on water flow where it causes increasing of upstream water level that may cause flooding around the structure and increase of scour rate downstream structures [23][24]. The blockage phenomenon through was studied experimentally and numerical [15][25][26][27][28][29][30][31][32][33]. Jaeger and Lucke [33] studied the debris transport behavior in a natural channel in Australia. Froude number scale model of an existing culvert was used. It was noticed that through rainfall event, the mobility of debris was impressed by stream shape (depth and width). The condition of the vegetation (size and quantities) through the catchment area was the main factor in debris transport. Rigby et al. [26] reported that steep slope was increasing the ability to mobilize debris that form field data of blocked culverts and bridges during a storm in Wollongong city.

Streftaris et al. [32] studied the probability of screen blockage by debris at trash screens through a numerical model to relate between the blockage probability and nature of the area around. Recently, many commercial computational fluid programs (CFD) such as SSIIM, Fluent, and FLOW 3D are used in the analysis of the scour process. Scour and sediment transport numerical model need to validate by using experimental data or field data [34][35][36][37][38]. Epely-Chauvin et al. [36] investigated numerically the effect of a series of parallel spur diked. The experimental data were compared by SSIIM and FLOW 3D program. It was found that the accuracy of calibrated FLOW 3D model was better than SSIIM model. Nielsen et al. [35] used the physical model and FLOW 3D model to analyze the scour process around the pile. The soil around the pile was uniform coarse stones in the physical models that were simulated by regular spheres, porous media, and a mixture of them. The calibrated porous media model can be used to determine the bed shear stress. In partially blocked culverts, there aren’t many studies that explain the blockage impact on scour dimensions. Sorourian et al. [14][15] studied the effect of inlet partial blockage on scour characteristics downstream box culvert. It resulted that the partial blockage at the culvert inlet could be the main factor in estimating the depth of scour. So, this study is aiming to investigate the effects of blockage through a box culvert on flow and scour characteristics by different blockage ratios and compares the results with a non-blocked case. Create a dimensionless equation relates the blockage ratio of the culvert with scour characteristics downstream culvert.

2. Experimental data

The experimental work of the study was conducted in the Hydraulics and Water Engineering Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, Zagazig University, Egypt. The flume had a rectangular cross-section of 66 cm width, 65.5 cm depth, and 16.2 m long. A rectangular culvert was built with 0.2 m width, 0.2 m height and 3.00 m long with θ = 25° gradually outlet and 0.8 m fixed apron. The model was located on the mid-point of the channel. The sediment part was extended for a distance 2.20 m with 0.66 m width and 0.20 m depth of coarse sand with specific weight 1.60 kg/cm3, d50 = 2.75 mm and σ (d90/d50) = 1.50. The particle size distribution was as shown in Fig. 1. The experimental model was tested for different inlet flow (Q) of 25, 30, 34, 40 l/s for different submerged ratio (S) of 1.25, 1.50, 1.75.

3. Dimensional analysis

A dimensional analysis has been used to reduce the number of variables which affecting on the scour pattern downstream partial blocked culvert. The main factors affecting the maximum scour depth are:(2)ds=f(b.h.L.hb.lb.Q.ud.hu.hd.D50.ρ.ρs.g.ls.dd.ld)

Fig. 2 shows a definition sketch of the experimental model. The maximum scour depth can be written in a dimensionless form as:(3)dsh=f(B.Fd.S)where the ds/h is the relative maximum scour depth.

4. Numerical work

The FLOW 3D is (CFD) program used by many researchers and appeared high accuracy in solving hydrodynamic and sediment transport models in the three dimensions. Numerical simulation with FLOW 3D was performed to study the impacts of blockage ratio through box culvert on shear stress, velocity distribution and the sediment transport in terms of the hydrodynamic features (water surface, velocity and shear stress) and morphological parameters (scour depth and sizes) conditions in accurately and efficiently. The renormalization group (RNG) turbulence model was selected due to its high ability to predict the velocity profiles and turbulent kinetic energy for the flow through culvert [39]. The one-fluid incompressible mode was used to simulate the water surface. Volume of fluid (VOF) method was employed in FLOW 3D to tracks a liquid interface through arbitrary deformations and apply the correct boundary conditions at the interface [40].1.

Governing equations

Three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) equation was applied for incompressible viscous fluid motion. The continuity equation is as following:(4)VF∂ρ∂t+∂∂xρuAx+∂∂yρvAy+∂∂zρwAz=RDIF(5)∂u∂t+1VFuAx∂u∂x+vAy∂u∂y+ωAz∂u∂z=-1ρ∂P∂x+Gx+fx(6)∂v∂t+1VFuAx∂v∂x+vAy∂v∂y+ωAz∂v∂z=-1ρ∂P∂y+Gy+fy(7)∂ω∂t+1VFuAx∂ω∂x+vAy∂ω∂y+ωAz∂ω∂z=-1ρ∂P∂z+Gz+fz

ρ is the fluid density,

VF is the volume fraction,

(x,y,z) is the Cartesian coordinates,

(u,v,w) are the velocity components,

(Ax,Ay,Az) are the area fractions and

RDIF is the turbulent diffusion.

P is the average hydrodynamic pressure,

(Gx, Gy, Gz) are the body accelerations and

(fx, fy, fz) are the viscous accelerations.

The motion of sediment transport (suspended, settling, entrainment, bed load) is estimated by predicting the erosion, advection and deposition process as presented in [41].

The critical shields parameter is (θcr) is defined as the critical shear stress τcr at which sediments begin to move on a flat and horizontal bed [41]:(8)θcr=τcrgd50(ρs-ρ)

The Soulsby–Whitehouse [42] is used to predict the critical shields parameter as:(9)θcr=0.31+1.2d∗+0.0551-e(-0.02d∗)(10)d∗=d50g(Gs-1ν3where:

d* is the dimensionless grain size

Gs is specific weight (Gs = ρs/ρ)

The entrainment coefficient (0.005) was used to scale the scour rates and fit the experimental data. The settling velocity controls the Soulsby deposition equation. The volumetric sediment transport rate per width of the bed is calculated using Van Rijn [43].2.

Meshing and geometry of model

After many trials, it was found that the uniform cell size with 0.03 m cell size is the closest to the experimental results and takes less time. As shown in Fig. 3. In x-direction, the total model length in this direction is 700 cm with mesh planes at −100, 0, 300, 380 and 600 cm respectively from the origin point, in y-direction, the total model length in this direction is 66 cm at distances 0, 23, 43 and 66 cm respectively from the origin point. In z-direction, the total model length in this direction is 120 cm. with mesh planes at −20, 0, 20 and 100 cm respectively.3.

Boundary condition

As shown in Fig. 4, the boundary conditions of the model have been defined to simulate the experimental flow conditions accurately. The upstream boundary was defined as the volume flow rate with a different flow rate. The downstream boundary was defined as specific pressure with different fluid elevation. Both of the right side, the left side, and the bottom boundary were defined as a wall. The top boundary defined as specified pressure with pressure value equals zero.

5. Validation of experimental results and numerical results

The experimental results investigated the flow and scour characteristics downstream culvert due to different flow conditions. The measured value of maximum scour depth is compared with the simulated depth from FLOW 3D model as shown in Fig. 5. The scour results show that the simulated results from the numerical model is quite close to the experimental results with an average error of 3.6%. The water depths in numerical model results is so close to the experimental results as shown in Fig. 6 where the experiment and numerical results are compared at different submerged ratios and flow rates. The results appear maximum error percentage in water depths upstream and downstream the culvert is about 2.37%. This indicated that the FLOW 3D is efficient for the prediction of maximum scour depth and the flow depths downstream box culvert.

6. Computation time

The run time was chosen according to reaching to the stability limit. Hydraulic stability was achieved after 50 s, where the scour development may still go on. For run 1, the numerical simulation was run for 1000 s as shown in Fig. 7 where it mostly reached to scour stability at 800 s. The simulation time was taken 500 s at about 95% of scour stability.

7. Analysis and discussions

Fig. 8 shows the study sections where sec 1 represents to upstream section, sec2 represents to inside section and sec3 represents to downstream stream section. Table 1 indicates the scour hole dimensions at different blockage case. The symbol (B) represents to blockage and the number points to blockage ratio. B0 case signifies to the non-blocked case, B30 is that blockage height is 30% to the culvert height and so on.

Table 1. The scour results of different blockage ratio.

Casehb cmB = hb/hQ lit/sSFdd50 mmds/h measuredls/hdd/hld/hds/h estimated
B000351.261.692.50.581.500.275.000.46
B3060.30351.261.682.50.481.250.274.250.40
B50100.50351.221.742.50.451.100.244.000.37
B70140.70351.231.732.50.431.500.165.500.33

7.1. Scour hole geometry

The scour hole geometry mainly depends on the properties of soil of the bed downstream the fixed apron. From Table 1, the results show that the maximum scour depth in B0 case is about 0.58 of culvert height while the maximum deposition in B0 is 0.27 culvert height. There is a symmetric scour hole as shown in Fig. 9 in B0 case. An asymmetric scour hole is created in B50 and B70 due to turbulences that causes the deviation of the jet direction from the center of the flume where appear in Fig. 11 and Fig. 19.

7.2. Flow water surface

Fig. 10 presents the relative free surface water (hw/h) along the x-direction at center of the box culvert. From the mention Figure, it is easy to release the effect of different blockage ratios. The upstream water level rises by increasing the blockage ratio. Increasing upstream water level may cause flooding over the banks of the waterway. In the 70% blockage case, the upstream water level rises to 2.3 times of culvert height more than the non-blocked case at the same discharge and submerged ratio. The water surface profile shows an increase in water level upstream the culvert due to a decrease in transverse velocity. Because of decreasing velocity downstream culvert, there is an increase in water level before it reaches its uniform depth.

7.3. Velocity vectors

Scour downstream hydraulic structures mainly affects by velocities distribution and bed shear stress. Fig. 11 shows the velocity vectors and their magnitude in xz plane at the same flow conditions. The difference in the upstream water level due to the different blockage ratios is so clear. The maximum water level is in B70 and the minimum level is in B0. The inlet mean velocity value is about 0.88 m/s in B0 increases to 2.86 m/s in B70. As the blockage ratio increases, the inlet velocity increases. The outlet velocity in B0 case makes downward jet causes scour hole just after the fixed apron in the middle of the bed while the blockage causes upward water flow that appears clearly in B70. The upward jet decreases the scour depth to 0.13 culvert height less than B0 case. After the scour hole, the velocity decreases and the flow becomes uniform.

7.4. Velocity distribution

Fig. 12 represents flow velocity (Vx) distribution along the vertical depth (z/hu) upstream the inlet for the different blockage ratios at the same flow conditions. From the Figure, the maximum velocity creates closed to bed in B0 while in blocked case, the maximum horizontal velocity creates at 0.30 of relative vertical depth (z/hu). Fig. 13 shows the (Vz) distribution along the vertical depth (z/hu) upstream culvert at sec 1. From the mentioned Figure, it is easy to note that the maximum vertical is in B70 which appears that as the blockage ratio increases the vertical ratio also increases. In the non-blocked case. The vertical velocity (Vz) is maximum at (z/hu) equals 0.64. At the end of the fixed apron (sec 3), the horizontal velocity (Vx) is slowly increasing to reach the maximum value closed to bed in B0 and B30 while the maximum horizontal velocity occurs near to the top surface in B50 and B70 as shown in Fig. 14. The vertical velocity component along the vertical depth (z/hd) is presented in Fig. 15. The vertical velocity (Vz) is maximum in B0 at vertical depth (z/hd) 0.3 with value 0.45 m/s downward. Figs. 16 and 17 observe velocity components (Vx, Vz) along the vertical depth just after the end of blockage length at the centerline of the culvert barrel. It could be noticed the uniform velocity distribution in B0 case with horizontal velocity (Vx) closed to 1.0 m/s and vertical velocity closed to zero. In the blocked case, the maximum horizontal velocity occurs in depth more than the blockage height.

7.5. Bed velocity distribution

Fig. 18 presents the x-velocity vectors at 1.5 cm above the bed for different blockage ratios from the velocity vectors distribution and magnitude, it is easy to realize the position of the scour hole and deposition region. In B0 and B30, the flow is symmetric so that the scour hole is created around the centerline of flow while in B50 and B70 cases, the flow is asymmetric and the scour hole creates in the right of flow direction in B50. The maximum scour depth is found in the left of flow direction in B70 case where the high velocity region is found.

8. Maximum scour depth prediction

Regression analysis is used to estimate maximum scour depth downstream box culvert for different ratios of blockage by correlating the maximum relative scour by other variables that affect on it in one formula. An equation is developed to predict maximum scour depth for blocked and non-blocked. As shown in the equation below, the relative maximum scour depth(ds/hd) is a function of densimetric Froude number (Fd), blockage ratio (B) and submerged ratio (S)(11)dsh=0.56Fd-0.20B+0.45S-1.05

In this equation the coefficient of correlation (R2) is 0.82 with standard error equals 0·08. The developed equation is valid for Fd = [0.9 to 2.10] and submerged ratio (S) ≥ 1.00. Fig. 19 shows the comparison between relative maximum scour depths (ds/h) measured and estimated for different blockage ratios. Fig. 20 clears the comparison between residuals and ds/h estimated for the present study. From these figures, it could be noticed that there is a good agreement between the measured and estimated relative scour depth.

9. Comparison with previous scour equations

Many previous scour formulae have been produced for calculation the maximum scour depth downstream non-blockage culvert. These equations have been included the effect of flow regime, culvert shape, soil properties and the flow rate on maximum scour depth. Two of previous experimental studies data have been chosen to be compared with the present study results in non-blocked study data. Table 2 shows comparison of culvert shape, densmetric Froude number, median particle size and scour equations for these previous studies. By applying the present study data in these studies scour formula as shown in Fig. 21, it could be noticed that there are a good agreement between present formula results and others empirical equations results. Where that Lim [44] and Abt [4] are so closed to the present study data.

Table 2. Comparison of some previous scour formula.

ResearchersFdCulvert shaped50(mm)Proposed equationSubmerged ratio
Present study0.9–2.11square2.75dsh=0.56Fd-0.20B+0.45S-1.051.25–1.75
Lim [44]1–10Circular1.65dsh=0.45Fd0.47
Abt [4]Fd ≥ 1Circular0.22–7.34-dsh=3.67Fd0.57∗D500.4∗σ-0.4

10. Conclusions

The present study has shown that the FLOW 3D model can accurately simulate water surface and the scour hole characteristics downstream the box culvert with error percentage in water depths does not exceed 2.37%. Velocities distribution through and outlets culvert barrel helped on understanding the scour hole shape.

The blockage through culvert had caused of increasing of water surface upstream structure where the upstream water level in B70 was 2.3 of culvert height more than non-blocked case at the same discharge that could be dangerous on the stability of roads above. The depth averaged velocity through culvert barrel increased by 3 times its value in non-blocked case.

On the other hand, blockage through culvert had a limited effect on the maximum scour depth. The little effect of blockage on maximum scour depth could be noticed in Fig. 11. From this Figure, it could be noted that the residual part of culvert barrel after the blockage part had made turbulences. These turbulences caused the deviation of the flow resulting in the formation of asymmetric scour hole on the side of channel. This not only but in B70 the blockage height caused upward jet which made a wide far scour hole as cleared from the results in Table 1.

An empirical equation was developed from the results to estimate the maximum scour depth relative to culvert height function of blockage ratio (B), submerged ratio (S), and densimetric Froude number (Fd). The equation results was compared with some scour formulas at the same densimetric Froude number rang where the present study results was in between the other equations results as shown in Fig. 21.

Declaration of Competing Interest

The authors declare that they have no known competing financial interests or personal relationships that could have appeared to influence the work reported in this paper.

References

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Peer review under responsibility of Faculty of Engineering, Alexandria University.

Numerical Simulation of the Geothechnical Effects on Local Scour in Inclined Pier Group with FLow-3D Softaware

FLOW-3D 소프트웨어를 사용한 경사 교각 그룹의 국부 세굴에 대한 지반 공학 효과의 수치 시뮬레이션

Numerical Simulation of the Geothechnical Effects on Local Scour in Inclined Pier Group with FLow-3D Softaware

Authors

Abstract

1 Civil Engineering,Enginnering Faculty,,Univeristy of Qom.Qom.Iran
2 Civil Engineering Department,Engineering Faculty,Islamic Azad University of Lahijan,Iran

교각이 물의 흐름 앞에 위치하면 소용돌이가 형성되고 그 활동으로 교각 주변의 하상 재료가 침식되고 세굴 구멍이 생성됩니다. 기초 깊이와 교각 말뚝이 충분하지 않으면 교량은 실패합니다.

말뚝 캡의 다른 레벨링에서 유동층의 총 전단 응력 연구는 말뚝 캡 위치가 동일할 때 가장 높은 전단 응력이 생성됨을 보여줍니다. 강바닥과 같은 수준; 강바닥보다 낮은 위치에 파일 캡을 설치하여 최대 전단 응력을 감소시킵니다. 

이 경우에 해당하기 때문일 수 있습니다. 교각 그룹 사이의 거리가 증가하고 두 번째 교각의 존재는 교각 그룹의 유량을 감소시키고 한 교각 그룹의 다른 교각은 흐름 패턴 형성에서 두 개의 독립적인 교각으로 작용합니다. 

파일 캡의 다른 레벨링에서 세굴의 최종 길이 방향 단면을 비교함으로써 세굴 깊이의 가장 큰 감소는 에어로포일 모양의 파일 캡에서 발생하며 더 날카로운 노즈와 더 나은 공기 역학적 모양을 가진 파일 캡이 제어하기에 좋은 옵션이라는 결론을 내렸습니다. 말굽 와류를 제거하고 경사 교각 그룹 주변의 세굴 깊이를 줄입니다.

When the bridge piers are located in front of the water flow, vortices are formed against it and due to their activity, the materials of the river bed are eroded around the bridge piers and the scouring hole is created. If the foundation depth and bridge pier piles are insufficient, the bridge will fail.The study of total shear stress in the flow bed at different leveling of the pile caps shows that the highest shear stress is created when the pile cap position is at the same level as the river bed; by installing the pile cap at a lower level than the river bed, the maximum shear stress decreases. This may be due to the fact that in this case, the distance between the pier group increases and the presence of the second pier decreases the flow rate in the pier group and different pier in the one pier group acts as the two independent piers in the formation of the flow pattern. By comparing the final longitudinal sections of the scouring at different leveling of the pile cap, it is concluded that the largest reduction in scouring depth occurs in aerofoil-shaped pile caps and pile caps with the sharper nose and better aerodynamic shapes are good options to control the horseshoe vortices and will reduce the scouring depth around the inclined pier group.

Keywords

e) 표시 탭에서 결과를 볼 수 있으며 필요한 경우 슬라이스 옵션을 사용하여 특정 영역을 분석할 수 있습니다.

유체 역학 및 응용 유압 분야에서 사용하기 위한 수치 모델링(CFD)을 적용한 가상 실험실 실습 매뉴얼

This manual was developed with the purpose of presenting and executing basic numerical models in the software known as Flow 3D within the virtual laboratories of Fluid Mechanics and Applied Hydraulics, to complement and reinforce what was learned in class, the development of the manual covers a theoretical content and an exemplified práctical part for the handling of the software, besides including some feedback for the students, in order to mark the characteristics that the software has. With the handling of the Flow 3D program, the student will be introduced to the concept of Computational Fluid Dynamics or CFD, and a simple procedure to represent numerically and graphically the behavior of hydraulic structures. The hydraulic structures presented in the laboratory manual are: thin and thick wall orifices, gates with free and submerged discharge, thin and thick wall spillways with free and submerged discharge, WES type spillway, submerged intake with pressure conduction and as a complement, hydrostatic pressures on vertical, curved and inclined walls were added. Each of the mentioned hydraulic structures obtained a práctical verification as a verification within the Flow 3D software, presenting a consistency in the results obtained in both ways.

이 매뉴얼은 Fluid Mechanics 및 Applied Hydraulics의 가상 연구실 내에서 Flow 3D로 알려진 소프트웨어에서 기본 수치 모델을 제시하고 실행하기 위해 개발되었으며, 수업에서 배운 내용을 보완하고 강화하기 위해 개발되었으며, 매뉴얼 개발은 이론적인 내용을 다룹니다. 소프트웨어의 특성을 표시하기 위해 학생들을 위한 일부 피드백을 포함하는 것 외에도 소프트웨어 처리에 대한 내용 및 예시된 실제적인 부분. Flow 3D 프로그램을 다루면서 학생은 전산유체역학(Computational Fluid Dynamics) 또는 CFD의 개념과 수력학적 구조의 거동을 수치 및 그래픽으로 표현하는 간단한 절차를 소개합니다. 실험실 매뉴얼에 제시된 유압 구조는 얇고 두꺼운 벽 오리피스, 자유 및 수중 배출이 있는 수문, 자유 및 수중 배출이 있는 얇고 두꺼운 벽 여수로, WES 유형 방수로, 압력 전도 및 보완으로 수중 유입이 있는 수중 흡입구입니다. 수직, 곡선 및 경사 벽에 추가되었습니다. 언급된 각 수력학적 구조는 Flow 3D 소프트웨어 내에서 검증으로 실제 검증을 획득하여 두 가지 방식에서 얻은 결과의 일관성을 나타냅니다.

Keywords: Flow 3D, numerical modeling, manual, practice, Fluid Mechanics.

e) 표시 탭에서 결과를 볼 수 있으며 필요한 경우 슬라이스 옵션을 사용하여 특정 영역을 분석할 수 있습니다.
e) 표시 탭에서 결과를 볼 수 있으며 필요한 경우 슬라이스 옵션을 사용하여 특정 영역을 분석할 수 있습니다.

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Figure 1. Photorealistic view of an inclined axis TAST (photo A. Stergiopoulou).

그리스 수로의 작은 수력 전위를 활용하는 관형 아르키메데스 스크류 터빈의 CFD 시뮬레이션

CFD Simulations of Tubular Archimedean Screw Turbines Harnessing the Small Hydropotential of Greek Watercourses

Alkistis Stergiopoulou1
, Vassilios Stergiopoulos2
1
Institut für Wasserwirtschaft, Hydrologie und Konstruktiven Wasserbau, B.O.K.U. University,
Muthgasse 18, 1190 Vienna, (actually Senior Process Engineer at the VTU Engineering in Vienna,
Zieglergasse 53/1/24, 1070 Vienna, Austria).
2 School of Pedagogical and Technological Education, Department of Civil Engineering Educators,
ASPETE Campus, Eirini Station, 15122 Amarousio, Athens, Greece.

Abstract

이 논문은 “그리스 아르키메데스의 부활: 아르키메데스 달팽이관 물레방아의 수리역학 및 유체역학적 거동 연구, 그리스 자연 및 기술 수로의 수력 잠재력 회복에 대한 기여”. 라는  제목의 최근 연구에서 수행한 최초의 아르키메데스 나사 터빈 CFD 모델링 결과에 대한 간략한 견해를 제시합니다.

FLOW-3D 코드를 기반으로 하는 이 CFD 분석은 일반적인 TAST(Tubular Archimedean Screw Turbines)에 관한 것으로, 그리스의 자연 및 기술 수로의 중요한 미개척 수력 잠재력을 활용하는 소규모 수력 발전 시스템에 대한 TWh/년 및 수천 MW 범위의 총 설치 용량등 몇 가지 유망한 성능을 보여줍니다.

This paper presents a short view of the first Archimedean Screw Turbines CFD modelling results, which were carried out within the recent research entitled “Rebirth of Archimedes in Greece: contribution to the study of hydraulic mechanics and hydrodynamic behavior of Archimedean cochlear waterwheels, for recovering the hydraulic potential of Greek natural and technical watercourses”. This CFD analysis, based to the Flow-3D code, concerns typical Tubular Archimedean Screw Turbines (TASTs) and shows some promising performances for such small hydropower systems harnessing the important unexploited hydraulic potential of natural and technical watercourses of Greece, of the order of several TWh / year and of a total installed capacity in the range of thousands MWs.

Keywords

CFD; Flow-3D; TAST; Small Hydro; Renewable Energy; Greek Watercourses.

Figure 1. Photorealistic view of an inclined axis TAST (photo A. Stergiopoulou).
Figure 1. Photorealistic view of an inclined axis TAST (photo A. Stergiopoulou).
Figure 4. Creation of the 3bladed Archimedean Screw with Solidworks.
Figure 4. Creation of the 3bladed Archimedean Screw with Solidworks.
Figure 8. Comparison of Archimedean Screw Turbine power performances P(W) for angle of orientation θ = 22ο and 32ο and for various water discharge values Q = 0.15, 0.30, 0.45 m3 /s.
Figure 8. Comparison of Archimedean Screw Turbine power performances P(W) for angle of orientation θ = 22ο and 32ο and for various water discharge values Q = 0.15, 0.30, 0.45 m3 /s.
Figure 12. Various performances of the Archimedean Screw (MKE/Mean Kinetic Energy, Torque, Turbulent Kinetic Energy, Turbulent Dissipation) for flow discharge Q = 0.45 m3 /s and an angle of orientation θ = 32ο .
Figure 12. Various performances of the Archimedean Screw (MKE/Mean Kinetic Energy, Torque, Turbulent Kinetic Energy, Turbulent Dissipation) for flow discharge Q = 0.45 m3 /s and an angle of orientation θ = 32ο .

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Figure 9. Scour morphology under different times for case 7.

Scour Characteristics and Equilibrium Scour Depth Prediction around Umbrella Suction Anchor Foundation under Random Waves

무작위 파동에서 우산 흡입 앵커 기초 주변의 세굴 특성 및 평형 세굴 깊이 예측

Ruigeng Hu 1
, Hongjun Liu 2
, Hao Leng 1
, Peng Yu 3 and Xiuhai Wang 1,2,*

1 College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266000, China;
huruigeng@stu.ouc.edu.cn (R.H.); lh4517@stu.ouc.edu.cn (H.L.)
2 Key Lab of Marine Environment and Ecology (Ocean University of China), Ministry of Education,
Qingdao 266000, China; hongjun@ouc.edu.cn
3 Qingdao Geo-Engineering Survering Institute, Qingdao 266100, China; yp6650@stu.ouc.edu.cn

Abstract

무작위 파동 하에서 우산 흡입 앵커 기초(USAF) 주변의 국부 세굴을 연구하기 위해 일련의 수치 시뮬레이션이 수행되었습니다. 본 연구에서는 먼저 본 모델의 정확성을 검증하기 위해 검증을 수행하였다.

또한, 세굴 진화와 세굴 메커니즘을 각각 분석하였다. 또한 USAF 주변의 평형 세굴 깊이 Seq를 예측하기 위해 두 가지 수정된 모델이 제안되었습니다. 마지막으로 Seq에 대한 Froude 수 Fr과 Euler 수 Eu의 영향을 연구하기 위해 매개변수 연구가 수행되었습니다.

결과는 현재 수치 모델이 무작위 파동에서 세굴 형태를 묘사하는 데 정확하고 합리적임을 나타냅니다.

수정된 Raaijmaker의 모델은 KCs,p < 8일 때 본 연구의 시뮬레이션 결과와 잘 일치함을 보여줍니다. 수정된 확률적 모델의 예측 결과는 KCrms,a < 4일 때 n = 10일 때 가장 유리합니다. Fr과 Eu가 높을수록 둘 다 더 집중적 인 말굽 소용돌이와 더 큰 결과를 초래합니다.

Figure 1. The close-up of umbrella suction anchor foundation (USAF).
Figure 1. The close-up of umbrella suction anchor foundation (USAF).
Figure 2. (a) The sketch of seabed-USAF-wave three-dimensional model; (b) boundary condation:Wvwave boundary, S-symmetric boundary, O-outflow boundary; (c) USAF model.
Figure 2. (a) The sketch of seabed-USAF-wave three-dimensional model; (b) boundary condation:Wvwave boundary, S-symmetric boundary, O-outflow boundary; (c) USAF model.
Figure 5. Comparison of time evolution of scour between the present study and Khosronejad et al. [52], Petersen et al. [17].
Figure 5. Comparison of time evolution of scour between the present study and Khosronejad et al. [52], Petersen et al. [17].
Figure 9. Scour morphology under different times for case 7.
Figure 9. Scour morphology under different times for case 7.

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Flow velocity profiles for canals with a depth of 3 m and flow velocities of 5–5.3 m/s.

Optimization Algorithms and Engineering: Recent Advances and Applications

Mahdi Feizbahr,1 Navid Tonekaboni,2Guang-Jun Jiang,3,4 and Hong-Xia Chen3,4Show moreAcademic Editor: Mohammad YazdiReceived08 Apr 2021Revised18 Jun 2021Accepted17 Jul 2021Published11 Aug 2021

Abstract

Vegetation along the river increases the roughness and reduces the average flow velocity, reduces flow energy, and changes the flow velocity profile in the cross section of the river. Many canals and rivers in nature are covered with vegetation during the floods. Canal’s roughness is strongly affected by plants and therefore it has a great effect on flow resistance during flood. Roughness resistance against the flow due to the plants depends on the flow conditions and plant, so the model should simulate the current velocity by considering the effects of velocity, depth of flow, and type of vegetation along the canal. Total of 48 models have been simulated to investigate the effect of roughness in the canal. The results indicated that, by enhancing the velocity, the effect of vegetation in decreasing the bed velocity is negligible, while when the current has lower speed, the effect of vegetation on decreasing the bed velocity is obviously considerable.


