Fig. 3. (a–c) Snapshots of the CtFD simulation of laser-beam irradiation: (a) Top, (b) longitudinal vertical cross-sectional, and (c) transversal vertical cross-sectional views. (d) z-position of the solid/liquid interface during melting and solidification.

Solute segregation in a rapidly solidified Hastelloy-X Ni-based superalloy during laser powder bed fusion investigated by phase-field simulations and computational thermal-fluid dynamics

Masayuki Okugawa ab, Kenji Saito a, Haruki Yoshima a, Katsuhiko Sawaizumi a, Sukeharu Nomoto c, Makoto Watanabe c, Takayoshi Nakano ab, Yuichiro Koizumi abShow moreAdd to MendeleyShareCite

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.addma.2024.104079

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Abstract

Solute segregation significantly affects material properties and is a critical issue in the laser powder-bed fusion (LPBF) additive manufacturing (AM) of Ni-based superalloys. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate a computational thermal-fluid dynamics (CtFD) simulation coupled multi-phase-field (MPF) simulation with a multicomponent-composition model of Ni-based superalloy to predict solute segregation under solidification conditions in LPBF. The MPF simulation of the Hastelloy-X superalloy reproduced the experimentally observed submicron-sized cell structure. Significant solute segregations were formed within interdendritic regions during solidification at high cooling rates of up to 10K s-1, a characteristic feature of LPBF. Solute segregation caused a decrease in the solidus temperature (TS), with a reduction of up to 30.4 K, which increases the risk of liquation cracks during LPBF. In addition, the segregation triggers the formation of carbide phases, which increases the susceptibility to ductility dip cracking. Conversely, we found that the decrease in TS is suppressed at the melt-pool boundary regions, where re-remelting occurs during the stacking of the layer above. Controlling the re-remelting behavior is deemed to be crucial for designing crack-free alloys. Thus, we demonstrated that solute segregation at the various interfacial regions of Ni-based multicomponent alloys can be predicted by the conventional MPF simulation. The design of crack-free Ni-based superalloys can be expedited by MPF simulations of a broad range of element combinations and their concentrations in multicomponent Ni-based superalloys.

Graphical abstract

Keywords

Laser powder-bed fusion, Hastelloy-X Nickel-based superalloy, solute element segregation, computational thermal-fluid dynamics simulation, phase-field method

1. Introduction

Additive manufacturing (AM) technologies have attracted considerable attention as they allow us to easily build three-dimensional (3D) parts with complex geometries. Among the wide range of available AM techniques, laser powder-bed fusion (LPBF) has emerged as a preferred technique for metal AM [1][2][3][4][5]. In LPBF, metal products are built layer-by-layer by scanning laser, which fuse metal powder particles into bulk solids.

Significant attempts have been made to integrate LPBF techniques within the aerospace industry, with a particular focus on weldable Ni-based superalloys, such as IN718 [6][7][8], IN625 [9][10], and Hastelloy-X (HX) [11][12][13][14]. Non-weldable alloys, such as IN738LC [15][16] and CMSX-4 [1][17] are also suitable for their sufficient creep resistance under higher temperature conditions. However, non-weldable alloys are difficult to build using LPBF because of their susceptibility to cracking during the process. In general, a macro solute-segregation during solidification is suppressed by the rapid cooling conditions (up to 108 K s-1) unique to the LPBF process [18]. However, the solute segregation still occurs in the interdendritic regions that are smaller than the micrometer scale [5][19][20][21]; these regions are suggested to be related to the hot cracks in LPBF-fabricated parts. Therefore, an understanding of solute segregation is essential for the fabrication of reliable LPBF-fabricated parts while avoiding cracks.

The multiphase-field (MPF) method has gained popularity for modeling the microstructure evolution and solute segregation under rapid cooling conditions [5][20][21][22][23][24][25][26][27][28]. Moreover, quantifiable predictions have been achieved by combining the MPF method with temperature distribution analysis methods such as the finite-element method (FEM) [20] and computational thermal-fluid dynamics (CtFD) simulations [28]. These aforementioned studies have used binary-approximated multicomponent systems, such as Ni–Nb binary alloys, to simulate IN718 alloys. While MPF simulations using binary alloy systems can effectively reproduce microstructure formations and segregation behaviors, the binary approximation might be affected by the chemical interactions between the removed solute elements in the target multicomponent alloy. The limit of absolute stability predicted by the Mullins-Sekerka theory [29] is also crucial because the limit velocity is close to the solidification rate in the LPBF process and is different in multicomponent and binary-approximated systems. The difference between the solidus and liquidus temperatures, ΔT0, directly determines the absolute stability according to the Mullins-Sekerka theory. For example, the ΔT0 values of IN718 and its binary-approximated Ni–5 wt.%Nb alloy are 134 K [28] and 71 K [30], respectively. The solidification rate compared to the limit of absolute stability, i.e., the relative non-equilibrium of solidification, changes by simplification of the system. It is therefore important to use the composition of the actual multicomponent system in such simulations. However, to the best of our knowledge, there is no MPF simulation using a multicomponent model coupled with a temperature analysis simulation to predict solute segregation in a Ni-based superalloy.

In this study, we demonstrate that the conventional MPF model can reproduce experimentally observed dendritic structures by performing a phase-field simulation using the temperature distribution obtained by a CtFD simulation of a multicomponent Ni-based alloy (conventional solid-solution hardening-type HX). The MPF simulation revealed that the segregation behavior of solute elements largely depends on the regions of the melt pool, such as the cell boundary, the interior of the melt-pool boundary, and heat-affected regions. The sensitivities of the various interfaces to liquation and solidification cracks are compared based on the predicted concentration distributions. Moreover, the feasibility of using the conventional MPF model for LPBF is discussed in terms of the absolute stability limit.

2. Methods

2.1. Laser-beam irradiation experiments

Rolled and recrystallized HX ingots with dimensions of 20 × 50 × 10 mm were used as the specimens for laser-irradiation experiments. The specimens were irradiated with a laser beam scanned along straight lines of 10 mm in length using a laser AM machine (EOS 290 M, EOS) equipped with a 400 W Yb-fiber laser. Irradiation was performed with a beam power of P = 300 W and a scanning speed of V = 600 mm s-1, which are the conditions generally used in the LPBF fabrication of Ni-based superalloy [8]. The corresponding line energy was 0.5 J mm-1. The samples were cut perpendicular to the beam-scanning direction for cross-sectional observation using a field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM, JEOL JSM 6500). Crystal orientation analysis was performed by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). The sizes of each crystal grain and their aspect ratios were evaluated by analyzing the EBSD data.

2.2. CtFD simulation

CtFD simulations of the laser-beam irradiation of HX were performed using a 3D thermo-fluid analysis software (Flow Science FLOW-3D® with Flow-3D Weld module). A Gaussian heat source model was used, in which the irradiation intensity distribution of the beam is regarded as a symmetrical Gaussian distribution over the entire beam. The distribution of the beam irradiation intensity is expressed by the following equation.(1)q̇=2ηPπR2exp−2r2R2.

Here, P is the power, R is the effective beam radius, r is the actual beam radius, and η is the beam absorption rate of the substrate. To improve the accuracy of the model, η was calculated by assuming multiple reflections using the Fresnel equation:(2)�=1−121+1−�cos�21+1+�cos�2+�2−2�cos�+2cos2��2+2�cos�+2cos2�.

ε is the Fresnel coefficient and θ is the incident angle of the laser. A local laser melt causes the vaporization of the material and results in a high vapor pressure. This vapor pressure acts as a recoil pressure on the surface, pushing the weld pool down. The recoil pressure is reproduced using the following equation.(3)precoil=Ap0exp∆HLVRTV1−TVT.

Here, p0 is the atmospheric pressure, ∆HLV is the latent heat of vaporization, R is the gas constant, and TV is the boiling point at the saturated vapor pressure. A is a ratio coefficient that is generally assumed to be 0.54, indicating that the recoil pressure due to evaporation is 54% of the vapor pressure at equilibrium on the liquid surface.

Table 1 shows the parameters used in the simulations. Most parameters were evaluated using an alloy physical property calculation software (Sente software JMatPro v11). The values in a previously published study [31] were used for the emissivity and the Stefan–Boltzmann constant, and the values for pure Ni [32] were used for the heat of vaporization and vaporization temperatures. The Fresnel coefficient, which determines the beam absorption efficiency, was used as a fitting parameter to reproduce the morphology of the experimentally observed melt region, and a Fresnel coefficient of 0.12 was used in this study.

Table 1. Parameters used in the CtFD simulations.

ParameterSymbolValueReference
Density at 298.15 Kρ8.24 g cm-3[]
Liquidus temperatureTL1628.15 K[]
Solidus temperatureTS1533.15 K[]
Viscosity at TLη6.8 g m-1 s-1[]
Specific heat at 298.15 KCP0.439 J g-1 K-1[]
Thermal conductivity at 298.15 Kλ10.3 W m-1 K-1[]
Surface tension at TLγL1.85 J m-2[]
Temperature coefficient of surface tensiondγL/dT–2.5 × 10−4 J m-2 K-1[]
EmissivityΕ0.27[31]
Stefan–Boltzmann constantσ5.67 × 10-8 W m-2 K-4[31]
Heat of fusionΔHSL2.76 × 102 J g-1[32]
Heat of vaporizationΔHLV4.29 × 10J g-1[32]
Vaporization temperatureTV3110 K[32]

Calculated using JMatPro v11.

The dimensions of the computational domain of the numerical model were 4.0 mm in the beam-scanning direction, 0.4 mm in width, and 0.3 mm in height. A uniform mesh size of 10 μm was applied throughout the computational domain. The boundary condition of continuity was applied to all boundaries except for the top surface. The temperature was initially set to 300 K. P and V were set to their experimental values, i.e., 300 W and 600 mm s-1, respectively. Solidification conditions based on the temperature gradient, G, the solidification rate, R, and the cooling rate were evaluated, and the obtained temperature distribution was used in the MPF simulations.

2.3. MPF simulation

Two-dimensional MPF simulations weakly coupled with the CtFD simulation were performed using the Microstructure Evolution Simulation Software (MICRESS) [33][34][35][36][37] with the TQ-Interface for Thermo-Calc [38]. A simplified HX alloy composition of Ni-21.4Cr-17.6Fe-0.46Mn-8.80Mo-0.39Si-0.50W-1.10Co-0.08 C (mass %) was used in this study. The Gibbs free energy and diffusion coefficient of the system were calculated using the TCNI9 thermodynamic database [39] and the MOBNi5 mobility database [40]. Τhe equilibrium phase diagram calculated using Thermo-Calc indicates that the face-centered cubic (FCC) and σ phases appear as the equilibrium solid phases [19]. However, according to the time-temperature-transformation (TTT) diagram [41], the phases are formed after the sample is maintained for tens of hours in a temperature range of 1073 to 1173 K. Therefore, only the liquid and FCC phases were assumed to appear in the MPF simulations. The simulation domain was 5 × 100 μm, and the grid size Δx and interface width were set to 0.025 and 0.1 µm, respectively. The interfacial mobility between the solid and liquid phases was set to 1.0 × 10-8 m4 J-1 s-1. Initially, one crystalline nucleus with a [100] crystal orientation was placed at the left bottom of the simulation domain, with the liquid phase occupying the remainder of the domain. The model was solidified under the temperature field distribution obtained by the CtFD simulation. The concentration distribution and crystal orientation of the solidified model were examined. The primary dendrite arm space (PDAS) was compared to the experimental PDAS measured by the cross-sectional SEM observation.

In an actual LPBF process, solidified layers are remelted and resolidified during the stacking of the one layer above, thereby greatly affecting solute element distributions in those regions. Therefore, remelting and resolidification simulations were performed to examine the effect of remelting on solute segregation. The solidified model was remelted and resolidified by applying a time-dependent temperature field shifted by 60 μm in the height direction, assuming reheating during the stacking of the upper layer (i.e., the upper 40 μm region of the simulation box was remelted and resolidified). The changes in the composition distribution and formed microstructure were investigated.

3. Results

3.1. Experimental observation of melt pool

Fig. 1 shows a cross-sectional optical microscopy image and corresponding inverse pole figure (IPF) orientation maps obtained from the laser-melted region of HX. The dashed line indicates the fusion line. A deep melted region was formed by keyhole-mode melting due to the vaporization of the metal and resultant recoil pressure. Epitaxial growth from the unmelted region was observed. Columnar crystal grains with an average diameter of 5.46 ± 0.32 μm and an aspect ratio of 3.61 ± 0.13 appeared at the melt regions (Figs. 1b–1d). In addition, crystal grains growing in the z direction could be observed in the lower center.

Fig. 1

Fig. 2a shows a cross-sectional backscattering electron image (BEI) obtained from the laser-melted region indicated by the black square in Fig. 1a. The bright particles with a diameter of approximately 2 μm observed outside the melt pool. It is well known that M6C, M23C6, σ, and μ precipitate phases are formed in Hastelloy-X [41]. These precipitates mainly consisted of Mo, Cr, Fe, and Ni; The μ and M6C phases are rich in Mo, while the σ and M23C6 phases are rich in Cr. The SEM energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis suggested that the bright particles are the stable precipitates as shown in Fig. S2 and Table S1. Conversely, there are no carbides in the melt pool. This suggests that the cooling rate is extremely high during LPBF, which prevents the formation of a stable carbide during solidification. Figs. 2b–2f show magnified BEI images at different height positions indicated in Fig. 2a. Bright regions are observed between the cells, which become fragmentary at the center of the melt pool, as indicated by the yellow arrow heads in Figs. 2e and 2f.

Fig. 2

3.2. CtFD simulation

Figs. 3a–3c show snapshots of the CtFD simulation of HX at 2.72 ms, with the temperature indicated in color. A melt pool with an elongated teardrop shape formed and keyhole-mode melting was observed at the front of the melt region. The cooling rate, temperature gradient (G), and solidification rate (R) were evaluated from the temporal change in the temperature distribution of the CtFD simulation results. The z-position of the solid/liquid interface during the melting and solidification processes is shown in Fig. 3d. The interface goes down rapidly during melting and then rises during solidification. The MPF simulation of the microstructure formation during solidification was performed using the temperature distribution. Moreover, the microstructure formation process during the fabrication of the upper layer was investigated by remelting and resolidifying the solidified layer using the same temperature distribution with a 60 μm upward shift, corresponding to the layer thickness commonly used in the LPBF of Ni-based superalloys.

Fig. 3

Figs. 4a–4c show the changes in the cooling rate, temperature gradient, and solidification rate in the center line of the melt pool parallel to the z direction. To output the solidification conditions at the solid/liquid interface in the melt pool, only the data of the mesh where the solid phase ratio was close to 0.5 were plotted. Solidification occurred where the cooling rate was in the range of 2.1 × 105–1.6 × 10K s-1G was in the range of 3.6 × 105–1.9 × 10K m-1, and R was in the range of 8.2 × 10−2–6.3 × 10−1 m s-1. The cooling rate was the highest near the fusion line and decreased as the interface approached the center of the melt region (Fig. 4a). G also exhibited the highest value in the regions near the fusion line and decreased throughout the solid/liquid interface toward the center of the melt pool (Fig. 4b). R had the lowest value near the fusion line and increased as the interface approached the center of the melt region (Fig. 4c).

Fig. 4

3.3. MPF simulations coupled with CtFD simulation

MPF simulations of solidification, remelting, and resolidification were performed using the temperature-time distribution obtained by the CtFD simulation. Fig. 5 shows the MPF solidified models colored by phase and Mo concentration. All the computational domains show the FCC phase after the solidification (Fig. 5a). Dendrites grew parallel to the heat flow direction, and solute segregations were observed in the interdendritic regions. At the bottom of the melt pool (Fig. 5d), planar interface growth occurred before the formation of primary dendrites. The bottom of the melt pool is the turning point of the solid/liquid interface from the downward motion in melting to the upward motion in solidification. Thus, the solidification rate at the boundary is zero, and is extremely low immediately above the molt-pool boundary. Here, the lower limit of the solidification rate (R) for dendritic growth can be represented by the constitutional supercooling criterion [29]Vcs = (G × DL) / ΔT, and planar interface growth occurs at R < VcsDL and ΔT denote the diffusion coefficient in the liquid and the equilibrium freezing range, respectively. The results suggest that planar interface growth occurs at the bottom of the melt pool, resulting in a dark region with a different solute element distribution. Some of the primary dendrites were diminished by competition with other dendrites. In addition, secondary dendrite arms could be seen in the upper regions (Fig. 5c), where solidification occurred at a lower cooling rate. The fragmentation of the solute segregation near the secondary dendrite arms is similar to that observed in the experimental melt pool shown in Figs. 2e and 2f, and the secondary dendrite arms are suggested to have appeared at the center of the melt region. Fig. 6 shows the PDASs measured from the MPF simulation models, compared to the experimental PDASs measured by the cross-sectional SEM observation of the laser-melted regions (Fig. 2). The PDAS obtained by the MPF simulation become larger as the solidification progress. Ghosh et al. [21] evident by the phase-field method that the PDAS decreases as the cooling rate increases under the rapid cooling conditions obtained by the finite element analysis. In this study, the cooling rate was decreased as the interface approached the center of the melt region (Fig. 4a), and the trends in PDAS changes with respect to cooling rate is same as the reported trend [21]. The simulated trends of the PDAS with the position in the melt pool agreed well with the experimental trends. However, all PDASs in the simulation were larger than those observed in the experiment at the same positions. Ode et al. [42] reported that PDAS differences between 2D and 3D MPF simulations can be represented by PDAS2D = 1.12 × PDAS3D owing to differences in the effects of the interfacial energy and diffusivity. We also performed 2D and 3D MPF simulations under the solidification conditions of G = 1.94 × 10K m-1 and R = 0.82 m s-1 (Fig. S1), and found that the PDAS from the 2D MPF simulation was 1.26 times larger than that from the 3D simulation. Therefore, the cell structure obtained by the CtFD simulation coupled with the 2D MPF simulation agreed well with the experimental results over the entire melt pool region considering the dimensional effects.