강의 식생은 거칠기를 증가시키고 평균 유속을 감소시키며, 유속 에너지를 감소시키고 강의 단면에서 유속 프로파일을 변경합니다. 자연의 많은 운하와 강은 홍수 동안 초목으로 덮여 있습니다. 운하의 조도는 식물의 영향을 많이 받으므로 홍수시 유동저항에 큰 영향을 미칩니다. 식물로 인한 흐름에 대한 거칠기 저항은 흐름 조건 및 식물에 따라 다르므로 모델은 유속, 흐름 깊이 및 운하를 따라 식생 유형의 영향을 고려하여 현재 속도를 시뮬레이션해야 합니다. 근관의 거칠기의 영향을 조사하기 위해 총 48개의 모델이 시뮬레이션되었습니다. 결과는 유속을 높임으로써 유속을 감소시키는 식생의 영향은 무시할 수 있는 반면, 해류가 더 낮은 유속일 때 유속을 감소시키는 식생의 영향은 분명히 상당함을 나타냈다.

1. Introduction

Considering the impact of each variable is a very popular field within the analytical and statistical methods and intelligent systems [114]. This can help research for better modeling considering the relation of variables or interaction of them toward reaching a better condition for the objective function in control and engineering [1527]. Consequently, it is necessary to study the effects of the passive factors on the active domain [2836]. Because of the effect of vegetation on reducing the discharge capacity of rivers [37], pruning plants was necessary to improve the condition of rivers. One of the important effects of vegetation in river protection is the action of roots, which cause soil consolidation and soil structure improvement and, by enhancing the shear strength of soil, increase the resistance of canal walls against the erosive force of water. The outer limbs of the plant increase the roughness of the canal walls and reduce the flow velocity and deplete the flow energy in vicinity of the walls. Vegetation by reducing the shear stress of the canal bed reduces flood discharge and sedimentation in the intervals between vegetation and increases the stability of the walls [3841].

One of the main factors influencing the speed, depth, and extent of flood in this method is Manning’s roughness coefficient. On the other hand, soil cover [42], especially vegetation, is one of the most determining factors in Manning’s roughness coefficient. Therefore, it is expected that those seasonal changes in the vegetation of the region will play an important role in the calculated value of Manning’s roughness coefficient and ultimately in predicting the flood wave behavior [4345]. The roughness caused by plants’ resistance to flood current depends on the flow and plant conditions. Flow conditions include depth and velocity of the plant, and plant conditions include plant type, hardness or flexibility, dimensions, density, and shape of the plant [46]. In general, the issue discussed in this research is the optimization of flood-induced flow in canals by considering the effect of vegetation-induced roughness. Therefore, the effect of plants on the roughness coefficient and canal transmission coefficient and in consequence the flow depth should be evaluated [4748].

Current resistance is generally known by its roughness coefficient. The equation that is mainly used in this field is Manning equation. The ratio of shear velocity to average current velocity  is another form of current resistance. The reason for using the  ratio is that it is dimensionless and has a strong theoretical basis. The reason for using Manning roughness coefficient is its pervasiveness. According to Freeman et al. [49], the Manning roughness coefficient for plants was calculated according to the Kouwen and Unny [50] method for incremental resistance. This method involves increasing the roughness for various surface and plant irregularities. Manning’s roughness coefficient has all the factors affecting the resistance of the canal. Therefore, the appropriate way to more accurately estimate this coefficient is to know the factors affecting this coefficient [51].

To calculate the flow rate, velocity, and depth of flow in canals as well as flood and sediment estimation, it is important to evaluate the flow resistance. To determine the flow resistance in open ducts, Manning, Chézy, and Darcy–Weisbach relations are used [52]. In these relations, there are parameters such as Manning’s roughness coefficient (n), Chézy roughness coefficient (C), and Darcy–Weisbach coefficient (f). All three of these coefficients are a kind of flow resistance coefficient that is widely used in the equations governing flow in rivers [53].

The three relations that express the relationship between the average flow velocity (V) and the resistance and geometric and hydraulic coefficients of the canal are as follows:where nf, and c are Manning, Darcy–Weisbach, and Chézy coefficients, respectively. V = average flow velocity, R = hydraulic radius, Sf = slope of energy line, which in uniform flow is equal to the slope of the canal bed,  = gravitational acceleration, and Kn is a coefficient whose value is equal to 1 in the SI system and 1.486 in the English system. The coefficients of resistance in equations (1) to (3) are related as follows:

Based on the boundary layer theory, the flow resistance for rough substrates is determined from the following general relation:where f = Darcy–Weisbach coefficient of friction, y = flow depth, Ks = bed roughness size, and A = constant coefficient.

On the other hand, the relationship between the Darcy–Weisbach coefficient of friction and the shear velocity of the flow is as follows:

By using equation (6), equation (5) is converted as follows:

Investigation on the effect of vegetation arrangement on shear velocity of flow in laboratory conditions showed that, with increasing the shear Reynolds number (), the numerical value of the  ratio also increases; in other words the amount of roughness coefficient increases with a slight difference in the cases without vegetation, checkered arrangement, and cross arrangement, respectively [54].

Roughness in river vegetation is simulated in mathematical models with a variable floor slope flume by different densities and discharges. The vegetation considered submerged in the bed of the flume. Results showed that, with increasing vegetation density, canal roughness and flow shear speed increase and with increasing flow rate and depth, Manning’s roughness coefficient decreases. Factors affecting the roughness caused by vegetation include the effect of plant density and arrangement on flow resistance, the effect of flow velocity on flow resistance, and the effect of depth [4555].

One of the works that has been done on the effect of vegetation on the roughness coefficient is Darby [56] study, which investigates a flood wave model that considers all the effects of vegetation on the roughness coefficient. There are currently two methods for estimating vegetation roughness. One method is to add the thrust force effect to Manning’s equation [475758] and the other method is to increase the canal bed roughness (Manning-Strickler coefficient) [455961]. These two methods provide acceptable results in models designed to simulate floodplain flow. Wang et al. [62] simulate the floodplain with submerged vegetation using these two methods and to increase the accuracy of the results, they suggested using the effective height of the plant under running water instead of using the actual height of the plant. Freeman et al. [49] provided equations for determining the coefficient of vegetation roughness under different conditions. Lee et al. [63] proposed a method for calculating the Manning coefficient using the flow velocity ratio at different depths. Much research has been done on the Manning roughness coefficient in rivers, and researchers [496366] sought to obtain a specific number for n to use in river engineering. However, since the depth and geometric conditions of rivers are completely variable in different places, the values of Manning roughness coefficient have changed subsequently, and it has not been possible to choose a fixed number. In river engineering software, the Manning roughness coefficient is determined only for specific and constant conditions or normal flow. Lee et al. [63] stated that seasonal conditions, density, and type of vegetation should also be considered. Hydraulic roughness and Manning roughness coefficient n of the plant were obtained by estimating the total Manning roughness coefficient from the matching of the measured water surface curve and water surface height. The following equation is used for the flow surface curve:where  is the depth of water change, S0 is the slope of the canal floor, Sf is the slope of the energy line, and Fr is the Froude number which is obtained from the following equation:where D is the characteristic length of the canal. Flood flow velocity is one of the important parameters of flood waves, which is very important in calculating the water level profile and energy consumption. In the cases where there are many limitations for researchers due to the wide range of experimental dimensions and the variety of design parameters, the use of numerical methods that are able to estimate the rest of the unknown results with acceptable accuracy is economically justified.

FLOW-3D software uses Finite Difference Method (FDM) for numerical solution of two-dimensional and three-dimensional flow. This software is dedicated to computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and is provided by Flow Science [67]. The flow is divided into networks with tubular cells. For each cell there are values of dependent variables and all variables are calculated in the center of the cell, except for the velocity, which is calculated at the center of the cell. In this software, two numerical techniques have been used for geometric simulation, FAVOR™ (Fractional-Area-Volume-Obstacle-Representation) and the VOF (Volume-of-Fluid) method. The equations used at this model for this research include the principle of mass survival and the magnitude of motion as follows. The fluid motion equations in three dimensions, including the Navier–Stokes equations with some additional terms, are as follows:where  are mass accelerations in the directions xyz and  are viscosity accelerations in the directions xyz and are obtained from the following equations:

Shear stresses  in equation (11) are obtained from the following equations:

The standard model is used for high Reynolds currents, but in this model, RNG theory allows the analytical differential formula to be used for the effective viscosity that occurs at low Reynolds numbers. Therefore, the RNG model can be used for low and high Reynolds currents.

Weather changes are high and this affects many factors continuously. The presence of vegetation in any area reduces the velocity of surface flows and prevents soil erosion, so vegetation will have a significant impact on reducing destructive floods. One of the methods of erosion protection in floodplain watersheds is the use of biological methods. The presence of vegetation in watersheds reduces the flow rate during floods and prevents soil erosion. The external organs of plants increase the roughness and decrease the velocity of water flow and thus reduce its shear stress energy. One of the important factors with which the hydraulic resistance of plants is expressed is the roughness coefficient. Measuring the roughness coefficient of plants and investigating their effect on reducing velocity and shear stress of flow is of special importance.

Roughness coefficients in canals are affected by two main factors, namely, flow conditions and vegetation characteristics [68]. So far, much research has been done on the effect of the roughness factor created by vegetation, but the issue of plant density has received less attention. For this purpose, this study was conducted to investigate the effect of vegetation density on flow velocity changes.

In a study conducted using a software model on three density modes in the submerged state effect on flow velocity changes in 48 different modes was investigated (Table 1).Table 1 The studied models.

The number of cells used in this simulation is equal to 1955888 cells. The boundary conditions were introduced to the model as a constant speed and depth (Figure 1). At the output boundary, due to the presence of supercritical current, no parameter for the current is considered. Absolute roughness for floors and walls was introduced to the model (Figure 1). In this case, the flow was assumed to be nonviscous and air entry into the flow was not considered. After  seconds, this model reached a convergence accuracy of .

Figure 1 The simulated model and its boundary conditions.

Due to the fact that it is not possible to model the vegetation in FLOW-3D software, in this research, the vegetation of small soft plants was studied so that Manning’s coefficients can be entered into the canal bed in the form of roughness coefficients obtained from the studies of Chow [69] in similar conditions. In practice, in such modeling, the effect of plant height is eliminated due to the small height of herbaceous plants, and modeling can provide relatively acceptable results in these conditions.

48 models with input velocities proportional to the height of the regular semihexagonal canal were considered to create supercritical conditions. Manning coefficients were applied based on Chow [69] studies in order to control the canal bed. Speed profiles were drawn and discussed.

Any control and simulation system has some inputs that we should determine to test any technology [7077]. Determination and true implementation of such parameters is one of the key steps of any simulation [237881] and computing procedure [8286]. The input current is created by applying the flow rate through the VFR (Volume Flow Rate) option and the output flow is considered Output and for other borders the Symmetry option is considered.

Simulation of the models and checking their action and responses and observing how a process behaves is one of the accepted methods in engineering and science [8788]. For verification of FLOW-3D software, the results of computer simulations are compared with laboratory measurements and according to the values of computational error, convergence error, and the time required for convergence, the most appropriate option for real-time simulation is selected (Figures 2 and 3 ).

Figure 2 Modeling the plant with cylindrical tubes at the bottom of the canal.

Figure 3 Velocity profiles in positions 2 and 5.

The canal is 7 meters long, 0.5 meters wide, and 0.8 meters deep. This test was used to validate the application of the software to predict the flow rate parameters. In this experiment, instead of using the plant, cylindrical pipes were used in the bottom of the canal.

The conditions of this modeling are similar to the laboratory conditions and the boundary conditions used in the laboratory were used for numerical modeling. The critical flow enters the simulation model from the upstream boundary, so in the upstream boundary conditions, critical velocity and depth are considered. The flow at the downstream boundary is supercritical, so no parameters are applied to the downstream boundary.

The software well predicts the process of changing the speed profile in the open canal along with the considered obstacles. The error in the calculated speed values can be due to the complexity of the flow and the interaction of the turbulence caused by the roughness of the floor with the turbulence caused by the three-dimensional cycles in the hydraulic jump. As a result, the software is able to predict the speed distribution in open canals.

2. Modeling Results

After analyzing the models, the results were shown in graphs (Figures 414 ). The total number of experiments in this study was 48 due to the limitations of modeling.(a)
(a)(b)
(b)(c)
(c)(d)
(d)(a)
(a)(b)
(b)(c)
(c)(d)
(d)Figure 4 Flow velocity profiles for canals with a depth of 1 m and flow velocities of 3–3.3 m/s. Canal with a depth of 1 meter and a flow velocity of (a) 3 meters per second, (b) 3.1 meters per second, (c) 3.2 meters per second, and (d) 3.3 meters per second.

Figure 5 Canal diagram with a depth of 1 meter and a flow rate of 3 meters per second.

Figure 6 Canal diagram with a depth of 1 meter and a flow rate of 3.1 meters per second.

Figure 7 Canal diagram with a depth of 1 meter and a flow rate of 3.2 meters per second.

Figure 8 Canal diagram with a depth of 1 meter and a flow rate of 3.3 meters per second.(a)
(a)(b)
(b)(c)
(c)(d)
(d)(a)
(a)(b)
(b)(c)
(c)(d)
(d)Figure 9 Flow velocity profiles for canals with a depth of 2 m and flow velocities of 4–4.3 m/s. Canal with a depth of 2 meters and a flow rate of (a) 4 meters per second, (b) 4.1 meters per second, (c) 4.2 meters per second, and (d) 4.3 meters per second.

Figure 10 Canal diagram with a depth of 2 meters and a flow rate of 4 meters per second.

Figure 11 Canal diagram with a depth of 2 meters and a flow rate of 4.1 meters per second.

Figure 12 Canal diagram with a depth of 2 meters and a flow rate of 4.2 meters per second.

Figure 13 Canal diagram with a depth of 2 meters and a flow rate of 4.3 meters per second.(a)
(a)(b)
(b)(c)
(c)(d)
(d)(a)
(a)(b)
(b)(c)
(c)(d)
(d)Figure 14 Flow velocity profiles for canals with a depth of 3 m and flow velocities of 5–5.3 m/s. Canal with a depth of 2 meters and a flow rate of (a) 4 meters per second, (b) 4.1 meters per second, (c) 4.2 meters per second, and (d) 4.3 meters per second.

To investigate the effects of roughness with flow velocity, the trend of flow velocity changes at different depths and with supercritical flow to a Froude number proportional to the depth of the section has been obtained.

According to the velocity profiles of Figure 5, it can be seen that, with the increasing of Manning’s coefficient, the canal bed speed decreases.

According to Figures 5 to 8, it can be found that, with increasing the Manning’s coefficient, the canal bed speed decreases. But this deceleration is more noticeable than the deceleration of the models 1 to 12, which can be justified by increasing the speed and of course increasing the Froude number.

According to Figure 10, we see that, with increasing Manning’s coefficient, the canal bed speed decreases.

According to Figure 11, we see that, with increasing Manning’s coefficient, the canal bed speed decreases. But this deceleration is more noticeable than the deceleration of Figures 510, which can be justified by increasing the speed and, of course, increasing the Froude number.

With increasing Manning’s coefficient, the canal bed speed decreases (Figure 12). But this deceleration is more noticeable than the deceleration of the higher models (Figures 58 and 1011), which can be justified by increasing the speed and, of course, increasing the Froude number.

According to Figure 13, with increasing Manning’s coefficient, the canal bed speed decreases. But this deceleration is more noticeable than the deceleration of Figures 5 to 12, which can be justified by increasing the speed and, of course, increasing the Froude number.

According to Figure 15, with increasing Manning’s coefficient, the canal bed speed decreases.

Figure 15 Canal diagram with a depth of 3 meters and a flow rate of 5 meters per second.

According to Figure 16, with increasing Manning’s coefficient, the canal bed speed decreases. But this deceleration is more noticeable than the deceleration of the higher model, which can be justified by increasing the speed and, of course, increasing the Froude number.

Figure 16 Canal diagram with a depth of 3 meters and a flow rate of 5.1 meters per second.

According to Figure 17, it is clear that, with increasing Manning’s coefficient, the canal bed speed decreases. But this deceleration is more noticeable than the deceleration of the higher models, which can be justified by increasing the speed and, of course, increasing the Froude number.

Figure 17 Canal diagram with a depth of 3 meters and a flow rate of 5.2 meters per second.

According to Figure 18, with increasing Manning’s coefficient, the canal bed speed decreases. But this deceleration is more noticeable than the deceleration of the higher models, which can be justified by increasing the speed and, of course, increasing the Froude number.

Figure 18 Canal diagram with a depth of 3 meters and a flow rate of 5.3 meters per second.

According to Figure 19, it can be seen that the vegetation placed in front of the flow input velocity has negligible effect on the reduction of velocity, which of course can be justified due to the flexibility of the vegetation. The only unusual thing is the unexpected decrease in floor speed of 3 m/s compared to higher speeds.(a)
(a)(b)
(b)(c)
(c)(a)
(a)(b)
(b)(c)
(c)Figure 19 Comparison of velocity profiles with the same plant densities (depth 1 m). Comparison of velocity profiles with (a) plant densities of 25%, depth 1 m; (b) plant densities of 50%, depth 1 m; and (c) plant densities of 75%, depth 1 m.

According to Figure 20, by increasing the speed of vegetation, the effect of vegetation on reducing the flow rate becomes more noticeable. And the role of input current does not have much effect in reducing speed.(a)
(a)(b)
(b)(c)
(c)(a)
(a)(b)
(b)(c)
(c)Figure 20 Comparison of velocity profiles with the same plant densities (depth 2 m). Comparison of velocity profiles with (a) plant densities of 25%, depth 2 m; (b) plant densities of 50%, depth 2 m; and (c) plant densities of 75%, depth 2 m.

According to Figure 21, it can be seen that, with increasing speed, the effect of vegetation on reducing the bed flow rate becomes more noticeable and the role of the input current does not have much effect. In general, it can be seen that, by increasing the speed of the input current, the slope of the profiles increases from the bed to the water surface and due to the fact that, in software, the roughness coefficient applies to the channel floor only in the boundary conditions, this can be perfectly justified. Of course, it can be noted that, due to the flexible conditions of the vegetation of the bed, this modeling can show acceptable results for such grasses in the canal floor. In the next directions, we may try application of swarm-based optimization methods for modeling and finding the most effective factors in this research [27815188994]. In future, we can also apply the simulation logic and software of this research for other domains such as power engineering [9599].(a)
(a)(b)
(b)(c)
(c)(a)
(a)(b)
(b)(c)
(c)Figure 21 Comparison of velocity profiles with the same plant densities (depth 3 m). Comparison of velocity profiles with (a) plant densities of 25%, depth 3 m; (b) plant densities of 50%, depth 3 m; and (c) plant densities of 75%, depth 3 m.

3. Conclusion

The effects of vegetation on the flood canal were investigated by numerical modeling with FLOW-3D software. After analyzing the results, the following conclusions were reached:(i)Increasing the density of vegetation reduces the velocity of the canal floor but has no effect on the velocity of the canal surface.(ii)Increasing the Froude number is directly related to increasing the speed of the canal floor.(iii)In the canal with a depth of one meter, a sudden increase in speed can be observed from the lowest speed and higher speed, which is justified by the sudden increase in Froude number.(iv)As the inlet flow rate increases, the slope of the profiles from the bed to the water surface increases.(v)By reducing the Froude number, the effect of vegetation on reducing the flow bed rate becomes more noticeable. And the input velocity in reducing the velocity of the canal floor does not have much effect.(vi)At a flow rate between 3 and 3.3 meters per second due to the shallow depth of the canal and the higher landing number a more critical area is observed in which the flow bed velocity in this area is between 2.86 and 3.1 m/s.(vii)Due to the critical flow velocity and the slight effect of the roughness of the horseshoe vortex floor, it is not visible and is only partially observed in models 1-2-3 and 21.(viii)As the flow rate increases, the effect of vegetation on the rate of bed reduction decreases.(ix)In conditions where less current intensity is passing, vegetation has a greater effect on reducing current intensity and energy consumption increases.(x)In the case of using the flow rate of 0.8 cubic meters per second, the velocity distribution and flow regime show about 20% more energy consumption than in the case of using the flow rate of 1.3 cubic meters per second.

Nomenclature

n:Manning’s roughness coefficient
C:Chézy roughness coefficient
f:Darcy–Weisbach coefficient
V:Flow velocity
R:Hydraulic radius
g:Gravitational acceleration
y:Flow depth
Ks:Bed roughness
A:Constant coefficient
:Reynolds number
y/∂x:Depth of water change
S0:Slope of the canal floor
Sf:Slope of energy line
Fr:Froude number
D:Characteristic length of the canal
G:Mass acceleration
:Shear stresses.

Data Availability

All data are included within the paper.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest.

Acknowledgments

This work was partially supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Contract no. 71761030 and Natural Science Foundation of Inner Mongolia under Contract no. 2019LH07003.

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Probabilistic investigation of cavitation occurrence in chute spillway based on the results of Flow-3D numerical modeling

Flow-3D 수치 모델링 결과를 기반으로 하는 슈트 여수로의 캐비테이션 발생 확률적 조사

Probabilistic investigation of cavitation occurrence in chute spillway based on the results of Flow-3D numerical modeling

Amin Hasanalipour Shahrabadi1*, Mehdi Azhdary Moghaddam2

1-University of Sistan and Baluchestan،amin.h.shahrabadi@gmail.com

2-University of Sistan and Baluchestan،Mazhdary@eng.usb.ac.ir

Abstract

Probabilistic designation is a powerful tool in hydraulic engineering. The uncertainty caused by random phenomenon in hydraulic design may be important. Uncertainty can be expressed in terms of probability density function, confidence interval, or statistical torques such as standard deviation or coefficient of variation of random parameters. Controlling cavitation occurrence is one of the most important factors in chute spillways designing due to the flow’s high velocity and the negative pressure (Azhdary Moghaddam & Hasanalipour Shahrabadi, ۲۰۲۰). By increasing dam’s height, overflow velocity increases on the weir and threats the structure and it may cause structural failure due to cavitation (Chanson, ۲۰۱۳). Cavitation occurs when the fluid pressure reaches its vapor pressure. Since high velocity and low pressure can cause cavitation, aeration has been recognized as one of the best ways to deal with cavitation (Pettersson, ۲۰۱۲). This study, considering the extracted results from the Flow-۳D numerical model of the chute spillway of Darian dam, investigates the probability of cavitation occurrence and examines its reliability. Hydraulic uncertainty in the design of this hydraulic structure can be attributed to the uncertainty of the hydraulic performance analysis. Therefore, knowing about the uncertainty characteristics of hydraulic engineering systems for assessing their reliability seems necessary (Yen et al., ۱۹۹۳). Hence, designation and operation of hydraulic engineering systems are always subject to uncertainties and probable failures. The reliability, ps, of a hydraulic engineering system is defined as the probability of safety in which the resistance, R, of the system exceeds the load, L, as follows (Chen, ۲۰۱۵): p_s=P(L≤R) (۱) Where P(۰) is probability. The failure probability, p_f, is a reliability complement and is expressed as follows: p_f=P[(L>R)]=۱- p_s (۲) Reliability development based on analytical methods of engineering applications has come in many references (Tung & Mays, ۱۹۸۰ and Yen & Tung, ۱۹۹۳). Therefore, based on reliability, in a control method, the probability of cavitation occurrence in the chute spillway can be investigated. In reliability analysis, the probabilistic calculations must be expressed in terms of a limited conditional function, W(X)=W(X_L ,X_R)as follows: p_s=P[W(X_L ,X_R)≥۰]= P[W(X)≥۰] (۳) Where X is the vector of basic random variables in load and resistance functions. In the reliability analysis, if W(X)> ۰, the system will be secure and in the W(X) <۰ system will fail. Accordingly, the eliability index, β, is used, which is defined as the ratio of the mean value, μ_W, to standard deviation, σ_W, the limited conditional function W(X) is defined as follows (Cornell, ۱۹۶۹): β=μ_W/σ_W (۴) The present study was carried out using the obtained results from the model developed by ۱:۵۰ scale plexiglass at the Water Research Institute of Iran. In this laboratory model, which consists of an inlet channel and a convergent thrower chute spillway, two aerators in the form of deflector were used at the intervals of ۲۱۱ and ۲۷۰ at the beginning of chute, in order to cope with cavitation phenomenon during the chute. An air duct was also used for air inlet on the left and right walls of the spillway. To measure the effective parameters in cavitation, seven discharges have been passed through spillway. As the pressure and average velocity are determined, the values of the cavitation index are calculated and compared with the values of the critical cavitation index, σ_cr. At any point when σ≤σ_cr, there is a danger of corrosion in that range (Chanson, ۱۹۹۳). In order to obtain uncertainty and calculate the reliability index of cavitation occurrence during a chute, it is needed to extract the limited conditional function. Therefore, for a constant flow between two points of flow, there would be the Bernoulli (energy) relation as follows (Falvey, ۱۹۹۰): σ= ( P_atm/γ- P_V/γ+h cos⁡θ )/(〖V_۰〗^۲/۲g) (۵) Where P_atm is the atmospheric pressure, γ is the unit weight of the water volume, θ is the angle of the ramp to the horizon, r is the curvature radius of the vertical arc, and h cos⁡θ is the flow depth perpendicular to the floor. Therefore, the limited conditional function can be written as follows: W(X)=(P_atm/γ- P_V/γ+h cos⁡θ )/(〖V_۰〗^۲/۲g) -σ_cr (۶) Flow-۳D is a powerful software in fluid dynamics. One of the major capabilities of this software is to model free-surface flows using finite volume method for hydraulic analysis. The spillway was modeled in three modes, without using aerator, ramp aerator, and ramp combination with aeration duct as detailed in Flow-۳D software. For each of the mentioned modes, seven discharges were tested. According to Equation (۶), velocity and pressure play a decisive and important role in the cavitation occurrence phenomenon. Therefore, the reliability should be evaluated with FORM (First Order Reliable Method) based on the probability distribution functions For this purpose, the most suitable probability distribution function of random variables of velocity and pressure on a laboratory model was extracted in different sections using Easy fit software. Probability distribution function is also considered normal for the other variables in the limited conditional function. These values are estimated for the constant gravity at altitudes of ۵۰۰ to ۷۰۰۰ m above the sea level for the unit weight, and vapor pressure at ۵ to ۳۵° C. For the critical cavitation index variable, the standard deviation is considered as ۰.۰۱. According to the conducted tests, for the velocity random variable, GEV (Generalized Extreme Value) distribution function, and for the pressure random variable, Burr (۴P) distribution function were presented as the best distribution function. The important point is to not follow the normal distribution above the random variables. Therefore, in order to evaluate the reliability with the FORM method, according to the above distributions, they should be converted into normal variables based on the existing methods. To this end, the non-normal distributions are transformed into the normal distribution by the method of Rackwitz and Fiiessler so that the value of the cumulative distribution function is equivalent to the original abnormal distribution at the design point of x_(i*). This point has the least distance from the origin in the standardized space of the boundary plane or the same limited conditional function. The reliability index will be equal to ۰.۴۲۰۴ before installing the aerator. As a result, reliability, p_s, and failure probability, p_f, are ۰.۶۶۲۹ and ۰.۳۳۷۱, respectively. This number indicates a high percentage for cavitation occurrence. Therefore, the use of aerator is inevitable to prevent imminent damage from cavitation. To deal with cavitation as planned in the laboratory, two aerators with listed specifications are embedded in a location where the cavitation index is critical. In order to analyze the reliability of cavitation occurrence after the aerator installation, the steps of the Hasofer-Lind algorithm are repeated. The modeling of ramps was performed separately in Flow-۳D software in order to compare the performance of aeration ducts as well as the probability of failure between aeration by ramp and the combination of ramps and aeration ducts. Installing an aerator in combination with a ramp and aerator duct greatly reduces the probability of cavitation occurrence. By installing aerator, the probability of cavitation occurrence will decrease in to about ۴ %. However, in the case of aeration only through the ramp, the risk of failure is equal to ۱۰%.

확률적 지정은 수력 공학에서 강력한 도구입니다. 유압 설계에서 임의 현상으로 인한 불확실성이 중요할 수 있습니다. 불확실성은 확률 밀도 함수, 신뢰 구간 또는 표준 편차 또는 무작위 매개변수의 변동 계수와 같은 통계적 토크로 표현될 수 있습니다. 캐비테이션 발생을 제어하는 ​​것은 흐름의 높은 속도와 음압으로 인해 슈트 여수로 설계에서 가장 중요한 요소 중 하나입니다(Azhdary Moghaddam & Hasanalipour Shahrabadi, ۲۰۲۰). 댐의 높이를 높이면 둑의 범람속도가 증가하여 구조물을 위협하고 캐비테이션으로 인한 구조물의 파손을 유발할 수 있다(Chanson, ۲۰۱۳). 캐비테이션은 유체 압력이 증기압에 도달할 때 발생합니다. 높은 속도와 낮은 압력은 캐비테이션을 유발할 수 있으므로, 통기는 캐비테이션을 처리하는 가장 좋은 방법 중 하나로 인식되어 왔습니다(Pettersson, ۲۰۱۲). 본 연구에서는 Darian 댐의 슈트 여수로의 Flow-۳D 수치모델에서 추출된 결과를 고려하여 캐비테이션 발생 확률을 조사하고 그 신뢰성을 조사하였다. 이 수력구조의 설계에서 수력학적 불확실성은 수력성능 해석의 불확실성에 기인할 수 있다. 따라서 신뢰성을 평가하기 위해서는 수력공학 시스템의 불확도 특성에 대한 지식이 필요해 보인다(Yen et al., ۱۹۹۳). 따라서 수력 공학 시스템의 지정 및 작동은 항상 불확실성과 가능한 고장의 영향을 받습니다. 유압 공학 시스템의 신뢰성 ps는 저항 R, 시스템의 부하 L은 다음과 같이 초과됩니다(Chen, ۲۰۱۵): p_s=P(L≤R)(۱) 여기서 P(۰)은 확률입니다. 고장 확률 p_f는 신뢰도 보완이며 다음과 같이 표현됩니다. Mays, ۱۹۸۰ 및 Yen & Tung, ۱۹۹۳). 따라서 신뢰성을 기반으로 제어 방법에서 슈트 여수로의 캐비테이션 발생 확률을 조사할 수 있습니다. 신뢰도 분석에서 확률적 계산은 제한된 조건부 함수 W(X)=W(X_L , X_R)은 다음과 같습니다. p_s=P[W(X_L,X_R)≥۰]= P[W(X)≥۰] (۳) 여기서 X는 부하 및 저항 함수의 기본 랜덤 변수 벡터입니다. 신뢰도 분석에서 W(X)> ۰이면 시스템은 안전하고 W(X) <۰에서는 시스템이 실패합니다. 따라서 표준편차 σ_W에 대한 평균값 μ_W의 비율로 정의되는 신뢰도 지수 β가 사용되며, 제한된 조건부 함수 W(X)는 다음과 같이 정의됩니다(Cornell, ۱۹۶۹). β= μ_W/σ_W (۴) 본 연구는 이란 물연구소의 ۱:۵۰ scale plexiglass로 개발된 모델로부터 얻은 결과를 이용하여 수행하였다. 이 실험 모델에서, 입구 수로와 수렴형 투수 슈트 여수로로 구성되며 슈트 중 캐비테이션 현상에 대처하기 위해 슈트 초기에 ۲۱۱과 ۲۷۰ 간격으로 편향기 형태의 2개의 에어레이터를 사용하였다. 여수로 좌우 벽의 공기 유입구에도 공기 덕트가 사용되었습니다. 캐비테이션의 효과적인 매개변수를 측정하기 위해 7번의 배출이 방수로를 통과했습니다. 압력과 평균 속도가 결정되면 캐비테이션 지수 값이 계산되고 임계 캐비테이션 지수 σ_cr 값과 비교됩니다. σ≤σ_cr일 때 그 범위에서 부식의 위험이 있다(Chanson, ۱۹۹۳). 슈트 중 캐비테이션 발생의 불확실성을 구하고 신뢰도 지수를 계산하기 위해서는 제한된 조건부 함수를 추출할 필요가 있다. 따라서 두 지점 사이의 일정한 흐름에 대해 다음과 같은 Bernoulli(에너지) 관계가 있습니다(Falvey, ۱۹۹۰). σ= ( P_atm/γ- P_V/γ+h cos⁡θ )/(〖V_۰〗 ^۲/۲g) (۵) 여기서 P_atm은 대기압, γ는 물의 단위 중량, θ는 수평선에 대한 경사로의 각도, r은 수직 호의 곡률 반경, h cos⁡ θ는 바닥에 수직인 흐름 깊이입니다. 따라서 제한된 조건부 함수는 다음과 같이 쓸 수 있습니다. W(X)=(P_atm/γ- P_V/γ+h cos⁡θ )/(〖V_۰〗^۲/۲g) -σ_cr (۶) Flow-۳D는 유체 역학의 강력한 소프트웨어. 이 소프트웨어의 주요 기능 중 하나는 수리학적 해석을 위해 유한 체적 방법을 사용하여 자유 표면 흐름을 모델링하는 것입니다. 방수로는 Flow-۳D 소프트웨어에 자세히 설명된 바와 같이 폭기 장치, 램프 폭기 장치 및 폭기 덕트가 있는 램프 조합을 사용하지 않고 세 가지 모드로 모델링되었습니다. 언급된 각 모드에 대해 7개의 방전이 테스트되었습니다. 식 (۶)에 따르면 속도와 압력은 캐비테이션 발생 현상에 결정적이고 중요한 역할을 합니다. 따라서 확률분포함수에 기반한 FORM(First Order Reliable Method)으로 신뢰도를 평가해야 한다 이를 위해 실험실 모델에 대한 속도와 압력의 확률변수 중 가장 적합한 확률분포함수를 Easy fit을 이용하여 구간별로 추출하였다. 소프트웨어. 확률 분포 함수는 제한된 조건부 함수의 다른 변수에 대해서도 정상으로 간주됩니다. 이 값은 단위 중량의 경우 해발 ۵۰۰ ~ ۷۰۰۰ m 고도에서의 일정한 중력과 ۵ ~ ۳۵ ° C에서의 증기압으로 추정됩니다. 임계 캐비테이션 지수 변수의 표준 편차는 ۰.۰۱으로 간주됩니다. . 수행된 시험에 따르면 속도 확률변수는 GEV(Generalized Extreme Value) 분포함수로, 압력변수는 Burr(۴P) 분포함수가 가장 좋은 분포함수로 제시되었다. 중요한 점은 확률 변수 위의 정규 분포를 따르지 않는 것입니다. 따라서 FORM 방법으로 신뢰도를 평가하기 위해서는 위의 분포에 따라 기존 방법을 기반으로 정규 변수로 변환해야 합니다. 이를 위해, 비정규분포를 Rackwitz와 Fiiessler의 방법에 의해 정규분포로 변환하여 누적분포함수의 값이 x_(i*)의 설계점에서 원래의 비정상분포와 같도록 한다. 이 점은 경계면의 표준화된 공간 또는 동일한 제한된 조건부 함수에서 원점으로부터 최소 거리를 갖습니다. 신뢰성 지수는 폭기 장치를 설치하기 전의 ۰.۴۲۰۴과 같습니다. 그 결과 신뢰도 p_s와 고장확률 p_f는 각각 ۰.۶۶۲۹과 ۰.۳۳۷۱이다. 이 숫자는 캐비테이션 발생의 높은 비율을 나타냅니다. 따라서 캐비테이션으로 인한 즉각적인 손상을 방지하기 위해 폭기 장치의 사용이 불가피합니다. 실험실에서 계획한 대로 캐비테이션을 처리하기 위해, 나열된 사양을 가진 두 개의 폭기 장치는 캐비테이션 지수가 중요한 위치에 내장되어 있습니다. 폭기장치 설치 후 캐비테이션 발생의 신뢰성을 분석하기 위해 Hasofer-Lind 알고리즘의 단계를 반복합니다. 경사로의 모델링은 폭기 덕트의 성능과 경사로에 의한 폭기 및 경사로와 폭기 덕트의 조합 사이의 실패 확률을 비교하기 위해 Flow-۳D 소프트웨어에서 별도로 수행되었습니다. 경사로 및 ​​폭기 덕트와 함께 폭기 장치를 설치하면 캐비테이션 발생 가능성이 크게 줄어듭니다. 에어레이터를 설치하면 캐비테이션 발생 확률이 약 ۴%로 감소합니다. 그러나 램프를 통한 폭기의 경우 실패 위험은 ۱۰%와 같습니다. 폭기 설치 후 캐비테이션 발생의 신뢰성을 분석하기 위해 Hasofer-Lind 알고리즘의 단계를 반복합니다. 경사로의 모델링은 폭기 덕트의 성능과 경사로에 의한 폭기 및 경사로와 폭기 덕트의 조합 사이의 실패 확률을 비교하기 위해 Flow-۳D 소프트웨어에서 별도로 수행되었습니다. 경사로 및 ​​폭기 덕트와 함께 폭기 장치를 설치하면 캐비테이션 발생 가능성이 크게 줄어듭니다. 에어레이터를 설치하면 캐비테이션 발생 확률이 약 ۴%로 감소합니다. 그러나 램프를 통한 폭기의 경우 실패 위험은 ۱۰%와 같습니다. 폭기장치 설치 후 캐비테이션 발생의 신뢰성을 분석하기 위해 Hasofer-Lind 알고리즘의 단계를 반복합니다. 경사로의 모델링은 폭기 덕트의 성능과 경사로에 의한 폭기 및 경사로와 폭기 덕트의 조합 사이의 실패 확률을 비교하기 위해 Flow-۳D 소프트웨어에서 별도로 수행되었습니다. 경사로 및 ​​폭기 덕트와 함께 폭기 장치를 설치하면 캐비테이션 발생 가능성이 크게 줄어듭니다. 에어레이터를 설치하면 캐비테이션 발생 확률이 약 ۴%로 감소합니다. 그러나 램프를 통한 폭기의 경우 실패 위험은 ۱۰%와 같습니다. 경사로의 모델링은 폭기 덕트의 성능과 경사로에 의한 폭기 및 경사로와 폭기 덕트의 조합 사이의 실패 확률을 비교하기 위해 Flow-۳D 소프트웨어에서 별도로 수행되었습니다. 경사로 및 ​​폭기 덕트와 함께 폭기 장치를 설치하면 캐비테이션 발생 가능성이 크게 줄어듭니다. 에어레이터를 설치하면 캐비테이션 발생 확률이 약 ۴%로 감소합니다. 그러나 램프를 통한 폭기의 경우 실패 위험은 ۱۰%와 같습니다. 경사로의 모델링은 폭기 덕트의 성능과 경사로에 의한 폭기 및 경사로와 폭기 덕트의 조합 사이의 실패 확률을 비교하기 위해 Flow-۳D 소프트웨어에서 별도로 수행되었습니다. 경사로 및 ​​폭기 덕트와 함께 폭기 장치를 설치하면 캐비테이션 발생 가능성이 크게 줄어듭니다. 에어레이터를 설치하면 캐비테이션 발생 확률이 약 ۴%로 감소합니다. 그러나 램프를 통한 폭기의 경우 실패 위험은 ۱۰%와 같습니다. 에어레이터를 설치하면 캐비테이션 발생 확률이 약 ۴%로 감소합니다. 그러나 램프를 통한 폭기의 경우 실패 위험은 ۱۰%와 같습니다. 에어레이터를 설치하면 캐비테이션 발생 확률이 약 ۴%로 감소합니다. 그러나 램프를 통한 폭기의 경우 실패 위험은 ۱۰%와 같습니다.

Keywords

Aerator Probable Failure Reliability Method FORM Flow ۳D. 

A 3-D numerical simulation of the characteristics of open channel flows with submerged rigid vegetation

A 3-D numerical simulation of the characteristics of open channel flows with submerged rigid vegetation

수중 강성 식생이 있는 개방 수로 흐름의 특성에 대한 3차원 수치 시뮬레이션

Journal of Hydrodynamics (2021)Cite this article

Abstract

이 논문은 FLOW-3D를 적용하여 다양한 흐름 배출 및 식생 시나리오가 유속(종방향, 횡방향 및 수직 속도 포함)에 미치는 영향을 조사합니다.

실험적 측정을 통한 검증 후 식생직경, 식생높이, 유출량에 대한 민감도 분석을 수행하였습니다. 종방향 속도의 경우 흐름 구조에 대한 가장 큰 영향은 배출보다는 식생 직경에서 비롯됩니다.

그러나 식생 높이는 수직 분포의 변곡점을 결정합니다. 식생 지역, 즉 상류와 하류의 두 위치에서 횡단 속도를 비교하면 수심을 따라 대칭 패턴이 식별됩니다. 식생 지역의 횡단 및 수직 유체 순환 패턴을 포함하여 흐름 또는 식생 시나리오에 관계없이 수직 속도에서도 동일한 패턴이 관찰됩니다.

또한 식생 직경이 클수록 이러한 패턴이 더 분명해집니다. 상부 순환은 식생 캐노피 근처에서 발생합니다. 식생 지역의 가로 세로 방향 순환에 관한 이러한 발견은 수중 식생을 통한 3차원 흐름 구조를 밝혀줍니다.

This paper applies the Flow-3D to investigate the impacts of different flow discharge and vegetation scenarios on the flow velocity (including the longitudinal, transverse and vertical velocities). After the verification by using experimental measurements, a sensitivity analysis is conducted for the vegetation diameter, the vegetation height and the flow discharge. For the longitudinal velocity, the greatest impact on the flow structure originates from the vegetation diameter, rather than the discharge. The vegetation height, however, determines the inflection point of the vertical distribution. Comparing the transverse velocities at two positions in the vegetated area, i.e., the upstream and the downstream, a symmetric pattern is identified along the water depth. The same pattern is also observed for the vertical velocity regardless of the flow or vegetation scenario, including both transverse and vertical fluid circulation patterns in the vegetated area. Moreover, the larger the vegetation diameter is, the more evident these patterns become. The upper circulation occurs near the vegetation canopy. These findings regarding the circulations along the transverse and vertical directions in the vegetated region shed light on the 3-D flow structure through the submerged vegetation.

Key words

  • Submerged rigid vegetation
  • longitudinal velocity
  • transverse velocity
  • vertical velocity

References

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Fig. 5 Comparison of experimental SEM image and CtFD simulated melt pool with beam diameters of(a)700 μm,(b)1000 μm, and(c)1300 μm and an absorption rate of 0.3. Electron beam power and scan speed are 900 W and 100 mm s-1, respectively

추가 생산용 전자빔 조사에 의한 316L 스테인리스 용융 · 응고 거동

Melting and Solidification Behavior of 316L Steel Induced by Electron-Beam Irradiation for Additive Manufacturing

付加製造用電子ビーム照射による 316L ステンレス鋼の溶融・凝固挙動

奥 川 将 行*・宮 田 雄一朗*・王     雷*・能 勢 和 史*
小 泉 雄一郎*・中 野 貴 由*
Masayuki OKUGAWA, Yuichiro MIYATA, Lei WANG, Kazufumi NOSE,
Yuichiro KOIZUMI and Takayoshi NAKANO

Abstract

적층 제조(AM) 기술은 복잡한 형상의 3D 부품을 쉽게 만들고 미세 구조 제어를 통해 재료 특성을 크게 제어할 수 있기 때문에 많은 관심을 받았습니다. PBF(Powderbed fusion) 방식의 AM 공정에서는 금속 분말을 레이저나 전자빔으로 녹이고 응고시키는 과정을 반복하여 3D 부품을 제작합니다.

일반적으로 응고 미세구조는 Hunt[Mater. 과학. 영어 65, 75(1984)]. 그러나 CET 이론이 일반 316L 스테인리스강에서도 높은 G와 R로 인해 PBF형 AM 공정에 적용될 수 있을지는 불확실하다.

본 연구에서는 미세구조와 응고 조건 간의 관계를 밝히기 위해 전자빔 조사에 의해 유도된 316L 강의 응고 미세구조를 분석하고 CtFD(Computational Thermal-Fluid Dynamics) 방법을 사용하여 고체/액체 계면에서의 응고 조건을 평가했습니다.

CET 이론과 반대로 높은 G 조건에서 등축 결정립이 종종 형성되는 것으로 밝혀졌다. CtFD 시뮬레이션은 약 400 mm s-1의 속도까지 유체 흐름이 있음을 보여 주며 수상 돌기의 파편 및 이동의 영향으로 등축 결정립이 형성됨을 시사했습니다.

Additive manufacturing(AM)technologies have attracted much attention because it enables us to build 3D parts with complicated geometry easily and control material properties significantly via the control of microstructures. In the powderbed fusion(PBF)type AM process, 3D parts are fabricated by repeating a process of melting and solidifying metal powders by laser or electron beams. In general, the solidification microstructures can be predicted from solidification conditions defined by the combination of temperature gradient G and solidification rate R on the basis of columnar-equiaxed transition(CET)theory proposed by Hunt [Mater. Sci. Eng. 65, 75(1984)]. However, it is unclear whether the CET theory can be applied to the PBF type AM process because of the high G and R, even for general 316L stainless steel. In this study, to reveal relationships between microstructures and solidification conditions, we have analyzed solidification microstructures of 316L steel induced by electronbeam irradiation and evaluated solidification conditions at the solid/liquid interface using a computational thermal-fluid dynamics (CtFD)method. It was found that equiaxed grains were often formed under high G conditions contrary to the CET theory. CtFD simulation revealed that there is a fluid flow up to a velocity of about 400 mm s-1, and suggested that equiaxed grains are formed owing to the effect of fragmentations and migrations of dendrites.

Keywords

Additive Manufacturing, 316L Stainless Steel, Powder Bed Fusion, Electron Beam Melting, Computational Thermal
Fluid Dynamics Simulation

Fig. 1 Width, height, and height differences calculated from laser microscope analysis of melt tracks formed by scanning electron beam. Fig. 2(a)Scanning electron microscope(SEM)image and(b) corresponding electron back-scattering diffraction(EBSD) IPF-map taken from the electron-beam irradiated region in P900-V100 sample. Fig. 3 Average grain size and their aspect ratio calculated from EBSD IPF-map taken from the electron-beam irradiated region.
Fig. 1 Width, height, and height differences calculated from laser microscope analysis of melt tracks formed by scanning electron beam. Fig. 2(a)Scanning electron microscope(SEM)image and(b) corresponding electron back-scattering diffraction(EBSD) IPF-map taken from the electron-beam irradiated region in P900-V100 sample. Fig. 3 Average grain size and their aspect ratio calculated from EBSD IPF-map taken from the electron-beam irradiated region.
Fig. 4 Comparison of experimental SEM image and computational thermal fluid dynamics(CtFD)simulated melt pool with a beam diameter of 700 μm and absorption rates of(a)0.3,(b)0.5, and (c)0.7. Electron beam power and scan speed are 900 W and 100 mm s-1, respectively.
Fig. 4 Comparison of experimental SEM image and computational thermal fluid dynamics(CtFD)simulated melt pool with a beam diameter of 700 μm and absorption rates of(a)0.3,(b)0.5, and (c)0.7. Electron beam power and scan speed are 900 W and 100 mm s-1, respectively.
Fig. 5 Comparison of experimental SEM image and CtFD simulated melt pool with beam diameters of(a)700 μm,(b)1000 μm, and(c)1300 μm and an absorption rate of 0.3. Electron beam power and scan speed are 900 W and 100 mm s-1, respectively
Fig. 5 Comparison of experimental SEM image and CtFD simulated melt pool with beam diameters of(a)700 μm,(b)1000 μm, and(c)1300 μm and an absorption rate of 0.3. Electron beam power and scan speed are 900 W and 100 mm s-1, respectively
Fig. 6 Depth of melt tracks calculated from experimental SEM image and CtFD simulation results.
Fig. 6 Depth of melt tracks calculated from experimental SEM image and CtFD simulation results.
Fig. 7 G-R plots of 316L steel colored by(a)aspect ratio of crystalline grains and(b)fluid velocity.
Fig. 7 G-R plots of 316L steel colored by(a)aspect ratio of crystalline grains and(b)fluid velocity.
Fig. 8 Comparison of solidification microstructure(EBSD IPF-map)of melt region formed by scanning electron beam and corresponding snap shot of CtFD simulation colored by fluid velocity
Fig. 8 Comparison of solidification microstructure(EBSD IPF-map)of melt region formed by scanning electron beam and corresponding snap shot of CtFD simulation colored by fluid velocity

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Numerical study of the dam-break waves and Favre waves down sloped wet rigid-bed at laboratory scale

Numerical study of the dam-break waves and Favre waves down sloped wet rigid-bed at laboratory scale

WenjunLiua  BoWangb  YakunGuoc

a State Key Laboratory of Hydraulics and Mountain River Engineering, College of Water Resource and Hydropower, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610065, China
State Key Laboratory of Hydraulics and Mountain River Engineering, Sichuan University, College Of Water Resource and Hydropower, Chengdu, 610065, China
faculty of Engineering & Informatics, University of Bradford, BD7 1DP, UK

Abstract

The bed slope and the tailwater depth are two important ones among the factors that affect the propagation of the dam-break flood and Favre waves. Most previous studies have only focused on the macroscopic characteristics of the dam-break flows or Favre waves under the condition of horizontal bed, rather than the internal movement characteristics in sloped channel. The present study applies two numerical models, namely, large eddy simulation (LES) and shallow water equations (SWEs) models embedded in the CFD software package FLOW-3D to analyze the internal movement characteristics of the dam-break flows and Favre waves, such as water level, the velocity distribution, the fluid particles acceleration and the bed shear stress, under the different bed slopes and water depth ratios. The results under the conditions considered in this study show that there is a flow state transition in the flow evolution for the steep bed slope even in water depth ratio α = 0.1 (α is the ratio of the tailwater depth to the reservoir water depth). The flow state transition shows that the wavefront changes from a breaking state to undular. Such flow transition is not observed for the horizontal slope and mild bed slope. The existence of the Favre waves leads to a significant increase of the vertical velocity and the vertical acceleration. In this situation, the SWEs model has poor prediction. Analysis reveals that the variation of the maximum bed shear stress is affected by both the bed slope and tailwater depth. Under the same bed slope (e.g., S0 = 0.02), the maximum bed shear stress position develops downstream of the dam when α = 0.1, while it develops towards the end of the reservoir when α = 0.7. For the same water depth ratio (e.g., α = 0.7), the maximum bed shear stress position always locates within the reservoir at S0 = 0.02, while it appears in the downstream of the dam for S0 = 0 and 0.003 after the flow evolves for a while. The comparison between the numerical simulation and experimental measurements shows that the LES model can predict the internal movement characteristics with satisfactory accuracy. This study improves the understanding of the effect of both the bed slope and the tailwater depth on the internal movement characteristics of the dam-break flows and Favre waves, which also provides a valuable reference for determining the flood embankment height and designing the channel bed anti-scouring facility.

댐붕괴 홍수와 파브르 파도의 전파에 영향을 미치는 요인 중 하상경사와 후미수심은 두 가지 중요한 요소이다. 대부분의 선행 연구들은 경사 수로에서의 내부 이동 특성보다는 수평층 조건에서 댐파괴류나 Favre파동의 거시적 특성에만 초점을 맞추었다.

본 연구에서는 CFD 소프트웨어 패키지 FLOW-3D에 내장된 LES(Large Eddy Simulation) 및 SWE(Shallow Water Equation) 모델의 두 가지 수치 모델을 적용하여 댐-파괴 흐름 및 Favre 파도의 내부 이동 특성을 분석합니다.

수위, 속도 분포, 유체 입자 가속도 및 층 전단 응력, 다양한 층 경사 및 수심 비율로. 본 연구에서 고려한 조건하의 결과는 수심비 α = 0.1(α는 저수지 수심에 대한 tailwater 깊이의 비율)에서도 급경사면에 대한 유동상태 전이가 있음을 보여준다. 유동 상태 전이는 파면이 파단 상태에서 비정형으로 변하는 것을 보여줍니다.

수평 경사와 완만한 바닥 경사에서는 이러한 흐름 전이가 관찰되지 않습니다. Favre 파의 존재는 수직 속도와 수직 가속도의 상당한 증가로 이어집니다. 이 상황에서 SWE 모델은 예측이 좋지 않습니다.

분석에 따르면 최대 바닥 전단 응력의 변화는 바닥 경사와 꼬리 수심 모두에 영향을 받습니다. 동일한 바닥 경사(예: S0 = 0.02)에서 최대 바닥 전단 응력 위치는 α = 0.1일 때 댐의 하류에서 발생하고 α = 0.7일 때 저수지의 끝쪽으로 발생합니다.

동일한 수심비(예: α = 0.7)에 대해 최대 바닥 전단 응력 위치는 항상 S0 = 0.02에서 저수지 내에 위치하는 반면, S0 = 0 및 0.003에 대해 흐름이 진화한 후 댐 하류에 나타납니다. 수치적 시뮬레이션과 실험적 측정을 비교한 결과 LES 모델이 내부 움직임 특성을 만족스러운 정확도로 예측할 수 있음을 알 수 있습니다.

본 연구는 댐 파절류 및 Favre파의 내부 이동 특성에 대한 하상 경사 및 후미 수심의 영향에 대한 이해를 향상 시키며, 이는 또한 제방 높이를 결정하고 수로 저반위 설계를 위한 귀중한 참고자료를 제공한다.

Keywords

Figure Numerical study of the dam-break waves and Favre waves down sloped wet rigid-bed at laboratory scale
Figure Numerical study of the dam-break waves and Favre waves down sloped wet rigid-bed at laboratory scale

Dam-break flow, Bed slope, Wet bed, Velocity profile, Bed shear stress, Large eddy simulation
댐파괴유동, 하상경사, 습상, 유속분포, 하상전단응력, 대와류 시뮬레이션

Fig. 1. Hydraulic jump flow structure.

Performance assessment of OpenFOAM and FLOW-3D in the numerical modeling of a low Reynolds number hydraulic jump

낮은 레이놀즈 수 유압 점프의 수치 모델링에서 OpenFOAM 및 FLOW-3D의 성능 평가

ArnauBayona DanielValerob RafaelGarcía-Bartuala Francisco ​JoséVallés-Morána P. AmparoLópez-Jiméneza

Abstract

A comparative performance analysis of the CFD platforms OpenFOAM and FLOW-3D is presented, focusing on a 3D swirling turbulent flow: a steady hydraulic jump at low Reynolds number. Turbulence is treated using RANS approach RNG k-ε. A Volume Of Fluid (VOF) method is used to track the air–water interface, consequently aeration is modeled using an Eulerian–Eulerian approach. Structured meshes of cubic elements are used to discretize the channel geometry. The numerical model accuracy is assessed comparing representative hydraulic jump variables (sequent depth ratio, roller length, mean velocity profiles, velocity decay or free surface profile) to experimental data. The model results are also compared to previous studies to broaden the result validation. Both codes reproduced the phenomenon under study concurring with experimental data, although special care must be taken when swirling flows occur. Both models can be used to reproduce the hydraulic performance of energy dissipation structures at low Reynolds numbers.

CFD 플랫폼 OpenFOAM 및 FLOW-3D의 비교 성능 분석이 3D 소용돌이치는 난류인 낮은 레이놀즈 수에서 안정적인 유압 점프에 초점을 맞춰 제시됩니다. 난류는 RANS 접근법 RNG k-ε을 사용하여 처리됩니다.

VOF(Volume Of Fluid) 방법은 공기-물 계면을 추적하는 데 사용되며 결과적으로 Eulerian-Eulerian 접근 방식을 사용하여 폭기가 모델링됩니다. 입방체 요소의 구조화된 메쉬는 채널 형상을 이산화하는 데 사용됩니다. 수치 모델 정확도는 대표적인 유압 점프 변수(연속 깊이 비율, 롤러 길이, 평균 속도 프로파일, 속도 감쇠 또는 자유 표면 프로파일)를 실험 데이터와 비교하여 평가됩니다.

모델 결과는 또한 결과 검증을 확장하기 위해 이전 연구와 비교됩니다. 소용돌이 흐름이 발생할 때 특별한 주의가 필요하지만 두 코드 모두 실험 데이터와 일치하는 연구 중인 현상을 재현했습니다. 두 모델 모두 낮은 레이놀즈 수에서 에너지 소산 구조의 수리 성능을 재현하는 데 사용할 수 있습니다.

Keywords

CFDRANS, OpenFOAM, FLOW-3D ,Hydraulic jump, Air–water flow, Low Reynolds number

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Study of Unconventional Alternatives to Vertical Breakwater

수직 방파제에 대한 비전통적 대안 연구

Karim Badr Hussein and Mohamed Ibrahim
Lecturer of Irrigation and Hydraulics, Faculty of Engineering, Al-Azhar University
Corresponding author E-mail: badrkarim713@yahoo.com

Abstract

방파제의 주요 목적은 항만 내부의 안정을 유지하여 선박의 안전과 운영의 용이성을 달성하는데 도움이 되기 때문에 강한 파도와 폭풍으로부터 항만, 해변 또는 해변 시설을 보호하는 것입니다.

이 연구는 수직 방파제에 대한 비전통적인 대안을 연구하는 것을 목표로 합니다. 이 연구에서는 유체역학적 성능의 연구 및 평가를 위해 구현된 수직파 장벽의 두 가지 다른 모델을 선택했습니다.

첫 번째 모델은 원형 슬롯이 있는 수직 벽이고 두 번째 모델은 사각형 슬롯이 있는 수직 벽입니다. 두 모델을 비교한 결과 정사각형 슬롯은 원형 슬롯보다 파동의 전송을 5~20% 감소시키는 것으로 나타났습니다.

두 개의 원형 홈이 있는 벽을 사용하면 단일 벽에 비해 파동 전송이 최대 30% 감소하고 파동 에너지 분산이 최대 40% 증가합니다. 상대 길이(h/L)가 증가함에 따라 수평파력이 증가합니다.

다공성 = 0.25에서 상대파력(F/Fo)은 다공성 = 0.50에서보다 10~30% 더 컸습니다. 개구부에서 파동 속도가 높고 파동 에너지 소산 계수도 높습니다. 파동 진폭이 클수록 파동 에너지 소산 계수가 커집니다.

Key words: Coastal, Breakwater, FLOW-3D, Numerical Models, Energy Dissipation, Vertical Wall.

Introduction

모든 국가에서 해안 지역은 가장 중요하고 중요한 지역 중 하나입니다. 연안지역과 항만은 대외무역 촉진, 연안관광 개발 및 활성화 등 다양한 분야에 기여하고 있어 경제적 파급효과가 매우 크며, 일자리 창출은 물론 도시근린 정착 및 안정에도 기여한다. 젊은이들에게 강력한 수익을 제공하는 가능성과 어항을 건설하여 어획량을 늘리는 것입니다. [1].

그러나 해안선 부근의 파도, 바람, 조수, 조류 등의 자연 현상은 해변과 해안 지역의 안정성에 영향을 미칩니다. 따라서 연안 보전 서비스는 연안 환경의 균형을 유지하고 보존하는 데 중요한 역할을 합니다. 거센 파도로부터 항구와 해변 시설을 보호하는 방파제 방파제. 방파제는 선박이 안전하게 정박할 수 있는 조용한 지역을 제공하고 건설 및 석유 및 광물 발견 동안 임시 보호를 제공합니다.

파도는 방파제에 부딪힐 때 많은 에너지를 잃습니다. 방파제는 눈에 보이거나 떠 있거나 수중일 수 있으며 다양한 크기, 재료 및 출력 표준이 있습니다[11]. 전통적인 장벽 또는 눈에 보이는 격벽은 매우 효율적이지만 해변의 미적 비전을 가립니다. 많은 건축 자재가 필요하고 건설 비용이 증가합니다[9].