Fig. 5
Fig. 6

Fig. 7b1 and 7c1 show the concentration profiles of the solidified model along the growth direction indicated by dashed lines in Fig. 7a. The differences in concentrations from the alloy composition are also shown in Fig. 7b2 and 7c2. Cr, Mo, C, Mn, and W were segregated to the interdendritic regions, while Si, Fe, and Co were depressed. The solute segregation behavior agrees with the experimentally observation [43] and the prediction by the Scheil-Gulliver simulation [19]. Segregation occurred to the highest degree in Mo, while the ratio of segregation to the alloy composition was remarkable in C. The concentration fluctuations correlated with the position in the melt pool and decreased at the center of the melt pool, which was suggested to correspond to the lower cooling rate in this region. Conversely, droplets that appeared between secondary dendrite arms in the upper regions of the simulation domain exhibited a locally high segregation of solute elements, with the same amount of segregation as that at the bottom of the melt pool.

Fig. 7

3.4. Remelting and resolidification simulation

The solidified model was subjected to remelting and resolidification conditions by shifting the temperature profile upward by 60 µm to reveal the effect of reheating on the solute segregation behavior. Figs. 8a and 8b shows the simulation domains of the HX model after resolidification, colored by phase and Mo concentration. The magnified MPF models during the resolidification of the regions indicated by rectangles in Figs. 8a and 8b are also shown as Figs. 8c and 8d. Dendrites grew from the bottom of the remelted region, with the segregation of solute elements occurring in the interdendritic regions. The entire domain become the FCC phase after the resolidification, as shown in Fig. 8a. The bottom of the remelted regions exhibited a different microstructure, and Mo was depressed at the remelted regions, rather than the interdendritic regions. The different solute segregation behavior [44] and the microstructure formation [45] at the melt pool boundary is also observed in LPBF manufactured 316 L stainless steel. We found that this microstructure was formed by further remelting during the resolidification process, which is shown in Fig. 9. Here, the solidified HX model was heated, and the interdendritic regions were preferentially melted while concentration fluctuations were maintained (Fig. 9a1 and 9a2). Subsequently, planer interface growth occurs near the melt pool boundary where the solidification rate is almost zero, and the dendrites outside of the boundary are grown epitaxially (Fig. 9b1 and 9b2). However, these remelted again because of the temperature rise (Fig. 9c1 and 9c2, and the temperature-time profile shown in Fig. 9e). The remelted regions then cooled and solidified with the abnormal solute segregations (Fig. 9d1 and 9d2). Then, dendrite grows from amplified fluctuations under the solidification rate larger than the criterion of constitutional supercooling (Fig. 9d1, 9d2, and Fig. 8d). It has been reported [46][47] that temperature rising owning to latent heat affects microstructure formation: phase-field simulations of a Ni–Al binary alloy suggest that the release of latent heat during solidification increases the average temperature of the system [46] and strongly influences the solidification conditions [47]. In this study, the release of latent heat during solidification is considered in CtFD simulations for calculating the temperature distribution, and the temperature increase is suggested to have also occurred due to the release of latent heat.

Fig. 8
Fig. 9

Fig. 10b1 and 10c1 show the solute element concentration line profiles of the resolidified model along the growth direction indicated by dashed lines in Fig. 10a. Fig. 10b2 and 10c2 show the corresponding differences in concentration from the alloy composition. The segregation behavior of solute elements at the interdendritic regions (Fig. 10b1 and 10b2) was the same as that in the solidified model (Figs. 7b1 and 7b2). Here, Cr, Mo, C, Mn, and W were segregated to the interdendritic regions, while Si, Fe, and Co were depressed. However, the concentration fluctuations at the interdendritic regions were larger than those in the solidified model. Moreover, the segregation of the outside of the melt pool, i.e., the heat-affected zone, was remarkable throughout remelting and resolidification. Different segregation behaviors were observed in the re-remelted region: Mo, Si, Mn, and W were segregated, while Ni, Fe, and Co were depressed. These solute segregations caused by remelting are expected to heavily influence the crack behavior.

Fig. 10

4. Discussion

4.1. Effect of segregation of solute elements on liquation cracking susceptibility

Strong solute segregation was observed between the interdendritic regions of the solidified alloy (Fig. 7). In addition, the solute segregation behavior was significantly affected by remelting and resolidification and varied across the alloy. Solute segregation can be categorized by the regions shown in Fig. 11a1–11a4, namely the cell boundary (Fig. 11a1), interior of the melt-pool boundary (Fig. 11a2), re-remelted regions (Fig. 11a3), and heat-affected regions (Fig. 11a4). The concentration profiles of these regions are shown in Fig. 11b1–11b4. Solute segregation was the highest in the cell boundary region. The solute segregation in the heat-affected region was almost the same as that in the cell boundary region, but seemed to have been attenuated by reheating during remelting and resolidification. The interior of the melt-pool boundary region also had the same tendency for solute segregation. However, the amount of Cr segregation was smaller than that of Mo. A decrease in the Cr concentration was also mitigated, and the concentration remained the same as that in the alloy composition. Fig. 11c1–11c4 show the chemical potentials of the solute elements for the FCC phase at 1073 K calculated using the compositions of those interfacial regions. All the interfacial regions showed non-constant chemical potentials for each element along the perpendicular direction, but the fluctuations of the chemical potentials differed by the type of interfaces. In particular, the fluctuation of the chemical potential of C at the cell boundary region was the largest, suggesting it can be relaxed easily by heat treatment. On the other hand, the fluctuations of the other elements in all the regions were small. The solute segregations are most likely to remain after the heat treatment and are supposed to affect the cracking susceptibilities.

Fig. 11

The solidus temperatures TS, the difference between the liquidus and solidus temperatures (i.e., the brittle temperature range (BTR)), and the fractions of the equilibrium precipitate phases at 1073 K of the interfacial regions were calculated as the liquation, solidification, and ductility dip cracking susceptibilities, respectively. At the cell boundary (Fig. 12a1), interior of the melt-pool boundary (Fig. 12a1), and heat-affected regions (Fig. 12a1), the internal and interfacial regions exhibited higher and lower TS compared to that of the alloy composition, respectively. The lowest Ts was obtained with the composition at the cell boundary region, which is the largest solute-segregated region. It has been suggested that strong segregations of solute elements in LPBF lead to liquation cracks [16]. This study also supports this suggestion, and liquation cracks are more likely to occur at the interfacial regions indicated by predicting the solute segregation behavior using the MPF model. Additionally, the BTRs of the cell boundary, interior of the melt-pool boundary, and heat-affected regions were wider at the interdendritic regions, and solidification cracks were also likely to occur in these regions. Moreover, within the solute segregation regions, the fraction of the precipitate phases in these interfacial regions was larger than that calculated using the alloy composition (Fig. 12c1, 12c2, and 12c4). This indicates that ductility dip cracking is also likely to occur at the cell boundary, interior of the melt-pool boundary, and in heat-affected regions. Contrarily, we found that the re-remelted region exhibited a higher TS and smaller BTR even in the interfacial region (Fig. 12a3 and 12b3), where the solute segregation behavior was different from that of the other regions. In addition, the re-remelting region exhibited less precipitation compared with the other segregated regions (Fig. 12c3). The re-remelting caused by the latent heat can attenuate solute segregation, prevent Ts from decreasing, decrease the BTR, and decrease the amount of precipitate phases. Alloys with a large amount of latent heat are expected to increase the re-remelting region, thereby decreasing the susceptibility to liquation and ductility dip cracks due to solute element segregation. This can be a guide for designing alloys for the LPBF process. As mentioned in Section 3.4, the microstructure [45] and the solute segregation behavior [44] at the melt pool boundary of LPBF-manufactured 316 L stainless steel are observed, and they are different from that of the interdendritic regions. Experimental observations of the solute segregation behavior in the LPBF-fabricated Ni-based alloys are currently underway.

Fig. 12

4.2. Applicability of the conventional MPF simulation to microstructure formation under LPBF

As the solidification growth rate increases, segregation coefficients approach 1, and the fluctuation of the solid/liquid interface is suppressed by the interfacial tension. The interface growth occurs in a flat fashion instead of having a cellular morphology at a velocity above the absolute stability limit, Ras, predicted by the Mullins-Sekerka theory [29]Ras = (ΔT0 DL) / (k Γ) where ΔT0DLk, and Γ are the difference between the liquidus and solidus temperatures, equilibrium segregation coefficient, the diffusivity of liquid, and the Gibbs-Thomson coefficient, respectively.

The Ras of HX was calculated using the equation and the thermodynamic parameters obtained by the TCNI9 thermodynamic database [39]. The calculated Ras of HX was 3.9 m s-1 and is ten times larger than that of the Ni–Nb alloy (approximately 0.4 m s-1[20]. The HX alloy was solidified under R values in the range of 8.2 × 10−2–6.3 × 10−1 m s-1. The theoretically calculated criterion is larger than the evaluated R, and is in agreement with the experiment in which dendritic growth is observed in the melt pool (Fig. 5). In contrast, Karayagiz et al. [20] reported that the R of the Ni–Nb binary alloy under LPBF was as high as approximately 2 m s-1, and planar interface growth was observed to be predominant under the high-growth-rate conditions. These experimentally observed microstructures agree well with the prediction by the Mullins-Sekerka theory about the relationship between the morphology and solidification rates.

In this study, the solidification microstructure formed by the laser-beam irradiation of an HX multicomponent Ni-based superalloy was reproduced by a conventional MPF simulation, in which the system was assumed to be in a quasi-equilibrium condition. Boussinot et al. [24] also suggested that the conventional phase-field model can be applied to simulate the microstructure of an IN718 multicomponent Ni-based superalloy in LPBF. In contrast, Kagayaski et al. [20] suggested that the conventional MPF simulation cannot be applied to the solidification of the Ni-Nb binary alloy system and that the finite interface dissipation model proposed by Steinbach et al. [48][49] is necessary to simulate the high solidification rates observed in LPBF. The difference in the applicability of the conventional MPF method to HX and Ni–Nb binary alloys is presumed to arise from the differences in the non-equilibrium degree of these systems under the high solidification rates of LPBF. The results suggest that Ras can be used as a simple index to apply the conventional MPF model for solidification in LPBF. Solidification becomes a non-equilibrium process as the solidification rate approaches the limit of absolute stability, Ras. In this study, the solidification of the HX multicomponent system occurred under a relatively low solidification rate compared to Ras, and the microstructure of the conventional MPF model was successfully reproduced in the physical experiment. However, note that the limit of absolute stability predicted by the Mullins-Sekerka theory was originally proposed for solidification in a binary alloy system, and further investigation is required to consider its applicability to multicomponent alloy systems. Moreover, the fast solidification, such as in the LPBF process, causes segregation coefficient approaching a value of 1 [20][21][25] corresponds to a diffusion length that is on the order of the atomic interface thickness. When the segregation coefficient approaches 1, solute undercooling disappears; hence, there is no driving force to amplify fluctuations regardless of whether interfacial tension is present. This phenomenon should be further investigated in future studies.

5. Conclusions

We simulated solute segregation in a multicomponent HX alloy under the LPBF process by an MPF simulation using the temperature distributions obtained by a CtFD simulation. We set the parameters of the CtFD simulation to match the melt pool shape formed in the laser-irradiation experiment and found that solidification occurred under high cooling rates of up to 1.6 × 10K s-1.

MPF simulations using the temperature distributions from CtFD simulation could reproduce the experimentally observed PDAS and revealed that significant solute segregation occurred at the interdendritic regions. Equilibrium thermodynamic calculations using the alloy compositions of the segregated regions when considering crack sensitivities suggested a decrease in the solidus temperature and an increase in the amount of carbide precipitation, thereby increasing the susceptibility to liquation and ductility dip cracks in these regions. Notably, these changes were suppressed at the melt-pool boundary region, where re-remelting occurred during the stacking of the layer above. This effect can be used to achieve a novel in-process segregation attenuation.

Our study revealed that a conventional MPF simulation weakly coupled with a CtFD simulation can be used to study the solidification of multicomponent alloys in LPBF, contrary to the cases of binary alloys investigated in previous studies. We discussed the applicability of the conventional MPF model to the LPBF process in terms of the limit of absolute stability, Ras, and suggested that alloys with a high limit velocity, i.e., multicomponent alloys, can be simulated using the conventional MPF model even under the high solidification velocity conditions of LPBF.

CRediT authorship contribution statement

Masayuki Okugawa: Writing – review & editing, Writing – original draft, Visualization, Validation, Software, Methodology, Investigation, Formal analysis, Data curation, Conceptualization. Takayoshi Nakano: Writing – review & editing, Validation, Supervision, Funding acquisition. Yuichiro Koizumi: Writing – review & editing, Visualization, Validation, Supervision, Project administration, Methodology, Investigation, Funding acquisition, Formal analysis, Data curation, Conceptualization. Sukeharu Nomoto: Writing – review & editing, Validation, Investigation. Makoto Watanabe: Writing – review & editing, Validation, Supervision, Funding acquisition. Katsuhiko Sawaizumi: Validation, Software, Investigation, Formal analysis, Data curation. Kenji Saito: Visualization, Validation, Software, Methodology, Investigation, Formal analysis, Data curation. Haruki Yoshima: Visualization, Validation, Software, Investigation, Formal analysis, Data curation.

Declaration of Competing Interest

The authors declare that they have no known competing financial interests or personal relationships that could have appeared to influence the work reported in this paper

Acknowledgments

This work was partly supported by the Cabinet Office, Government of Japan, Cross-ministerial Strategic Innovation Promotion Program (SIP), “Materials Integration for Revolutionary Design System of Structural Materials,” (funding agency: The Japan Science and Technology Agency), by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Numbers 21H05018 and 21H05193, and by CREST Nanomechanics: Elucidation of macroscale mechanical properties based on understanding nanoscale dynamics for innovative mechanical materials (Grant Number: JPMJCR2194) from the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST). The authors would like to thank Mr. H. Kawabata and Mr. K. Kimura for their technical support with the sample preparations and laser beam irradiation experiments.

Appendix A. Supplementary material

Download : Download Word document (654KB)

Supplementary material.

Data availability

Data will be made available on request.

References

Figure 5. Simulation of the molten pool under low-speed scanning (1.06 m/s). (a) Sequential solidification of the molten pool at the end of the melt track for laser powers of 190 and 340 W, respectively. (b) Recoil pressure on the molten pool at the keyhole for laser powers of 190 and 340 W, respectively. (c) The force diagram of the melt at the back of the keyhole at t = 750 μs in case B. (d) Temperature gradient at the solid–liquid interface of the molten pool at the moment the laser is deactivated in case A. (e) Temperature gradient at the solid–liquid interface of the molten pool at the moment the laser is deactivated in case B.

Revealing formation mechanism of end of processdepression in laser powder bed fusion by multiphysics meso-scale simulation

다중물리 메조 규모 시뮬레이션을 통해 레이저 분말층 융합에서 공정 종료의 함몰 형성 메커니즘 공개

Haodong Chen a,b, Xin Lin a,b,c, Yajing Sund, Shuhao Wanga,b, Kunpeng Zhu a,b,c and Binbin Dana,b

To link to this article: https://doi.org/10.1080/17452759.2024.2326599

ABSTRACT

Unintended end-of-process depression (EOPD) commonly occurs in laser powder bed fusion (LPBF), leading to poor surface quality and lower fatigue strength, especially for many implants. In this study, a high-fidelity multi-physics meso-scale simulation model is developed to uncover the forming mechanism of this defect. A defect-process map of the EOPD phenomenon is obtained using this simulation model. It is found that the EOPD formation mechanisms are different under distinct regions of process parameters. At low scanning speeds in keyhole mode, the long-lasting recoil pressure and the large temperature gradient easily induce EOPD. While at high scanning speeds in keyhole mode, the shallow molten pool morphology and the large solidification rate allow the keyhole to evolve into an EOPD quickly. Nevertheless, in the conduction mode, the Marangoni effects along with a faster solidification rate induce EOPD. Finally, a ‘step’ variable power strategy is proposed to optimise the EOPD defects for the case with high volumetric energy density at low scanning speeds. This work provides a profound understanding and valuable insights into the quality control of LPBF fabrication.

의도하지 않은 공정 종료 후 함몰(EOPD)은 LPBF(레이저 분말층 융합)에서 흔히 발생하며, 특히 많은 임플란트의 경우 표면 품질이 떨어지고 피로 강도가 낮아집니다. 본 연구에서는 이 결함의 형성 메커니즘을 밝히기 위해 충실도가 높은 다중 물리학 메조 규모 시뮬레이션 모델을 개발했습니다.

이 시뮬레이션 모델을 사용하여 EOPD 현상의 결함 프로세스 맵을 얻습니다. EOPD 형성 메커니즘은 공정 매개변수의 별개 영역에서 서로 다른 것으로 밝혀졌습니다.

키홀 모드의 낮은 스캔 속도에서는 오래 지속되는 반동 압력과 큰 온도 구배로 인해 EOPD가 쉽게 유발됩니다. 키홀 모드에서 높은 스캐닝 속도를 유지하는 동안 얕은 용융 풀 형태와 큰 응고 속도로 인해 키홀이 EOPD로 빠르게 진화할 수 있습니다.

그럼에도 불구하고 전도 모드에서는 더 빠른 응고 속도와 함께 마랑고니 효과가 EOPD를 유발합니다. 마지막으로, 낮은 스캐닝 속도에서 높은 체적 에너지 밀도를 갖는 경우에 대해 EOPD 결함을 최적화하기 위한 ‘단계’ 가변 전력 전략이 제안되었습니다.

이 작업은 LPBF 제조의 품질 관리에 대한 심오한 이해와 귀중한 통찰력을 제공합니다.

Figure 5. Simulation of the molten pool under low-speed scanning (1.06 m/s). (a) Sequential solidification of the molten pool at the
end of the melt track for laser powers of 190 and 340 W, respectively. (b) Recoil pressure on the molten pool at the keyhole for laser
powers of 190 and 340 W, respectively. (c) The force diagram of the melt at the back of the keyhole at t = 750 μs in case B. (d) Temperature gradient at the solid–liquid interface of the molten pool at the moment the laser is deactivated in case A. (e) Temperature
gradient at the solid–liquid interface of the molten pool at the moment the laser is deactivated in case B.
Figure 5. Simulation of the molten pool under low-speed scanning (1.06 m/s). (a) Sequential solidification of the molten pool at the end of the melt track for laser powers of 190 and 340 W, respectively. (b) Recoil pressure on the molten pool at the keyhole for laser powers of 190 and 340 W, respectively. (c) The force diagram of the melt at the back of the keyhole at t = 750 μs in case B. (d) Temperature gradient at the solid–liquid interface of the molten pool at the moment the laser is deactivated in case A. (e) Temperature gradient at the solid–liquid interface of the molten pool at the moment the laser is deactivated in case B.

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Schematic diagram of HP-LPBF melting process.

Modeling and numerical studies of high-precision laser powder bed fusion

Yi Wei ;Genyu Chen;Nengru Tao;Wei Zhou
https://doi.org/10.1063/5.0191504

In order to comprehensively reveal the evolutionary dynamics of the molten pool and the state of motion of the fluid during the high-precision laser powder bed fusion (HP-LPBF) process, this study aims to deeply investigate the specific manifestations of the multiphase flow, solidification phenomena, and heat transfer during the process by means of numerical simulation methods. Numerical simulation models of SS316L single-layer HP-LPBF formation with single and double tracks were constructed using the discrete element method and the computational fluid dynamics method. The effects of various factors such as Marangoni convection, surface tension, vapor recoil, gravity, thermal convection, thermal radiation, and evaporative heat dissipation on the heat and mass transfer in the molten pool have been paid attention to during the model construction process. The results show that the molten pool exhibits a “comet” shape, in which the temperature gradient at the front end of the pool is significantly larger than that at the tail end, with the highest temperature gradient up to 1.69 × 108 K/s. It is also found that the depth of the second track is larger than that of the first one, and the process parameter window has been determined preliminarily. In addition, the application of HP-LPBF technology helps to reduce the surface roughness and minimize the forming size.

Topics

Heat transferNonequilibrium thermodynamicsSolidification processComputer simulationDiscrete element methodLasersMass transferFluid mechanicsComputational fluid dynamicsMultiphase flows

I. INTRODUCTION

Laser powder bed fusion (LPBF) has become a research hotspot in the field of additive manufacturing of metals due to its advantages of high-dimensional accuracy, good surface quality, high density, and high material utilization.1,2 With the rapid development of electronics, medical, automotive, biotechnology, energy, communication, and optics, the demand for microfabrication technology is increasing day by day.3 High-precision laser powder bed fusion (HP-LPBF) is one of the key manufacturing technologies for tiny parts in the fields of electronics, medical, automotive, biotechnology, energy, communication, and optics because of its process characteristics such as small focal spot diameter, small powder particle size, and thin powder layup layer thickness.4–13 Compared with LPBF, HP-LPBF has the significant advantages of smaller focal spot diameter, smaller powder particle size, and thinner layer thickness. These advantages make HP-LPBF perform better in producing micro-fine parts, high surface quality, and parts with excellent mechanical properties.

HP-LPBF is in the exploratory stage, and researchers have already done some exploratory studies on the focal spot diameter, the amount of defocusing, and the powder particle size. In order to explore the influence of changing the laser focal spot diameter on the LPBF process characteristics of the law, Wildman et al.14 studied five groups of different focal spot diameter LPBF forming 316L stainless steel (SS316L) processing effect, the smallest focal spot diameter of 26 μm, and the results confirm that changing the focal spot diameter can be achieved to achieve the energy control, so as to control the quality of forming. Subsequently, Mclouth et al.15 proposed the laser out-of-focus amount (focal spot diameter) parameter, which characterizes the distance between the forming plane and the laser focal plane. The laser energy density was controlled by varying the defocusing amount while keeping the laser parameters constant. Sample preparation at different focal positions was investigated, and their microstructures were characterized. The results show that the samples at the focal plane have finer microstructure than those away from the focal plane, which is the effect of higher power density and smaller focal spot diameter. In order to explore the influence of changing the powder particle size on the characteristics of the LPBF process, Qian et al.16 carried out single-track scanning simulations on powder beds with average powder particle sizes of 70 and 40 μm, respectively, and the results showed that the melt tracks sizes were close to each other under the same process parameters for the two particle-size distributions and that the molten pool of powder beds with small particles was more elongated and the edges of the melt tracks were relatively flat. In order to explore the superiority of HP-LPBF technology, Xu et al.17 conducted a comparative analysis of HP-LPBF and conventional LPBF of SS316L. The results showed that the average surface roughness of the top surface after forming by HP-LPBF could reach 3.40 μm. Once again, it was verified that HP-LPBF had higher forming quality than conventional LPBF. On this basis, Wei et al.6 comparatively analyzed the effects of different laser focal spot diameters on different powder particle sizes formed by LPBF. The results showed that the smaller the laser focal spot diameter, the fewer the defects on the top and side surfaces. The above research results confirm that reducing the laser focal spot diameter can obtain higher energy density and thus better forming quality.

LPBF involves a variety of complex systems and mechanisms, and the final quality of the part is influenced by a large number of process parameters.18–24 Some research results have shown that there are more than 50 factors affecting the quality of the specimen. The influencing factors are mainly categorized into three main groups: (1) laser parameters, (2) powder parameters, and (3) equipment parameters, which interact with each other to determine the final specimen quality. With the continuous development of technologies such as computational materials science and computational fluid dynamics (CFD), the method of studying the influence of different factors on the forming quality of LPBF forming process has been shifted from time-consuming and laborious experimental characterization to the use of numerical simulation methods. As a result, more and more researchers are adopting this approach for their studies. Currently, numerical simulation studies on LPBF are mainly focused on the exploration of molten pool, temperature distribution, and residual stresses.

  1. Finite element simulation based on continuum mechanics and free surface fluid flow modeling based on fluid dynamics are two common approaches to study the behavior of LPBF molten pool.25–28 Finite element simulation focuses on the temperature and thermal stress fields, treats the powder bed as a continuum, and determines the molten pool size by plotting the elemental temperature above the melting point. In contrast, fluid dynamics modeling can simulate the 2D or 3D morphology of the metal powder pile and obtain the powder size and distribution by certain algorithms.29 The flow in the molten pool is mainly affected by recoil pressure and the Marangoni effect. By simulating the molten pool formation, it is possible to predict defects, molten pool shape, and flow characteristics, as well as the effect of process parameters on the molten pool geometry.30–34 In addition, other researchers have been conducted to optimize the laser processing parameters through different simulation methods and experimental data.35–46 Crystal growth during solidification is studied to further understand the effect of laser parameters on dendritic morphology and solute segregation.47–54 A multi-scale system has been developed to describe the fused deposition process during 3D printing, which is combined with the conductive heat transfer model and the dendritic solidification model.55,56
  2. Relevant scholars have adopted various different methods for simulation, such as sequential coupling theory,57 Lagrangian and Eulerian thermal models,58 birth–death element method,25 and finite element method,59 in order to reveal the physical phenomena of the laser melting process and optimize the process parameters. Luo et al.60 compared the LPBF temperature field and molten pool under double ellipsoidal and Gaussian heat sources by ANSYS APDL and found that the diffusion of the laser energy in the powder significantly affects the molten pool size and the temperature field.
  3. The thermal stresses obtained from the simulation correlate with the actual cracks,61 and local preheating can effectively reduce the residual stresses.62 A three-dimensional thermodynamic finite element model investigated the temperature and stress variations during laser-assisted fabrication and found that powder-to-solid conversion increases the temperature gradient, stresses, and warpage.63 Other scholars have predicted residual stresses and part deflection for LPBF specimens and investigated the effects of deposition pattern, heat, laser power, and scanning strategy on residual stresses, noting that high-temperature gradients lead to higher residual stresses.64–67 

In short, the process of LPBF forming SS316L is extremely complex and usually involves drastic multi-scale physicochemical changes that will only take place on a very small scale. Existing literature employs DEM-based mesoscopic-scale numerical simulations to investigate the effects of process parameters on the molten pool dynamics of LPBF-formed SS316L. However, a few studies have been reported on the key mechanisms of heating and solidification, spatter, and convective behavior of the molten pool of HP-LPBF-formed SS316L with small laser focal spot diameters. In this paper, the geometrical properties of coarse and fine powder particles under three-dimensional conditions were first calculated using DEM. Then, numerical simulation models for single-track and double-track cases in the single-layer HP-LPBF forming SS316L process were developed at mesoscopic scale using the CFD method. The flow genesis of the melt in the single-track and double-track molten pools is discussed, and their 3D morphology and dimensional characteristics are discussed. In addition, the effects of laser process parameters, powder particle size, and laser focal spot diameter on the temperature field, characterization information, and defects in the molten pool are discussed.

II. MODELING

A. 3D powder bed modeling

HP-LPBF is an advanced processing technique for preparing target parts layer by layer stacking, the process of which involves repetitive spreading and melting of powders. In this process, both the powder spreading and the morphology of the powder bed are closely related to the results of the subsequent melting process, while the melted surface also affects the uniform distribution of the next layer of powder. For this reason, this chapter focuses on the modeling of the physical action during the powder spreading process and the theory of DEM to establish the numerical model of the powder bed, so as to lay a solid foundation for the accuracy of volume of fluid (VOF) and CFD.

1. DEM

DEM is a numerical technique for calculating the interaction of a large number of particles, which calculates the forces and motions of the spheres by considering each powder sphere as an independent unit. The motion of the powder particles follows the laws of classical Newtonian mechanics, including translational and rotational,38,68–70 which are expressed as follows:����¨=���+∑��ij,

(1)����¨=∑�(�ij×�ij),

(2)

where �� is the mass of unit particle i in kg, ��¨ is the advective acceleration in m/s2, And g is the gravitational acceleration in m/s2. �ij is the force in contact with the neighboring particle � in N. �� is the rotational inertia of the unit particle � in kg · m2. ��¨ is the unit particle � angular acceleration in rad/s2. �ij is the vector pointing from unit particle � to the contact point of neighboring particle �⁠.

Equations (1) and (2) can be used to calculate the velocity and angular velocity variations of powder particles to determine their positions and velocities. A three-dimensional powder bed model of SS316L was developed using DEM. The powder particles are assumed to be perfect spheres, and the substrate and walls are assumed to be rigid. To describe the contact between the powder particles and between the particles and the substrate, a non-slip Hertz–Mindlin nonlinear spring-damping model71 was used with the following expression:�hz=��������+��[(�����ij−�eff����)−(�����+�eff����)],

(3)

where �hz is the force calculated using the Hertzian in M. �� and �� are the radius of unit particles � and � in m, respectively. �� is the overlap size of the two powder particles in m. ��⁠, �� are the elastic constants in the normal and tangential directions, respectively. �ij is the unit vector connecting the centerlines of the two powder particles. �eff is the effective mass of the two powder particles in kg. �� and �� are the viscoelastic damping constants in the normal and tangential directions, respectively. �� and �� are the components of the relative velocities of the two powder particles. ��� is the displacement vector between two spherical particles. The schematic diagram of overlapping powder particles is shown in Fig. 1.

FIG. 1.

VIEW LARGEDOWNLOAD SLIDE

Schematic diagram of overlapping powder particles.

Because the particle size of the powder used for HP-LPBF is much smaller than 100 μm, the effect of van der Waals forces must be considered. Therefore, the cohesive force �jkr of the Hertz–Mindlin model was used instead of van der Waals forces,72 with the following expression:�jkr=−4��0�*�1.5+4�*3�*�3,

(4)1�*=(1−��2)��+(1−��2)��,

(5)1�*=1��+1��,

(6)

where �* is the equivalent Young’s modulus in GPa; �* is the equivalent particle radius in m; �0 is the surface energy of the powder particles in J/m2; α is the contact radius in m; �� and �� are the Young’s modulus of the unit particles � and �⁠, respectively, in GPa; and �� and �� are the Poisson’s ratio of the unit particles � and �⁠, respectively.

2. Model building

Figure 2 shows a 3D powder bed model generated using DEM with a coarse powder geometry of 1000 × 400 × 30 μm3. The powder layer thickness is 30 μm, and the powder bed porosity is 40%. The average particle size of this spherical powder is 31.7 μm and is normally distributed in the range of 15–53 μm. The geometry of the fine powder was 1000 × 400 × 20 μm3, with a layer thickness of 20 μm, and the powder bed porosity of 40%. The average particle size of this spherical powder is 11.5 μm and is normally distributed in the range of 5–25 μm. After the 3D powder bed model is generated, it needs to be imported into the CFD simulation software for calculation, and the imported geometric model is shown in Fig. 3. This geometric model is mainly composed of three parts: protective gas, powder bed, and substrate. Under the premise of ensuring the accuracy of the calculation, the mesh size is set to 3 μm, and the total number of coarse powder meshes is 1 704 940. The total number of fine powder meshes is 3 982 250.

FIG. 2.

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Three-dimensional powder bed model: (a) coarse powder, (b) fine powder.

FIG. 3.

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Geometric modeling of the powder bed computational domain: (a) coarse powder, (b) fine powder.

B. Modeling of fluid mechanics simulation

In order to solve the flow, melting, and solidification problems involved in HP-LPBF molten pool, the study must follow the three governing equations of conservation of mass, conservation of energy, and conservation of momentum.73 The VOF method, which is the most widely used in fluid dynamics, is used to solve the molten pool dynamics model.

1. VOF

VOF is a method for tracking the free interface between the gas and liquid phases on the molten pool surface. The core idea of the method is to define a volume fraction function F within each grid, indicating the proportion of the grid space occupied by the material, 0 ≤ F ≤ 1 in Fig. 4. Specifically, when F = 0, the grid is empty and belongs to the gas-phase region; when F = 1, the grid is completely filled with material and belongs to the liquid-phase region; and when 0 < F < 1, the grid contains free surfaces and belongs to the mixed region. The direction normal to the free surface is the direction of the fastest change in the volume fraction F (the direction of the gradient of the volume fraction), and the direction of the gradient of the volume fraction can be calculated from the values of the volume fractions in the neighboring grids.74 The equations controlling the VOF are expressed as follows:𝛻����+�⋅(��→)=0,

(7)

where t is the time in s and �→ is the liquid velocity in m/s.

FIG. 4.

VIEW LARGEDOWNLOAD SLIDE

Schematic diagram of VOF.

The material parameters of the mixing zone are altered due to the inclusion of both the gas and liquid phases. Therefore, in order to represent the density of the mixing zone, the average density �¯ is used, which is expressed as follows:72�¯=(1−�1)�gas+�1�metal,

(8)

where �1 is the proportion of liquid phase, �gas is the density of protective gas in kg/m3, and �metal is the density of metal in kg/m3.

2. Control equations and boundary conditions

Figure 5 is a schematic diagram of the HP-LPBF melting process. First, the laser light strikes a localized area of the material and rapidly heats up the area. Next, the energy absorbed in the region is diffused through a variety of pathways (heat conduction, heat convection, and surface radiation), and this process triggers complex phase transition phenomena (melting, evaporation, and solidification). In metals undergoing melting, the driving forces include surface tension and the Marangoni effect, recoil due to evaporation, and buoyancy due to gravity and uneven density. The above physical phenomena interact with each other and do not occur independently.

FIG. 5.

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Schematic diagram of HP-LPBF melting process.