이에 반해 부유방벽은 자재가 필요없고 공사비가 저렴하지만 그 효과는 제한적입니다. 결과적으로 수중 파티션은 이러한 종류의 단점을 방지하기 때문에 더 나은 옵션 중 하나로 간주됩니다.

수중 방벽은 가장 중요한 해변 방어 시설 중 하나이며, 수중 방벽의 장점 중 하나는 투명 방벽에 비해 건설 비용이 비교적 저렴하고 물이 앞에서 뒤로 흐를 수 있다는 것입니다[3].

멤브레인 아래에서 물이 재생됩니다. 또한 바다의 미적 이미지를 왜곡하지 않고 조망을 방해하지 않아 인근 해변에 미치는 영향도 미미하다[18]. 반면에 잠긴 방파제는 건설 후 가라앉으면서 파도 에너지를 분산시키고 해안선을 방어하는 효과를 잃습니다. 장벽의 품질은 높은 수위의 영향도 받습니다.

결과적으로 해안 보호의 가장 중요한 측면 중 하나는 수중 방파제의 효율성을 향상시키는 것입니다. 수직 방파제 이러한 유형의 방파제는 바다를 향한 수직면이 있는 설비입니다[10]. 이러한 장벽은 파도 에너지의 일부가 해안이나 보호할 수역에 도달하는 것을 방지하여 파도를 진정시키는 역할을 합니다[16].

수직 방파제는 블록, 케이슨, 시트 파일 또는 셀룰러로 구성될 수 있습니다. 이 연구는 정사각형 및 원형 구멍이 있는 천공된 수직 방파제의 유체역학적 성능에 대한 연구를 제시하는 것을 목적으로 합니다.

이 논문은 또한 제안된 모델의 유체역학적 효율뿐만 아니라 이 분야의 유사한 연구와 비교되었습니다. 이것은 다음 헤드라인으로 이 백서에 나와 있습니다.

 Materials and methods.
 Results and discussion.
 Conclusions and recommendations.

Fig. 1. The open channel
Fig. 1. The open channel
Fig. 2. Breakwaters model (a) perforated wall with circular slots and (b) perforated wall with square slots.
Fig. 2. Breakwaters model (a) perforated wall with circular slots and (b) perforated wall with square slots.
Fig. 3. Breakwaters model in Flow-3D with meshing geometry and boundary (a) circular slots (b) square slots.
Fig. 3. Breakwaters model in Flow-3D with meshing geometry and boundary (a) circular slots (b) square slots.
Fig. 4. Details and dimensions of proposed breakwater
Fig. 4. Details and dimensions of proposed breakwater
Fig 5 .Wave profiles using (Flow-3D) at wave period (T) = 1.2 sec for perforated walls with circular slots at behind model (Ht).
Fig 5 .Wave profiles using (Flow-3D) at wave period (T) = 1.2 sec for perforated walls with circular slots at behind model (Ht).
Fig. 11. Velocity distribution through slots at (a) quarter wave period, (b) half wave period and (c) three quarters wave period.
Fig. 11. Velocity distribution through slots at (a) quarter wave period, (b) half wave period and (c) three quarters wave period.
Fig. 13. Velocity vectors at front, between and behind barriers.
Fig. 13. Velocity vectors at front, between and behind barriers.

Conclusion & Recommendations

얻어진 결과에 대한 이전 분석을 바탕으로 도달한 결론은 다음과 같습니다.
 결과와 연구에 따르면 FLOW-3D는 수직으로 구멍이 뚫린 벽이 있는 선형 파동과 파동의 관계를 설명하는 강력한 능력을 가지고 있습니다. 또한 실험실 데이터 및 반분석 결과의 가장 중요한 측면을 복제할 수 있습니다. FLOW-3D에 의해 생성된 수치적 결과는 훌륭합니다.
 사각슬롯은 원형슬롯에 비해 파동의 투과율이 5:20% 감소합니다.
 한 쌍의 원형 슬롯 벽을 사용하면 단일 벽에 비해 파동 투과율이 최대 30% 감소하고 파동 에너지 분산이 최대 40% 증가합니다.
 수평파력은 상대길이(h/L)가 증가할수록 증가한다. 다공성 = 0.25에서 상대파력(F/Fo)은 다공성 = 0.50에서보다 10~30% 더 높았다.
 파도가 원 모양으로 움직이고 큰 원이 위쪽에 있었다가 점차 아래쪽으로 내려갑니다.  개구부에서 파동 속도가 높았고 파동 에너지 소산 계수도 높았습니다. 파동 진폭이 높을수록 파동 에너지 소산 계수가 높아집니다.

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Fig. 1. Schematic of (a) geometry of the simulation model, (b) A-A cross-section presenting the locations of point probes for recording temperature history (unit: µm).

Laser powder bed fusion of 17-4 PH stainless steel: a comparative study on the effect of heat treatment on the microstructure evolution and mechanical properties

17-4 PH 스테인리스강의 레이저 분말 베드 융합: 열처리가 미세조직의 진화 및 기계적 특성에 미치는 영향에 대한 비교 연구

panelS.Saboonia, A.Chaboka, S.Fenga,e, H.Blaauwb, T.C.Pijperb,c, H.J.Yangd, Y.T.Peia
aDepartment of Advanced Production Engineering, Engineering and Technology Institute Groningen, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG, Groningen, The Netherlands
bPhilips Personal Care, Oliemolenstraat 5, 9203 ZN, Drachten, The Netherlands
cInnovation Cluster Drachten, Nipkowlaan 5, 9207 JA, Drachten, The Netherlands
dShi-changxu Innovation Center for Advanced Materials, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016, P. R. China
eSchool of Mechanical Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, 100083, P.R. China

Abstract

17-4 PH (precipitation hardening) stainless steel is commonly used for the fabrication of complicated molds with conformal cooling channels using laser powder bed fusion process (L-PBF). However, their microstructure in the as-printed condition varies notably with the chemical composition of the feedstock powder, resulting in different age-hardening behavior. In the present investigation, 17-4 PH stainless steel components were fabricated by L-PBF from two different feedstock powders, and subsequently subjected to different combinations of post-process heat treatments. It was observed that the microstructure in as-printed conditions could be almost fully martensitic or ferritic, depending on the ratio of Creq/Nieq of the feedstock powder. Aging treatment at 480 °C improved the yield and ultimate tensile strengths of the as-printed components. However, specimens with martensitic structures exhibited accelerated age-hardening response compared with the ferritic specimens due to the higher lattice distortion and dislocation accumulation, resulting in the “dislocation pipe diffusion mechanism”. It was also found that the martensitic structures were highly susceptible to the formation of reverted austenite during direct aging treatment, where 19.5% of austenite phase appeared in the microstructure after 15 h of direct aging. Higher fractions of reverted austenite activates the transformation induced plasticity and improves the ductility of heat treated specimens. The results of the present study can be used to tailor the microstructure of the L-PBF printed 17-4 PH stainless steel by post-process heat treatments to achieve a good combination of mechanical properties.

17-4 PH(석출 경화) 스테인리스강은 레이저 분말 베드 융합 공정(L-PBF)을 사용하여 등각 냉각 채널이 있는 복잡한 금형 제작에 일반적으로 사용됩니다. 그러나 인쇄된 상태의 미세 구조는 공급원료 분말의 화학적 조성에 따라 크게 달라지므로 시효 경화 거동이 다릅니다.

현재 조사에서 17-4 PH 스테인리스강 구성요소는 L-PBF에 의해 두 가지 다른 공급원료 분말로 제조되었으며, 이후에 다양한 조합의 후처리 열처리를 거쳤습니다. 인쇄된 상태의 미세구조는 공급원료 분말의 Creq/Nieq 비율에 따라 거의 완전히 마르텐사이트 또는 페라이트인 것으로 관찰되었습니다.

480 °C에서 노화 처리는 인쇄된 구성 요소의 수율과 극한 인장 강도를 개선했습니다. 그러나 마텐자이트 구조의 시편은 격자 변형 및 전위 축적이 높아 페라이트 시편에 비해 시효 경화 반응이 가속화되어 “전위 파이프 확산 메커니즘”이 발생합니다.

또한 마르텐사이트 구조는 직접 시효 처리 중에 복귀된 오스테나이트의 형성에 매우 민감한 것으로 밝혀졌으며, 여기서 15시간의 직접 시효 후 미세 조직에 19.5%의 오스테나이트 상이 나타났습니다.

복귀된 오스테나이트의 비율이 높을수록 변형 유도 가소성이 활성화되고 열처리된 시편의 연성이 향상됩니다. 본 연구의 결과는 기계적 특성의 우수한 조합을 달성하기 위해 후처리 열처리를 통해 L-PBF로 인쇄된 17-4 PH 스테인리스강의 미세 구조를 조정하는 데 사용할 수 있습니다.

Keywords

Laser powder bed fusion17-4 PH stainless steelPost-process heat treatmentAge hardeningReverted austenite

Fig. 1. Schematic of (a) geometry of the simulation model, (b) A-A cross-section presenting the locations of point probes for recording temperature history (unit: µm).
Fig. 1. Schematic of (a) geometry of the simulation model, (b) A-A cross-section presenting the locations of point probes for recording temperature history (unit: µm).
Fig. 2. Optical (a, b) and TEM (c) micrographs of the wrought 17-4 PH stainless steel.
Fig. 2. Optical (a, b) and TEM (c) micrographs of the wrought 17-4 PH stainless steel.
Fig. 3. EBSD micrographs of the as-printed 17-4 PH steel fabricated with “powder A” (a, b) and “powder B” (c, d) on two different cross sections: (a, c) perpendicular to the building direction, and (b, d) parallel to the building direction.
Fig. 3. EBSD micrographs of the as-printed 17-4 PH steel fabricated with “powder A” (a, b) and “powder B” (c, d) on two different cross sections: (a, c) perpendicular to the building direction, and (b, d) parallel to the building direction.
Fig. 4. Microstructure of the as-printed 17-4 PH stainless steel fabricated with “powder A” (a) and “powder B” (b).
Fig. 4. Microstructure of the as-printed 17-4 PH stainless steel fabricated with “powder A” (a) and “powder B” (b).
Fig. 5. Simulated temperature history of the probes located at the cross section of the L-PBF 17-4 PH steel sample.
Fig. 5. Simulated temperature history of the probes located at the cross section of the L-PBF 17-4 PH steel sample.
Fig. 6. Dependency of the volume fraction of delta ferrite in the final microstructure of L-PBF printed 17-4 PH steel as a function of Creq/Nieq.
Fig. 6. Dependency of the volume fraction of delta ferrite in the final microstructure of L-PBF printed 17-4 PH steel as a function of Creq/Nieq.
Fig. 7. IQ + IPF (left column), parent austenite grain maps (middle column) and phase maps (right column, green color = martensite, red color = austenite) of the post-process heat treated 17-4 PH stainless steel: (a-c) direct aged, (d-f) HIP + aging, (g-i) SA + Aging, and (j-l) HIP + SA + aging (all sample were printed with “powder A”).
Fig. 7. IQ + IPF (left column), parent austenite grain maps (middle column) and phase maps (right column, green color = martensite, red color = austenite) of the post-process heat treated 17-4 PH stainless steel: (a-c) direct aged, (d-f) HIP + aging, (g-i) SA + Aging, and (j-l) HIP + SA + aging (all sample were printed with “powder A”).
Fig. 8. TEM micrographs of the post process heat treated 17-4 PH stainless steel: (a) direct aging and (b) HIP + aging (printed with “powder A”).
Fig. 8. TEM micrographs of the post process heat treated 17-4 PH stainless steel: (a) direct aging and (b) HIP + aging (printed with “powder A”).
Fig. 9. XRD patterns of the post-process heat treated 17-4 PH stainless steel printed with “powder A”.
Fig. 9. XRD patterns of the post-process heat treated 17-4 PH stainless steel printed with “powder A”.
Fig. 10. (a) Volume fraction of reverted austenite as a function of aging time for “direct aging” condition, (b) phase map (green color = martensite, red color = austenite) of the 15 h direct aged specimen printed with “powder A”.
Fig. 10. (a) Volume fraction of reverted austenite as a function of aging time for “direct aging” condition, (b) phase map (green color = martensite, red color = austenite) of the 15 h direct aged specimen printed with “powder A”.
Fig. 11. Microhardness variations of the “direct aged” specimens as a function of aging time at 480 °C.
Fig. 11. Microhardness variations of the “direct aged” specimens as a function of aging time at 480 °C.
Fig. 12. Kernel average misorientation graphs of the as-printed 17-4 PH steel with (a) martensitic structure (printed with “powder A”) and (b) ferritic structure (printed with “powder b”).
Fig. 12. Kernel average misorientation graphs of the as-printed 17-4 PH steel with (a) martensitic structure (printed with “powder A”) and (b) ferritic structure (printed with “powder b”).
Fig. 13. Typical stress-strain curves (a) along with the yield and ultimate tensile strengths (b) and elongation (c) of the as-printed and post-process heat treated 17-4 PH stainless steel (all sample are fabricated with “powder A”).
Fig. 13. Typical stress-strain curves (a) along with the yield and ultimate tensile strengths (b) and elongation (c) of the as-printed and post-process heat treated 17-4 PH stainless steel (all sample are fabricated with “powder A”).
Fig. 14. (a) IQ + IPF and (b) phase map (green color = martensite, red color = austenite) of the “direct aged” specimen after tensile test at a location nearby the rupture point (tension direction from left to right).
Fig. 14. (a) IQ + IPF and (b) phase map (green color = martensite, red color = austenite) of the “direct aged” specimen after tensile test at a location nearby the rupture point (tension direction from left to right).

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Laser powder bed fusion Figure

A study of transient and steady-state regions from single-track deposition in laser powder bed fusion

SubinShrestha KevinChou

J.B. Speed School of Engineering, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40292, United States

Abstract

The surface morphology of parts made by the laser powder bed fusion (L-PBF) process is governed by the flow of the melt pool. The nature of the molten metal flow depends on the material properties, process parameters, and powder-bed particles, etc., and may result in potentially significant variations along a laser scanning path.

This study investigates the formation of transient and steady-state zones through a single-track l-PBF experiment using Inconel 625 powder. Single tracks with lengths of 1 mm and 2 mm were fabricated using 195 W laser power and scan speeds of 400 mm/s or 800 mm/s. The surface morphology of the track was analyzed using a white light interferometer (WLI), and an individual single track can be divided into three distinct zones based on the track width and height.

The initial transient region has a wider and taller solidified track geometry, the region near the end of a scan has a tapered profile with a decreasing track width and height, while the steady-state region in the middle has a smaller variation in the width and height.

A mesoscale numerical model was further developed using FLOW-3D to examine the formation of the transient and steady-state zones. At the start of a scan, strong flow occurs outward and backward, leading to the formation of a wider track with a bump. As the scan continues, the thermal gradient stabilizes, leading to a steady state, which resulted in a very small fluctuation in the width. Furthermore, the tapered end of the scan track is due to the half-lemniscate shape of the melt pool during laser scanning.

L-PBF(Laser Powder Bed fusion) 공정으로 만든 부품의 표면 형태는 용융 풀의 흐름에 따라 결정됩니다. 용융 금속 흐름의 특성은 재료 특성, 공정 매개변수 및 분말층 입자 등에 따라 달라지며 레이저 스캐닝 경로를 따라 잠재적으로 상당한 변동이 발생할 수 있습니다.

이 연구는 Inconel 625 분말을 사용하여 단일 트랙 l-PBF 실험을 통해 과도 및 정상 상태 영역의 형성을 조사합니다. 1 mm 및 2 mm 길이의 단일 트랙은 195 W 레이저 출력과 400 mm/s 또는 800 mm/s의 스캔 속도를 사용하여 제작되었습니다. 트랙의 표면 형태는 백색광 간섭계(WLI)를 사용하여 분석되었으며 개별 단일 트랙은 트랙 너비와 높이에 따라 3개의 별개 영역으로 나눌 수 있습니다.

초기 과도 영역은 더 넓고 더 높은 응고된 트랙 형상을 가지며, 스캔 끝 근처의 영역은 트랙 너비와 높이가 감소하는 테이퍼 프로파일을 갖는 반면, 중간의 정상 상태 영역은 너비와 높이에서 더 작은 변동을 가집니다. 신장. 중간 규모 수치 모델은 과도 및 정상 상태 영역의 형성을 조사하기 위해 FLOW-3D를 사용하여 추가로 개발되었습니다.

스캔이 시작될 때 강한 흐름이 바깥쪽과 뒤쪽으로 발생하여 범프가 있는 더 넓은 트랙이 형성됩니다. 스캔이 계속됨에 따라 열 구배가 안정화되어 정상 상태로 이어지며 폭의 변동이 매우 작습니다. 또한 스캔 트랙의 끝이 가늘어지는 것은 레이저 스캔 중 용융 풀의 반-렘니케이트 모양 때문입니다.

A study of transient and steady-state regions from single-track deposition in laser powder bed fusion
A study of transient and steady-state regions from single-track deposition in laser powder bed fusion

Keywords

Additive manufacturing, Laser powder bed fusion, Numerical modelling, Transient region

참조 : YS Lee and W. Zhang, Modeling of heat transfer, fluid flow and solidification microstructure of nickel-base superalloy fabricated by laser powder bed fusion , S2214-8604 (16) 30087-2, doi.org/10.1016/j.addma .2016.05.003 , ADDMA 86.

FLOW-3D AM 미세 구조 예측 | 열 응력 해석

미세 구조 예측

냉각 속도 및 온도 구배와 같은 FLOW-3D AM 데이터를 미세 구조 모델에 입력하여 결정 성장 및 수상 돌기 암 간격을 예측할 수 있습니다. 

레이저 파우더 베드 융합으로 제작 된 니켈 기반 초합금의 열전달, 유체 흐름 및 응고 미세 구조 모델링

오하이오 주립 대학의 연구원들은 니켈 기반 초합금의 미세 구조 진화를 예측하기 위해 용융 풀과 고체 / 액체 인터페이스의 적절한 위치에서 열 구배 및 냉각 속도 데이터를 추출했습니다.

참조 : YS Lee and W. Zhang, Modeling of heat transfer, fluid flow and solidification microstructure of nickel-base superalloy fabricated by laser powder bed fusion , S2214-8604 (16) 30087-2, doi.org/10.1016/j.addma .2016.05.003 , ADDMA 86.
참조 : YS Lee and W. Zhang, Modeling of heat transfer, fluid flow and solidification microstructure of nickel-base superalloy fabricated by laser powder bed fusion , S2214-8604 (16) 30087-2, doi.org/10.1016/j.addma .2016.05.003 , ADDMA 86.

열 응력 | Thermal Stresses

FLOW-3D AM 시뮬레이션의 결과를 ABAQUS 또는 MSC NASTRAN과 같은 FEA 소프트웨어에 입력하여 추가 열 응력 분석을 실행할 수 있습니다. 여기에서 T- 조인트의 레이저 용접 시뮬레이션 결과를 추가 응력 분석을 위해 ABAQUS로 가져 오는 방법을 볼 수 있습니다. 마찬가지로 LPBF 시뮬레이션에서 응고 된 용융 풀 데이터의 결과를 사용하여 다른 FEA 소프트웨어에서 열 응력 및 왜곡 분석을 연구 할 수 있습니다.

Thermal Stresses Analysis Fig1
Thermal Stresses Analysis Fig1
Thermal Stresses Analysis Fig2
Thermal Stresses Analysis Fig2

Thermal Stresses Case Study

Directed Energy Deposition

DED (Directed Energy Deposition)는 레이저 또는 전자 빔과 같은 에너지 소스를 사용하여 가열 및 융합되는 와이어 또는 분말을 증착하여 부품을 만드는 적층 제조 공정입니다. FLOW-3D AM 은 분말 또는 와이어 이송 속도 및 크기 특성, 레이저 출력 및 스캔 속도와 같은 공정 매개 변수를 고려하여 DED 공정을 시뮬레이션 할 수 있습니다. 또한, 기판과 분말 재료의 서로 다른 합금에 대해 독립적 인 열 물리적 재료 특성을 정의하여 다중 재료 DED 프로세스를 시뮬레이션 할 수 있습니다. 

레이저 물리학의 구현과 열 전달, 응고, 표면 장력, 차폐 가스 효과 및 반동 압력을 포함한 압력 효과를 통해 연구원은 결과 용접 비드의 강도 및 균일성에 대한 공정 매개 변수의 영향을 정확하게 분석 할 수 있습니다. 또한 이러한 시뮬레이션을 여러 레이어로 확장하여 후속 레이어 간의 융합을 분석 할 수 있습니다. 

FLOW-3D AM

flow3d AM-product
FLOW-3D AM-product

와이어 파우더 기반 DED | Wire Powder Based DED

일부 연구자들은 부품을 만들기 위해 더 넓은 범위의 처리 조건을 사용하여 하이브리드 와이어 분말 기반 DED 시스템을 찾고 있습니다. 예를 들어, 이 시뮬레이션은 다양한 분말 및 와이어 이송 속도를 가진 하이브리드 시스템을 살펴봅니다.

와이어 기반 DED | Wire Based DED

와이어 기반 DED는 분말 기반 DED보다 처리량이 높고 낭비가 적지만 재료 구성 및 증착 방향 측면에서 유연성이 떨어집니다. FLOW-3D AM 은 와이어 기반 DED의 처리 결과를 이해하는데 유용하며 최적화 연구를 통해 빌드에 대한 와이어 이송 속도 및 직경과 같은 최상의 처리 매개 변수를 찾을 수 있습니다.

FLOW-3D AM은 레이저 파우더 베드 융합 (L-PBF), 바인더 제트 및 DED (Directed Energy Deposition)와 같은 적층 제조 공정 ( additive manufacturing )을 시뮬레이션하고 분석하는 CFD 소프트웨어입니다. FLOW-3D AM 의 다중 물리 기능은 공정 매개 변수의 분석 및 최적화를 위해 분말 확산 및 압축, 용융 풀 역학, L-PBF 및 DED에 대한 다공성 형성, 바인더 분사 공정을 위한 수지 침투 및 확산에 대해 매우 정확한 시뮬레이션을 제공합니다.

3D 프린팅이라고도하는 적층 제조(additive manufacturing)는 일반적으로 층별 접근 방식을 사용하여, 분말 또는 와이어로 부품을 제조하는 방법입니다. 금속 기반 적층 제조 공정에 대한 관심은 지난 몇 년 동안 시작되었습니다. 오늘날 사용되는 3 대 금속 적층 제조 공정은 PBF (Powder Bed Fusion), DED (Directed Energy Deposition) 및 바인더 제트 ( Binder jetting ) 공정입니다.  FLOW-3D  AM  은 이러한 각 프로세스에 대한 고유 한 시뮬레이션 통찰력을 제공합니다.

파우더 베드 융합 및 직접 에너지 증착 공정에서 레이저 또는 전자 빔을 열원으로 사용할 수 있습니다. 두 경우 모두 PBF용 분말 형태와 DED 공정용 분말 또는 와이어 형태의 금속을 완전히 녹여 융합하여 층별로 부품을 형성합니다. 그러나 바인더 젯팅(Binder jetting)에서는 결합제 역할을 하는 수지가 금속 분말에 선택적으로 증착되어 층별로 부품을 형성합니다. 이러한 부품은 더 나은 치밀화를 달성하기 위해 소결됩니다.

FLOW-3D AM 의 자유 표면 추적 알고리즘과 다중 물리 모델은 이러한 각 프로세스를 높은 정확도로 시뮬레이션 할 수 있습니다. 레이저 파우더 베드 융합 (L-PBF) 공정 모델링 단계는 여기에서 자세히 설명합니다. DED 및 바인더 분사 공정에 대한 몇 가지 개념 증명 시뮬레이션도 표시됩니다.

레이저 파우더 베드 퓨전 (L-PBF)

LPBF 공정에는 유체 흐름, 열 전달, 표면 장력, 상 변화 및 응고와 같은 복잡한 다중 물리학 현상이 포함되어 공정 및 궁극적으로 빌드 품질에 상당한 영향을 미칩니다. FLOW-3D AM 의 물리적 모델은 질량, 운동량 및 에너지 보존 방정식을 동시에 해결하는 동시에 입자 크기 분포 및 패킹 비율을 고려하여 중규모에서 용융 풀 현상을 시뮬레이션합니다.

FLOW-3D DEM FLOW-3D WELD 는 전체 파우더 베드 융합 공정을 시뮬레이션하는 데 사용됩니다. L-PBF 공정의 다양한 단계는 분말 베드 놓기, 분말 용융 및 응고,이어서 이전에 응고 된 층에 신선한 분말을 놓는 것, 그리고 다시 한번 새 층을 이전 층에 녹이고 융합시키는 것입니다. FLOW-3D AM  은 이러한 각 단계를 시뮬레이션하는 데 사용할 수 있습니다.

파우더 베드 부설 공정

FLOW-3D DEM을 통해 분말 크기 분포, 재료 특성, 응집 효과는 물론 롤러 또는 블레이드 움직임 및 상호 작용과 같은 기하학적 효과와 관련된 분말 확산 및 압축을 이해할 수 있습니다. 이러한 시뮬레이션은 공정 매개 변수가 후속 인쇄 공정에서 용융 풀 역학에 직접적인 영향을 미치는 패킹 밀도와 같은 분말 베드 특성에 어떻게 영향을 미치는지에 대한 정확한 이해를 제공합니다.

다양한 파우더 베드 압축을 달성하는 한 가지 방법은 베드를 놓는 동안 다양한 입자 크기 분포를 선택하는 것입니다. 아래에서 볼 수 있듯이 세 가지 크기의 입자 크기 분포가 있으며, 이는 가장 높은 압축을 제공하는 Case 2와 함께 다양한 분말 베드 압축을 초래합니다.

파우더 베드 분포 다양한 입자 크기 분포
세 가지 다른 입자 크기 분포를 사용하여 파우더 베드 배치
파우더 베드 압축 결과
세 가지 다른 입자 크기 분포를 사용한 분말 베드 압축

입자-입자 상호 작용, 유체-입자 결합 및 입자 이동 물체 상호 작용은 FLOW-3D DEM을 사용하여 자세히 분석 할 수도 있습니다 . 또한 입자간 힘을 지정하여 분말 살포 응용 분야를 보다 정확하게 연구 할 수도 있습니다.

FLOW-3D AM  시뮬레이션은 이산 요소 방법 (DEM)을 사용하여 역 회전하는 원통형 롤러로 인한 분말 확산을 연구합니다. 비디오 시작 부분에서 빌드 플랫폼이 위로 이동하는 동안 분말 저장소가 아래로 이동합니다. 그 직후, 롤러는 분말 입자 (초기 위치에 따라 색상이 지정됨)를 다음 층이 녹고 구축 될 준비를 위해 구축 플랫폼으로 펼칩니다. 이러한 시뮬레이션은 저장소에서 빌드 플랫폼으로 전송되는 분말 입자의 선호 크기에 대한 추가 통찰력을 제공 할 수 있습니다.

Melting | 파우더 베드 용해

DEM 시뮬레이션에서 파우더 베드가 생성되면 STL 파일로 추출됩니다. 다음 단계는 CFD를 사용하여 레이저 용융 공정을 시뮬레이션하는 것입니다. 여기서는 레이저 빔과 파우더 베드의 상호 작용을 모델링 합니다. 이 프로세스를 정확하게 포착하기 위해 물리학에는 점성 흐름, 용융 풀 내의 레이저 반사 (광선 추적을 통해), 열 전달, 응고, 상 변화 및 기화, 반동 압력, 차폐 가스 압력 및 표면 장력이 포함됩니다. 이 모든 물리학은 이 복잡한 프로세스를 정확하게 시뮬레이션하기 위해 TruVOF 방법을 기반으로 개발되었습니다.

레이저 출력 200W, 스캔 속도 3.0m / s, 스폿 반경 100μm에서 파우더 베드의 용융 풀 분석.

용융 풀이 응고되면 FLOW-3D AM  압력 및 온도 데이터를 Abaqus 또는 MSC Nastran과 같은 FEA 도구로 가져와 응력 윤곽 및 변위 프로파일을 분석 할 수도 있습니다.

Multilayer | 다층 적층 제조

용융 풀 트랙이 응고되면 DEM을 사용하여 이전에 응고된 층에 새로운 분말 층의 확산을 시뮬레이션 할 수 있습니다. 유사하게, 레이저 용융은 새로운 분말 층에서 수행되어 후속 층 간의 융합 조건을 분석 할 수 있습니다.

해석 진행 절차는 첫 번째 용융층이 응고되면 입자의 두 번째 층이 응고 층에 증착됩니다. 새로운 분말 입자 층에 레이저 공정 매개 변수를 지정하여 용융 풀 시뮬레이션을 다시 수행합니다. 이 프로세스를 여러 번 반복하여 연속적으로 응고된 층 간의 융합, 빌드 내 온도 구배를 평가하는 동시에 다공성 또는 기타 결함의 형성을 모니터링 할 수 있습니다.

다층 적층 적층 제조 시뮬레이션

LPBF의 키홀 링 | Keyholing in LPBF

키홀링 중 다공성은 어떻게 형성됩니까? 이것은 TU Denmark의 연구원들이 FLOW-3D AM을 사용하여 답변한 질문이었습니다. 레이저 빔의 적용으로 기판이 녹으면 기화 및 상 변화로 인한 반동 압력이 용융 풀을 압박합니다. 반동 압력으로 인한 하향 흐름과 레이저 반사로 인한 추가 레이저 에너지 흡수가 공존하면 폭주 효과가 발생하여 용융 풀이 Keyholing으로 전환됩니다. 결국, 키홀 벽을 따라 온도가 변하기 때문에 표면 장력으로 인해 벽이 뭉쳐져서 진행되는 응고 전선에 의해 갇힐 수 있는 공극이 생겨 다공성이 발생합니다. FLOW-3D AM 레이저 파우더 베드 융합 공정 모듈은 키홀링 및 다공성 형성을 시뮬레이션 하는데 필요한 모든 물리 모델을 보유하고 있습니다.