  1. Laser heat sourceThe Gaussian surface heat source model is used as the laser heat source model with the following expression:�=2�0����2exp(−2�12��2),(9)where � is the heat flow density in W/m2, �0 is the absorption rate of SS316L, �� is the radius of the laser focal spot in m, and �1 is the radial distance from the center of the laser focal spot in m. The laser focal spot can be used for a wide range of applications.
  2. Energy absorptionThe formula for calculating the laser absorption �0 of SS316L is as follows:�0=0.365(�0[1+�0(�−20)]/�)0.5,(10)where �0 is the direct current resistivity of SS316L at 20 °C in Ω m, �0 is the resistance temperature coefficient in ppm/°C, � is the temperature in °C, and � is the laser wavelength in m.
  3. Heat transferThe basic principle of heat transfer is conservation of energy, which is expressed as follows:𝛻𝛻𝛻�(��)��+�·(��→�)=�·(�0����)+��,(11)where � is the density of liquid phase SS316L in kg/m3, �� is the specific heat capacity of SS316L in J/(kg K), 𝛻� is the gradient operator, t is the time in s, T is the temperature in K, 𝛻�� is the temperature gradient, �→ is the velocity vector, �0 is the coefficient of thermal conduction of SS316L in W/(m K), and  �� is the thermal energy dissipation term in the molten pool.
  4. Molten pool flowThe following three conditions need to be satisfied for the molten pool to flow:
    • Conservation of mass with the following expression:𝛻�·(��→)=0.(12)
    • Conservation of momentum (Navier–Stokes equation) with the following expression:𝛻𝛻𝛻𝛻���→��+�(�→·�)�→=�·[−pI+�(��→+(��→)�)]+�,(13)where � is the pressure in Pa exerted on the liquid phase SS316L microelement, � is the unit matrix, � is the fluid viscosity in N s/m2, and � is the volumetric force (gravity, atmospheric pressure, surface tension, vapor recoil, and the Marangoni effect).
    • Conservation of energy, see Eq. (11)
  5. Surface tension and the Marangoni effectThe effect of temperature on the surface tension coefficient is considered and set as a linear relationship with the following expression:�=�0−��dT(�−��),(14)where � is the surface tension of the molten pool at temperature T in N/m, �� is the melting temperature of SS316L in K, �0 is the surface tension of the molten pool at temperature �� in Pa, and σdσ/ dT is the surface tension temperature coefficient in N/(m K).In general, surface tension decreases with increasing temperature. A temperature gradient causes a gradient in surface tension that drives the liquid to flow, known as the Marangoni effect.
  6. Metal vapor recoilAt higher input energy densities, the maximum temperature of the molten pool surface reaches the evaporation temperature of the material, and a gasification recoil pressure occurs vertically downward toward the molten pool surface, which will be the dominant driving force for the molten pool flow.75 The expression is as follows:��=0.54�� exp ���−���0���,(15)where �� is the gasification recoil pressure in Pa, �� is the ambient pressure in kPa, �� is the latent heat of evaporation in J/kg, �0 is the gas constant in J/(mol K), T is the surface temperature of the molten pool in K, and Te is the evaporation temperature in K.
  7. Solid–liquid–gas phase transitionWhen the laser hits the powder layer, the powder goes through three stages: heating, melting, and solidification. During the solidification phase, mutual transformations between solid, liquid, and gaseous states occur. At this point, the latent heat of phase transition absorbed or released during the phase transition needs to be considered.68 The phase transition is represented based on the relationship between energy and temperature with the following expression:�=�����,(�<��),�(��)+�−����−����,(��<�<��)�(��)+(�−��)����,(��<�),,(16)where �� and �� are solid and liquid phase density, respectively, of SS316L in kg/m3. �� and �� unit volume of solid and liquid phase-specific heat capacity, respectively, of SS316L in J/(kg K). �� and ��⁠, respectively, are the solidification temperature and melting temperature of SS316L in K. �� is the latent heat of the phase transition of SS316L melting in J/kg.

3. Assumptions

The CFD model was computed using the commercial software package FLOW-3D.76 In order to simplify the calculation and solution process while ensuring the accuracy of the results, the model makes the following assumptions:

  1. It is assumed that the effects of thermal stress and material solid-phase thermal expansion on the calculation results are negligible.
  2. The molten pool flow is assumed to be a Newtonian incompressible laminar flow, while the effects of liquid thermal expansion and density on the results are neglected.
  3. It is assumed that the surface tension can be simplified to an equivalent pressure acting on the free surface of the molten pool, and the effect of chemical composition on the results is negligible.
  4. Neglecting the effect of the gas flow field on the molten pool.
  5. The mass loss due to evaporation of the liquid metal is not considered.
  6. The influence of the plasma effect of the molten metal on the calculation results is neglected.

It is worth noting that the formulation of assumptions requires a trade-off between accuracy and computational efficiency. In the above models, some physical phenomena that have a small effect or high difficulty on the calculation results are simplified or ignored. Such simplifications make numerical simulations more efficient and computationally tractable, while still yielding accurate results.

4. Initial conditions

The preheating temperature of the substrate was set to 393 K, at which time all materials were in the solid state and the flow rate was zero.

5. Material parameters

The material used is SS316L and the relevant parameters required for numerical simulations are shown in Table I.46,77,78

TABLE I.

SS316L-related parameters.

PropertySymbolValue
Density of solid metal (kg/m3�metal 7980 
Solid phase line temperature (K) �� 1658 
Liquid phase line temperature (K) �� 1723 
Vaporization temperature (K) �� 3090 
Latent heat of melting (⁠ J/kg⁠) �� 2.60×105 
Latent heat of evaporation (⁠ J/kg⁠) �� 7.45×106 
Surface tension of liquid phase (N /m⁠) � 1.60 
Liquid metal viscosity (kg/m s) �� 6×10−3 
Gaseous metal viscosity (kg/m s) �gas 1.85×10−5 
Temperature coefficient of surface tension (N/m K) ��/�T 0.80×10−3 
Molar mass (⁠ kg/mol⁠) 0.05 593 
Emissivity � 0.26 
Laser absorption �0 0.35 
Ambient pressure (kPa) �� 101 325 
Ambient temperature (K) �0 300 
Stefan–Boltzmann constant (W/m2 K4� 5.67×10−8 
Thermal conductivity of metals (⁠ W/m K⁠) � 24.55 
Density of protective gas (kg/m3�gas 1.25 
Coefficient of thermal expansion (/K) �� 16×10−6 
Generalized gas constant (⁠ J/mol K⁠) 8.314 

III. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

With the objective of studying in depth the evolutionary patterns of single-track and double-track molten pool development, detailed observations were made for certain specific locations in the model, as shown in Fig. 6. In this figure, P1 and P2 represent the longitudinal tangents to the centers of the two melt tracks in the XZ plane, while L1 is the transverse profile in the YZ plane. The scanning direction is positive and negative along the X axis. Points A and B are the locations of the centers of the molten pool of the first and second melt tracks, respectively (x = 1.995 × 10−4, y = 5 × 10−7, and z = −4.85 × 10−5).

FIG. 6.

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Schematic diagram of observation position.

A. Single-track simulation

A series of single-track molten pool simulation experiments were carried out in order to investigate the influence law of laser power as well as scanning speed on the HP-LPBF process. Figure 7 demonstrates the evolution of the 3D morphology and temperature field of the single-track molten pool in the time period of 50–500 μs under a laser power of 100 W and a scanning speed of 800 mm/s. The powder bed is in the natural cooling state. When t = 50 μs, the powder is heated by the laser heat and rapidly melts and settles to form the initial molten pool. This process is accompanied by partial melting of the substrate and solidification together with the melted powder. The molten pool rapidly expands with increasing width, depth, length, and temperature, as shown in Fig. 7(a). When t = 150 μs, the molten pool expands more obviously, and the temperature starts to transfer to the surrounding area, forming a heat-affected zone. At this point, the width of the molten pool tends to stabilize, and the temperature in the center of the molten pool has reached its peak and remains largely stable. However, the phenomenon of molten pool spatter was also observed in this process, as shown in Fig. 7(b). As time advances, when t = 300 μs, solidification begins to occur at the tail of the molten pool, and tiny ripples are produced on the solidified surface. This is due to the fact that the melt flows toward the region with large temperature gradient under the influence of Marangoni convection and solidifies together with the melt at the end of the bath. At this point, the temperature gradient at the front of the bath is significantly larger than at the end. While the width of the molten pool was gradually reduced, the shape of the molten pool was gradually changed to a “comet” shape. In addition, a slight depression was observed at the top of the bath because the peak temperature at the surface of the bath reached the evaporation temperature, which resulted in a recoil pressure perpendicular to the surface of the bath downward, creating a depressed region. As the laser focal spot moves and is paired with the Marangoni convection of the melt, these recessed areas will be filled in as shown in Fig. 7(c). It has been shown that the depressed regions are the result of the coupled effect of Marangoni convection, recoil pressure, and surface tension.79 By t = 500 μs, the width and height of the molten pool stabilize and show a “comet” shape in Fig. 7(d).

FIG. 7.

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Single-track molten pool process: (a) t = 50  ��⁠, (b) t = 150  ��⁠, (c) t = 300  ��⁠, (d) t = 500  ��⁠.

Figure 8 depicts the velocity vector diagram of the P1 profile in a single-track molten pool, the length of the arrows represents the magnitude of the velocity, and the maximum velocity is about 2.36 m/s. When t = 50 μs, the molten pool takes shape, and the velocities at the two ends of the pool are the largest. The variation of the velocities at the front end is especially more significant in Fig. 8(a). As the time advances to t = 150 μs, the molten pool expands rapidly, in which the velocity at the tail increases and changes more significantly, while the velocity at the front is relatively small. At this stage, the melt moves backward from the center of the molten pool, which in turn expands the molten pool area. The melt at the back end of the molten pool center flows backward along the edge of the molten pool surface and then converges along the edge of the molten pool to the bottom center, rising to form a closed loop. Similarly, a similar closed loop is formed at the front end of the center of the bath, but with a shorter path. However, a large portion of the melt in the center of the closed loop formed at the front end of the bath is in a nearly stationary state. The main cause of this melt flow phenomenon is the effect of temperature gradient and surface tension (the Marangoni effect), as shown in Figs. 8(b) and 8(e). This dynamic behavior of the melt tends to form an “elliptical” pool. At t = 300 μs, the tendency of the above two melt flows to close the loop is more prominent and faster in Fig. 8(c). When t = 500 μs, the velocity vector of the molten pool shows a stable trend, and the closed loop of melt flow also remains stable. With the gradual laser focal spot movement, the melt is gradually solidified at its tail, and finally, a continuous and stable single track is formed in Fig. 8(d).

FIG. 8.

VIEW LARGEDOWNLOAD SLIDE

Vector plot of single-track molten pool velocity in XZ longitudinal section: (a) t = 50  ��⁠, (b) t = 150  ��⁠, (c) t = 300  ��⁠, (d) t = 500  ��⁠, (e) molten pool flow.

In order to explore in depth the transient evolution of the molten pool, the evolution of the single-track temperature field and the melt flow was monitored in the YZ cross section. Figure 9(a) shows the state of the powder bed at the initial moment. When t = 250 μs, the laser focal spot acts on the powder bed and the powder starts to melt and gradually collects in the molten pool. At this time, the substrate will also start to melt, and the melt flow mainly moves in the downward and outward directions and the velocity is maximum at the edges in Fig. 9(b). When t = 300 μs, the width and depth of the molten pool increase due to the recoil pressure. At this time, the melt flows more slowly at the center, but the direction of motion is still downward in Fig. 9(c). When t = 350 μs, the width and depth of the molten pool further increase, at which time the intensity of the melt flow reaches its peak and the direction of motion remains the same in Fig. 9(d). When t = 400 μs, the melt starts to move upward, and the surrounding powder or molten material gradually fills up, causing the surface of the molten pool to begin to flatten. At this time, the maximum velocity of the melt is at the center of the bath, while the velocity at the edge is close to zero, and the edge of the melt starts to solidify in Fig. 9(e). When t = 450 μs, the melt continues to move upward, forming a convex surface of the melt track. However, the melt movement slows down, as shown in Fig. 9(f). When t = 500 μs, the melt further moves upward and its speed gradually becomes smaller. At the same time, the melt solidifies further, as shown in Fig. 9(g). When t = 550 μs, the melt track is basically formed into a single track with a similar “mountain” shape. At this stage, the velocity is close to zero only at the center of the molten pool, and the flow behavior of the melt is poor in Fig. 9(h). At t = 600 μs, the melt stops moving and solidification is rapidly completed. Up to this point, a single track is formed in Fig. 9(i). During the laser action on the powder bed, the substrate melts and combines with the molten state powder. The powder-to-powder fusion is like the convergence of water droplets, which are rapidly fused by surface tension. However, the fusion between the molten state powder and the substrate occurs driven by surface tension, and the molten powder around the molten pool is pulled toward the substrate (a wetting effect occurs), which ultimately results in the formation of a monolithic whole.38,80,81

FIG. 9.

VIEW LARGEDOWNLOAD SLIDE

Evolution of single-track molten pool temperature and melt flow in the YZ cross section: (a) t = 0  ��⁠, (b) t = 250  ��⁠, (c) t = 300  ��⁠, (d) t = 350  ��⁠, (e) t = 400  ��⁠, (f) t = 450  ��⁠, (g) t = 500  ��⁠, (h) t = 550  ��⁠, (i) t = 600  ��⁠.

The wetting ability between the liquid metal and the solid substrate in the molten pool directly affects the degree of balling of the melt,82,83 and the wetting ability can be measured by the contact angle of a single track in Fig. 10. A smaller value of contact angle represents better wettability. The contact angle α can be calculated by�=�1−�22,

(17)

where �1 and �2 are the contact angles of the left and right regions, respectively.

FIG. 10.

VIEW LARGEDOWNLOAD SLIDE

Schematic of contact angle.

Relevant studies have confirmed that the wettability is better at a contact angle α around or below 40°.84 After measurement, a single-track contact angle α of about 33° was obtained under this process parameter, which further confirms the good wettability.

B. Double-track simulation

In order to deeply investigate the influence of hatch spacing on the characteristics of the HP-LPBF process, a series of double-track molten pool simulation experiments were systematically carried out. Figure 11 shows in detail the dynamic changes of the 3D morphology and temperature field of the double-track molten pool in the time period of 2050–2500 μs under the conditions of laser power of 100 W, scanning speed of 800 mm/s, and hatch spacing of 0.06 mm. By comparing the study with Fig. 7, it is observed that the basic characteristics of the 3D morphology and temperature field of the second track are similar to those of the first track. However, there are subtle differences between them. The first track exhibits a basically symmetric shape, but the second track morphology shows a slight deviation influenced by the difference in thermal diffusion rate between the solidified metal and the powder. Otherwise, the other characteristic information is almost the same as that of the first track. Figure 12 shows the velocity vector plot of the P2 profile in the double-track molten pool, with a maximum velocity of about 2.63 m/s. The melt dynamics at both ends of the pool are more stable at t = 2050 μs, where the maximum rate of the second track is only 1/3 of that of the first one. Other than that, the rest of the information is almost no significant difference from the characteristic information of the first track. Figure 13 demonstrates a detailed observation of the double-track temperature field and melts flow in the YZ cross section, and a comparative study with Fig. 9 reveals that the width of the second track is slightly wider. In addition, after the melt direction shifts from bottom to top, the first track undergoes four time periods (50 μs) to reach full solidification, while the second track takes five time periods. This is due to the presence of significant heat buildup in the powder bed after the forming of the first track, resulting in a longer dynamic time of the melt and an increased molten pool lifetime. In conclusion, the level of specimen forming can be significantly optimized by adjusting the laser power and hatch spacing.

FIG. 11.

VIEW LARGEDOWNLOAD SLIDE

Double-track molten pool process: (a) t = 2050  ��⁠, (b) t = 2150  ��⁠, (c) t = 2300  ��⁠, (d) t = 2500  ��⁠.

FIG. 12.

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Vector plot of double-track molten pool velocity in XZ longitudinal section: (a) t = 2050  ��⁠, (b) t = 2150  ��⁠, (c) t = 2300  ��⁠, (d) t = 2500  ��⁠.

FIG. 13.

VIEW LARGEDOWNLOAD SLIDE

Evolution of double-track molten pool temperature and melt flow in the YZ cross section: (a) t = 2250  ��⁠, (b) t = 2300  ��⁠, (c) t = 2350  ��⁠, (d) t = 2400  ��⁠, (e) t = 2450  ��⁠, (f) t = 2500  ��⁠, (g) t = 2550  ��⁠, (h) t = 2600  ��⁠, (i) t = 2650  ��⁠.

In order to quantitatively detect the molten pool dimensions as well as the remolten region dimensions, the molten pool characterization information in Fig. 14 is constructed by drawing the boundary on the YZ cross section based on the isothermal surface of the liquid phase line. It can be observed that the heights of the first track and second track are basically the same, but the depth of the second track increases relative to the first track. The molten pool width is mainly positively correlated with the laser power as well as the scanning speed (the laser line energy density �⁠). However, the remelted zone width is negatively correlated with the hatch spacing (the overlapping ratio). Overall, the forming quality of the specimens can be directly influenced by adjusting the laser power, scanning speed, and hatch spacing.

FIG. 14.

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Double-track molten pool characterization information on YZ cross section.

In order to study the variation rule of the temperature in the center of the molten pool with time, Fig. 15 demonstrates the temperature variation curves with time for two reference points, A and B. Among them, the red dotted line indicates the liquid phase line temperature of SS316L. From the figure, it can be seen that the maximum temperature at the center of the molten pool in the first track is lower than that in the second track, which is mainly due to the heat accumulation generated after passing through the first track. The maximum temperature gradient was calculated to be 1.69 × 108 K/s. When the laser scanned the first track, the temperature in the center of the molten pool of the second track increased slightly. Similarly, when the laser scanned the second track, a similar situation existed in the first track. Since the temperature gradient in the second track is larger than that in the first track, the residence time of the liquid phase in the molten pool of the first track is longer than that of the second track.

FIG. 15.

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Temperature profiles as a function of time for two reference points A and B.

C. Simulation analysis of molten pool under different process parameters

In order to deeply investigate the effects of various process parameters on the mesoscopic-scale temperature field, molten pool characteristic information and defects of HP-LPBF, numerical simulation experiments on mesoscopic-scale laser power, scanning speed, and hatch spacing of double-track molten pools were carried out.

1. Laser power

Figure 16 shows the effects of different laser power on the morphology and temperature field of the double-track molten pool at a scanning speed of 800 mm/s and a hatch spacing of 0.06 mm. When P = 50 W, a smaller molten pool is formed due to the lower heat generated by the Gaussian light source per unit time. This leads to a smaller track width, which results in adjacent track not lapping properly and the presence of a large number of unmelted powder particles, resulting in an increase in the number of defects, such as pores in the specimen. The surface of the track is relatively flat, and the depth is small. In addition, the temperature gradient before and after the molten pool was large, and the depression location appeared at the biased front end in Fig. 16(a). When P = 100 W, the surface of the track is flat and smooth with excellent lap. Due to the Marangoni effect, the velocity field of the molten pool is in the form of “vortex,” and the melt has good fluidity, and the maximum velocity reaches 2.15 m/s in Fig. 16(b). When P = 200 W, the heat generated by the Gaussian light source per unit time is too large, resulting in the melt rapidly reaching the evaporation temperature, generating a huge recoil pressure, forming a large molten pool, and the surface of the track is obviously raised. The melt movement is intense, especially the closed loop at the center end of the molten pool. At this time, the depth and width of the molten pool are large, leading to the expansion of the remolten region and the increased chance of the appearance of porosity defects in Fig. 16(c). The results show that at low laser power, the surface tension in the molten pool is dominant. At high laser power, recoil pressure is its main role.

FIG. 16.

VIEW LARGEDOWNLOAD SLIDE

Simulation results of double-track molten pool under different laser powers: (a) P = 50 W, (b) P = 100 W, (c) P = 200 W.

Table II shows the effect of different laser powers on the characteristic information of the double-track molten pool at a scanning speed of 800 mm/s and a hatch spacing of 0.06 mm. The negative overlapping ratio in the table indicates that the melt tracks are not lapped, and 26/29 indicates the melt depth of the first track/second track. It can be seen that with the increase in laser power, the melt depth, melt width, melt height, and remelted zone show a gradual increase. At the same time, the overlapping ratio also increases. Especially in the process of laser power from 50 to 200 W, the melting depth and melting width increased the most, which increased nearly 2 and 1.5 times, respectively. Meanwhile, the overlapping ratio also increases with the increase in laser power, which indicates that the melting and fusion of materials are better at high laser power. On the other hand, the dimensions of the molten pool did not change uniformly with the change of laser power. Specifically, the depth-to-width ratio of the molten pool increased from about 0.30 to 0.39 during the increase from 50 to 120 W, which further indicates that the effective heat transfer in the vertical direction is greater than that in the horizontal direction with the increase in laser power. This dimensional response to laser power is mainly affected by the recoil pressure and also by the difference in the densification degree between the powder layer and the metal substrate. In addition, according to the experimental results, the contact angle shows a tendency to increase and then decrease during the process of laser power increase, and always stays within the range of less than 33°. Therefore, in practical applications, it is necessary to select the appropriate laser power according to the specific needs in order to achieve the best processing results.

TABLE II.

Double-track molten pool characterization information at different laser powers.

Laser power (W)Depth (μm)Width (μm)Height (μm)Remolten region (μm)Overlapping ratio (%)Contact angle (°)
50 16 54 11 −10 23 
100 26/29 74 14 18 23.33 33 
200 37/45 116 21 52 93.33 28 

2. Scanning speed

Figure 17 demonstrates the effect of different scanning speeds on the morphology and temperature field of the double-track molten pool at a laser power of 100 W and a hatch spacing of 0.06 mm. With the gradual increase in scanning speed, the surface morphology of the molten pool evolves from circular to elliptical. When � = 200 mm/s, the slow scanning speed causes the material to absorb too much heat, which is very easy to trigger the overburning phenomenon. At this point, the molten pool is larger and the surface morphology is uneven. This situation is consistent with the previously discussed scenario with high laser power in Fig. 17(a). However, when � = 1600 mm/s, the scanning speed is too fast, resulting in the material not being able to absorb sufficient heat, which triggers the powder particles that fail to melt completely to have a direct effect on the bonding of the melt to the substrate. At this time, the molten pool volume is relatively small and the neighboring melt track cannot lap properly. This result is consistent with the previously discussed case of low laser power in Fig. 17(b). Overall, the ratio of the laser power to the scanning speed (the line energy density �⁠) has a direct effect on the temperature field and surface morphology of the molten pool.

FIG. 17.

VIEW LARGEDOWNLOAD SLIDE

Simulation results of double-track molten pool under different scanning speed: (a)  � = 200 mm/s, (b)  � = 1600 mm/s.

Table III shows the effects of different scanning speed on the characteristic information of the double-track molten pool under the condition of laser power of 100 W and hatch spacing of 0.06 mm. It can be seen that the scanning speed has a significant effect on the melt depth, melt width, melt height, remolten region, and overlapping ratio. With the increase in scanning speed, the melt depth, melt width, melt height, remelted zone, and overlapping ratio show a gradual decreasing trend. Among them, the melt depth and melt width decreased faster, while the melt height and remolten region decreased relatively slowly. In addition, when the scanning speed was increased from 200 to 800 mm/s, the decreasing speeds of melt depth and melt width were significantly accelerated, while the decreasing speeds of overlapping ratio were relatively slow. When the scanning speed was further increased to 1600 mm/s, the decreasing speeds of melt depth and melt width were further accelerated, and the un-lapped condition of the melt channel also appeared. In addition, the contact angle increases and then decreases with the scanning speed, and both are lower than 33°. Therefore, when selecting the scanning speed, it is necessary to make reasonable trade-offs according to the specific situation, and take into account the factors of melt depth, melt width, melt height, remolten region, and overlapping ratio, in order to achieve the best processing results.

TABLE III.

Double-track molten pool characterization information at different scanning speeds.

Scanning speed (mm/s)Depth (μm)Width (μm)Height (μm)Remolten region (μm)Overlapping ratio (%)Contact angle (°)
200 55/68 182 19/32 124 203.33 22 
1600 13 50 11 −16.67 31 

3. Hatch spacing

Figure 18 shows the effect of different hatch spacing on the morphology and temperature field of the double-track molten pool under the condition of laser power of 100 W and scanning speed of 800 mm/s. The surface morphology and temperature field of the first track and second track are basically the same, but slightly different. The first track shows a basically symmetric morphology along the scanning direction, while the second track shows a slight offset due to the difference in the heat transfer rate between the solidified material and the powder particles. When the hatch spacing is too small, the overlapping ratio increases and the probability of defects caused by remelting phenomenon grows. When the hatch spacing is too large, the neighboring melt track cannot overlap properly, and the powder particles are not completely melted, leading to an increase in the number of holes. In conclusion, the ratio of the line energy density � to the hatch spacing (the volume energy density E) has a significant effect on the temperature field and surface morphology of the molten pool.

FIG. 18.

VIEW LARGEDOWNLOAD SLIDE

Simulation results of double-track molten pool under different hatch spacings: (a) H = 0.03 mm, (b) H = 0.12 mm.

Table IV shows the effects of different hatch spacing on the characteristic information of the double-track molten pool under the condition of laser power of 100 W and scanning speed of 800 mm/s. It can be seen that the hatch spacing has little effect on the melt depth, melt width, and melt height, but has some effect on the remolten region. With the gradual expansion of hatch spacing, the remolten region shows a gradual decrease. At the same time, the overlapping ratio also decreased with the increase in hatch spacing. In addition, it is observed that the contact angle shows a tendency to increase and then remain stable when the hatch spacing increases, which has a more limited effect on it. Therefore, trade-offs and decisions need to be made on a case-by-case basis when selecting the hatch spacing.

TABLE IV.

Double-track molten pool characterization information at different hatch spacings.

Hatch spacing (mm)Depth (μm)Width (μm)Height (μm)Remolten region (μm)Overlapping ratio (%)Contact angle (°)
0.03 25/27 82 14 59 173.33 30 
0.12 26 78 14 −35 33 

In summary, the laser power, scanning speed, and hatch spacing have a significant effect on the formation of the molten pool, and the correct selection of these three process parameters is crucial to ensure the forming quality. In addition, the melt depth of the second track is slightly larger than that of the first track at higher line energy density � and volume energy density E. This is mainly due to the fact that a large amount of heat accumulation is generated after the first track, forming a larger molten pool volume, which leads to an increase in the melt depth.

D. Simulation analysis of molten pool with powder particle size and laser focal spot diameter

Figure 19 demonstrates the effect of different powder particle sizes and laser focal spot diameters on the morphology and temperature field of the double-track molten pool under a laser power of 100 W, a scanning speed of 800 mm/s, and a hatch spacing of 0.06 mm. In the process of melting coarse powder with small laser focal spot diameter, the laser energy cannot completely melt the larger powder particles, resulting in their partial melting and further generating excessive pore defects. The larger powder particles tend to generate zigzag molten pool edges, which cause an increase in the roughness of the melt track surface. In addition, the molten pool is also prone to generate the present spatter phenomenon, which can directly affect the quality of forming. The volume of the formed molten pool is relatively small, while the melt depth, melt width, and melt height are all smaller relative to the fine powder in Fig. 19(a). In the process of melting fine powders with a large laser focal spot diameter, the laser energy is able to melt the fine powder particles sufficiently, even to the point of overmelting. This results in a large number of fine spatters being generated at the edge of the molten pool, which causes porosity defects in the melt track in Fig. 19(b). In addition, the maximum velocity of the molten pool is larger for large powder particle sizes compared to small powder particle sizes, which indicates that the temperature gradient in the molten pool is larger for large powder particle sizes and the melt motion is more intense. However, the size of the laser focal spot diameter has a relatively small effect on the melt motion. However, a larger focal spot diameter induces a larger melt volume with greater depth, width, and height. In conclusion, a small powder size helps to reduce the surface roughness of the specimen, and a small laser spot diameter reduces the minimum forming size of a single track.

FIG. 19.

VIEW LARGEDOWNLOAD SLIDE

Simulation results of double-track molten pool with different powder particle size and laser focal spot diameter: (a) focal spot = 25 μm, coarse powder, (b) focal spot = 80 μm, fine powder.

Table V shows the maximum temperature gradient at the reference point for different powder sizes and laser focal spot diameters. As can be seen from the table, the maximum temperature gradient is lower than that of HP-LPBF for both coarse powders with a small laser spot diameter and fine powders with a large spot diameter, a phenomenon that leads to an increase in the heat transfer rate of HP-LPBF, which in turn leads to a corresponding increase in the cooling rate and, ultimately, to the formation of finer microstructures.

TABLE V.

Maximum temperature gradient at the reference point for different powder particle sizes and laser focal spot diameters.

Laser power (W)Scanning speed (mm/s)Hatch spacing (mm)Average powder size (μm)Laser focal spot diameter (μm)Maximum temperature gradient (×107 K/s)
100 800 0.06 31.7 25 7.89 
11.5 80 7.11 

IV. CONCLUSIONS

In this study, the geometrical characteristics of 3D coarse and fine powder particles were first calculated using DEM and then numerical simulations of single track and double track in the process of forming SS316L from monolayer HP-LPBF at mesoscopic scale were developed using CFD method. The effects of Marangoni convection, surface tension, recoil pressure, gravity, thermal convection, thermal radiation, and evaporative heat dissipation on the heat and mass transfer in the molten pool were considered in this model. The effects of laser power, scanning speed, and hatch spacing on the dynamics of the single-track and double-track molten pools, as well as on other characteristic information, were investigated. The effects of the powder particle size on the molten pool were investigated comparatively with the laser focal spot diameter. The main conclusions are as follows:

  1. The results show that the temperature gradient at the front of the molten pool is significantly larger than that at the tail, and the molten pool exhibits a “comet” morphology. At the top of the molten pool, there is a slightly concave region, which is the result of the coupling of Marangoni convection, recoil pressure, and surface tension. The melt flow forms two closed loops, which are mainly influenced by temperature gradients and surface tension. This special dynamic behavior of the melt tends to form an “elliptical” molten pool and an almost “mountain” shape in single-track forming.
  2. The basic characteristics of the three-dimensional morphology and temperature field of the second track are similar to those of the first track, but there are subtle differences. The first track exhibits a basically symmetrical shape; however, due to the difference in thermal diffusion rates between the solidified metal and the powder, a slight asymmetry in the molten pool morphology of the second track occurs. After forming through the first track, there is a significant heat buildup in the powder bed, resulting in a longer dynamic time of the melt, which increases the life of the molten pool. The heights of the first track and second track remained essentially the same, but the depth of the second track was greater relative to the first track. In addition, the maximum temperature gradient was 1.69 × 108 K/s during HP-LPBF forming.
  3. At low laser power, the surface tension in the molten pool plays a dominant role. At high laser power, recoil pressure becomes the main influencing factor. With the increase of laser power, the effective heat transfer in the vertical direction is superior to that in the horizontal direction. With the gradual increase of scanning speed, the surface morphology of the molten pool evolves from circular to elliptical. In addition, the scanning speed has a significant effect on the melt depth, melt width, melt height, remolten region, and overlapping ratio. Too large or too small hatch spacing will lead to remelting or non-lap phenomenon, which in turn causes the formation of defects.
  4. When using a small laser focal spot diameter, it is difficult to completely melt large powder particle sizes, resulting in partial melting and excessive porosity generation. At the same time, large powder particles produce curved edges of the molten pool, resulting in increased surface roughness of the melt track. In addition, spatter occurs, which directly affects the forming quality. At small focal spot diameters, the molten pool volume is relatively small, and the melt depth, the melt width, and the melt height are correspondingly small. Taken together, the small powder particle size helps to reduce surface roughness, while the small spot diameter reduces the forming size.

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Validity evaluation of popular liquid-vapor phase change models for cryogenic self-pressurization process

극저온 자체 가압 공정을 위한 인기 있는 액체-증기 상 변화 모델의 타당성 평가

액체-증기 상 변화 모델은 밀폐된 용기의 자체 가압 프로세스 시뮬레이션에 매우 큰 영향을 미칩니다. Hertz-Knudsen 관계, 에너지 점프 모델 및 그 파생물과 같은 널리 사용되는 액체-증기 상 변화 모델은 실온 유체를 기반으로 개발되었습니다. 액체-증기 전이를 통한 극저온 시뮬레이션에 널리 적용되었지만 각 모델의 성능은 극저온 조건에서 명시적으로 조사 및 비교되지 않았습니다. 본 연구에서는 171가지 일반적인 액체-증기 상 변화 모델을 통합한 통합 다상 솔버가 제안되었으며, 이를 통해 이러한 모델을 실험 데이터와 직접 비교할 수 있습니다. 증발 및 응축 모델의 예측 정확도와 계산 속도를 평가하기 위해 총 <>개의 자체 가압 시뮬레이션이 수행되었습니다. 압력 예측은 최적화 전략이 서로 다른 모델 계수에 크게 의존하는 것으로 나타났습니다. 에너지 점프 모델은 극저온 자체 가압 시뮬레이션에 적합하지 않은 것으로 나타났습니다. 평균 편차와 CPU 소비량에 따르면 Lee 모델과 Tanasawa 모델은 다른 모델보다 안정적이고 효율적인 것으로 입증되었습니다.

Elsevier

International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer

Volume 181, December 2021, 121879

International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer

Validity evaluation of popular liquid-vapor phase change models for cryogenic self-pressurization process

Author links open overlay panelZhongqi Zuo, Jingyi Wu, Yonghua HuangShow moreAdd to MendeleyShareCite

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2021.121879Get rights and content

Abstract

Liquid-vapor phase change models vitally influence the simulation of self-pressurization processes in closed containers. Popular liquid-vapor phase change models, such as the Hertz-Knudsen relation, energy jump model, and their derivations were developed based on room-temperature fluids. Although they had widely been applied in cryogenic simulations with liquid-vapor transitions, the performance of each model was not explicitly investigated and compared yet under cryogenic conditions. A unified multi-phase solver incorporating four typical liquid-vapor phase change models has been proposed in the present study, which enables direct comparison among those models against experimental data. A total number of 171 self-pressurization simulations were conducted to evaluate the evaporation and condensation models’ prediction accuracy and calculation speed. It was found that the pressure prediction highly depended on the model coefficients, whose optimization strategies differed from each other. The energy jump model was found inadequate for cryogenic self-pressurization simulations. According to the average deviation and CPU consumption, the Lee model and the Tanasawa model were proven to be more stable and more efficient than the others.

Introduction

The liquid-vapor phase change of cryogenic fluids is widely involved in industrial applications, such as the hydrogen transport vehicles [1], shipborne liquid natural gas (LNG) containers [2] and on-orbit cryogenic propellant tanks [3]. These applications require cryogenic fluids to be stored for weeks to months. Although high-performance insulation measures are adopted, heat inevitably enters the tank via radiation and conduction. The self-pressurization in the tank induced by the heat leakage eventually causes the venting loss of the cryogenic fluids and threatens the safety of the craft in long-term missions. To reduce the boil-off loss and extend the cryogenic storage duration, a more comprehensive understanding of the self-pressurization mechanism is needed.

Due to the difficulties and limitations in implementing cryogenic experiments, numerical modeling is a convenient and powerful way to study the self-pressurization process of cryogenic fluids. However, how the phase change models influence the mass and heat transfer under cryogenic conditions is still unsettled [4]. As concluded by Persad and Ward [5], a seemingly slight variation in the liquid-vapor phase change models can lead to erroneous predictions.

Among the liquid-vapor phase change models, the kinetic theory gas (KTG) based models and the energy jump model are the most popular ones used in recent self-pressurization simulations [6]. The KTG based models, also known as the Hertz-Knudsen relation models, were developed on the concept of the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution of the gas molecular [7]. The Hertz-Knudsen relation has evolved to several models, including the Schrage model [8], the Tanasawa model [9], the Lee model [10] and the statistical rate theory (SRT) [11], which will be described in Section 2.2. Since the Schrage model and the Lee model are embedded and configured as the default ones in the commercial CFD solvers Flow-3D® and Ansys Fluent® respectively, they have been widely used in self-pressurization simulations for liquid nitrogen [12], [13] and liquid hydrogen [14], [15]. The major drawback of the KTG models lies in the difficulty of selecting model coefficients, which were reported in a considerably wide range spanning three magnitudes even for the same working fluid [16], [17], [18], [19], [20], [21]. Studies showed that the liquid level, pressure and mass transfer rate are directly influenced by the model coefficients [16], [22], [23], [24], [25]. Wrong coefficients will lead to deviation or even divergence of the results. The energy jump model is also known as the thermal limitation model. It assumes that the evaporation and condensation at the liquid-vapor interface are induced only by heat conduction. The model is widely adopted in lumped node simulations due to its simplicity [6], [26], [27]. To improve the accuracy of mass flux prediction, the energy jump model was modified by including the convection heat transfer [28], [29]. However, the convection correlations are empirical and developed mainly for room-temperature fluids. Whether the correlation itself can be precisely applied in cryogenic simulations still needs further investigation.