바인더 분사 (Binder jetting)

Binder jetting 시뮬레이션은 모세관 힘의 영향을받는 파우더 베드에서 바인더의 확산 및 침투에 대한 통찰력을 제공합니다. 공정 매개 변수와 재료 특성은 증착 및 확산 공정에 직접적인 영향을 미칩니다.

Scan Strategy | 스캔 전략

스캔 전략은 온도 구배 및 냉각 속도에 영향을 미치기 때문에 미세 구조에 직접적인 영향을 미칩니다. 연구원들은 FLOW-3D AM 을 사용하여 결함 형성과 응고된 금속의 미세 구조에 영향을 줄 수 있는 트랙 사이에서 발생하는 재 용융을 이해하기 위한 최적의 스캔 전략을 탐색하고 있습니다. FLOW-3D AM 은 하나 또는 여러 레이저에 대해 시간에 따른 방향 속도를 구현할 때 완전한 유연성을 제공합니다.

Beam Shaping | 빔 형성

레이저 출력 및 스캔 전략 외에도 레이저 빔 모양과 열유속 분포는 LPBF 공정에서 용융 풀 역학에 큰 영향을 미칩니다. AM 기계 제조업체는 공정 안정성 및 처리량에 대해 다중 코어 및 임의 모양의 레이저 빔 사용을 모색하고 있습니다. FLOW-3D AM을 사용하면 멀티 코어 및 임의 모양의 빔 프로파일을 구현할 수 있으므로 생산량을 늘리고 부품 품질을 개선하기 위한 최상의 구성에 대한 통찰력을 제공 할 수 있습니다.

이 영역에서 수행 된 일부 작업에 대해 자세히 알아 보려면 “The Next Frontier of Metal AM”웨비나를 시청하십시오.

Multi-material Powder Bed Fusion | 다중 재료 분말 베드 융합

이 시뮬레이션에서 스테인리스 강 및 알루미늄 분말은 FLOW-3D AM 이 용융 풀 역학을 정확하게 포착하기 위해 추적하는 독립적으로 정의 된 온도 의존 재료 특성을 가지고 있습니다. 시뮬레이션은 용융 풀에서 재료 혼합을 이해하는 데 도움이됩니다.

다중 재료 용접 사례 연구

이종 금속의 레이저 키홀 용접에서 금속 혼합 조사

GM과 University of Utah의 연구원들은 FLOW-3D WELD 를 사용 하여 레이저 키홀 용접을 통한 이종 금속의 혼합을 이해했습니다. 그들은 반동 압력 및 Marangoni 대류와 관련하여 구리와 알루미늄의 혼합 농도에 대한 레이저 출력 및 스캔 속도의 영향을 조사했습니다. 그들은 시뮬레이션을 실험 결과와 비교했으며 샘플 내의 절단 단면에서 재료 농도 사이에 좋은 일치를 발견했습니다.

이종 금속의 레이저 키홀 용접에서 금속 혼합 조사
이종 금속의 레이저 키홀 용접에서 금속 혼합 조사
참조 : Wenkang Huang, Hongliang Wang, Teresa Rinker, Wenda Tan, 이종 금속의 레이저 키홀 용접에서 금속 혼합 조사 , Materials & Design, Volume 195, (2020). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.matdes.2020.109056
참조 : Wenkang Huang, Hongliang Wang, Teresa Rinker, Wenda Tan, 이종 금속의 레이저 키홀 용접에서 금속 혼합 조사 , Materials & Design, Volume 195, (2020). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.matdes.2020.109056

방향성 에너지 증착

FLOW-3D AM 의 내장 입자 모델 을 사용하여 직접 에너지 증착 프로세스를 시뮬레이션 할 수 있습니다. 분말 주입 속도와 고체 기질에 입사되는 열유속을 지정함으로써 고체 입자는 용융 풀에 질량, 운동량 및 에너지를 추가 할 수 있습니다. 다음 비디오에서 고체 금속 입자가 용융 풀에 주입되고 기판에서 용융 풀의 후속 응고가 관찰됩니다.

electromagnetic metal casting computation designs Fig1

A survey of electromagnetic metal casting computation designs, present approaches, future possibilities, and practical issues

The European Physical Journal Plus volume 136, Article number: 704 (2021) Cite this article

Abstract

Electromagnetic metal casting (EMC) is a casting technique that uses electromagnetic energy to heat metal powders. It is a faster, cleaner, and less time-consuming operation. Solid metals create issues in electromagnetics since they reflect the electromagnetic radiation rather than consume it—electromagnetic energy processing results in sounded pieces with higher-ranking material properties and a more excellent microstructure solution. For the physical production of the electromagnetic casting process, knowledge of electromagnetic material interaction is critical. Even where the heated material is an excellent electromagnetic absorber, the total heating quality is sometimes insufficient. Numerical modelling works on finding the proper coupled effects between properties to bring out the most effective operation. The main parameters influencing the quality of output of the EMC process are: power dissipated per unit volume into the material, penetration depth of electromagnetics, complex magnetic permeability and complex dielectric permittivity. The contact mechanism and interference pattern also, in turn, determines the quality of the process. Only a few parameters, such as the environment’s temperature, the interference pattern, and the rate of metal solidification, can be controlled by AI models. Neural networks are used to achieve exact outcomes by stimulating the neurons in the human brain. Additive manufacturing (AM) is used to design mold and cores for metal casting. The models outperformed the traditional DFA optimization approach, which is susceptible to local minima. The system works only offline, so real-time analysis and corrections are not yet possible.

Korea Abstract

전자기 금속 주조 (EMC)는 전자기 에너지를 사용하여 금속 분말을 가열하는 주조 기술입니다. 더 빠르고 깨끗하며 시간이 덜 소요되는 작업입니다.

고체 금속은 전자기 복사를 소비하는 대신 반사하기 때문에 전자기학에서 문제를 일으킵니다. 전자기 에너지 처리는 더 높은 등급의 재료 특성과 더 우수한 미세 구조 솔루션을 가진 사운드 조각을 만듭니다.

전자기 주조 공정의 물리적 생산을 위해서는 전자기 물질 상호 작용에 대한 지식이 중요합니다. 가열된 물질이 우수한 전자기 흡수재인 경우에도 전체 가열 품질이 때때로 불충분합니다. 수치 모델링은 가장 효과적인 작업을 이끌어 내기 위해 속성 간의 적절한 결합 효과를 찾는데 사용됩니다.

EMC 공정의 출력 품질에 영향을 미치는 주요 매개 변수는 단위 부피당 재료로 분산되는 전력, 전자기의 침투 깊이, 복합 자기 투과성 및 복합 유전율입니다. 접촉 메커니즘과 간섭 패턴 또한 공정의 품질을 결정합니다. 환경 온도, 간섭 패턴 및 금속 응고 속도와 같은 몇 가지 매개 변수 만 AI 모델로 제어 할 수 있습니다.

신경망은 인간 뇌의 뉴런을 자극하여 정확한 결과를 얻기 위해 사용됩니다. 적층 제조 (AM)는 금속 주조용 몰드 및 코어를 설계하는 데 사용됩니다. 모델은 로컬 최소값에 영향을 받기 쉬운 기존 DFA 최적화 접근 방식을 능가했습니다. 이 시스템은 오프라인에서만 작동하므로 실시간 분석 및 수정은 아직 불가능합니다.

electromagnetic metal casting computation designs Fig1
electromagnetic metal casting computation designs Fig1
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Fig6. 실험실 연구에서 계단식 오버 플로우에 대한 쐐기 요소의 선택된 형상 및 배열

Numerical and Experimental Study of Wedge Elements Influence on Hydraulic Parameters and Energy Dissipation over Stepped Spillway in Skimming Flow Regime

Wedge Elements의 수치 및 실험적 연구가 스키밍 흐름 체제에서 계단식 배수로에 대한 유압 매개 변수 및 에너지 소산에 미치는 영향

Authors

  • Kiyoumars Roushangar  1 ; samira akhgar 2
  • 1 Civil Engineering Department, Tabriz University, Tabriz, Iran.
  • 2 Water Engineering Department, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Tabriz University, Tabriz, Iran

Abstract

A stepped spillway is a hydraulic and cost-effective measure to dissipate the energy of large water flow over the spillway. Due to some limitations in stepped spillways, this study has intended a plan to increase and improve the effectiveness of energy depreciation. For this purpose, the effect of the wedge-shaped elements on the velocity and pressure changes over the steps, water level, and energy dissipation downstream the stepped spillway are evaluated.In this regard, several forms of wedge elements are studied with changes in wedge arrangement and the rate of discharge by using a numerical model of Flow-3D, and the appropriate models from the aspect of the most energy depreciation are selected and studied in the laboratory.In the laboratory, 25 experiments were performed on 5 physical models. Numerical and experimental results show that the addition of wedge elements on the stepped spillway has reduced the velocity and water depth downstream of the spillway to about 80% and 30%, respectively, and the energy dissipation over the stepped spillway increased by about 2.7 times. Also, by drawing the distribution profiles of pressure on the edge and the floor of steps, it was observed that the negative pressure in the horizontal section turned into a positive one. Also, negative pressure in the vertical section decreased up to 96% and positive pressure increased about 2 times. As well as increasing the density of the elements, the results that increase the energy dissipation are going to be more remarkable.

요약계단식 배수로는 배수로를 통해 큰 물 흐름의 에너지를 분산시키는 유압적이고 비용 효율적인 조치입니다. 계단식 배수로의 일부 한계로 인해 본 연구는 에너지 감가 상각의 효과를 높이고 개선하기위한 계획을 세웠습니다. 이를 위해 계단, 수위 및 계단식 배수로 하류의 에너지 소실에 대한 속도 및 압력 변화에 대한 쐐기 모양 요소의 영향을 평가합니다. 이와 관련하여 Flow-3D의 수치 모델을 이용하여 쐐기 배열 및 배출 속도의 변화로 여러 형태의 쐐기 요소를 연구하고 가장 에너지 감가 상각 측면에서 적절한 모델을 선택하여 실험실에서 연구합니다. .실험실에서는 5 개의 물리적 모델에 대해 25 개의 실험이 수행되었습니다. 수치 및 실험 결과에 따르면 계단식 배수로에 쐐기 요소를 추가하면 배수로 하류의 속도와 수심이 각각 약 80 % 및 30 %로 감소했으며 계단식 배수로에 대한 에너지 소산은 약 2.7 배 증가했습니다. 또한 계단의 가장자리와 바닥의 압력 분포 프로파일을 그려서 수평 단면의 부압이 양압으로 변하는 것을 관찰했습니다. 또한 수직 부의 부압은 96 %까지 감소했고 양압은 약 2 배 증가했습니다. 요소의 밀도를 높이는 것 외에도 에너지 소산을 증가시키는 결과가 더욱 두드러 질 것입니다.

키워드

Stepped spillway Wedge elements Change of the velocity and pressure Energy dissipation Flow-3D, 계단식 방수로, 웨지 요소 , 속도와 압력의 변화 , 에너지 소산 


Fig. 1. Geometry and alignment of the wedges in the numerical study    Fig. 2. Secondary water depth versus unit flow rate in the simple stepped spillway and stepped spillway with wedge elements.
Fig. 1. Geometry and alignment of the wedges in the numerical study Fig. 2. Secondary water depth versus unit flow rate in the simple stepped spillway and stepped spillway with wedge elements.
Fig6. 실험실 연구에서 계단식 오버 플로우에 대한 쐐기 요소의 선택된 형상 및 배열
Fig6. 실험실 연구에서 계단식 오버 플로우에 대한 쐐기 요소의 선택된 형상 및 배열

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Fig. 1. A) Computational domain showing the cylinder, the profiles PF1, PF2 and the mining pit as set-up in the laboratory (B).

Numerical analysis of water flow around a bridge pier in a sand mined channel

모래 채굴 수로에서 교각 주변의 물 흐름에 대한 수치 해석

Oscar HERRERA-GRANADOS1,, Abhijit LADE2, , Bimlesh KUMAR3
1 Faculty of Civil Engineering, Wroclaw University of Science and Technology, Poland
email: Oscar.Herrera-Granados@pwr.edu.pl
2 3Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Guwahati, India
email: lade176104013@iitg.ac.in
email: bimk@iitg.ac.in

ABSTRACT

Extraction of sand from river beds has a variety of effects on the hydraulic and morphological characteristicsof the fluvial systems. Recent studies on mining pit have revealed that downstream reaches of the mining pitare more prone to erosion due to increased bed shear stresses. Bridge piers in the vicinity of such mining pitsare also prone to streambed instabilities due to turbulence alterations as suggested by a few recent studies.Thus, a numerical study was carried out to study the effects of a mining pit on the hydrodynamics around acircular pier. The numerical experiments were conducted with the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codeFlow-3D, which can run several turbulence model closures. In this contribution, the authors applied theclassical RANS equations with the volume of fluid (VOF) method (Savage and Johnson, 2001).

강바닥에서 모래를 추출하는 것은 하강 시스템의 수력 학적 및 형태 학적 특성에 다양한 영향을 미칩니다. 광산 구덩이에 대한 최근 연구에 따르면 광산 구덩이의 하류 도달은 베드 전단 응력 증가로 인해 침식되기 쉽습니다. 이러한 광산 구덩이 근처의 교각은 최근 몇 가지 연구에서 제안한 바와 같이 난류 변화로 인해 유동 불안정성이 발생하기 쉽습니다. 따라서 원형 부두 주변의 유체 역학에 대한 광산 구덩이의 영향을 연구하기 위해 수치 연구가 수행되었습니다. 수치 실험은 CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) 코드 Flow-3D로 수행되었으며, 여러 난류 모델 폐쇄를 실행할 수 있습니다. 이 공헌에서 저자는 VOF (volume of fluid) 방법 (Savage and Johnson, 2001)과 함께 고전적인 RANS 방정식을 적용했습니다.

1. Set-up and boundary conditions

두 번의 수치 실행 결과가 이 기여도에서 비교됩니다. 첫 번째 실험에서 0.044 [m3-s-1]의 정상 유량이 원통 부두가 있는 1.0 [m] 폭의 채널을 따라 흐르는 상류 경계 조건으로 설정되었습니다. 계산 영역은 IIT Guwahati 수력학 실험실 (Lade et al., 2019b)의 틸팅 유체 크기를 기반으로 정의됩니다. 두 번째 실행에서는 동일한 배출물이 실린더의 상류에 있는 준설 사다리꼴 구덩이와 함께 실린더 주위로 통과되었습니다. 구덩이의 깊이는 0.1 [m]이고 수로 전체에 걸쳐 확장되었습니다. 수로의 길이 방향을 따라 피트의 상단 너비는 0.67 [m], 하단 너비는 0.33 [m]였습니다.

이 연구의 주요 초점은 채굴 구덩이 (그림 1의 PF2)가있을 때 구덩이 하류 (그림 1의 PF1)와 실린더 하류의 흐름 특성의 변화를 조사하는 것이 었습니다. 따라서 채널 베드는 고정 베드 모델을 사용하여 시뮬레이션 되었습니다. 두 실험의 수압 조건은 CFD 경계 조건으로 설정된 표 1에 나와 있습니다. 배출구 (하류 경계 조건)는 실험실 기록 중에 측정된 수심을 사용하여 설정되었습니다 (Lade et al., 2019a).

Fig. 1. A) Computational domain showing the cylinder, the profiles PF1, PF2 and the mining pit as set-up in the laboratory (B).
Fig. 1. A) Computational domain showing the cylinder, the profiles PF1, PF2 and the mining pit as set-up in the laboratory (B).
Fig. 2. Output of the CFD model (velocity magnitude) without the sand pit (left side) and with the trapezoidal sand pit (right side).
Fig. 2. Output of the CFD model (velocity magnitude) without the sand pit (left side) and with the trapezoidal sand pit (right side).
Fig. 3. Output of the CFD model. Streamwise velocity ux, TKE as well as Lt profiles along the locations PF1 and PF2
Fig. 3. Output of the CFD model. Streamwise velocity ux, TKE as well as Lt profiles along the locations PF1 and PF2

References

Herrera-Granados O (2018) Turbulence flow modeling of one-sharp-groyne field. In Free surface flows and transport processes :
36th International School of Hydraulics. Geoplanet: Earth and Planetary Series. Springer IP AG, 207-218.
Lade AD, Deshpande V, Kumar B (2019a) Study of flow turbulence around a circular bridge pier in sand-mined stream channel.
Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers – Water Management,https://doi.org/10.1680/jwama.19.00041
Lade AD, A, DT, Kumar B (2019b) Randomness in flow turbulence around a bridge pier in a sand
mined channel..Physica A 535 122426
Savage, BM, Johnson, M.C (2001). Flow over ogee spillway: Physical and numerical model case study. J. Hydraulic Eng.,
127(8), 640–649.

Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Civil, Offshore and Environmental Engineering (ICCOEE2020)

Numerical Simulation to Assess Floating Instability of Small Passenger Vehicle Under Sub-critical Flow

미 임계 흐름에서 소형 승용차의 부동 불안정성을 평가하기 위한 수치 시뮬레이션

Proceedings of the International Conference on Civil, Offshore and Environmental Engineering
ICCOEE 2021: ICCOEE2020 pp 258-265| Cite as

  • Ebrahim Hamid Hussein Al-Qadami
  • Zahiraniza Mustaffa
  • Eduardo Martínez-Gomariz
  • Khamaruzaman Wan Yusof
  • Abdurrasheed S. Abdurrasheed
  • Syed Muzzamil Hussain Shah

Conference paperFirst Online: 01 January 2021

  • 355Downloads

Part of the Lecture Notes in Civil Engineering book series (LNCE, volume 132)

Abstract

Parked vehicles can be directly affected by the floods and at a certain flow velocity and depth, vehicles can be easily swept away. Therefore, studying flooded vehicles stability limits is required. Herein, an attempt has been done to assess numerically the floating instability mode of a small passenger car with a scaled-down ratio of 1:10 using FLOW-3D. The 3D car model was placed inside a closed box and the six degrees of freedom numerical simulation was conducted. Later, numerical results validated experimentally and analytically. Results showed that buoyancy depths were 3.6 and 3.8 cm numerically and experimentally, respectively with a percentage difference of 5.4%. Further, the buoyancy forces were 8.95 N and 8.97 N numerically and analytically, respectively with a percentage difference of 0.2%. With this small difference, it can be concluded that the numerical modeling for such cases using FLOW-3D software can give an acceptable prediction on the vehicle stability limits.

주차된 차량은 홍수의 직접적인 영향을 받을 수 있으며 특정 유속과 깊이에서 차량을 쉽게 쓸어 버릴 수 있습니다. 따라서 침수 차량 안정성 한계를 연구해야 합니다. 여기에서는 FLOW-3D를 사용하여 축소 비율이 1:10 인 소형 승용차의 부동 불안정 모드를 수치 적으로 평가하려는 시도가 이루어졌습니다. 3D 자동차 모델은 닫힌 상자 안에 배치되었고 6 개의 자유도 수치 시뮬레이션이 수행되었습니다. 나중에 수치 결과는 실험적으로 그리고 분석적으로 검증되었습니다. 결과는 부력 깊이가 각각 5.4 %의 백분율 차이로 수치 및 실험적으로 3.6 및 3.8 cm임을 보여 주었다. 또한 부력은 수치적으로 8.95N과 분석적으로 8.97N이었고 백분율 차이는 0.2 %였다. 이 작은 차이로 인해 FLOW-3D 소프트웨어를 사용한 이러한 경우의 수치 모델링은 차량 안정성 한계에 대한 허용 가능한 예측을 제공 할 수 있다는 결론을 내릴 수 있습니다.

Keywords

Floating instability Small passenger car Numerical simulation FLOW-3D Subcritical flowe 

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Fig.1 Schematic diagram of the novel cytometric device

Fabrication and Experimental Investigation of a Novel 3D Hydrodynamic Focusing Micro Cytometric Device

Yongquan Wang*a , Jingyuan Wangb, Hualing Chenc

School of Mechanical Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi, 710049, P. R. China
a yqwang@mail.xjtu.edu.cn,, bwjy2006@stu.xjtu.edu.cn,, c hlchen@mail.xjtu.edu.cn,

Abstract:

This paper presents the fabrication of a novel micro-machined cytometric device, and the experimental investigations for its 3D hydrodynamic focusing performance. The proposed device is simple in structure, with the uniqueness that the depth of its microchannels is non-uniform. Using the SU-8 soft lithography containing two exposures, as well as micro-molding techniques, the PDMS device is successfully fabricated. Two kinds of experiments, i.e., the red ink fluidity observation experiments and the fluorescent optical experiments, are then performed for the device prototypes with different step heights, or channel depth differences, to explore the influence laws of the feature parameter on the devices hydrodynamic focusing behaviors. The experimental results show that the introducing of the steps can efficiently enhance the vertical focusing performance of the device. At appropriate geometry and operating conditions, good 3D hydrodynamic focusing can be obtained.

Korea Abstract

이 논문은 새로운 마이크로 머신 세포 측정 장치의 제조와 3D 유체 역학적 초점 성능에 대한 실험적 조사를 제시합니다. 제안 된 장치는 구조가 단순하며, 마이크로 채널의 깊이가 균일하지 않다는 독특함이 있습니다. 두 가지 노출이 포함 된 SU-8 소프트 리소그래피와 마이크로 몰딩 기술을 사용하여 PDMS 장치가 성공적으로 제작되었습니다. 그런 다음 두 종류의 실험, 즉 적색 잉크 유동성 관찰 실험과 형광 광학 실험을 단계 높이 또는 채널 깊이 차이가 다른 장치 프로토 타입에 대해 수행하여 장치 유체 역학적 초점에 대한 기능 매개 변수의 영향 법칙을 탐색합니다. 행동. 실험 결과는 단계의 도입이 장치의 수직 초점 성능을 효율적으로 향상시킬 수 있음을 보여줍니다. 적절한 형상과 작동 조건에서 우수한 3D 유체 역학적 초점을 얻을 수 있습니다.

Keywords

Flow cytometer, Hydrodynamic focusing, Three-dimensional (3D), Micro-machined

Fig.1 Schematic diagram of the novel cytometric device
Fig.1 Schematic diagram of the novel cytometric device
Fig.2 Overview of the cytometric device fabrication process
Fig.2 Overview of the cytometric device fabrication process
Fig.3 The fabricated micro cytometric device Fig.4 Experiment setup for focusing performance
Fig.3 The fabricated micro cytometric device Fig. 4 Experiment setup for focusing performance
Fig.5 Horizontal focusing images of two devices with and without steps
Fig.5 Horizontal focusing images of two devices with and without steps
Fig.6 Channel cross-section fluorescence images for different step heights
Fig.6 Channel cross-section fluorescence images for different step heights

References 

Fig.7 Effect of the step height on the 3D focusing at different velocity ratios
Fig.7 Effect of the step height on the 3D focusing at different velocity ratios

Conclusions

In this paper, we presented a novel micro-machined cytometric device and its fabrication process,
emphasizing on the experimental investigations for its 3D hydrodynamic focusing performance. The
proposed device is simple in structure, low cost, and easy to be batch produced. Besides this, as a
device based on standard micro-fabrication methodology, it can be conveniently integrated with other
micro-fluidic and/or micro-optical units to form a complete detection and analysis system.
The experimental tests for the prototype devices not only verified the design conception, but also
gave us a comprehensive understanding of the device hydro-focusing performance. The experimental
results show that, as the uniqueness of this design, the introducing of the feature steps can
significantly enhance the vertical focusing performance of the devices, which is crucial for the
achievement of 3D focusing. In summary, for the proposed novel device, good 3D hydrodynamic
focusing can be attained at appropriate geometry and operating conditions.
In addition, an improved design can be obtained by replacing the flat cover with an identical
device unit, in other words, the same two device units are bonded together (The channels are inward
and aligned) to form a new device. Then the sample stream can focused to the center of the assembly
outlet channel due to the hydrodynamic forces equally in both horizontal and vertical directions, and
thus avoiding the adsorption or friction issues of cells/particles to the top channel wall.

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Figure 6. Evolution of melt pool in the overhang region (θ = 45°, P = 100 W, v = 1000 mm/s, the streamlines are shown by arrows).

Experimental and numerical investigation of the origin of surface roughness in laser powder bed fused overhang regions

레이저 파우더 베드 융합 오버행 영역에서 표면 거칠기의 원인에 대한 실험 및 수치 조사

Shaochuan Feng,Amar M. Kamat,Soheil Sabooni &Yutao PeiPages S66-S84 | Received 18 Jan 2021, Accepted 25 Feb 2021, Published online: 10 Mar 2021

ABSTRACT

Surface roughness of laser powder bed fusion (L-PBF) printed overhang regions is a major contributor to deteriorated shape accuracy/surface quality. This study investigates the mechanisms behind the evolution of surface roughness (Ra) in overhang regions. The evolution of surface morphology is the result of a combination of border track contour, powder adhesion, warp deformation, and dross formation, which is strongly related to the overhang angle (θ). When 0° ≤ θ ≤ 15°, the overhang angle does not affect Ra significantly since only a small area of the melt pool boundaries contacts the powder bed resulting in slight powder adhesion. When 15° < θ ≤ 50°, powder adhesion is enhanced by the melt pool sinking and the increased contact area between the melt pool boundary and powder bed. When θ > 50°, large waviness of the overhang contour, adhesion of powder clusters, severe warp deformation and dross formation increase Ra sharply.

레이저 파우더 베드 퓨전 (L-PBF) 프린팅 오버행 영역의 표면 거칠기는 형상 정확도 / 표면 품질 저하의 주요 원인입니다. 이 연구 는 오버행 영역에서 표면 거칠기 (Ra ) 의 진화 뒤에 있는 메커니즘을 조사합니다 . 표면 형태의 진화는 오버행 각도 ( θ ) 와 밀접한 관련이있는 경계 트랙 윤곽, 분말 접착, 뒤틀림 변형 및 드로스 형성의 조합의 결과입니다 . 0° ≤  θ  ≤ 15° 인 경우 , 용융풀 경계의 작은 영역 만 분말 베드와 접촉하여 약간의 분말 접착이 발생하기 때문에 오버행 각도가 R a에 큰 영향을 주지 않습니다 . 15° < θ 일 때  ≤ 50°, 용융 풀 싱킹 및 용융 풀 경계와 분말 베드 사이의 증가된 접촉 면적으로 분말 접착력이 향상됩니다. θ  > 50° 일 때 오버행 윤곽의 큰 파형, 분말 클러스터의 접착, 심한 휨 변형 및 드 로스 형성이 Ra 급격히 증가 합니다.

KEYWORDS: Laser powder bed fusion (L-PBF), melt pool dynamics, overhang region, shape deviation, surface roughness

1. Introduction

레이저 분말 베드 융합 (L-PBF)은 첨단 적층 제조 (AM) 기술로, 집중된 레이저 빔을 사용하여 금속 분말을 선택적으로 융합하여 슬라이스 된 3D 컴퓨터 지원에 따라 층별로 3 차원 (3D) 금속 부품을 구축합니다. 설계 (CAD) 모델 (Chatham, Long 및 Williams 2019 ; Tan, Zhu 및 Zhou 2020 ). 재료가 인쇄 층 아래에 ​​존재하는지 여부에 따라 인쇄 영역은 각각 솔리드 영역 또는 돌출 영역으로 분류 될 수 있습니다. 따라서 오버행 영역은 고체 기판이 아니라 분말 베드 바로 위에 건설되는 특수 구조입니다 (Patterson, Messimer 및 Farrington 2017). 오버행 영역은지지 구조를 포함하거나 포함하지 않고 구축 할 수 있으며, 지지대가있는 돌출 영역의 L-PBF는 지지체가 더 낮은 밀도로 구축된다는 점을 제외 하고 (Wang and Chou 2018 ) 고체 기판의 공정과 유사합니다 (따라서 기계적 강도가 낮기 때문에 L-PBF 공정 후 기계적으로 쉽게 제거 할 수 있습니다. 따라서지지 구조로 인쇄 된 오버행 영역은 L-PBF 공정 후 지지물 제거, 연삭 및 연마와 같은 추가 후 처리 단계가 필요합니다.

수평 내부 채널의 제작과 같은 일부 특정 경우에는 공정 후 지지대를 제거하기가 어려우므로 채널 상단 절반의 돌출부 영역을 지지대없이 건설해야합니다 (Hopkinson and Dickens 2000 ). 수평 내부 채널에 사용할 수없는지지 구조 외에도 내부 표면, 특히 등각 냉각 채널 (Feng, Kamat 및 Pei 2021 ) 에서 발생하는 복잡한 3D 채널 네트워크의 경우 표면 마감 프로세스를 구현하는 것도 어렵습니다 . 결과적으로 오버행 영역은 (i) 잔류 응력에 의한 변형, (ii) 계단 효과 (Kuo et al. 2020 ; Li et al. 2020 )로 인해 설계된 모양에서 벗어날 수 있습니다 .) 및 (iii) 원하지 않는 분말 소결로 인한 향상된 표면 거칠기; 여기서, 앞의 두 요소는 일반적으로 mm 길이 스케일에서 ‘매크로’편차로 분류되고 후자는 일반적으로 µm 길이 스케일에서 ‘마이크로’편차로 인식됩니다.