Fig. 1 summarizes the cryogenic simulations involving the modeling of evaporation and condensation processes in recent years. The publication has been increasing rapidly. However, the characteristics of each evaporation and condensation model are not explicitly revealed when simulating self-pressurization. A comparative study of the phase change models is highly needed for cryogenic fluids for a better simulation of the self-pressurization processes.

In the present paper, a unified multi-phase solver incorporating four typical liquid-vapor phase change models, namely the Tanasawa model, the Lee model, the energy jump model, and the modified energy jump model has been proposed, which enables direct comparison among different models. The models are used to simulate the pressure and temperature evolutions in an experimental liquid nitrogen tank in normal gravity, which helps to evaluate themselves in the aspects of accuracy, calculation speed and robustness.

Section snippets

Governing equations for the self-pressurization tank

In the present study, both the fluid domain and the solid wall of the tank are modeled and discretized. The heat transportation at the solid boundaries is considered to be irrelevant with the nearby fluid velocity. Consequently, two sets of the solid and the fluid governing equations can be decoupled and solved separately. The pressures in the cryogenic container are usually from 100 kPa to 300 kPa. Under these conditions, the Knudsen number is far smaller than 0.01, and the fluids are

Self-pressurization results and phase change model comparison

This section compares the simulation results by different phase change models. Section 3.1 compares the pressure and temperature outputs from two KTG based models, namely the Lee model and the Tanasawa model. Section 3.2 presents the pressure predictions from the energy transport models, namely the energy jump model and the modified energy jump model, and compares pressure prediction performances between the KTG based models and the energy transport models. Section 3.3 evaluates the four models 

Conclusion

A unified vapor-liquid-solid multi-phase numerical solver has been accomplished for the self pressurization simulation in cryogenic containers. Compared to the early fluid-only solver, the temperature prediction in the vicinity of the tank wall improves significantly. Four liquid-vapor phase change models were integrated into the solver, which enables fair and effective comparison for performances between each other. The pressure and temperature prediction accuracies, and the calculation speed

CRediT authorship contribution statement

Zhongqi Zuo: Data curation, Formal analysis, Writing – original draft, Validation. Jingyi Wu: Conceptualization, Writing – review & editing, Validation. Yonghua Huang: Conceptualization, Formal analysis, Writing – review & editing, Validation.

Declaration of Competing Interest

Authors declare that they have no financial and personal relationships with other people or organizations that can inappropriately influence our work, there is no professional or other personal interest of any nature or kind in any product, service and/or company that could be construed as influencing the position presented in, or the review of, the manuscript entitled, “Validity evaluation of popular liquid-vapor phase change models for cryogenic self-pressurization process”.

Acknowledgement

This project is supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51936006).

References (40)

There are more references available in the full text version of this article.

Cited by (7)

Figure 3: 3D temperature contours and 2D melt pool cross-sections where the melt pool is stabilized at x=500 µm from the start of the laser initial location for cases where (a) absorptivity = 0.1, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 1 and laser beam radius = 12 µm, (b) absorptivity = 0.1, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 20 and laser beam radius = 12 µm, (c) absorptivity = 0.1, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 1 and laser beam radius = 18 µm, (d) absorptivity = 0.45, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 1 and laser beam radius = 18 µm, (e) absorptivity = 0.45, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 20 and laser beam radius = 12 µm, (f) absorptivity = 0.45, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 20 and laser beam radius = 18 µm.

MULTI-PHYSICS NUMERICAL MODELLING OF 316L AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL IN LASER POWDER BED FUSION PROCESS AT MESO-SCALE

W.E. Alphonso1, M.Bayat1,*, M. Baier 2, S. Carmignato2, J.H. Hattel1
1Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark (DTU), Lyngby, Denmark
2Department of Management and Engineering – University of Padova, Padova, Italy

ABSTRACT

L-PBF(Laser Powder Bed Fusion)는 레이저 열원을 사용하여 선택적으로 통합되는 분말 층으로 복잡한 3D 금속 부품을 만드는 금속 적층 제조(MAM) 기술입니다. 처리 영역은 수십 마이크로미터 정도이므로 L-PBF를 다중 규모 제조 공정으로 만듭니다.

기체 기공의 형성 및 성장 및 용융되지 않은 분말 영역의 생성은 다중물리 모델에 의해 예측할 수 있습니다. 또한 이러한 모델을 사용하여 용융 풀 모양 및 크기, 온도 분포, 용융 풀 유체 흐름 및 입자 크기 및 형태와 같은 미세 구조 특성을 계산할 수 있습니다.

이 작업에서는 용융, 응고, 유체 흐름, 표면 장력, 열 모세관, 증발 및 광선 추적을 통한 다중 반사를 포함하는 스테인리스 스틸 316-L에 대한 충실도 다중 물리학 중간 규모 수치 모델이 개발되었습니다. 완전한 실험 설계(DoE) 방법을 사용하는 통계 연구가 수행되었으며, 여기서 불확실한 재료 특성 및 공정 매개변수, 즉 흡수율, 반동 압력(기화) 및 레이저 빔 크기가 용융수지 모양 및 크기에 미치는 영향을 분석했습니다.

또한 용융 풀 역학에 대한 위에서 언급한 불확실한 입력 매개변수의 중요성을 강조하기 위해 흡수율이 가장 큰 영향을 미치고 레이저 빔 크기가 그 뒤를 잇는 주요 효과 플롯이 생성되었습니다. 용융 풀 크기에 대한 반동 압력의 중요성은 흡수율에 따라 달라지는 용융 풀 부피와 함께 증가합니다.

모델의 예측 정확도는 유사한 공정 매개변수로 생성된 단일 트랙 실험과 시뮬레이션의 용융 풀 모양 및 크기를 비교하여 검증됩니다.

더욱이, 열 렌즈 효과는 레이저 빔 크기를 증가시켜 수치 모델에서 고려되었으며 나중에 결과적인 용융 풀 프로파일은 모델의 견고성을 보여주기 위한 실험과 비교되었습니다.

Laser Powder Bed Fusion (L-PBF) is a Metal Additive Manufacturing (MAM) technology where a complex 3D metal part is built from powder layers, which are selectively consolidated using a laser heat source. The processing zone is in the order of a few tenths of micrometer, making L-PBF a multi-scale manufacturing process. The formation and growth of gas pores and the creation of un-melted powder zones can be predicted by multiphysics models. Also, with these models, the melt pool shape and size, temperature distribution, melt pool fluid flow and its microstructural features like grain size and morphology can be calculated. In this work, a high fidelity multi-physics meso-scale numerical model is developed for stainless steel 316-L which includes melting, solidification, fluid flow, surface tension, thermo-capillarity, evaporation and multiple reflection with ray-tracing. A statistical study using a full Design of Experiments (DoE) method was conducted, wherein the impact of uncertain material properties and process parameters namely absorptivity, recoil pressure (vaporization) and laser beam size on the melt pool shape and size was analysed. Furthermore, to emphasize on the significance of the above mentioned uncertain input parameters on the melt pool dynamics, a main effects plot was created which showed that absorptivity had the highest impact followed by laser beam size. The significance of recoil pressure on the melt pool size increases with melt pool volume which is dependent on absorptivity. The prediction accuracy of the model is validated by comparing the melt pool shape and size from the simulation with single track experiments that were produced with similar process parameters. Moreover, the effect of thermal lensing was considered in the numerical model by increasing the laser beam size and later on the resultant melt pool profile was compared with experiments to show the robustness of the model.

Figure 1: a) Computational domain for single track L-PBF which includes a 200 μm thick substrate and 45 μm powder layer thickness b) 3D temperature contour plot after scanning a single track with melt pool contours at two locations along the scanning direction where the green region indicates the melted regions.
Figure 1: a) Computational domain for single track L-PBF which includes a 200 μm thick substrate and 45 μm powder layer thickness b) 3D temperature contour plot after scanning a single track with melt pool contours at two locations along the scanning direction where the green region indicates the melted regions.
Figure 2: Main effects plot of uncertain parameters: absorptivity, recoil pressure coefficient and laser beam radius on the melt pool dimensions (width and depth)
Figure 2: Main effects plot of uncertain parameters: absorptivity, recoil pressure coefficient and laser beam radius on the melt pool dimensions (width and depth)
Figure 3: 3D temperature contours and 2D melt pool cross-sections where the melt pool is stabilized at x=500 µm from the start of the laser initial location for cases where (a) absorptivity = 0.1, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 1 and laser beam radius = 12 µm, (b) absorptivity = 0.1, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 20 and laser beam radius = 12 µm, (c) absorptivity = 0.1, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 1 and laser beam radius = 18 µm, (d) absorptivity = 0.45, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 1 and laser beam radius = 18 µm, (e) absorptivity = 0.45, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 20 and laser beam radius = 12 µm, (f) absorptivity = 0.45, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 20 and laser beam radius = 18 µm.
Figure 3: 3D temperature contours and 2D melt pool cross-sections where the melt pool is stabilized at x=500 µm from the start of the laser initial location for cases where (a) absorptivity = 0.1, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 1 and laser beam radius = 12 µm, (b) absorptivity = 0.1, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 20 and laser beam radius = 12 µm, (c) absorptivity = 0.1, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 1 and laser beam radius = 18 µm, (d) absorptivity = 0.45, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 1 and laser beam radius = 18 µm, (e) absorptivity = 0.45, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 20 and laser beam radius = 12 µm, (f) absorptivity = 0.45, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 20 and laser beam radius = 18 µm.
Figure 4: Validation of Numerical model with Recoil pressure coefficient B= 20, absorptivity = 0.45 and a) laser beam radius = 15 µm b) laser beam radius = 20 µm
Figure 4: Validation of Numerical model with Recoil pressure coefficient B= 20, absorptivity = 0.45 and a) laser beam radius = 15 µm b) laser beam radius = 20 µm

CONCLUSION

In this work, a high-fidelity multi-physics numerical model was developed for L-PBF using the FVM method in Flow-3D. The impact of uncertainty in the input parameters including absorptivity, recoil pressure and laser beam size on the melt pool is addressed using a DoE method. The DoE analysis shows that absorptivity has the highest impact on the melt pool. The recoil pressure and laser beam size only become significant once absorptivity is 0.45. Furthermore, the numerical model is validated by comparing the predicted melt pool shape and size with experiments conducted with similar process parameters wherein a high prediction accuracy is achieved by the model. In addition, the impact of thermal lensing on the melt pool dimensions by increasing the laser beam spot size is considered in the validated numerical model and the resultant melt pool is compared with experiments.

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[5] M. Bayat, A. Thanki, S. Mohanty, A. Witvrouw, S. Yang, J. Thorborg, N.S. Tiedje, J.H. Hattel, Keyholeinduced porosities in Laser-based Powder Bed Fusion (L-PBF) of Ti6Al4V: High-fidelity modelling and
experimental validation, Addit. Manuf. 30 (2019) 100835. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.addma.2019.100835.
[6] M. Bayat, S. Mohanty, J.H. Hattel, Multiphysics modelling of lack-of-fusion voids formation and evolution
in IN718 made by multi-track/multi-layer L-PBF, Int. J. Heat Mass Transf. 139 (2019) 95–114.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2019.05.003.
[7] J. Metelkova, Y. Kinds, K. Kempen, C. de Formanoir, A. Witvrouw, B. Van Hooreweder, On the influence
of laser defocusing in Selective Laser Melting of 316L, Addit. Manuf. 23 (2018) 161–169.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.addma.2018.08.006.

Figure 2: Temperature contours and melt pool border lines at different times for the 50 % duty cycle case: (a) - (c) Δtcycle = 400 μs, (d) – (f) Δtcycle = 1000 μs and (g) – (i) Δtcycle = 3000 μs.

MULTIPHYSICS SIMULATION OF THEMRAL AND FLUID DYNAMICS PHENOMENA DURING THE PULSED LASER POWDER BED FUSION PROCESS OF 316-L STEEL

M. Bayat* , V. K. Nadimpalli, J. H. Hattel
1Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark (DTU), Produktionstorvet
425, Kgs. 2800, Lyngby, Denmark

ABSTRACT

L-PBF(Laser Powder Bed Fusion)는 다양한 산업 분야에서 많은 관심을 받았으며, 주로 기존 제조 기술을 사용하여 만들 수 없었던 복잡한 토폴로지 최적화 구성 요소를 구현하는 잘 알려진 능력 덕분입니다. . 펄스 L-PBF(PL-PBF)에서 레이저의 시간적 프로파일은 주기 지속 시간과 듀티 주기 중 하나 또는 둘 다를 수정하여 변조할 수 있습니다. 따라서 레이저의 시간적 프로파일은 향후 적용을 위해 이 프로세스를 더 잘 제어할 수 있는 길을 열어주는 새로운 프로세스 매개변수로 간주될 수 있습니다. 따라서 이 작업에서 우리는 레이저의 시간적 프로파일을 변경하는 것이 PL-PBF 공정에서 용융 풀 조건과 트랙의 최종 모양 및 형상에 어떻게 영향을 미칠 수 있는지 조사하는 것을 목표로 합니다. 이와 관련하여 본 논문에서는 CFD(Computational Fluid Dynamics) 소프트웨어 패키지인 Flow-3D를 기반으로 하는 316-L 스테인리스강 PL-PBF 공정의 다중물리 수치 모델을 개발하고 이 모델을 사용하여 열과 유체를 시뮬레이션합니다. 다양한 펄스 모드에서 공정 과정 중 용융 풀 내부에서 발생하는 유동 조건. 따라서 고정된 레이저 듀티 사이클(50%)이 있는 레이저 주기 지속 시간이 용융 풀의 모양과 크기 및 최종 트랙 형태에 미치는 영향을 연구하기 위해 매개변수 연구가 수행됩니다. 더 긴 주기 기간에서 더 많은 재료가 더 큰 용융 풀 내에서 변위됨에 따라 용융 풀의 후류에 더 눈에 띄는 혹이 형성되며, 동시에 더 심각한 반동 압력을 받습니다. 또한 시뮬레이션에서 50% 듀티 사이클에서 1000μs에서 형성된 보다 대칭적인 용융 풀과 비교하여 400μs 사이클 주기에서 더 긴 용융 풀이 형성된다는 것이 관찰되었습니다. 풀 볼륨은 1000μs의 경우 더 큽니다. 매개변수 연구는 연속 트랙과 파손된 트랙 PL-PBF 사이의 경계를 설명하며, 여기서 연속 트랙은 항상 소량의 용융 재료를 유지함으로써 유지됩니다.

English Abstract

Laser Powder Bed Fusion (L-PBF) has attracted a lot of attention from various industrial sectors and mainly thanks to its well-proven well-known capacity of realizing complex topology-optimized components that have so far been impossible to make using conventional manufacturing techniques. In Pulsed L-PBF (PL-PBF), the laser’s temporal profile can be modulated via modifying either or both the cycle duration and the duty cycle. Thus, the laser’s temporal profile could be considered as a new process parameter that paves the way for a better control of this process for future applications. Therefore, in this work we aim to investigate how changing the laser’s temporal profile can affect the melt pool conditions and the final shape and geometry of a track in the PL-PBF process. In this respect, in this paper a multiphysics numerical model of the PL-PBF process of 316-L stainless steel is developed based on the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software package Flow-3D and the model is used to simulate the heat and fluid flow conditions occurring inside the melt pool during the course of the process at different pulsing modes. Thus, a parametric study is carried out to study the influence of the laser’s cycle duration with a fixed laser duty cycle (50 %) on the shape and size of the melt pool and the final track morphology. It is noticed that at longer cycle periods, more noticeable humps form at the wake of the melt pool as more material is displaced within bigger melt pools, which are at the same time subjected to more significant recoil pressures. It is also observed in the simulations that at 50 % duty cycle, longer melt pools form at 400 μs cycle period compared to the more symmetrical melt pools formed at 1000 μs, primarily because of shorter laser off-times in the former, even though melt pool volume is bigger for the 1000 μs case. The parameteric study illustrates the boundary between a continuous track and a broken track PL-PBF wherein the continuous track is retained by always maintaining a small volume of molten material.

Figure 1: Front and side views of the computational domain. Note that the region along z and from -100 μm to +50 μm is void.
Figure 1: Front and side views of the computational domain. Note that the region along z and from -100 μm to +50 μm is void.
Figure 2: Temperature contours and melt pool border lines at different times for the 50 % duty cycle case: (a) - (c) Δtcycle = 400 μs, (d) – (f) Δtcycle = 1000 μs and (g) – (i) Δtcycle = 3000 μs.
Figure 2: Temperature contours and melt pool border lines at different times for the 50 % duty cycle case: (a) – (c) Δtcycle = 400 μs, (d) – (f) Δtcycle = 1000 μs and (g) – (i) Δtcycle = 3000 μs.
Figure 3: Plot of melt pool volume versus time for four cases including continuous wave laser as well as 50 % duty cycle at 400 μs, 1000 μs and 3000 μs.
Figure 3: Plot of melt pool volume versus time for four cases including continuous wave laser as well as 50 % duty cycle at 400 μs, 1000 μs and 3000 μs.

CONCLUSIONS

In this work a CFD model of the modulated PL-PBF process of stainless steel 316-L is developed in the commercial software package Flow-3D. The model involves physics such as solidification, melting, evaporation, convection, laser-material interaction, capillarity, Marangoni effect and the recoil pressure effect. In the current study, a parametric study is carried out to understand how the change in the cycle period duration affects the melt pool’s thermo-fluid conditions during the modulated PL-PBF process. It is observed that at the pulse mode with 50 % duty cycle and 400 μs cycle period, an overlapped chain of humps form at the wake of the melt pool and at a spatial frequency of occurrence of about 78 μm. Furthermore and as expected, it is noted that the melt pool volume, the size of the hump as well as the crater size at the end of the track, increase with increase in the cycle period duration, as more material is re-deposited at the back of the melt pool and that itself is caused by more pronounced recoil pressures. Moreover, it is noticed that due to the short off-time period of the laser in the 400 μs cycle period case, there is always an amount of liquid metal left from the previous cycle, at the time the new cycle starts. This is found to be the main reason why longer and elongated melt pools form at 400 μs cycle period, compared to the bigger, shorter and more symmetrical-like melt pools forming at the 1000 μs case. In this study PL-PBF single tracks including the broken track and the continuous track examples were studied to illustrate the boundary of this transition at a given laser scan parameter setting. At higher scan speeds, it is expected that the Plateau–Rayleigh instability will compete with the pulsing behavior to change the transition boundary between a broken and continuous track, which is suggested as future work from this study.

REFERENCES

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Heat and Mass Transfer in a Cryogenic Tank in Case of Active-Pressurization

능동 가압의 경우 극저온 탱크의 열 및 물질 전달

Heat and Mass Transfer in a Cryogenic Tank in Case of Active-Pressurization

하이라이트

헤닝 슈플러 옌스 게르스트만DLR 독일 항공 우주 센터, 우주 시스템 연구소, 28359 Bremen, Germany

상변화 및 공액 열전달을 포함하는 압축성 2상 솔버 개발.

분석 솔루션으로 솔버를 성공적으로 검증.

극저온 탱크의 압력 및 온도 변화에 대한 정확한 시뮬레이션.

자유 표면에서의 물질 전달 분석.

Abstract

압력 요구 사항을 예측하는 것은 극저온 추진 시스템의 주요 과제 중 하나입니다. 이러한 맥락에서 증발 및 응축 현상을 고려한 탱크 여압을 시뮬레이션하기 위한 수치 모델을 개발하여 적용하였습니다. 

새로운 솔버는 PISO(splitting of operator) 알고리즘이 있는 압력 암시적 방법을 기반으로 하는 OpenFOAM의 약한 압축성 다상 솔버와 기울기 기반 위상 변화 모델을 결합합니다. 날카로운 인터페이스를 유지하기 위해 인터페이스에 인접한 셀에 질량 소스 용어가 적용됩니다. 

첫째, 모델은 1차원 상 변화 문제와 중력이 없는 상태에서 과열된 액체에서 증기 기포의 성장이라는 두 가지 분석 솔루션에 대해 검증되었습니다. 

두 번째 단계에서는 검증된 모델을 극저온 가압 실험에 적용했습니다. 측정된 압력 거동은 수치 모델이 양호한 근사값으로 확인될 수 있습니다. 

수치 모델을 사용하면 물리적 거동에 대한 추가 통찰력을 얻을 수 있습니다. 응축 및 증발 효과는 가압 중 및 가압 후의 압력 발생에 상당한 영향을 미칩니다. 기액 계면에서 일어나는 상변화로 인한 질량유동은 계면의 위치와 시간에 따라 달라진다. 벽에서 직접적으로 증발이 지배적이며 액체 표면의 중앙 영역에서 응결이 발생합니다. 

응축 및 증발 효과는 가압 중 및 가압 후의 압력 발생에 상당한 영향을 미칩니다. 기액 계면에서 일어나는 상변화로 인한 질량유동은 계면의 위치와 시간에 따라 달라진다. 벽에서 직접적으로 증발이 지배적이며 액체 표면의 중앙 영역에서 응결이 발생합니다. 

응축 및 증발 효과는 가압 중 및 가압 후의 압력 발생에 상당한 영향을 미칩니다. 기액 계면에서 일어나는 상변화로 인한 질량유동은 계면의 위치와 시간에 따라 달라진다. 벽에서 직접적으로 증발이 지배적이며 액체 표면의 중앙 영역에서 응결이 발생합니다.

Predicting the pressurant requirements is one of the key challenges for cryogenic propulsion systems. In this context, a numerical model to simulate the tank pressurization that considers evaporation and condensation phenomena was developed and applied. The novel solver combines the a gradient-based phase change model with a weakly compressible multiphase solver of OpenFOAM based on the pressure implicit method with splitting of operator (PISO) algorithm. To maintain a sharp interface the mass source terms are applied to the cells adjacent to the interface. First, the model is validated against two analytical solutions: the one-dimensional phase change problem and secondly, the growth of a vapor bubble in a superheated liquid in the absence of gravity. In a second step, the validated model was applied to a cryogenic pressurization experiment. The measured pressure behavior could be confirmed with the numerical model being in a good approximation. With the numerical model further insights into the physical behavior could be achieved. The condensation and evaporation effects have a significant impact on the pressure development during and after the pressurization. The mass flows due to phase change occurring at the vapor-liquid interface depend on interface location and time. Directly at the wall, evaporation becomes dominant while condensation occurs at the center area of the liquid surface.

  1. Fig. 1. Calculation of the gradient at the interface: On the left side the interface…
  2. Fig. 2. Mass source term distribution: First the sharp mass source term ρ0, which is…
  3. Fig. 3. a) Layout of the Stefan-Problem: a vapor is located between a liquid and a…
  4. Fig. 4. Bubble in a superheated liquid: The left side depicts the calculated and…
  5. Fig. 5. Modified drawing of the dewar (as documented in [5] [6]; dimensions in mm) and…
  6. Fig. 6. Schematic presentation of the pressure evoluation in the dewar: Initial…
  7. Fig. 7. Simulation of the pressurization phase: The diagram shows the pressure…
  8. Fig. 8. Turbulent thermal diffusivity in pressurization and relaxation phase
  9. Fig. 9. Comparison of the pressure evolution in the relaxation phase of the solver with…
  10. Fig. 10. On the left side the temperature evolution in the bulk of the gas phase is shown
  11. Fig. 11. Heat Flux profile over the interface caused by evaporation with details of the…
  12. Fig. 12. Temperatures field with velocity vectors at 420 seconds after the start of the…
  13. Fig. 13. Heat transfer to the liquid from the wall and the freesurface with and without…

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키워드

Pressurization, Phase Change, CFD, Propellant Management, 가압, 상 변화, 추진제 관리

On the role of the powder stream on the heat and fluid flow conditions during Directed Energy Deposition of maraging steel-Fig3

On the role of the powder stream on the heat and fluid flow conditions during Directed Energy Deposition of maraging steel—Multiphysics modeling and experimental validation

MohamadBayataVenkata K.NadimpalliaFrancesco G.BiondaniaSinaJafarzadehbJesperThorborgaNiels S.TiedjeaGiulianoBissaccoaDavid B.PedersenaJesper H.Hattela
a Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Building 425, Lyngby, Denmark
Department of Energy Conversion and Storage, Technical University of Denmark, Building 301, Lyngby, Denmark

Received 15 December 2020, Revised 12 April 2021, Accepted 19 April 2021, Available online 8 May 2021.

Abstract

The Directed Energy Deposition (DED) process of metals, has a broad range of applications in several industrial sectors. Surface modification, component repairing, production of functionally graded materials and more importantly, manufacturing of complex geometries are major DED’s applications. In this work, a multi-physics numerical model of the DED process of maraging steel is developed to study the influence of the powder stream specifications on the melt pool’s thermal and fluid dynamics conditions. The model is developed based on the Finite Volume Method (FVM) framework using the commercial software package Flow-3D. Different physical phenomena e.g. solidification, evaporation, the Marangoni effect and the recoil pressure are included in the model. As a new feature, the powder particles’ dynamics are modeled using a Lagrangian framework and their impact on the melt pool conditions is taken into account as well. In-situ and ex-situ experiments are carried out using a thermal camera and optical microscopy. The predicted track morphology is in good agreement with the experimental measurements. Besides, the predicted melt pool evolution follows the same trend as observed with the online thermal camera. Furthermore, a parametric study is carried out to investigate the effect of the powder particles incoming velocity on the track morphology. It is shown that the height-to-width ratio of tracks increases while using higher powder velocities. Moreover, it is shown that by tripling the powder particles velocity, the height-to-width ratio increases by 104% and the wettability of the track decreases by 24%.

Korea Abstract

금속의 DED (Directed Energy Deposition) 공정은 여러 산업 분야에서 광범위한 응용 분야를 가지고 있습니다. 표면 수정, 부품 수리, 기능 등급 재료의 생산 및 더 중요한 것은 복잡한 형상의 제조가 DED의 주요 응용 분야입니다.

이 작업에서는 용융 풀의 열 및 유체 역학 조건에 대한 분말 스트림 사양의 영향을 연구하기 위해 강철 마레이징 DED 공정의 다중 물리 수치 모델이 개발되었습니다. 이 모델은 상용 소프트웨어 패키지 FLOW-3D를 사용하여 FVM (Finite Volume Method) 프레임 워크를 기반으로 개발되었습니다.

다른 물리적 현상 예 : 응고, 증발, 마랑고니 효과 및 반동 압력이 모델에 포함됩니다. 새로운 기능으로 분말 입자의 역학은 Lagrangian 프레임 워크를 사용하여 모델링되며 용융 풀 조건에 미치는 영향도 고려됩니다.

현장 및 현장 실험은 열 화상 카메라와 광학 현미경을 사용하여 수행됩니다. 예측된 트랙 형태는 실험 측정과 잘 일치합니다. 게다가 예측된 용융 풀 진화는 온라인 열 화상 카메라에서 관찰된 것과 동일한 추세를 따릅니다. 또한, 분말 입자 유입 속도가 트랙 형태에 미치는 영향을 조사하기 위해 매개 변수 연구가 수행됩니다.

더 높은 분말 속도를 사용하는 동안 트랙의 높이 대 너비 비율이 증가하는 것으로 나타났습니다. 또한 분말 입자 속도를 3 배로 늘림으로써 높이 대 너비 비율이 104 % 증가하고 트랙의 젖음성은 24 % 감소하는 것으로 나타났습니다.

Keywords

Multi-physics modelDEDHeat and fluid flowFVMParticle motion

On the role of the powder stream on the heat and fluid flow conditions during Directed Energy Deposition of maraging steel-Fig
On the role of the powder stream on the heat and fluid flow conditions during Directed Energy Deposition of maraging steel-Fig
On the role of the powder stream on the heat and fluid flow conditions during Directed Energy Deposition of maraging steel-Fig2
On the role of the powder stream on the heat and fluid flow conditions during Directed Energy Deposition of maraging steel-Fig2
On the role of the powder stream on the heat and fluid flow conditions during Directed Energy Deposition of maraging steel-Fig3
On the role of the powder stream on the heat and fluid flow conditions during Directed Energy Deposition of maraging steel-Fig3
On the role of the powder stream on the heat and fluid flow conditions during Directed Energy Deposition of maraging steel-Fig4
On the role of the powder stream on the heat and fluid flow conditions during Directed Energy Deposition of maraging steel-Fig4
On the role of the powder stream on the heat and fluid flow conditions during Directed Energy Deposition of maraging steel-Fig5
On the role of the powder stream on the heat and fluid flow conditions during Directed Energy Deposition of maraging steel-Fig5
On the role of the powder stream on the heat and fluid flow conditions during Directed Energy Deposition of maraging steel-Fig6
On the role of the powder stream on the heat and fluid flow conditions during Directed Energy Deposition of maraging steel-Fig6
On the role of the powder stream on the heat and fluid flow conditions during Directed Energy Deposition of maraging steel-Fig7
On the role of the powder stream on the heat and fluid flow conditions during Directed Energy Deposition of maraging steel-Fig7
On the role of the powder stream on the heat and fluid flow conditions during Directed Energy Deposition of maraging steel-Fig8
On the role of the powder stream on the heat and fluid flow conditions during Directed Energy Deposition of maraging steel-Fig8
On the role of the powder stream on the heat and fluid flow conditions during Directed Energy Deposition of maraging steel-Fig9
On the role of the powder stream on the heat and fluid flow conditions during Directed Energy Deposition of maraging steel-Fig9
On the role of the powder stream on the heat and fluid flow conditions during Directed Energy Deposition of maraging steel-Fig10
On the role of the powder stream on the heat and fluid flow conditions during Directed Energy Deposition of maraging steel-Fig10
On the role of the powder stream on the heat and fluid flow conditions during Directed Energy Deposition of maraging steel-Fig11
On the role of the powder stream on the heat and fluid flow conditions during Directed Energy Deposition of maraging steel-Fig11
Fig. 9 (a) Velocity field, keyhole profile, and breakage of the keyhole to form bubble and (b) 2D temperature and velocity field along the longitudinal section

A Numerical Study on the Keyhole Formation During Laser Powder Bed Fusion Process

Keyhole에 대한 수치적 연구 : 레이저 분말 중 형성 베드 퓨전 공정

Subin Shrestha1
J.B. Speed School of Engineering,University of Louisville,Louisville, KY 40292
e-mail: subin.shrestha@louisville.edu

Y. Kevin Chou
J.B. Speed School of Engineering,University of Louisville,Louisville, KY 40292
e-mail: kevin.chou@louisville.edu

LPBF (Laser Powder Bed fusion) 공정 중 용융 풀의 동적 현상은 복잡하고 공정 매개 변수에 민감합니다. 에너지 밀도 입력이 특정 임계 값을 초과하면 키홀이라고 하는 거대한 증기 함몰이 형성 될 수 있습니다.

이 연구는 수치 분석을 통해 LPBF 과정에서 키홀 거동 및 관련 기공 형성을 이해하는 데 중점을 둡니다. 이를 위해 이산 분말 입자가 있는 열 유동 모델이 개발되었습니다.

이산 요소 방법 (DEM)에서 얻은 분말 분포는 계산 영역에 통합되어 FLOW-3D를 사용하는 3D 프로세스 물리학 모델을 개발합니다.

전도 모드 중 용융 풀 형성과 용융의 키홀 모드가 식별되고 설명되었습니다. 높은 에너지 밀도는 증기 기둥의 형성으로 이어지고 결과적으로 레이저 스캔 트랙 아래에 구멍이 생깁니다.

또한 다양한 레이저 출력과 스캔 속도로 인한 Keyhole 모양을 조사합니다. 수치 결과는 동일한 에너지 밀도에서도 레이저 출력이 증가함에 따라 Keyhole크기가 증가 함을 나타냅니다. Keyhole은 더 높은 출력에서 ​​안정되어 레이저 스캔 중 Keyhole 발생을 줄일 수 있습니다.

The dynamic phenomenon of a melt pool during the laser powder bed fusion (LPBF) process is complex and sensitive to process parameters. As the energy density input exceeds a certain threshold, a huge vapor depression may form, known as the keyhole. This study focuses on understanding the keyhole behavior and related pore formation during the LPBF process through numerical analysis. For this purpose, a thermo-fluid model with discrete powder particles is developed. The powder distribution, obtained from a discrete element method (DEM), is incorporated into the computational domain to develop a 3D process physics model using flow-3d. The melt pool formation during the conduction mode and the keyhole mode of melting has been discerned and explained. The high energy density leads to the formation of a vapor column and consequently pores under the laser scan track. Further, the keyhole shape resulted from different laser powers and scan speeds is investigated. The numerical results indicated that the keyhole size increases with the increase in the laser power even with the same energy density. The keyhole becomes stable at a higher power, which may reduce the occurrence of pores during laser scanning.

Keywords: additive manufacturing, keyhole, laser powder bed fusion, porosity

Fig. 1 (a) Powder added to the dispenser platform and (b) powder particles settled over build plate after the recoating process
Fig. 1 (a) Powder added to the dispenser platform and (b) powder particles settled over build plate after the recoating process
Fig. 2 3D computational domain used for single-track simulation
Fig. 2 3D computational domain used for single-track simulation
Fig. 3 Temperature-dependent material properties of Ti-6Al-4V
Fig. 3 Temperature-dependent material properties of Ti-6Al-4V
Fig. 4 Powder and substrate melting during laser application
Fig. 4 Powder and substrate melting during laser application
Fig. 5 Melt region formed after complete melting and solidification
Fig. 5 Melt region formed after complete melting and solidification
Fig. 6 Melt pool boundary comparison between the experiment [25] and the simulation
Fig. 6 Melt pool boundary comparison between the experiment [25] and the simulation
Fig. 7 Equilibrium points during the formation of vapor column [27]
Fig. 7 Equilibrium points during the formation of vapor column [27]
Fig. 8 Multiple reflection vectors from the keyhole wall
Fig. 8 Multiple reflection vectors from the keyhole wall
Fig. 9 (a) Velocity field, keyhole profile, and breakage of the keyhole to form bubble and (b) 2D temperature and velocity field along the longitudinal section
Fig. 9 (a) Velocity field, keyhole profile, and breakage of the keyhole to form bubble and (b) 2D temperature and velocity field along the longitudinal section
Fig. 10 Fluid flow in the transverse direction during keyhole melting
Fig. 10 Fluid flow in the transverse direction during keyhole melting
Fig. 11 Melt pool boundary compared with the experiment [21] for 195 W laser power and 400 mm/s scan speed
Fig. 11 Melt pool boundary compared with the experiment [21] for 195 W laser power and 400 mm/s scan speed
Fig. 12 Melt region formed after complete melting and solidification
Fig. 12 Melt region formed after complete melting and solidification
Fig. 13 2D images of the pores formed at the beginning of the single track and their 3D-rendered morphology
Fig. 13 2D images of the pores formed at the beginning of the single track and their 3D-rendered morphology
Fig. 14 Pore number and volume from a different level of power with LED = 0.4 J/mm [29]
Fig. 14 Pore number and volume from a different level of power with LED = 0.4 J/mm [29]
Fig. 15 Keyhole shape at different time steps from different parameters: (a) P = 100 W, v = 250 mm/s, (b) P = 200 W, v = 500 mm/s, (c) P = 300 W, v = 750 mm/s, and (d) P = 400 W, v = 1000 mm/s
Fig. 15 Keyhole shape at different time steps from different parameters: (a) P = 100 W, v = 250 mm/s, (b) P = 200 W, v = 500 mm/s, (c) P = 300 W, v = 750 mm/s, and (d) P = 400 W, v = 1000 mm/s
Fig. 16 Intensity dependence in the relationship between vapor column and evaporation pressure [27]
Fig. 16 Intensity dependence in the relationship between vapor column and evaporation pressure [27]
Fig. 17 Temperature distribution when laser has moved 0.8 mm with P = 300 W, v = 750 mm/s and P = 400 W, v = 1000 mm/s
Fig. 17 Temperature distribution when laser has moved 0.8 mm with P = 300 W, v = 750 mm/s and P = 400 W, v = 1000 mm/s
Fig. 18 Melt region with different level of power with LED of 0.4 J/mm
Fig. 18 Melt region with different level of power with LED of 0.4 J/mm

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Figure 2.6 ESI apparatus for offline analysis with microscope imaging.