열 응력에 의한 변형은 오버행 영역에서 발생하는 중요한 문제입니다 (Patterson, Messimer 및 Farrington 2017 ). 국부적 인 용융 / 냉각은 용융 풀 내부 및 주변에서 큰 온도 구배를 유도하여 응고 된 층에 집중적 인 열 응력을 유발합니다. 열 응력에 의한 뒤틀림은 고체 영역을 현저하게 변형하지 않습니다. 이러한 영역은 아래의 여러 레이어에 의해 제한되기 때문입니다. 반면에 오버행 영역은 구속되지 않고 공정 중 응력 완화로 인해 상당한 변형이 발생합니다 (Kamat 및 Pei 2019 ). 더욱이 용융 깊이는 레이어 두께보다 큽니다 (이전 레이어도 재용 해되어 빌드 된 레이어간에 충분한 결합을 보장하기 때문입니다 [Yadroitsev et al. 2013 ; Kamath et al.2014 ]),응고 된 두께가 설계된 두께보다 크기 때문에형태 편차 (예 : 드 로스 [Charles et al. 2020 ; Feng et al. 2020 ])가 발생합니다. 마이크로 스케일에서 인쇄 된 표면 (R a 및 S a ∼ 10 μm)은 기계적으로 가공 된 표면보다 거칠다 (Duval-Chaneac et al. 2018 ; Wen et al. 2018 ). 이 문제는고형화 된 용융 풀의 가장자리에 부착 된 용융되지 않은 분말의 결과로 표면 거칠기 (R a )가 일반적으로 약 20 μm인 오버행 영역에서 특히 심각합니다 (Mazur et al. 2016 ; Pakkanen et al. 2016 ).

오버행 각도 ( θ , 빌드 방향과 관련하여 측정)는 오버행 영역의 뒤틀림 편향과 표면 거칠기에 영향을 미치는 중요한 매개 변수입니다 (Kamat and Pei 2019 ; Mingear et al. 2019 ). θ ∼ 45 ° 의 오버행 각도 는 일반적으로지지 구조없이 오버행 영역을 인쇄 할 수있는 임계 값으로 합의됩니다 (Pakkanen et al. 2016 ; Kadirgama et al. 2018 ). θ 일 때이 임계 값보다 크면 오버행 영역을 허용 가능한 표면 품질로 인쇄 할 수 없습니다. 오버행 각도 외에도 레이저 매개 변수 (레이저 에너지 밀도와 관련된)는 용융 풀의 모양 / 크기 및 용융 풀 역학에 영향을줌으로써 오버행 영역의 표면 거칠기에 영향을줍니다 (Wang et al. 2013 ; Mingear et al . 2019 ).

용융 풀 역학은 고체 (Shrestha 및 Chou 2018 ) 및 오버행 (Le et al. 2020 ) 영역 모두에서 수행되는 L-PBF 공정을 포함한 레이저 재료 가공의 일반적인 물리적 현상입니다 . 용융 풀 모양, 크기 및 냉각 속도는 잔류 응력으로 인한 변형과 ​​표면 거칠기에 모두 영향을 미치므로 처리 매개 변수와 표면 형태 / 품질 사이의 다리 역할을하며 용융 풀을 이해하기 위해 수치 시뮬레이션을 사용하여 추가 조사를 수행 할 수 있습니다. 거동과 표면 거칠기에 미치는 영향. 현재까지 고체 영역의 L-PBF 동안 용융 풀 동작을 시뮬레이션하기 위해 여러 연구가 수행되었습니다. 유한 요소 방법 (FEM)과 같은 시뮬레이션 기술 (Roberts et al. 2009 ; Du et al.2019 ), 유한 차분 법 (FDM) (Wu et al. 2018 ), 전산 유체 역학 (CFD) (Lee and Zhang 2016 ), 임의의 Lagrangian-Eulerian 방법 (ALE) (Khairallah and Anderson 2014 )을 사용하여 증발 반동 압력 (Hu et al. 2018 ) 및 Marangoni 대류 (Zhang et al. 2018 ) 현상을포함하는 열 전달 (온도 장) 및 물질 전달 (용융 흐름) 프로세스. 또한 이산 요소법 (DEM)을 사용하여 무작위 분산 분말 베드를 생성했습니다 (Lee and Zhang 2016 ; Wu et al. 2018 ). 이 모델은 분말 규모의 L-PBF 공정을 시뮬레이션했습니다 (Khairallah et al. 2016) 메조 스케일 (Khairallah 및 Anderson 2014 ), 단일 트랙 (Leitz et al. 2017 )에서 다중 트랙 (Foroozmehr et al. 2016 ) 및 다중 레이어 (Huang, Khamesee 및 Toyserkani 2019 )로.

그러나 결과적인 표면 거칠기를 결정하는 오버행 영역의 용융 풀 역학은 문헌에서 거의 관심을받지 못했습니다. 솔리드 영역의 L-PBF에 대한 기존 시뮬레이션 모델이 어느 정도 참조가 될 수 있지만 오버행 영역과 솔리드 영역 간의 용융 풀 역학에는 상당한 차이가 있습니다. 오버행 영역에서 용융 금속은 분말 입자 사이의 틈새로 아래로 흘러 용융 풀이 다공성 분말 베드가 제공하는 약한 지지체 아래로 가라 앉습니다. 이것은 중력과 표면 장력의 영향이 용융 풀의 결과적인 모양 / 크기를 결정하는 데 중요하며, 결과적으로 오버행 영역의 마이크로 스케일 형태의 진화에 중요합니다. 또한 분말 입자 사이의 공극, 열 조건 (예 : 에너지 흡수,2019 ; Karimi et al. 2020 ; 노래와 영 2020 ). 표면 거칠기는 (마이크로) 형상 편차를 증가시킬뿐만 아니라 주기적 하중 동안 미세 균열의 시작 지점 역할을함으로써 기계적 강도를 저하시킵니다 (Günther et al. 2018 ). 오버행 영역의 높은 표면 거칠기는 (마이크로) 정확도 / 품질에 대한 엄격한 요구 사항이있는 부품 제조에서 L-PBF의 적용을 제한합니다.

본 연구는 실험 및 시뮬레이션 연구를 사용하여 오버행 영역 (지지물없이 제작)의 미세 형상 편차 형성 메커니즘과 표면 거칠기의 기원을 체계적이고 포괄적으로 조사합니다. 결합 된 DEM-CFD 시뮬레이션 모델은 경계 트랙 윤곽, 분말 접착 및 뒤틀림 변형의 효과를 고려하여 오버행 영역의 용융 풀 역학과 표면 형태의 형성 메커니즘을 나타 내기 위해 개발되었습니다. 표면 거칠기 R의 시뮬레이션 및 단일 요인 L-PBF 인쇄 실험을 사용하여 오버행 각도의 함수로 연구됩니다. 용융 풀의 침몰과 관련된 오버행 영역에서 분말 접착의 세 가지 메커니즘이 식별되고 자세히 설명됩니다. 마지막으로, 인쇄 된 오버행 영역에서 높은 표면 거칠기 문제를 완화 할 수 있는 잠재적 솔루션에 대해 간략하게 설명합니다.

The shape and size of the L-PBF printed samples are illustrated in Figure 1
The shape and size of the L-PBF printed samples are illustrated in Figure 1
Figure 2. Borders in the overhang region depending on the overhang angle θ
Figure 2. Borders in the overhang region depending on the overhang angle θ
Figure 3. (a) Profile of the volumetric heat source, (b) the model geometry of single-track printing on a solid substrate (unit: µm), and (c) the comparison of melt pool dimensions obtained from the experiment (right half) and simulation (left half) for a calibrated optical penetration depth of 110 µm (laser power 200 W and scan speed 800 mm/s, solidified layer thickness 30 µm, powder size 10–45 µm).
Figure 3. (a) Profile of the volumetric heat source, (b) the model geometry of single-track printing on a solid substrate (unit: µm), and (c) the comparison of melt pool dimensions obtained from the experiment (right half) and simulation (left half) for a calibrated optical penetration depth of 110 µm (laser power 200 W and scan speed 800 mm/s, solidified layer thickness 30 µm, powder size 10–45 µm).
Figure 4. The model geometry of an overhang being L-PBF processed: (a) 3D view and (b) right view.
Figure 4. The model geometry of an overhang being L-PBF processed: (a) 3D view and (b) right view.
Figure 5. The cross-sectional contour of border tracks in a 45° overhang region.
Figure 5. The cross-sectional contour of border tracks in a 45° overhang region.
Figure 6. Evolution of melt pool in the overhang region (θ = 45°, P = 100 W, v = 1000 mm/s, the streamlines are shown by arrows).
Figure 6. Evolution of melt pool in the overhang region (θ = 45°, P = 100 W, v = 1000 mm/s, the streamlines are shown by arrows).
Figure 7. The overhang contour is contributed by (a) only outer borders when θ ≤ 60° (b) both inner borders and outer borders when θ > 60°.
Figure 7. The overhang contour is contributed by (a) only outer borders when θ ≤ 60° (b) both inner borders and outer borders when θ > 60°.
Figure 8. Schematic of powder adhesion on a 45° overhang region.
Figure 8. Schematic of powder adhesion on a 45° overhang region.
Figure 9. The L-PBF printed samples with various overhang angle (a) θ = 0° (cube), (b) θ = 30°, (c) θ = 45°, (d) θ = 55° and (e) θ = 60°.
Figure 9. The L-PBF printed samples with various overhang angle (a) θ = 0° (cube), (b) θ = 30°, (c) θ = 45°, (d) θ = 55° and (e) θ = 60°.
Figure 10. Two mechanisms of powder adhesion related to the overhang angle: (a) simulation-predicted, θ = 45°; (b) simulation-predicted, θ = 60°; (c, e) optical micrographs, θ = 45°; (d, f) optical micrographs, θ = 60°. (e) and (f) are partial enlargement of (c) and (d), respectively.
Figure 10. Two mechanisms of powder adhesion related to the overhang angle: (a) simulation-predicted, θ = 45°; (b) simulation-predicted, θ = 60°; (c, e) optical micrographs, θ = 45°; (d, f) optical micrographs, θ = 60°. (e) and (f) are partial enlargement of (c) and (d), respectively.
Figure 11. Simulation-predicted surface morphology in the overhang region at different overhang angle: (a) θ = 15°, (b) θ = 30°, (c) θ = 45°, (d) θ = 60° and (e) θ = 80° (Blue solid lines: simulation-predicted contour; red dashed lines: the planar profile of designed overhang region specified by the overhang angles).
Figure 11. Simulation-predicted surface morphology in the overhang region at different overhang angle: (a) θ = 15°, (b) θ = 30°, (c) θ = 45°, (d) θ = 60° and (e) θ = 80° (Blue solid lines: simulation-predicted contour; red dashed lines: the planar profile of designed overhang region specified by the overhang angles).
Figure 12. Effect of overhang angle on surface roughness Ra in overhang regions
Figure 12. Effect of overhang angle on surface roughness Ra in overhang regions
Figure 13. Surface morphology of L-PBF printed overhang regions with different overhang angle: (a) θ = 15°, (b) θ = 30°, (c) θ = 45° and (d) θ = 60° (overhang border parameters: P = 100 W, v = 1000 mm/s).
Figure 13. Surface morphology of L-PBF printed overhang regions with different overhang angle: (a) θ = 15°, (b) θ = 30°, (c) θ = 45° and (d) θ = 60° (overhang border parameters: P = 100 W, v = 1000 mm/s).
Figure 14. Effect of (a) laser power (scan speed = 1000 mm/s) and (b) scan speed (lase power = 100 W) on surface roughness Ra in overhang regions (θ = 45°, laser power and scan speed referred to overhang border parameters, and the other process parameters are listed in Table 2).
Figure 14. Effect of (a) laser power (scan speed = 1000 mm/s) and (b) scan speed (lase power = 100 W) on surface roughness Ra in overhang regions (θ = 45°, laser power and scan speed referred to overhang border parameters, and the other process parameters are listed in Table 2).

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Figure 1. (a) Top view of the microfluidic-magnetophoretic device, (b) Schematic representation of the channel cross-sections studied in this work, and (c) the magnet position relative to the channel location (Sepy and Sepz are the magnet separation distances in y and z, respectively).

Continuous-Flow Separation of Magnetic Particles from Biofluids: How Does the Microdevice Geometry Determine the Separation Performance?

1Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, ETSIIT, University of Cantabria, Avda. Los Castros s/n, 39005 Santander, Spain
2William G. Lowrie Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The Ohio State University, 151 W. Woodruff Ave., Columbus, OH 43210, USA
*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sensors 202020(11), 3030; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20113030
Received: 16 April 2020 / Revised: 21 May 2020 / Accepted: 25 May 2020 / Published: 27 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lab-on-a-Chip and Microfluidic Sensors)

Abstract

The use of functionalized magnetic particles for the detection or separation of multiple chemicals and biomolecules from biofluids continues to attract significant attention. After their incubation with the targeted substances, the beads can be magnetically recovered to perform analysis or diagnostic tests. Particle recovery with permanent magnets in continuous-flow microdevices has gathered great attention in the last decade due to the multiple advantages of microfluidics. As such, great efforts have been made to determine the magnetic and fluidic conditions for achieving complete particle capture; however, less attention has been paid to the effect of the channel geometry on the system performance, although it is key for designing systems that simultaneously provide high particle recovery and flow rates. Herein, we address the optimization of Y-Y-shaped microchannels, where magnetic beads are separated from blood and collected into a buffer stream by applying an external magnetic field. The influence of several geometrical features (namely cross section shape, thickness, length, and volume) on both bead recovery and system throughput is studied. For that purpose, we employ an experimentally validated Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) numerical model that considers the dominant forces acting on the beads during separation. Our results indicate that rectangular, long devices display the best performance as they deliver high particle recovery and high throughput. Thus, this methodology could be applied to the rational design of lab-on-a-chip devices for any magnetically driven purification, enrichment or isolation.

Keywords: particle magnetophoresisCFDcross sectionchip fabrication

Korea Abstract

생체 유체에서 여러 화학 물질과 생체 분자의 검출 또는 분리를위한 기능화 된 자성 입자의 사용은 계속해서 상당한 관심을 받고 있습니다. 표적 물질과 함께 배양 한 후 비드를 자기 적으로 회수하여 분석 또는 진단 테스트를 수행 할 수 있습니다. 연속 흐름 마이크로 장치에서 영구 자석을 사용한 입자 회수는 마이크로 유체의 여러 장점으로 인해 지난 10 년 동안 큰 관심을 모았습니다. 

따라서 완전한 입자 포획을 달성하기 위한 자기 및 유체 조건을 결정하기 위해 많은 노력을 기울였습니다. 그러나 높은 입자 회수율과 유속을 동시에 제공하는 시스템을 설계하는 데있어 핵심이기는 하지만 시스템 성능에 대한 채널 형상의 영향에 대해서는 덜주의를 기울였습니다. 

여기에서 우리는 자기 비드가 혈액에서 분리되고 외부 자기장을 적용하여 버퍼 스트림으로 수집되는 YY 모양의 마이크로 채널의 최적화를 다룹니다. 비드 회수 및 시스템 처리량에 대한 여러 기하학적 특징 (즉, 단면 형상, 두께, 길이 및 부피)의 영향을 연구합니다. 

이를 위해 분리 중에 비드에 작용하는 지배적인 힘을 고려하는 실험적으로 검증 된 CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) 수치 모델을 사용합니다. 우리의 결과는 직사각형의 긴 장치가 높은 입자 회수율과 높은 처리량을 제공하기 때문에 최고의 성능을 보여줍니다. 

따라서 이 방법론은 자기 구동 정제, 농축 또는 분리를 위한 랩온어 칩 장치의 합리적인 설계에 적용될 수 있습니다.

Figure 1. (a) Top view of the microfluidic-magnetophoretic device, (b) Schematic representation of the channel cross-sections studied in this work, and (c) the magnet position relative to the channel location (Sepy and Sepz are the magnet separation distances in y and z, respectively).
Figure 1. (a) Top view of the microfluidic-magnetophoretic device, (b) Schematic representation of the channel cross-sections studied in this work, and (c) the magnet position relative to the channel location (Sepy and Sepz are the magnet separation distances in y and z, respectively).
Figure 2. (a) Channel-magnet configuration and (b–d) magnetic force distribution in the channel midplane for 2 mm, 5 mm and 10 mm long rectangular (left) and U-shaped (right) devices.
Figure 2. (a) Channel-magnet configuration and (b–d) magnetic force distribution in the channel midplane for 2 mm, 5 mm and 10 mm long rectangular (left) and U-shaped (right) devices.
Figure 3. (a) Velocity distribution in a section perpendicular to the flow for rectangular (left) and U-shaped (right) cross section channels, and (b) particle location in these cross sections.
Figure 3. (a) Velocity distribution in a section perpendicular to the flow for rectangular (left) and U-shaped (right) cross section channels, and (b) particle location in these cross sections.
Figure 4. Influence of fluid flow rate on particle recovery when the applied magnetic force is (a) different and (b) equal in U-shaped and rectangular cross section microdevices.
Figure 4. Influence of fluid flow rate on particle recovery when the applied magnetic force is (a) different and (b) equal in U-shaped and rectangular cross section microdevices.
Figure 5. Magnetic bead capture as a function of fluid flow rate for all of the studied geometries.
Figure 5. Magnetic bead capture as a function of fluid flow rate for all of the studied geometries.
Figure 6. Influence of (a) magnetic and fluidic forces (J parameter) and (b) channel geometry (θ parameter) on particle recovery. Note that U-2mm does not accurately fit a line.
Figure 6. Influence of (a) magnetic and fluidic forces (J parameter) and (b) channel geometry (θ parameter) on particle recovery. Note that U-2mm does not accurately fit a line.
Figure 7. Dependence of bead capture on the (a) functional channel volume and (b) particle residence time (tres). Note that in the curve fitting expressions V represents the functional channel volume and that U-2mm does not accurately fit a line.
Figure 7. Dependence of bead capture on the (a) functional channel volume and (b) particle residence time (tres). Note that in the curve fitting expressions V represents the functional channel volume and that U-2mm does not accurately fit a line.

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Fluid velocity magnitude including velocity vectors and blood volumetric fraction contours for scenario 3: (a,b) Magnet distance d = 0; (c,d) Magnet distance d = 1 mm.

Numerical Analysis of Bead Magnetophoresis from Flowing Blood in a Continuous-Flow Microchannel: Implications to the Bead-Fluid Interactions

Scientific Reports volume 9, Article number: 7265 (2019) Cite this article

Abstract

이 연구에서는 비드 운동과 유체 흐름에 미치는 영향에 대한 자세한 분석을 제공하기 위해 연속 흐름 마이크로 채널 내부의 비드 자기 영동에 대한 수치 흐름 중심 연구를 보고합니다.

수치 모델은 Lagrangian 접근 방식을 포함하며 영구 자석에 의해 생성 된 자기장의 적용에 의해 혈액에서 비드 분리 및 유동 버퍼로의 수집을 예측합니다.

다음 시나리오가 모델링됩니다. (i) 운동량이 유체에서 점 입자로 처리되는 비드로 전달되는 단방향 커플 링, (ii) 비드가 점 입자로 처리되고 운동량이 다음으로부터 전달되는 양방향 결합 비드를 유체로 또는 그 반대로, (iii) 유체 변위에서 비드 체적의 영향을 고려한 양방향 커플 링.

결과는 세 가지 시나리오에서 비드 궤적에 약간의 차이가 있지만 특히 높은 자기력이 비드에 적용될 때 유동장에 상당한 변화가 있음을 나타냅니다.

따라서 높은 자기력을 사용할 때 비드 운동과 유동장의 체적 효과를 고려한 정확한 전체 유동 중심 모델을 해결해야 합니다. 그럼에도 불구하고 비드가 중간 또는 낮은 자기력을 받을 때 계산적으로 저렴한 모델을 안전하게 사용하여 자기 영동을 모델링 할 수 있습니다.

Sketch of the magnetophoresis process in the continuous-flow microdevice.
Sketch of the magnetophoresis process in the continuous-flow microdevice.
Schematic view of the microdevice showing the working conditions set in the simulations.
Schematic view of the microdevice showing the working conditions set in the simulations.
Bead trajectories for different magnetic field conditions, magnet placed at different distances “d” from the channel: (a) d = 0; (b) d = 1 mm; (c) d = 1.5 mm; (d) d = 2 mm
Bead trajectories for different magnetic field conditions, magnet placed at different distances “d” from the channel: (a) d = 0; (b) d = 1 mm; (c) d = 1.5 mm; (d) d = 2 mm
Separation efficacy as a function of the magnet distance. Comparison between one-way and two-way coupling.
Separation efficacy as a function of the magnet distance. Comparison between one-way and two-way coupling.
(a) Fluid velocity magnitude including velocity vectors and (b) blood volumetric fraction contours with magnet distance d = 0 mm for scenario 1 (t = 0.25 s).
(a) Fluid velocity magnitude including velocity vectors and (b) blood volumetric fraction contours with magnet distance d = 0 mm for scenario 1 (t = 0.25 s).
luid velocity magnitude including velocity vectors and blood volumetric fraction contours for scenario 2: (a,b) Magnet distance d = 0 mm at t = 0.4 s; (c,d) Magnet distance d = 1 mm at t = 0.4 s.
luid velocity magnitude including velocity vectors and blood volumetric fraction contours for scenario 2: (a,b) Magnet distance d = 0 mm at t = 0.4 s; (c,d) Magnet distance d = 1 mm at t = 0.4 s.
Fluid velocity magnitude including velocity vectors and blood volumetric fraction contours for scenario 3: (a,b) Magnet distance d = 0; (c,d) Magnet distance d = 1 mm.
Fluid velocity magnitude including velocity vectors and blood volumetric fraction contours for scenario 3: (a,b) Magnet distance d = 0; (c,d) Magnet distance d = 1 mm.
Blood volumetric fraction contours. Scenario 1: (a) Magnet distance d = 0 and (b) Magnet distance d = 1 mm; Scenario 2: (c) Magnet distance d = 0 and (d) Magnet distance d = 1 mm; and Scenario 3: (e) Magnet distance d = 0 and (f) Magnet distance d = 1 mm.
Blood volumetric fraction contours. Scenario 1: (a) Magnet distance d = 0 and (b) Magnet distance d = 1 mm; Scenario 2: (c) Magnet distance d = 0 and (d) Magnet distance d = 1 mm; and Scenario 3: (e) Magnet distance d = 0 and (f) Magnet distance d = 1 mm.

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Author information

  1. Edward P. Furlani is deceased.

Affiliations

  1. Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, ETSIIT, University of Cantabria, Avda. Los Castros s/n, 39005, Santander, SpainJenifer Gómez-Pastora, Eugenio Bringas & Inmaculada Ortiz
  2. Flow Science, Inc, Santa Fe, New Mexico, 87505, USAIoannis H. Karampelas
  3. Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University at Buffalo (SUNY), Buffalo, New York, 14260, USAEdward P. Furlani
  4. Department of Electrical Engineering, University at Buffalo (SUNY), Buffalo, New York, 14260, USAEdward P. Furlani
Fig.4 Schematic of a package structure

Three-Dimensional Flow Analysis of a Thermosetting Compound during Mold Filling

Junichi Saeki and Tsutomu Kono
Production Engineering Research Laboratory, Hitachi Ltd.
292, Y shida-cho, Totsuka-ku, Yokohama, 244-0817 Japan

Abstract

Thermosetting molding compounds are widely used for encapsulating semiconductor devices and electronic modules. In recent years, the number of electronic parts encapsulated in an electronic module has increased, in order to meet the requirements for high performance. As a result, the configuration of inserted parts during molding has become very complicated. Meanwhile, package thickness has been reduced in response to consumer demands for miniaturization. These trends have led to complicated flow patterns of molten compounds in a mold cavity, increasing the difficulty of predicting the occurrence of void formation or gold-wire deformation.

A method of three-dimensional (3-D) flow analysis of thermosetting compounds has been developed with the objective of minimizing the trial term before mass production and of enhancing the quality of molded products. A constitutive equation model was developed to describe isothermal viscosity changes as a function of time and temperature. This isothermal model was used for predicting non-isothermal viscosity changes. In addition, an empirical model was developed for calculating the amount of wire deformation as a function of viscosity, wire configuration, and other parameters. These models were integrated with FLOW-3D® software, which is used for multipurpose 3-D flow analysis.

The mold-filling dynamics of an epoxy compound were analyzed using the newly developed modeling software during transfer molding of an actual high performance electronic module. The changes in the 3-D distributions of parameters such as temperature, viscosity, velocity, and pressure were compared with the flow front patterns. The predicted results of cavity filling behavior corresponded well with actual short shot data. As well, the predicted amount of gold-wire deformation at each LSI chip with a substrate connection also corresponded well with observed data obtained by X-ray inspection of the molded product.

Korea Abstract

열경화성 몰딩 컴파운드는 반도체 장치 및 전자 모듈을 캡슐화하는 데 널리 사용됩니다. 최근에는 고성능에 대한 요구 사항을 충족시키기 위해 전자 모듈에 캡슐화되는 전자 부품의 수가 증가하고 있습니다.

그 결과 성형시 삽입 부품의 구성이 매우 복잡해졌습니다. 한편, 소비자의 소형화 요구에 부응하여 패키지 두께를 줄였다. 이러한 경향은 몰드 캐비티에서 용융된 화합물의 복잡한 흐름 패턴을 야기하여 보이드 형성 또는 금선 변형의 발생을 예측하기 어렵게합니다.

열경화성 화합물의 3 차원 (3-D) 유동 분석 방법은 대량 생산 전에 시험 기간을 최소화하고 성형 제품의 품질을 향상시킬 목적으로 개발되었습니다. 시간과 온도의 함수로서 등온 점도 변화를 설명하기 위해 구성 방정식 모델이 개발되었습니다. 이 등온 모델은 비등 온 점도 변화를 예측하는 데 사용되었습니다.

또한 점도, 와이어 구성 및 기타 매개 변수의 함수로 와이어 변형량을 계산하기위한 경험적 모델이 개발되었습니다. 이 모델은 다목적 3D 흐름 분석에 사용되는 FLOW-3D® 소프트웨어와 통합되었습니다.

실제 고성능 전자 모듈의 트랜스퍼 몰딩 과정에서 새로 개발 된 모델링 소프트웨어를 사용하여 에폭시 화합물의 몰드 충전 역학을 분석했습니다. 온도, 점도, 속도 및 압력과 같은 매개 변수의 3D 분포 변화를 유동 선단 패턴과 비교했습니다.

캐비티 충전 거동의 예측 결과는 실제 미 성형 데이터와 잘 일치했습니다. 또한, 기판 연결이 있는 각 LSI 칩에서 예상되는 금선 변형량은 성형품의 X-ray 검사에서 얻은 관찰 데이터와도 잘 일치했습니다.

Fig.1 A system of three-dimensional flow analysis for thermosetting compounds
Fig.1 A system of three-dimensional flow analysis for thermosetting compounds
Fig.2 Procedure for determining viscosity changes of thermosetting compounds
Fig.2 Procedure for determining viscosity changes of thermosetting compounds
Fig.4 Schematic of a package structure
Fig.4 Schematic of a package structure
Fig.6 Calculated results of filling behavior and temperature  distribution in the runner
Fig.6 Calculated results of filling behavior and temperature distribution in the runner
Fig.8 Comparison of cavity filling
Fig.8 Comparison of cavity filling

References

1)J.Saeki et al. ,6th annual meeting of PPS, 12KN1(1990)
2)J.Saeki et al. , JSME International Journal Series Ⅱ, 33,486(1990)
3)J.Saeki et al.,SEIKEI KAKOU,12,67(2000)
4) J.Saeki et al.,SEIKEI KAKOU,12,788(2000)
5) J.Saeki et al.,SEIKEI KAKOU,13,49(2001)

Hierarchical grain refinement during the laser additive manufacturing of Ti-6Al-4V alloys by the addition of micron-sized refractory particles

Hierarchical grain refinement during the laser additive manufacturing of Ti-6Al-4V alloys by the addition of micron-sized refractory particles

Xiang Wang  Lin-Jie Zhang  Jie Ning  Sen Li  Liang-Liang Zhang  Jian Long
State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, China

Received 22 January 2021, Revised 6 April 2021, Accepted 6 May 2021, Available online 2 June 2021.

Abstract

Ti-6Al-4V alloys mad by additive manufacturing (AM) with slower cooling rate (e. g., direct energy deposition (DED)) generally have the problem of severe coarsening of α phase. This study presents a method to refine the microstructure of the primary β phase formed during the solid–liquid transformation, microstructures formed during the β → α + β transformation, and recrystallized microstructures formed during the repeated heating cycles encountered in AM processes. This is accomplished by the in situ precipitation of nano-sized dispersed high-melting-point yttria Y2O3 particles. The addition of micron-sized particles with high melting points can refine primary crystallized grains and transformed grains corresponding to the secondary phase in Ti-6Al-4V alloys. In addition, they can effectively inhibit the recrystallization and growth of prior-deposited metal grains. The microstructural and tensile properties of laser additive manufactured with filler wire Ti-6Al-4V components with different amounts of Y2O3 (0, 0.12, and 0.22 wt%) were investigated. The refining effect of Y2O3 was significant and the tensile strength of Ti-6Al-4V containing 0.22 wt% Y2O3 in the longitudinal and transverse directions was greater than that of Ti-6Al-4V by approximately 12% and 9%, respectively. Concurrently, there was no loss in the elongation of the material in either direction. The strategy of using micron-sized refractory particles to control phase transformation (primary crystallization, solid-state phase transformation, and recrystallization) can be applied to the AM of different metals, in which microstructures are susceptible to coarsening.

Korea Abstract

더 느린 냉각 속도 (예를 들어, 직접 에너지 증착 (DED))를 가진 적층 제조 (AM)에 의해 미친 Ti-6Al-4V 합금은 일반적으로 α상의 심한 조 대화 문제가 있습니다. 이 연구는 고체-액체 변환 중에 형성된 1 차 β상의 미세 구조, β → α + β 변환 중에 형성된 미세 구조, AM 공정에서 발생하는 반복되는 가열주기 동안 형성된 재결정 화 된 미세 구조를 정제하는 방법을 제시합니다.

이는 나노 크기의 분산 된 고 융점이 트리아 Y2O3 입자의 현장 침전에 의해 달성됩니다. 녹는 점이 높은 미크론 크기의 입자를 추가하면 Ti-6Al-4V 합금의 2 차 상에 해당하는 1 차 결정 입자 및 변형 된 입자를 정제 할 수 있습니다. 또한 사전에 증착 된 금속 입자의 재결정 화 및 성장을 효과적으로 억제 할 수 있습니다.

Y2O3 (0, 0.12, 0.22 wt %)의 양이 다른 필러 와이어 Ti-6Al-4V 성분으로 제조 된 레이저 첨가제의 미세 구조 및 인장 특성을 조사했습니다. Y2O3의 정제 효과는 유의미했으며, Y2O3 0.22 wt %를 세로 및 가로 방향으로 포함하는 Ti-6Al-4V의 인장 강도는 Ti-6Al-4V보다 각각 약 12 ​​% 및 9 % 더 컸습니다.

동시에 어느 방향으로도 재료의 연신율에 손실이 없었습니다. 미크론 크기의 내화 입자를 사용하여 상 변환 (1 차 결정화, 고체 상 변환 및 재결정 화)을 제어하는 ​​전략은 미세 구조가 거칠어지기 쉬운 다양한 금속의 AM에 적용될 수 있습니다.

Hierarchical grain refinement during the laser additive manufacturing of Ti-6Al-4V alloys by the addition of micron-sized refractory particles
Hierarchical grain refinement during the laser additive manufacturing of Ti-6Al-4V alloys by the addition of micron-sized refractory particles
Hierarchical grain refinement during the laser additive manufacturing of Ti-6Al-4V alloys by the addition of micron-sized refractory particles Fig1
Hierarchical grain refinement during the laser additive manufacturing of Ti-6Al-4V alloys by the addition of micron-sized refractory particles Fig1
Hierarchical grain refinement during the laser additive manufacturing of Ti-6Al-4V alloys by the addition of micron-sized refractory particles Fig2
Hierarchical grain refinement during the laser additive manufacturing of Ti-6Al-4V alloys by the addition of micron-sized refractory particles Fig2
Hierarchical grain refinement during the laser additive manufacturing of Ti-6Al-4V alloys by the addition of micron-sized refractory particles Fig3
Hierarchical grain refinement during the laser additive manufacturing of Ti-6Al-4V alloys by the addition of micron-sized refractory particles Fig3
Hierarchical grain refinement during the laser additive manufacturing of Ti-6Al-4V alloys by the addition of micron-sized refractory particles Fig4
Hierarchical grain refinement during the laser additive manufacturing of Ti-6Al-4V alloys by the addition of micron-sized refractory particles Fig4
Hierarchical grain refinement during the laser additive manufacturing of Ti-6Al-4V alloys by the addition of micron-sized refractory particles Fig5
Hierarchical grain refinement during the laser additive manufacturing of Ti-6Al-4V alloys by the addition of micron-sized refractory particles Fig5
Hierarchical grain refinement during the laser additive manufacturing of Ti-6Al-4V alloys by the addition of micron-sized refractory particles Fig6
Hierarchical grain refinement during the laser additive manufacturing of Ti-6Al-4V alloys by the addition of micron-sized refractory particles Fig6
Hierarchical grain refinement during the laser additive manufacturing of Ti-6Al-4V alloys by the addition of micron-sized refractory particles Fig7
Hierarchical grain refinement during the laser additive manufacturing of Ti-6Al-4V alloys by the addition of micron-sized refractory particles Fig7

Keywords

Grain hierarchical refinement, Yttria, Solidification microstructures, Solid phase transition microstructures, Recrystallization microstructures

A new dynamic masking technique for time resolved PIV analysis

A new dynamic masking technique for time resolved PIV analysis

시간 분해 PIV 분석을위한 새로운 동적 마스킹 기술

물체 가시성을 허용하기 위해 형광 코팅과 결합 된 새로운 프리웨어 레이 캐스팅 도구

Journal of Visualization ( 2021 ) 이 기사 인용

Abstract

Time resolved PIV encompassing moving and/or deformable objects interfering with the light source requires the employment of dynamic masking (DM). A few DM techniques have been recently developed, mainly in microfluidics and multiphase flows fields. Most of them require ad-hoc design of the experimental setup, and may spoil the accuracy of the resulting PIV analysis. A new DM technique is here presented which envisages, along with a dedicated masking algorithm, the employment of fluorescent coating to allow for accurate tracking of the object. We show results from measurements obtained through a validated PIV setup demonstrating the need to include a DM step even for objects featuring limited displacements. We compare the proposed algorithm with both a no-masking and a static masking solution. In the framework of developing low cost, flexible and accurate PIV setups, the proposed algorithm is made available through a freeware application able to generate masks to be used by an existing, freeware PIV analysis package.

광원을 방해하는 이동 또는 변형 가능한 물체를 포함하는 시간 해결 PIV는 동적 마스킹 (DM)을 사용해야 합니다. 주로 미세 유체 및 다상 흐름 분야에서 몇 가지 DM 기술이 최근 개발되었습니다. 대부분은 실험 설정의 임시 설계가 필요하며 결과 PIV 분석의 정확도를 떨어 뜨릴 수 있습니다. 여기에는 전용 마스킹 알고리즘과 함께 형광 코팅을 사용하여 물체를 정확하게 추적 할 수있는 새로운 DM 기술이 제시되어 있습니다. 제한된 변위를 특징으로 하는 물체에 대해서도 DM 단계를 포함해야 하는 필요성을 보여주는 검증 된 PIV 설정을 통해 얻은 측정 결과를 보여줍니다. 제안 된 알고리즘을 no-masking 및 static masking 솔루션과 비교합니다. 저비용, 유연하고 정확한 PIV 설정 개발 프레임 워크에서 제안 된 알고리즘은 기존 프리웨어 PIV 분석 패키지에서 사용할 마스크를 생성 할 수 있는 프리웨어 애플리케이션을 통해 사용할 수 있습니다.

Keywords

  • Time resolved PIV, Dynamics masking, Image processing, Vibration inducers, Fluorescent coating

그래픽 개요

소개

PIV (입자 영상 속도계)의 사용은 70 년대 후반 (Archbold 및 Ennos 1972 )이 반점 계측의 확장 (Barker and Fourney 1977 ) 으로 도입된 이래 실험 유체 역학에서 중심적인 역할을 했습니다 . PIV 기술의 기본 아이디어는 유체에 주입된 입자의 속도를 측정하여 유동장을 재구성하는 것입니다. 입자의 크기와 밀도는 확실하게 선택되고 유동을 만족스럽게 따르게 됩니다.

흐름은 레이저 / LED 소스를 통해 조명되고 입자에 의해 산란 된 빛은 추적을 허용합니다. 독자는 리뷰 작품 Grant ( 1997 ), Westerweel et al. ( 2013 년)에 대한 자세한 설명을 참조하십시오. 기본 2D 기술은 고유한 설정으로 발전했으며, 가장 진보 된 것은 단일 / 다중 평면 입체 PIV (Prasad 2000 ) 및 체적 / 단층 PIV (Scarano 2013 )입니다. 광범위한 유동장의 비 침습적 측정이 필요한 산업 및 연구 응용 분야에서 광범위하게 사용되었습니다.

조사된 유동장이 단단한 서있는 경계의 영향을 받는 경우 정적 마스킹 (SM) 접근 방식을 사용하여 PIV 분석을 수행하는 영역에서 솔리드 객체와 그림자가 차지하는 영역을 빼기 위해 주의를 기울여야 합니다. 실제로 이러한 영역에서는 파종 입자를 식별 할 수 없으므로 유속 재구성을 수행 할 수 없습니다. 제대로 처리되지 않으면 이 마스킹 단계는 잘못된 예측으로 이어질 수 있으며, 불행히도 그림자 영역 경계의 근접성에 국한되지 않습니다.

PIV 기술은 획득 프레임 속도를 관심있는 시간 척도로 조정하여 정상 상태 또는 시간 변화 흐름에 적용 할 수 있습니다. 시간의 가변성이 고체 물체의 위치 / 모양과 관련된 경우 이미지를 동적으로 마스킹하기 위해 추가 노력이 필요합니다. 고체 물체뿐만 아니라 다른 유체 단계도 가려야한다는 점에 유의해야합니다 (Foeth et al. 2006). 

이 프로세스는 고체 물체의 움직임이 선험적으로 알려진 경우 비교적 쉬우므로 SM 알고리즘에 대한 최소한의 수정이 목적에 부합 할 수 있습니다. 그러나 고체 물체의 위치 및 / 또는 모양이 알려지지 않은 방식으로 시간에 따라 변할 경우 물체를 동적으로 추적 할 수 있는 마스킹 기술이 필요합니다. PIV 분석을위한 동적 마스킹 (DM) 접근 방식은 현재 상당한 주목을 받고 있습니다 (Sanchis and Jensen 2011 , Masullo 및 Theunissen 2017 , Anders et al. 2019 ) . 시간 분해 PIV 시스템의 확산 덕분에 고속 카메라의 가용성이 높아집니다. 

DM 기술의 주요 발전은 마이크로 PIV 분야에서 비롯됩니다 (Lindken et al. 2009) 마이크로 및 나노 스위 머 (Ergin et al. 2015 ) 및 다상 흐름 (Brücker 2000 , Khalitov 및 Longmire 2002 ) 주변의 유동장을 조사 하려면 정확하고 유연한 알고리즘이 필요합니다. DM 기술은 상용 PIV 분석 소프트웨어 패키지 (TSI Instruments 2014 , DantecDynamics 2018 )에 포함되어 있습니다. 최근 개발 (Vennemann 및 Rösgen 2020 )은 신경망 자동 마스킹 기술의 적용을 예상하지만, 네트워크를 훈련하려면 합성 데이터 세트를 생성해야합니다.

많은 알고리즘은 이미지 처리 기술을 사용하여 개체를 추적하며, 대부분 사용자는 획득 한 이미지에서 추적 할 개체를 강조 표시 할 수있는 임시 실험 설정을 개발해야합니다. 따라서 실험 설정의 설계는 알고리즘의 최종 정확도에 영향을줍니다.

몇 가지 해결책을 구상 할 수 있습니다. 다음에서는 간단한 2D PIV 설정을 참조하지만 대부분의 고려 사항은 더 복잡한 설정으로 확장 할 수 있습니다. PIV 설정에서 객체를 쉽고 정확하게 추적 할 수 있도록 렌더링하는 가장 간단한 방법은 일반적으로 PIV 레이저 시트에 대략 수직 인 카메라를 향한 반사를 최대화하는 방향을 가리키는 추가 광원을 사용하여 조명하는 것입니다. 이 순진한 솔루션과 관련된 주요 문제는 PIV의 ROI (관심 영역)를 비추 지 않고는 광원을 움직이는 물체에만 겨냥하는 것이 사실상 불가능하여 시딩에 의해 산란 된 레이저 광 사이의 명암비를 감소 시킨다는 것입니다. 입자와 어두운 배경.

카메라의 프레임 속도가 높을수록 센서에 닿는 빛의 양이 적다는 사실로 인해 상황이 가혹 해집니다. 고체 물체의 움직임과 유동 입자가 모두 사용 된 설정의 획득 속도에 비해 충분히 느리다면, 가능한 해결책은 레이저 펄스 쌍 사이에 단일 확산 광 샷을 삽입하는 것입니다 (반드시 대칭 삽입은 아님). 그리고 카메라 샷을 둘 모두에 동기화합니다. 각 레이저 커플에서 물체의 위치는 확산 광에 의해 생성 된 이전 샷과 다음 샷의 두 위치를 보간하여 결정될 수 있습니다. 이 접근 방식에는 레이저, 카메라 및 빛을 제어 할 수있는 동기화 장치가 필요합니다.

이 문제에 대한 해결책이 제안되었으며 유체 인터페이스 (Foeth et al. 2006 ; Dussol et al. 2016 ) 의 밝은 반사를 활용 하여 이미지에서 많은 양의 산란 레이저 광을 획득 할 수 있습니다. 고체 표면에는 효과를 높이기 위해 반사 코팅이 제공 될 수 있습니다. 그런 다음 물체는 비정상적으로 큰 입자로 식별되고 경계를 쉽게 추적 할 수 있습니다. 이 솔루션의 단점은 물체 표면에서 산란 된 빛이 레이저 시트에 있지 않은 많은 시딩 입자를 비추어 PIV 분석의 정확도를 점진적으로 저하 시킨다는 것입니다.

위의 접근 방식의 개선은 다른 파장 의 두 번째 동일 평면 레이저 시트 (Driscoll et al. 2003 )를 사용합니다. 첫 번째 레이저 파장을 중심으로 한 좁은 반사 대역. 전체 설정은 매우 비쌀 수 있습니다. 파장 방출의 차이를 이용하여 설정을 저렴하게 만들 수 있습니다. 서로 다른 필터가 장착 된 두 대의 카메라를 적용하면 인터페이스로부터의 반사와 독립적으로 형광 시드 입자를 식별 할 수 있습니다 (Pedocchi et al. 2008 ).

객체의 변위가 작을 때 기본 솔루션은 실제 시간에 따라 변하는 음영 영역에 가장 근접한 하나의 정적 마스크를 추출하는 것입니다. 일반적인 경험 법칙은 예상되는 음영 영역보다 약간 더 크게 마스크를 그려 분석에 포함 된 조명 영역의 양을 단순화하고 최소화하는 것 사이의 최상의 균형을 찾는 것입니다.

본 논문에서는 PIV 분석을위한 DM 문제에 대한 새로운 실험적 접근법을 제안합니다. 우리의 방법은 형광 페인팅을 사용하여 물체를 쉽게 추적 할 수 있도록 하는 기술과 시변 마스크를 생성 할 수있는 특정 오픈 소스 알고리즘을 포함합니다. 이 접근법은 레이저 광에 불투명 한 물체의 큰 변위를 허용함으로써 효과적인 것으로 입증되었습니다. 

우리의 방법인 NM (no-masking)과 SM (static masking) 접근 방식을 비교합니다. 우리의 접근 방식의 타당성을 입증하는 것 외에도 이 백서는 마스킹 단계가 정확한 결과를 얻기 위해 가장 중요하다는 것을 확인합니다. 실제로 물체의 변위가 무시할 수 없는 경우 DM에 대한 리조트는 필수이며 SM 접근 방식은 음영 처리 된 영역의 주변 환경에 국한되지 않는 부정확성을 유발합니다. 

논문의 구조는 다음과 같습니다. 먼저 형광 코팅 기술과 마스킹 소프트웨어를 설명하는 제안된 접근법의 근거를 소개합니다. 그런 다음 PIV 설정에 대한 설명 후 두 벤치 마크 사례를 통해 전체 PIV 체인 분석의 신뢰성을 평가합니다. 그런 다음 제안 된 DM 방법의 결과를 NM 및 SM 솔루션과 비교합니다. 마지막으로 몇 가지 결론이 도출됩니다.

행동 양식

제안 된 DM 기술은 PIV 분석을 위해 캡처 한 동일한 이미지에서 쉽고 정확한 추적 성을 허용하기 위해 움직이는 물체 표면의 형광 코팅을 구상합니다. 물체가 가시화되면 특정 알고리즘이 물체 추적을 수행하고 레이저 위치가 알려지면 (그림 1 참조  ) 음영 영역의 마스킹을 수행합니다.

형광 코팅

코팅은 구조적 매트릭스 에 시판되는 형광 분말 (fluorescein (Taniguchi and Lindsey 2018 ; Taniguchi et al. 2018 )) 의 분산액으로 구성됩니다 . 단단한 물체의 경우 매트릭스는 폴리 에스터 / 에폭시 (대상 재료와의 화학적 호환성에 따라) 투명 수지 일 수 있습니다. 변형 가능한 물체의 경우 매트릭스는 투명한 실리콘 고무로 만들 수 있습니다. 형광 코팅 된 물체는 실행 중에 지속적으로 빛을 방출하기 위해 실험 전에 충분히 오랫동안 조명을 비춰 야합니다. 우리는 4W LED 소스 (그림 2 에서 볼 수 있음)에 20 초 긴 노출이  실험 실행 (몇 초)의 짧은 기간 동안 일관된 형광 방출을 제공하기에 충분하다는 것을 발견했습니다.

우리 실험에서 물체와 입자 크기 사이의 상당한 차이를 감안할 때 전자를 식별하는 것은 간단합니다. 그림  3 은 씨 뿌리기 입자와 물체 모양이 서로 다른 세 번에 겹쳐진 모습을 보여줍니다 (색상은 다른 순간을 나타냄).

대신, 이러한 크기 기반 분류가 가능하지 않은 경우 입자와 물체의 파장을 분리해야합니다. 이러한 분리는 시드 입자에 의해 산란 된 빛과 현저하게 다른 파장에서 방출되는 형광 코팅을 선택하여 달성 할 수 있습니다. 또는 레이저에서 멀리 떨어진 대역에서 방출되는 형광 입자를 이용하는 것 (Pedocchi et al. 2008 ). 두 경우 모두 컬러 이미지 획득의 채널 분리 또는 멀티 카메라 설정의 애드혹 필터링은 물체 식별을 크게 촉진 할 수 있습니다. 우리의 경우에는 그러한 파장 분리를 달성 할 필요가 없습니다. 실제로 형광 코팅의 방출 스펙트럼의 피크는 540nm입니다 (Taniguchi and Lindsey 2018 ; Taniguchi et al. 2018), 사용 된 레이저의 532 nm에 매우 가깝습니다.

마스킹 소프트웨어

DM 용으로 개발 된 알고리즘 은 무료 PIV 분석 패키지 PIVlab (Thielicke 2020 , Thielicke 및 Stamhuis 2014 ) 과 함께 작동하도록 고안된 오픈 소스 프리웨어 GUI 기반 도구 (Prestininzi 및 Lombardi 2021 )입니다. 이것은 세 단계의 순차적 실행으로 구성됩니다 (그림 1 에서 a–b–c라고 함 ). 첫 번째 단계 (a)는 장면에서 레이저 위치를 찾는 데 사용됩니다 (즉, 소스의 좌표를 계산합니다. 장애물에 부딪히는 빛); 두 번째 항목 (b)은 개체 위치를 추적하고 각 프레임의 음영 영역을 계산합니다. 세 번째 항목 (c)은 추적 된 개체 영역과 음영 처리 된 개체 영역을 PIV 알고리즘을위한 단일 마스크로 병합합니다.

각 단계에 대한 자세한 내용은 다음과 같습니다.

  1. (ㅏ)레이저 위치는 프레임 (즉, 획득 한 프레임의 시야 (FOV)) 내에서 가시적 일 수도 있고 아닐 수도 있습니다. 전자의 경우 사용자는 GUI에서 레이저 소스를 클릭하여 찾기 만하면됩니다. 후자의 경우, 사용자는 음영 영역의 경계에 속하는 두 개의 세그먼트 (두 쌍의 점)를 그리도록 요청받습니다. 그러면 FOV 외부에있는 레이저 위치가 두 선의 교차점으로 계산됩니다. 세그먼트로 구성됩니다. 개체 그림자는 ROI 프레임 상자에 도달하는 것으로 간주됩니다.
  2. (비)레이저 위치가 알려지면 물체 추적은 다음과 같이 수행됩니다. 각 프레임의 하나의 채널 (이 경우 RGB 색상 공간이 사용되기 때문에 녹색 채널이지만 GUI는 선호하는 채널을 지정할 수 있음)은 다음과 같습니다. 로컬 적응 임계 값을 사용하여 이진화 됨 (Bradley and Roth 2007), 후자는 이웃 주변의 로컬 평균 강도를 사용하여 각 픽셀에 대해 계산됩니다. 그런 다음 입자와 물체로 구성된 이진 이미지가 영역으로 변환됩니다. 우리 실험에 존재하는 유일한 장애물은 모든 입자에 비해 더 큰 크기를 기준으로 식별됩니다. 다른 전략은 이전에 논의되었습니다. 그런 다음 장애물 영역의 경계 다각형은 사용자 정의 포인트 밀도로 결정됩니다. 여기에서는 그림자 결정을 위해 광선 투사 (RC) 접근 방식을 채택했습니다. RC는 컴퓨터 그래픽을 기반으로하는 “경 운송 모델링”의 틀에 속합니다. 수치 적으로 정확한 그림자를 제공하기 때문에 여기에서 선택됩니다. 정확도는 떨어지지 만 주로 RC의 계산 부하를 줄이는 것을 목표로하는 몇 가지 다른 방법이 개발되었습니다.2015 ), 여기서 간략히 회상합니다. 각 프레임 (명확성을 위해 여기에 색인화되지 않음)에 대해 광선아르 자형나는 j아르 자형나는제이레이저 위치 L 에서 i 번째 정점 으로 캐스트됩니다.피나는 j피나는제이의 J 오브젝트의 경계 다각형 일; 목표는피나는 j피나는제이 하위 집합에 속 ㅏ제이ㅏ제이 레이저에 의해 직접 조명되는 경계 정점의 피나는 j피나는제이 에 추가됩니다 ㅏ제이ㅏ제이 만약 아르 자형나는 j아르 자형나는제이 적어도 한쪽을 교차 에스k j에스케이제이( j 번째 개체 경계 다각형 의 모든면에 걸쳐있는 k )피나는 j피나는제이 (그것이 교차로 큐나는 j k큐나는제이케이 레이저 위치와 정점 사이에 있지 않습니다. 피나는 j피나는제이). 두 개의 광선, 즉ρ1ρ1 과 ρ2ρ2추가면을 가로 지르지 않는는 저장됩니다.
  3. (씨)일단 정점 세트, 즉 ㅏ제이ㅏ제이 레이저에 의해 직접 비춰지고 식별되었으며 ROI 프레임 상자의 음영 부분은 후자와 교차하여 결정됩니다. ρ1ρ1 과 ρ2ρ2. 두 교차점은 다음에 추가됩니다.ㅏ제이ㅏ제이. 점으로 둘러싸인 영역ㅏ제이ㅏ제이 마침내 마스크로 변환됩니다.

레이저 소스가 여러 개인 경우 각각에 RC 알고리즘을 적용해야하며 음영 영역의 결합이 수행됩니다. 레이 캐스팅 절차의 의사 코드는 Alg에보고됩니다. 1.

그림
그림 1
그림 1

DM 검증

이 섹션에서는 제안 된 DM으로 수행 된 PIV 측정과 두 가지 다른 접근 방식, 즉 no-masking (NM)과 static masking (SM) 간의 비교를 제시합니다.

그림 2
그림 2
그림 3
그림 3

실험 설정

진동 유도기 (VI)의 성능을 분석하기 위해 PIV 설정을 설계하고 현재 DM 기술을 개발했습니다 (Curatolo et al. 2019 , 2020 ). 후자는 비 맥동 ​​유체 흐름에서 역류에 배치 된 캔틸레버의 규칙적이고 넓은 진동을 유도 할 수있는 윙렛입니다. 이러한 VI는 캔틸레버의 끝에 장착되며 (그림 2 참조   ) 진동 운동의 어느 지점에서든 캔틸레버의 중립 구성을 향해 양력을 생성 할 수있는 두 개의 오목한 날개가 있습니다.

VI는 캔틸레버 표면에 장착 된 압전 패치를 사용하여 고정 유체 흐름에서 기계적 에너지 추출을 향상시킬 수 있습니다. 그림 2 에서 강조된 날개의 전체 측면 가장자리는  Sect에 설명 된 사양에 따라 형광 페인트로 코팅되어 있습니다. 2.1 . 실험은 Roma Tre University 공학부 수력 학 실험실의 자유 표면 채널에서 수행됩니다. 10.8cm 길이의 캔틸레버는 채널의 중심선에 배치되고 상류로 향하며 수직-세로 평면에서 진동합니다. 세라믹 페 로브 스카이 트 (PZT) 압전 패치 (7××캔틸레버의 윗면에는 Physik Instrumente (PI)에서 만든 3cm)가 부착되어 있습니다. 흐름 유도 진동 하에서 변형으로 인해 AC 전압 차이를 제공합니다. VI 왼쪽 날개의 수직 중앙면에있는 2D 속도 필드는 수제 수중 PIV 장비를 통해 얻었습니다.각주1 연속파, 저비용, 저전력 (150mW), 녹색 (532nm) 레이저 빔이 2mm 두께의 부채꼴 시트에 퍼집니다.120∘120∘그림 2 와 같이 VI의 한쪽 날개를 절반으로 교차 합니다. 물은 평균 직경이 100 인 폴리 아미드 입자로 시드됩니다.μμm 및 1016 Kg / m의 밀도삼삼. 레이저 소스는 VI의 15cm 위쪽 (자유 표면 아래 약 4cm)과 VI의 하류 5cm에 경사지게 배치됩니다.5∘5∘상류. 위의 설정은 주로 날개의 후류를 조사하기 위해 고안되었습니다. 날개의 상류면과 하류 부분의 일부는 레이저 시트에 직접 맞지 않습니다. 레이저 시트에 수직으로 촬영하는 고속 상용 카메라 (Sony RX100 M5)를 사용하여 동영상을 촬영합니다. 후자는 1920의 프레임 크기로 500fps의 높은 프레임 속도 모드로 기록됩니다.×× 1080px, 나중에 더 작은 655로 잘림 ××이미지 분석 중에 분석 할 850px ROI. 시간 해결, 프리웨어, 오픈 소스, MatLab 용 PIV 분석 도구가 사용됩니다 (Thielicke and Stamhuis 2014 ). 이 도구는 질의 영역 (IA) 변형 (우리의 경우 64×× 64, 32 ×× 32 및 26 ××26). 각 패스에서 각 IA의 경계와 모서리에서 추가 변위 정보를 얻기 위해 인접한 IA 사이에 50 %의 중첩이 허용됩니다. 첫 번째 통과 후, 입자 변위 정보가 보간되어 IA의 모든 픽셀의 변위를 도출하고 그에 따라 변형됩니다.

시딩 입자 수 밀도는 첫 번째 패스에서 IA 당 약 5입니다. Keane과 Adrian ( 1992 )에 따르면 이러한 밀도 값은 95 % 유효한 탐지 확률을 보장합니다. IA는 프레임 커플 내에서 입자의 충분한 영구성을 보장하기 위해 크기가 조정됩니다. 분석 된 유동 역학은 0.4 ~ 0.7m / s 범위의 유동 속도를 특징으로합니다. 따라서 입자는 권장 최소값 인 2 프레임 (Keane and Adrian 1992 ) 보다 큰 약 3-4 프레임의 세 번째 패스 IA에 나타납니다 .

PIV 체인 분석 평가

사용 된 PIV 알고리즘의 정확성은 이전에 문헌에서 광범위하게 평가되었습니다 (예 : Guérin et al. ( 2020 ), Vennemann and Rösgen ( 2020 ), Mohammadshahi et al. ( 2020 ), Narayan et al. ( 2020 )). 그러나 PIV 측정의 물리적 일관성을 보장하기 위해 두 가지 벤치 마크 사례가 여기에 나와 있습니다.

첫 번째는 Sect에 설명 된 동일한 PIV 설정을 통해 측정 된 세로 유속의 수직 프로파일을 비교합니다. 3.1 분석 기준 용액이있는 실험 채널에서. 후자는 플로팅 트레이서로 수행되는 PTV (입자 추적 속도계) 측정을 통해 보정되었습니다. 분석 속도 프로파일은 Eq. 1 (Keulegan 1938 ).u ( z) =유∗[5.75 로그(지δ) +8.5];유(지)=유∗[5.75로그⁡(지δ)+8.5];(1)

여기서 u 는 수평 유속 성분, z 는 수직 좌표,δδ 침대 거칠기 및 V∗V∗ 균일 한 흐름 공식에 의해 주어진 것으로 가정되는 마찰 속도, 즉 유∗= U/ C유∗=유/씨; U 는 깊이 평균 유속이고 C 는 다음 과 같이 주어진 마찰 계수입니다.씨= 5.75로그( 13.3에프R / δ)씨=5.75로그⁡(13.3에프아르 자형/δ), R = 0.2아르 자형=0.2 m은 유압 반경이고 에프= 0.92에프=0.92유한 폭 채널의 형상 계수. 그림  4 는 4 초의 시간 창에 걸쳐 순간 값을 평균화하여 얻은 분석 프로필과 PIV 측정 간의 비교를 보여줍니다. 국부적 인 변동은 대략 0.5 초의 시간 척도에서 진화하는 것으로 밝혀졌습니다. PTV 결과에 가장 적합하면 다음과 같은 값이 산출됩니다.δ= 1δ=1cm, 베드 거칠기의 경우 Eq. 1 , 실험 채널 침대 표면의 실제 조건과 호환됩니다. VI의 휴지 구성 위치에서 유속의 분석 값은 그림에서 검은 색 십자가로 표시됩니다. 비교는 놀라운 일치를 보여 주므로 실험 설정과 PIV 알고리즘의 조합이 분석 된 설정에 대해 신뢰할 수있는 것으로 간주 될 수 있음을 증명합니다.

두 번째 벤치 마크는 VI 뒷면에 재 부착 된 흐름의 양을 비교합니다. 실제로 이러한 장치의 높은 캠버를 고려할 때 흐름은 하류 표면에서 분리되어 결국 다시 연결됩니다. 첨부 흐름을 나타내는 표면의 양 (Curatolo 외. 발견 2020 ) 흥미로운 압전 패치 (즉, 효율이 큰 경우에 더 빠르게 진동이 유발되는 것이다)에서 VI의 효율과 상관된다. 여기에서는 PIV 분석을 통해 측정 된 진동의 상사 점에서 재 부착 된 흐름의 길이를 CFD (전산 유체 역학) 상용 코드 FLOW-3D® (Flow Science 2019 )로 예측 한 길이와 비교하여 RANS를 해결합니다. 결합 식 (비어 스톡스 레이놀즈 평균) 케이 -ϵϵ구조화 된 그리드의 난류 폐쇄 (시뮬레이션을 위해 1mm 간격이 선택됨). 다운 스트림 측면의 흐름은 이러한 높은 캠버 VI를 위해 여러 위치에서 분리 및 재 부착됩니다. 이 벤치 마크에서 비교 된 양은 VI의 앞쪽 가장자리와 가장 가까운 흐름 재 부착 위치 사이의 호 길이입니다. 그림 5를 참조  하면 CFD 모델에 의해 예측 된 호의 길이는 측정 된 호의 길이보다 10 % 더 큽니다. 이 작업에 제시된 DM 기술을 사용하는 PIV 분석은 물리적으로 건전한 측정을 제공하는 것으로 입증됩니다. 후류의 유체 역학에 대한 자세한 분석과 VI의 전반적인 효율성과의 상관 관계는 현재 진행 중이며 향후 작업의 대상이 될 것입니다.

그림 4
그림 4
그림 5
그림 5

결과

그림 6을 참조하여  순간 유속 장의 관점에서 세 가지 접근법의 결과를 비교합니다. 선택한 순간은 진동의 상사 점에 해당합니다.

제안 된 DM (그림 6 의 패널 a  )은 부드러운 유동장을 생성하여 후류에서 일관된 소용돌이 구조를 나타냅니다.

NM 접근법 (그림 6 의 패널 b1  )도 후류의 와류 구조를 정확하게 예측하지만 음영 영역에서 대부분 부정확 한 값을 산출합니다. 또한 비교에서 합리적인 기준을 추론 할 수 없기 때문에 획득 한 유동장 의 사후 필터링이 실현 가능하지 않다는 것이 분명합니다 . 실제로 유속은 그림 6 의 패널 c1에서 볼 수 있듯이 가장 큰 오류가 생성되는 위치에서도 “합리적인”크기를 갖습니다. , DM 및 NM 접근 방식으로 얻은 속도 필드 간의 차이가 표시됩니다. 더욱이 후류에서 발생하는 매우 불안정한 소용돌이 운동이 이러한 위치에 가깝게 이동하기 때문에 그럴듯한 흐름 방향을 가정하더라도 필터링 기준을 공식화 할 수 없습니다. 모델러가 그러한 부정확성을 알고 있었다하더라도 NM 접근법은 “합리적”이지만 여전히 날개의 내부 현과 그 바로 아래에있는 유동장의 대부분은 부정확합니다. 이러한 행동은 매우 오해의 소지가 있습니다.

그림 6 의 패널 b2는  SM 접근법으로 얻은 유속 장을 보여주고 패널 c2는 SM과 DM 접근법으로 얻은 결과 간의 차이를 보여줍니다. SM 접근법은 NM 대응 물에 비해 전반적으로 더 나은 정확도를 명확하게 보여 주지만, 이는 레이저 소스의 위치가 진동 중에 음영 영역이 많이 움직이지 않기 때문입니다 (그림 3 참조). 한 번의 진동 동안 VI가 경험 한 최대 변위를 육안으로 검사합니다. 즉, 분석 된 사례의 경우 정적 마스크를 그리기위한 중립 구성을 선택하면 NM 접근 방식보다 낮은 오류를 얻을 수 있습니다. 더 큰 물체 변위를 포함하는 실험 설정은 NM이 일관되게 더 정확해질 수 있기 때문에 NM보다 SM의 우월성은 일반화 될 수 없음을 강조하고 싶습니다.

그림  6 은 분석 된 접근법에 의해 생성 된 차이를 철저히 보여 주지만 결과에 대한보다 정량적 인 평가를 제공하기 위해 오류의 빈도 분포를 계산했습니다. 그림 7 에서 이러한 분포를  살펴보면 SM 접근법이 NM보다 전체적인 예측이 더 우수하고 SM 분포가 더 정점에 있음을 확인합니다. 그럼에도 불구하고 SM은 여전히 ​​비정상적인 강도의 스파이크를 생성합니다. 분포의 꼬리로 표시되는 이러한 값은 정적 마스크 범위의 과대 평가 (왼쪽 꼬리) 및 과소 평가 (오른쪽 꼬리)에 연결됩니다. 그러나 주파수의 크기는 고려되는 경우에 SM과 NM의 적용 가능성을 배제하여 DM에 대한 리조트를 의무적으로 만듭니다.

그림 6
그림 6
그림 7
그림 7

결론

이 작업에서는 PIV 분석 도구에 DM (Dynamic Masking) 모듈을 제공하기위한 새로운 실험 기법을 제시합니다. 동적 마스킹은 유체 흐름에 잠긴 불투명 이동 / 변형 가능한 물체를 포함하는 시간 해결 PIV 설정에서 필요한 단계입니다. 마스킹 알고리즘과 함께 형광 코팅을 사용하여 물체를 정확하게 추적 할 수 있습니다. 우리는 제안 된 DM과 두 가지 다른 접근 방식, 즉 no-masking (NM)과 static masking (SM)을 비교하여 자체적으로 설계된 저비용 PIV 설정을 통해 수행 된 측정을 제시합니다. 분석 된 유동 역학은 고체 물체의 제한된 변위를 포함하지만 정량적 비교는 DM 기술을 채택해야하는 필수 필요성을 보여줍니다. 여기에서 정확성이 입증 된 현재의 실험적 접근 방식은

메모

  1. 1.실험 데이터 세트는 PIV 분석의 복제를 허용하기 위해 요청시 제공됩니다.

참고 문헌

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  1. 이탈리아 Roma, Università Roma Tre 공학과Valentina Lombardi, Michele La Rocca, Pietro Prestininzi

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Valentina Lombardi에 대한 서신 .

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Lombardi, V., Rocca, ML & Prestininzi, P. 시간 분해 PIV 분석을위한 새로운 동적 마스킹 기술. J Vis (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12650-021-00756-0

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  • 시간 해결 PIV
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  • 이미지 처리
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On the role of the powder stream on the heat and fluid flow conditions during Directed Energy Deposition of maraging steel-Fig3

On the role of the powder stream on the heat and fluid flow conditions during Directed Energy Deposition of maraging steel—Multiphysics modeling and experimental validation

MohamadBayataVenkata K.NadimpalliaFrancesco G.BiondaniaSinaJafarzadehbJesperThorborgaNiels S.TiedjeaGiulianoBissaccoaDavid B.PedersenaJesper H.Hattela
a Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Building 425, Lyngby, Denmark
Department of Energy Conversion and Storage, Technical University of Denmark, Building 301, Lyngby, Denmark

Received 15 December 2020, Revised 12 April 2021, Accepted 19 April 2021, Available online 8 May 2021.

Abstract

The Directed Energy Deposition (DED) process of metals, has a broad range of applications in several industrial sectors. Surface modification, component repairing, production of functionally graded materials and more importantly, manufacturing of complex geometries are major DED’s applications. In this work, a multi-physics numerical model of the DED process of maraging steel is developed to study the influence of the powder stream specifications on the melt pool’s thermal and fluid dynamics conditions. The model is developed based on the Finite Volume Method (FVM) framework using the commercial software package Flow-3D. Different physical phenomena e.g. solidification, evaporation, the Marangoni effect and the recoil pressure are included in the model. As a new feature, the powder particles’ dynamics are modeled using a Lagrangian framework and their impact on the melt pool conditions is taken into account as well. In-situ and ex-situ experiments are carried out using a thermal camera and optical microscopy. The predicted track morphology is in good agreement with the experimental measurements. Besides, the predicted melt pool evolution follows the same trend as observed with the online thermal camera. Furthermore, a parametric study is carried out to investigate the effect of the powder particles incoming velocity on the track morphology. It is shown that the height-to-width ratio of tracks increases while using higher powder velocities. Moreover, it is shown that by tripling the powder particles velocity, the height-to-width ratio increases by 104% and the wettability of the track decreases by 24%.

Korea Abstract

금속의 DED (Directed Energy Deposition) 공정은 여러 산업 분야에서 광범위한 응용 분야를 가지고 있습니다. 표면 수정, 부품 수리, 기능 등급 재료의 생산 및 더 중요한 것은 복잡한 형상의 제조가 DED의 주요 응용 분야입니다.

이 작업에서는 용융 풀의 열 및 유체 역학 조건에 대한 분말 스트림 사양의 영향을 연구하기 위해 강철 마레이징 DED 공정의 다중 물리 수치 모델이 개발되었습니다. 이 모델은 상용 소프트웨어 패키지 FLOW-3D를 사용하여 FVM (Finite Volume Method) 프레임 워크를 기반으로 개발되었습니다.

다른 물리적 현상 예 : 응고, 증발, 마랑고니 효과 및 반동 압력이 모델에 포함됩니다. 새로운 기능으로 분말 입자의 역학은 Lagrangian 프레임 워크를 사용하여 모델링되며 용융 풀 조건에 미치는 영향도 고려됩니다.

현장 및 현장 실험은 열 화상 카메라와 광학 현미경을 사용하여 수행됩니다. 예측된 트랙 형태는 실험 측정과 잘 일치합니다. 게다가 예측된 용융 풀 진화는 온라인 열 화상 카메라에서 관찰된 것과 동일한 추세를 따릅니다. 또한, 분말 입자 유입 속도가 트랙 형태에 미치는 영향을 조사하기 위해 매개 변수 연구가 수행됩니다.

더 높은 분말 속도를 사용하는 동안 트랙의 높이 대 너비 비율이 증가하는 것으로 나타났습니다. 또한 분말 입자 속도를 3 배로 늘림으로써 높이 대 너비 비율이 104 % 증가하고 트랙의 젖음성은 24 % 감소하는 것으로 나타났습니다.

Keywords

Multi-physics modelDEDHeat and fluid flowFVMParticle motion

On the role of the powder stream on the heat and fluid flow conditions during Directed Energy Deposition of maraging steel-Fig
On the role of the powder stream on the heat and fluid flow conditions during Directed Energy Deposition of maraging steel-Fig
On the role of the powder stream on the heat and fluid flow conditions during Directed Energy Deposition of maraging steel-Fig2
On the role of the powder stream on the heat and fluid flow conditions during Directed Energy Deposition of maraging steel-Fig2
On the role of the powder stream on the heat and fluid flow conditions during Directed Energy Deposition of maraging steel-Fig3
On the role of the powder stream on the heat and fluid flow conditions during Directed Energy Deposition of maraging steel-Fig3
On the role of the powder stream on the heat and fluid flow conditions during Directed Energy Deposition of maraging steel-Fig4
On the role of the powder stream on the heat and fluid flow conditions during Directed Energy Deposition of maraging steel-Fig4
On the role of the powder stream on the heat and fluid flow conditions during Directed Energy Deposition of maraging steel-Fig5
On the role of the powder stream on the heat and fluid flow conditions during Directed Energy Deposition of maraging steel-Fig5
On the role of the powder stream on the heat and fluid flow conditions during Directed Energy Deposition of maraging steel-Fig6
On the role of the powder stream on the heat and fluid flow conditions during Directed Energy Deposition of maraging steel-Fig6
On the role of the powder stream on the heat and fluid flow conditions during Directed Energy Deposition of maraging steel-Fig7
On the role of the powder stream on the heat and fluid flow conditions during Directed Energy Deposition of maraging steel-Fig7
On the role of the powder stream on the heat and fluid flow conditions during Directed Energy Deposition of maraging steel-Fig8
On the role of the powder stream on the heat and fluid flow conditions during Directed Energy Deposition of maraging steel-Fig8
On the role of the powder stream on the heat and fluid flow conditions during Directed Energy Deposition of maraging steel-Fig9
On the role of the powder stream on the heat and fluid flow conditions during Directed Energy Deposition of maraging steel-Fig9
On the role of the powder stream on the heat and fluid flow conditions during Directed Energy Deposition of maraging steel-Fig10
On the role of the powder stream on the heat and fluid flow conditions during Directed Energy Deposition of maraging steel-Fig10
On the role of the powder stream on the heat and fluid flow conditions during Directed Energy Deposition of maraging steel-Fig11
On the role of the powder stream on the heat and fluid flow conditions during Directed Energy Deposition of maraging steel-Fig11
Dam-Break Flows: Comparison between Flow-3D, MIKE 3 FM, and Analytical Solutions with Experimental Data

Dam-Break Flows: Comparison between Flow-3D, MIKE 3 FM, and Analytical Solutions with Experimental Data

by Hui Hu,Jianfeng Zhang andTao Li *
State Key Laboratory Base of Eco-Hydraulic Engineering in Arid Area, School of Water Resources and Hydropower, Xi’an University of Technology, Xi’an 710048, China
*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Appl. Sci.20188(12), 2456; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8122456Received: 14 October 2018 /
Revised: 20 November 2018 / Accepted: 29 November 2018 / Published: 2 December 2018

Abstract

The objective of this study was to evaluate the applicability of a flow model with different numbers of spatial dimensions in a hydraulic features solution, with parameters such a free surface profile, water depth variations, and averaged velocity evolution in a dam-break under dry and wet bed conditions with different tailwater depths. Two similar three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic models (Flow-3D and MIKE 3 FM) were studied in a dam-break simulation by performing a comparison with published experimental data and the one-dimensional (1D) analytical solution. The results indicate that the Flow-3D model better captures the free surface profile of wavefronts for dry and wet beds than other methods. The MIKE 3 FM model also replicated the free surface profiles well, but it underestimated them during the initial stage under wet-bed conditions. However, it provided a better approach to the measurements over time. Measured and simulated water depth variations and velocity variations demonstrate that both of the 3D models predict the dam-break flow with a reasonable estimation and a root mean square error (RMSE) lower than 0.04, while the MIKE 3 FM had a small memory footprint and the computational time of this model was 24 times faster than that of the Flow-3D. Therefore, the MIKE 3 FM model is recommended for computations involving real-life dam-break problems in large domains, leaving the Flow-3D model for fine calculations in which knowledge of the 3D flow structure is required. The 1D analytical solution was only effective for the dam-break wave propagations along the initially dry bed, and its applicability was fairly limited. 

Keywords: dam breakFlow-3DMIKE 3 FM1D Ritter’s analytical solution

이 연구의 목적은 자유 표면 프로파일, 수심 변화 및 건식 및 댐 파괴에서 평균 속도 변화와 같은 매개 변수를 사용하여 유압 기능 솔루션에서 서로 다른 수의 공간 치수를 가진 유동 모델의 적용 가능성을 평가하는 것이었습니다.

테일 워터 깊이가 다른 습식베드 조건. 2 개의 유사한 3 차원 (3D) 유체 역학 모델 (Flow-3D 및 MIKE 3 FM)이 게시된 실험 데이터와 1 차원 (1D) 분석 솔루션과의 비교를 수행하여 댐 브레이크 시뮬레이션에서 연구되었습니다.

결과는 FLOW-3D 모델이 다른 방법보다 건식 및 습식 베드에 대한 파면의 자유 표면 프로파일을 더 잘 포착함을 나타냅니다. MIKE 3 FM 모델도 자유 표면 프로파일을 잘 복제했지만, 습식 조건에서 초기 단계에서 과소 평가했습니다. 그러나 시간이 지남에 따라 측정에 더 나은 접근 방식을 제공했습니다.

측정 및 시뮬레이션 된 수심 변화와 속도 변화는 두 3D 모델 모두 합리적인 추정치와 0.04보다 낮은 RMSE (root mean square error)로 댐 브레이크 흐름을 예측하는 반면 MIKE 3 FM은 메모리 공간이 적고 이 모델의 계산 시간은 Flow-3D보다 24 배 더 빠릅니다.

따라서 MIKE 3 FM 모델은 대규모 도메인의 실제 댐 브레이크 문제와 관련된 계산에 권장되며 3D 흐름 구조에 대한 지식이 필요한 미세 계산을 위해 Flow-3D 모델을 남겨 둡니다. 1D 분석 솔루션은 초기 건조 층을 따라 전파되는 댐 파괴에만 효과적이었으며 그 적용 가능성은 상당히 제한적이었습니다.

1. Introduction

저수지에 저장된 물의 통제되지 않은 방류[1]로 인해 댐 붕괴와 그로 인해 하류에서 발생할 수 있는 잠재적 홍수로 인해 큰 자연 위험이 발생한다. 이러한 영향을 최대한 완화하기 위해서는 홍수[2]로 인한 위험을 관리하고 감소시키기 위해 홍수의 시간적 및 공간적 진화를 모두 포착하여 댐 붕괴 파동의 움직임을 예측하고 댐 붕괴 파동의 전파 과정 효과를 다운스트림[3]으로 예측하는 것이 중요하다. 

그러나 이러한 수량을 예측하는 것은 어려운 일이며, 댐 붕괴 홍수의 움직임을 정확하게 시뮬레이션하고 유동장에 대한 유용한 정보를 제공하기 위한 적절한 모델을 선택하는 것은 그러므로 필수적인 단계[4]이다.

적절한 수학적 및 수치적 모델의 선택은 댐 붕괴 홍수 분석에서 매우 중요한 것으로 나타났다.분석적 해결책에서 행해진 댐 붕괴 흐름에 대한 연구는 100여 년 전에 시작되었다. 

리터[5]는 먼저 건조한 침대 위에 1D de 생베넌트 방정식의 초기 분석 솔루션을 도출했고, 드레슬러[6,7]와 휘담[8]은 마찰저항의 영향을 받은 파동학을 연구했으며, 스토커[9]는 젖은 침대를 위한 1D 댐 붕괴 문제에 리터의 솔루션을 확장했다. 

마샬과 멩데즈[10]는 고두노프가 가스 역학의 오일러 방정식을 위해 개발한 방법론[11]을 적용하여 젖은 침대 조건에서 리만 문제를 해결하기 위한 일반적인 절차를 고안했다. Toro [12]는 습식 및 건식 침대 조건을 모두 해결하기 위해 완전한 1D 정밀 리만 용해제를 실시했다. 

Chanson [13]은 특성 방법을 사용하여 갑작스러운 댐 붕괴로 인한 홍수에 대한 간단한 분석 솔루션을 연구했다. 그러나 이러한 분석 솔루션은 특히 댐 붕괴 초기 단계에서 젖은 침대의 정확한 결과를 도출하지 못했다[14,15].과거 연구의 발전은 이른바 댐 붕괴 홍수 문제 해결을 위한 여러 수치 모델[16]을 제공했으며, 헥-라스, DAMBRK, MIK 11 등과 같은 1차원 모델을 댐 붕괴 홍수를 모델링하는 데 사용하였다.

[17 2차원(2D) 깊이 평균 방정식도 댐 붕괴 흐름 문제를 시뮬레이션하는 데 널리 사용되어 왔으며[18,19,20,21,22] 그 결과 얕은 물 방정식(SWE)이 유체 흐름을 나타내는 데 적합하다는 것을 알 수 있다. 그러나, 경우에 따라 2D 수치해결기가 제공하는 해결책이 특히 근거리 분야에서 실험과 일관되지 않을 수 있다[23,24]. 더욱이, 1차원 및 2차원 모델은 3차원 현상에 대한 일부 세부사항을 포착하는 데 한계가 있다.

[25]. RANS(Reynolds-averageed Navier-Stok크스 방정식)에 기초한 여러 3차원(3D) 모델이 얕은 물 모델의 일부 단점을 극복하기 위해 적용되었으며, 댐 붕괴 초기 단계에서의 복잡한 흐름의 실제 동작을 이해하기 위해 사용되었다 [26,27,28]장애물이나 바닥 실에 대한 파장의 충격으로 인한 튜디 댐 붕괴 흐름 [19,29] 및 근거리 영역의 난류 댐 붕괴 흐름 거동 [4] 최근 상용화된 수치 모델 중 잘 알려진 유체 방식(VOF) 기반 CFD 모델링 소프트웨어 FLOW-3D는 컴퓨터 기술의 진보에 따른 계산력 증가로 인해 불안정한 자유 표면 흐름을 분석하는 데 널리 사용되고 있다. 

이 소프트웨어는 유한 차이 근사치를 사용하여 RANS 방정식에 대한 수치 해결책을 계산하며, 자유 표면을 추적하기 위해 VOF를 사용한다 [30,31]; 댐 붕괴 흐름을 모델링하는 데 성공적으로 사용되었다 [32,33].그러나, 2D 얕은 물 모델을 사용하여 포착할 수 없는 공간과 시간에 걸친 댐 붕괴 흐름의 특정한 유압적 특성이 있다. 

실생활 현장 척도 시뮬레이션을 위한 완전한 3D Navier-Stokes 방정식의 적용은 더 높은 계산 비용[34]을 가지고 있으며, 원하는 결과는 얕은 물 모델[35]보다 더 정확한 결과를 산출하지 못할 수 있다. 따라서, 본 논문은 3D 모델의 기능과 그 계산 효율을 평가하기 위해 댐 붕괴 흐름 시뮬레이션을 위한 단순화된 3D 모델-MIKE 3 FM을 시도한다. 

MIK 3 모델은 자연 용수 분지의 여러 유체 역학 시뮬레이션 조사에 적용되었다. 보치 외 연구진이 사용해 왔다. [36], 니콜라오스 및 게오르기오스 [37], 고얄과 라토드[38] 등 현장 연구에서 유체역학 시뮬레이션을 위한 것이다. 이러한 저자들의 상당한 연구에도 불구하고, MIK 3 FM을 이용한 댐 붕괴의 모델링에 관한 연구는 거의 없었다. 

또한 댐 붕괴 홍수 전파 문제를 해결하기 위한 3D 얕은 물과 완전한 3D RANS 모델의 성능을 비교한 연구도 아직 보고되지 않았다. 이 공백을 메우기 위해 현재 연구의 주요 목표는 댐 붕괴 흐름을 시뮬레이션하기 위한 단순화된 3D SWE, 상세 RANS 모델 및 분석 솔루션을 평가하여 댐 붕괴 문제에 대한 정확도와 적용 가능성을 평가하는 것이다.실제 댐 붕괴 문제를 해결하기 위해 유체역학 시뮬레이션을 시도하기 전에 수치 모델을 검증할 필요가 있다. 

일련의 실험 벤치마크를 사용하여 수치 모델을 확인하는 것은 용인된 관행이다. 현장 데이터 확보가 어려워 최근 몇 년 동안 제한된 측정 데이터를 취득했다. 

본 논문은 Ozmen-Cagatay와 Kocaman[30] 및 Khankandi 외 연구진이 제안한 두 가지 테스트 사례에 의해 제안된 검증에서 인용한 것이다. [39] 오즈멘-카가테이와 코카만[30]이 수행한 첫 번째 실험에서, 다른 미숫물 수위에 걸쳐 초기 단계 동안 댐 붕괴 홍수파가 발생했으며, 자유 지표면 프로파일의 측정치를 제공했다. Ozmen-Cagatay와 Kocaman[30]은 초기 단계에서 Flow-3D 소프트웨어가 포함된 2D SWE와 3D RANS의 숫자 솔루션에 의해 계산된 자유 표면 프로필만 비교했다. 

Khankandi 등이 고안한 두 번째 실험 동안. [39], 이 실험의 측정은 홍수 전파를 시뮬레이션하고 측정된 데이터를 제공하는 것을 목적으로 하는 수치 모델을 검증하기 위해 사용되었으며, 말기 동안의 자유 표면 프로필, 수위의 시간 진화 및 속도 변화를 포함한다. Khankandi 등의 연구. [39] 주로 실험 조사에 초점을 맞추었으며, 초기 단계에서는 리터의 솔루션과의 수위만을 언급하고 있다.

경계 조건(상류 및 하류 모두 무한 채널 길이를 갖는 1D 분석 솔루션에서는 실험 결과를 리터와 비교하는 것이 타당하지 않기 때문이다(건조 be)d) 또는 스토커(웨트 베드) 솔루션은 벽의 반사가 깊이 프로파일에 영향을 미쳤을 때, 그리고 참조 [39]의 실험에 대한 수치 시뮬레이션과의 추가 비교가 불량할 때. 이 논문은 이러한 문제를 직접 겨냥하여 전체 댐 붕괴 과정에서의 자유 표면 프로필, 수심 변화 및 속도 변화에 대한 완전한 비교 연구를 제시한다. 

여기서 댐 붕괴파의 수치 시뮬레이션은 초기에 건조하고 습한 직사각형 채널을 가진 유한 저장소의 순간 댐 붕괴에 대해 두 개의 3D 모델을 사용하여 개발된다.본 논문은 다음과 같이 정리되어 있다. 두 모델에 대한 통치 방정식은 숫자 체계를 설명하기 전에 먼저 도입된다. 

일반적인 단순화된 시험 사례는 3D 수치 모델과 1D 분석 솔루션을 사용하여 시뮬레이션했다. 모델 결과와 이들이 실험실 실험과 비교하는 방법이 논의되고, 서로 다른 수심비에서 시간에 따른 유압 요소의 변동에 대한 시뮬레이션 결과가 결론을 도출하기 전에 제시된다.

2. Materials and Methods

2.1. Data

첫째, 수평 건조 및 습식 침상에 대한 초기 댐 붕괴 단계 동안의 자유 표면 프로필 측정은 Ozmen-Cagatay와 Kocaman에 의해 수행되었다[30]. 이 시험 동안, 매끄럽고 직사각형의 수평 채널은 그림 1에서 표시한 대로 너비 0.30m, 높이 0.30m, 길이 8.9m이었다. 

채널은 채널 입구에서 4.65m 떨어진 수직 플레이트(담) 즉, 저장소의 길이 L0=4.65mL0에 의해 분리되었다., 및 다운스트림 채널 L1=4.25 mL1. m저수지는 댐의 좌측에 위치하고 처음에는 침수된 것으로 간주되었다; 저수지의 초기 상류 수심 h0 0.25m로 일정했다.

오른쪽의 초기 수심 h1h1 건식침대의 경우 0m, 습식침대의 경우 0.025m, 0.1m이므로 수심비 α=h1/h0α으로 세 가지 상황이 있었다. 0, 0.1, 0.4의 습식침대 조건은 플룸 끝에 낮은 보를 사용함으로써 만들어졌다. 물 표면 프로필은 3개의 고속 디지털 카메라(50프레임/s)를 사용하여 초기에 관찰되었으며, 계측 측정의 정확도는 참고문헌 [30]에서 입증되었다. In the following section, the corresponding numerical results refer to positions x = −1 m (P1), −0.5 m (P2), −0.2 m (P3), +0.2 m (P4), +0.5 m (P5), +1 m (P6), +2 m (P7), and +2.85 m (P8), where the origin of the coordinate system x = 0 is at the dam site. 3수심비 ααα 0, 0.1, 0.4의 경우 x,yx의 경우 좌표는 h0.으로 정규화된다.

<중략> ……

Figure 1. Schematic view of the experimental conditions by Ozmen-Cagatay and Kocaman [30]: (a) α = 0; (b) α = 0.1; and (c) α = 0.4.
Figure 1. Schematic view of the experimental conditions by Ozmen-Cagatay and Kocaman [30]: (a) α = 0; (b) α = 0.1; and (c) α = 0.4.

Figure 2. Schematic view of the experimental conditions by Khankandi et al. [39]: (a) α = 0 and (b) α = 0.2.
Figure 2. Schematic view of the experimental conditions by Khankandi et al. [39]: (a) α = 0 and (b) α = 0.2.
Figure 3. Typical profiles of the dam-break flow regimes for Stoker’s analytical solution [9]: Wet-bed downstream
Figure 3. Typical profiles of the dam-break flow regimes for Stoker’s analytical solution [9]: Wet-bed downstream
Figure 4. Sensitivity analysis of the numerical simulation using Flow-3D for the different mesh sizes of the experiments in Reference [30].
Figure 4. Sensitivity analysis of the numerical simulation using Flow-3D for the different mesh sizes of the experiments in Reference [30].
Figure 5. Sensitivity analysis of the numerical simulation using MIKE 3 FM for the different mesh sizes of the experiments in Reference [30].
Figure 5. Sensitivity analysis of the numerical simulation using MIKE 3 FM for the different mesh sizes of the experiments in Reference [30].
Figure 6. Comparison between observed and simulated free surface profiles at dimensionless times T = t(g/h0)1/2 and for dry-bed (α=0). The experimental data are from Reference [30].
Figure 6. Comparison between observed and simulated free surface profiles at dimensionless times T = t(g/h0)1/2 and for dry-bed (α=0). The experimental data are from Reference [30].
Figure 7. Comparison between observed and simulated free surface profiles at dimensionless times T = t(g/h0)1/2 and for a wet-bed (α = 0.1). The experimental data are from Reference [30].
Figure 7. Comparison between observed and simulated free surface profiles at dimensionless times T = t(g/h0)1/2 and for a wet-bed (α = 0.1). The experimental data are from Reference [30].
Figure 8. Comparison between observed and simulated free surface profiles at dimensionless times T = t(g/h0)1/2 and for the wet-bed (α = 0.4). The experimental data are from Reference [30].
Figure 8. Comparison between observed and simulated free surface profiles at dimensionless times T = t(g/h0)1/2 and for the wet-bed (α = 0.4). The experimental data are from Reference [30].
Figure 9. Experimental and numerical comparison of free surface profiles h/h0(x/h0) during late stages at various dimensionless times T after the failure in the dry-bed by Khankandi et al. [39].
Figure 9. Experimental and numerical comparison of free surface profiles h/h0(x/h0) during late stages at various dimensionless times T after the failure in the dry-bed by Khankandi et al. [39].

Table 2. RMSE values for the free surface profiles observed by Khankandi et al. [39].