MODELING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF MICROFABRICATED EMITTERS: IN PURSUIT OF IMPROVED ESI-MS PERFORMANCE

미세 가공 방사체의 모델링 및 특성화 : 개선된 ESI-MS 성능 추구

by XINYUN WU

A thesis submitted to the Department of Chemistry in conformity with the requirements for the degree of Master of Science Queen’s University Kingston, Ontario, Canada December, 2011 Copyright © Xinyun Wu, 2011

Abstract

ESI (Electrospray ionization)는 특히 탁월한 감도, 견고성 및 단순성으로 대형 생체 분자를 분석하는 데있어 질량 분석 (MS)에 매우 귀중한 기술이었습니다. ESI 기술 개발에 많은 노력을 기울였습니다. 그 형태와 기하학적 구조가 전기 분무 성능과 추가 MS 감지에 중추적 인 것으로 입증 되었기 때문입니다.

막힘 및 낮은 처리량을 포함하여 전통적인 단일 홀 이미터의 본질적인 문제는 기술의 적용 가능성을 제한합니다. 이 문제를 해결하기 위해 현재 프로젝트는 향상된 ESI-MS 분석을위한 다중 전자 분무(MES) 방출기를 개발하는데 초점을 맞추고 있습니다.

이 논문에서는 스프레이 전류 측정을 위한 전기 분무와 오프라인 전기 분무 실험을 위한 전산 유체 역학 (CFD) 시뮬레이션의 공동 작업이 수행되었습니다. 전기 분무 성능에 대한 다양한 이미터 설계의 영향을 테스트하기 위해 수치 시뮬레이션이 사용되었으며 실험실 결과는 가이드 및 검증으로 사용되었습니다.

CFD 코드는 Taylor-Melcher 누설 유전체 모델(LDM)을 기반으로 하며 과도 전기 분무 공정이 성공적으로 시뮬레이션되었습니다.

이 방법은 750 μm 내경 (i.d.) 이미 터를 통해 먼저 검증되었으며 20 μm i.d.에 추가로 적용되었습니다. 모델. 전기 분무 공정의 여러 단계가 시각적으로 시연되었으며 다양한 적용 전기장 및 유속에서 분무 전류의 변화에 ​​대한 정량적 조사는 이전 시뮬레이션 및 측정과 잘 일치합니다.

단일 조리개 프로토 타입을 기반으로 2 홀 및 3 홀 이미터로 MES 시뮬레이션을 수행했습니다. 시뮬레이션 예측은 실험 결과와 유사하게 비교되었습니다. 이 작업의 증거는 CFD 시뮬레이션이 MES의 이미 터 설계를 테스트하는 효과적인 수치 도구로 사용될 수 있음을 입증했습니다.

이 작업에서 달성 된 마이크로 스케일 에미 터 전기 분무의 성공적인 시뮬레이션에 대한 벤치마킹 결과는 현재까지 발표 된 전기 분무에 대한 동적 시뮬레이션의 가장 작은 규모로 여겨집니다.

Co-Authorship

공동 저자: 이 논문에 대한 모든 연구는 Natalie M. Cann 박사와 Richard D. Oleschuk 박사의 지도하에 완료되었습니다. 다중 전자 분무에 관한 4 장에서 제시된 연구 작업의 일부는 Ramin Wright가 공동 저술했으며, 이 작업은 press에서 다음 논문에서 인용되었습니다.

ibson,G.T.T.; Wright, R.D.; Oleschuk, R.D. Multiple electrosprays generated from a single poly carbonate microstructured fibre. Journal of Mass Spectrometry, 2011, in press.

Chapter 1 Introduction

소프트 이온화 방법으로 ESI (electrospray ionization)의 도입은 질량 분석법 (MS)의 적용 가능성에 혁명을 일으켰습니다. 이 기술의 부드러운 특징은 상대적으로 높은 전하를 가진 이온을 생성하는 고유한 이점으로 인해 액상에서 직접 펩티드 및 단백질과 같은 큰 생체 분자를 분석 할 수 있게했습니다 [1].

지난 10 년 동안 ESI-MS는 놀라운 성장을 보였으며 현재는 단백질 체학, 대사 체학, 글리코 믹스, 합성 화학자를 위한 식별 도구 등 다양한 생화학 분야에서 광범위하게 채택되고 있습니다 [2-3].

ESI-MS는 겔 전기 영동과 같은 생물학적 분자에 대한 기존의 질량 측정 기술보다 훨씬 빠르고 민감하며 정확합니다. 또한, 액체상에서 직접 분석 할 수 있는 큰 비 휘발성 분자의 능력은 고성능 액체 크로마토 그래피 (HPLC) 및 모세관 전기 영동 (CE)과 같은 업스트림 분리 기술과의 결합을 가능하게합니다 [4].

일반적인 ESI 공정은 일반적으로 액적 형성, 액적 수축 및 기상 이온의 최종 형성을 포함합니다. 일렉트로 스프레이의 성능에 영향을 미치는 많은 요소 중에서 스프레이를 위한 이미터의 구조 (즉, 기하학, 모양 등)가 중요한 요소입니다.

전통적인 전기 분무 이미터는 일반적으로 풀링 또는 에칭 기술로 제작 된 단일 채널 테이퍼 형 또는 비 테이퍼 형입니다. 그러나 이러한 이미터는 종종 막힘, 부적절한 처리량 등과 같은 문제로 어려움을 겪습니다. [5]

향상된 감도 및 샘플 활용을 위해 다중 스프레이를 생성하는 새로운 이미터 설계 개발로 분명한 발전이 있었습니다. 새로운 ESI 이미터 설계에 대한 연구는 실험적으로나 이론적으로 큰 관심을 불러 일으켰습니다 [3]. 그러나 ESI의 복잡한 물리적 과정은 팁 형상 외에도 많은 다른 변수에 의존하기 때문에 연구간 직접 비교의 어려움은 장애물이 됩니다.

또한 새로운 나노 이미터 제조 및 테스트 비용이 상당히 높을 수 있습니다. 이 논문은 CFD 시뮬레이션 도구를 활용하여 가상 랩을 설정함으로써 이러한 문제를 해결합니다. 다른 매개 변수로 인해 상호 연결된 변경 없이 다양한 이미터 설계를 비교할 수 있도록 이상적으로 균일한 물리적 조건을 제공합니다.

맞춤 제작된 프로토 타입의 실험 측정 값도 수집되어 더 나은 계산 체계를 형성하는 데 도움이 되는 지침과 검증을 모두 제공합니다. 특히 이 분야의 주요 미래 플랫폼으로 여겨지는 다중 노즐 이미 터 설계에 중점을 둘 것입니다.

전기 분무 거동에 영향을 미치는 요인에 대한 추가 기본 연구는 다양한 기하학적 및 작동 매개 변수와 관련하여 수행됩니다. 이는 보다 효율적이고 견고한 이미터의 개발을 가능하게 할 뿐만 아니라 더 넓은 영역에서 ESI의 적용을 향상시킬 수 있습니다.

Figure 1.1Schematic setup for ESI-MS technique
Figure 1.1Schematic setup for ESI-MS technique
Figure 1.2 Schematic of major processes occurring in electrospray [5].
Figure 1.2 Schematic of major processes occurring in electrospray [5].
Figure 1.3 Illustration of detailed geometric parameters of a spraying Taylor cone wherera is the radius of curvature of the best fitting circle at the tip of the cone; re is the radius of the emission region for droplets at the tip of a Taylor cone;is the liquid cone angle.
Figure 1.3 Illustration of detailed geometric parameters of a spraying Taylor cone wherera is the radius of curvature of the best fitting circle at the tip of the cone; re is the radius of the emission region for droplets at the tip of a Taylor cone;is the liquid cone angle.
Figure 1.4 (A)Externally tapered emitter  (B) Optical image of a clogged tapered emitter with normal use [46].
Figure 1.4 (A)Externally tapered emitter (B) Optical image of a clogged tapered emitter with normal use [46].
Figure 1.5 (A)Three by three configuration of an emitter array made with polycarbonate using laser ablation; (B) Photomicrograph of nine stable electrosprays generated from the nine-emitter array [52]
Figure 1.5 (A)Three by three configuration of an emitter array made with polycarbonate using laser ablation; (B) Photomicrograph of nine stable electrosprays generated from the nine-emitter array [52]
Figure 1.6 SEM images of the distal ends of four multichannel nanoelectrospray emitters and a tapered emitter: (A) 30 orifice emitter; (B) 54 orifice emitter; (C) 84 orifice emitter; (D) 168 orifice emitter; Scale bars in A, B, and C represent 50 μm, and 100 μm in D[54]
Figure 1.6 SEM images of the distal ends of four multichannel nanoelectrospray emitters and a tapered emitter: (A) 30 orifice emitter; (B) 54 orifice emitter; (C) 84 orifice emitter; (D) 168 orifice emitter; Scale bars in A, B, and C represent 50 μm, and 100 μm in D[54]
Figure 1.7 Photomicrographs of electrospray from of a 168-hole MCN emitter at different flow rates. (A) A traditional integrated Taylor cone observed from offline electrospray of water with 0.1% formic acid at 300 nL/min; (B) A mist of coalesced Taylor cones observed from offline electrospray at 25 nL/min[54]
Figure 1.7 Photomicrographs of electrospray from of a 168-hole MCN emitter at different flow rates. (A) A traditional integrated Taylor cone observed from offline electrospray of water with 0.1% formic acid at 300 nL/min; (B) A mist of coalesced Taylor cones observed from offline electrospray at 25 nL/min[54]
Figure 1.8 Circular arrays of etched emitters for better electric field homogeneity [53].
Figure 1.8 Circular arrays of etched emitters for better electric field homogeneity [53].
Figure 2.6 ESI apparatus for offline analysis with microscope imaging.
Figure 2.6 ESI apparatus for offline analysis with microscope imaging.
Figure 3.9 Typical panel for displaying instant simulation result during simulation process.
Figure 3.9 Typical panel for displaying instant simulation result during simulation process.
Figure 5.3 Generation of a Taylor cone-jet mode (simulation) plotted with iso-potential lines at times    (Top to bottom panels correspond to 0.002 s, 0.012 s, 0.018 s, 0.08 s respectively).
Figure 5.3 Generation of a Taylor cone-jet mode (simulation) plotted with iso-potential lines at times (Top to bottom panels correspond to 0.002 s, 0.012 s, 0.018 s, 0.08 s respectively).
Figure 5.8 (A) Taylor cone-jet profiles with different contact angle of 30 degrees and 20 degrees (B) under the same physical conditions of 6 kV and 0.04 m/s. (C) Cone-jet profile generated from a tapered tip with a 20 degree contact angle at 6 kV and 0.04 m/s (as a comparison with (B)).
Figure 5.8 (A) Taylor cone-jet profiles with different contact angle of 30 degrees and 20 degrees (B) under the same physical conditions of 6 kV and 0.04 m/s. (C) Cone-jet profile generated from a tapered tip with a 20 degree contact angle at 6 kV and 0.04 m/s (as a comparison with (B)).

Omit below: Please refer to the original text for the full content.

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Figure 1.1: A water droplet with a radius of 1 mm resting on a glass substrate. The surface of the droplet takes on a spherical cap shape. The contact angle θ is defined by the balance of the interfacial forces.

Effect of substrate cooling and droplet shape and composition on the droplet evaporation and the deposition of particles

기판 냉각 및 액적 모양 및 조성이 액적 증발 및 입자 증착에 미치는 영향

by Vahid Bazargan
M.A.Sc., Mechanical Engineering, The University of British Columbia, 2008
B.Sc., Mechanical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, 2006
B.Sc., Chemical & Petroleum Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, 2006

고착 방울은 평평한 기판에 놓인 액체 방울입니다. 작은 고정 액적이 증발하는 동안 액적의 접촉선은 고정된 접촉 영역이 있는 고정된 단계와 고정된 접촉각이 있는 고정 해제된 단계의 두 가지 단계를 거칩니다. 고정된 접촉 라인이 있는 증발은 액적 내부에서 접촉 라인을 향한 흐름을 생성합니다.

이 흐름은 입자를 운반하고 접촉 선 근처에 침전시킵니다. 이로 인해 일반적으로 관찰되는 “커피 링”현상이 발생합니다. 이 논문은 증발 과정과 고착성 액적의 증발 유도 흐름에 대한 연구를 제공하고 콜로이드 현탁액에서 입자의 침착에 대한 통찰력을 제공합니다. 여기서 우리는 먼저 작은 고착 방울의 증발을 연구하고 증발 과정에서 기판의 열전도도의 중요성에 대해 논의합니다.

현재 증발 모델이 500µm 미만의 액적 크기에 대해 심각한 오류를 생성하는 방법을 보여줍니다. 우리의 모델에는 열 효과가 포함되어 있으며, 특히 증발 잠열의 균형을 맞추기 위해 액적에 열을 제공하는 기판의 열전도도를 포함합니다. 실험 결과를 바탕으로 접촉각의 진화와 관련된 접촉 선의 가상 움직임을 정의하여 고정 및 고정 해제 단계의 전체 증발 시간을 고려합니다.

우리의 모델은 2 % 미만의 오차로 500 µm보다 작은 물방울에 대한 실험 결과와 일치합니다. 또한 유한한 크기의 라인 액적의 증발을 연구하고 증발 중 접촉 라인의 복잡한 동작에 대해 논의합니다. 에너지 공식을 적용하고 접촉 선이 구형 방울의 후퇴 접촉각보다 높은 접촉각을 가진 선 방울의 두 끝에서 후퇴하기 시작 함을 보여줍니다. 그리고 라인 방울 내부의 증발 유도 흐름을 보여줍니다.

마지막으로, 계면 활성제 존재 하에서 접촉 라인의 거동을 논의하고 입자 증착에 대한 Marangoni 흐름 효과에 대해 논의합니다. 열 Marangoni 효과는 접촉 선 근처에 증착 된 입자의 양에 영향을 미치며, 기판 온도가 낮을수록 접촉 선 근처에 증착되는 입자의 양이 많다는 것을 알 수 있습니다.

Figure 1.1: A water droplet with a radius of 1 mm resting on a glass substrate. The surface of the droplet takes on a spherical cap shape. The contact angle θ is defined by the balance of the interfacial forces.
Figure 1.1: A water droplet with a radius of 1 mm resting on a glass substrate. The surface of the droplet takes on a spherical cap shape. The contact angle θ is defined by the balance of the interfacial forces.
Figure 2.1: Evaporation modes of sessile droplets on a substrate: (a) evaporation at constant contact angle (de-pinned stage) and (b) evaporation at constant contact area (pinned stage)
Figure 2.1: Evaporation modes of sessile droplets on a substrate: (a) evaporation at constant contact angle (de-pinned stage) and (b) evaporation at constant contact area (pinned stage)
Figure 2.2: A sessil droplet with its image can be profiled as the equiconvex lens formed by two intersecting spheres with radius of a.
Figure 2.2: A sessil droplet with its image can be profiled as the equiconvex lens formed by two intersecting spheres with radius of a.
Figure 2.3: The droplet life time for both evaporation modes derived from Equation 2.2.
Figure 2.3: The droplet life time for both evaporation modes derived from Equation 2.2.
Figure 2.4: A probability of escape for vapor molecules at two different sites of the surface of the droplet for diffusion controlled evaporation. The random walk path initiated from a vapor molecule is more likely to result in a return to the surface if the starting point is further away from the edge of the droplet.
Figure 2.4: A probability of escape for vapor molecules at two different sites of the surface of the droplet for diffusion controlled evaporation. The random walk path initiated from a vapor molecule is more likely to result in a return to the surface if the starting point is further away from the edge of the droplet.
Figure 2.5: Schematic of the sessile droplet on a substrate
Figure 2.5: Schematic of the sessile droplet on a substrate. The evaporation rate at the surface of the droplet is enhanced toward the edge of the droplet.
Figure 2.6: The domain mesh (a) and the solution of the Laplace equation for diffusion of the water vapor molecule with the concentration of Cv = 1.9×10−8 g/mm3 at the surface of the droplet into the ambient air with the relative humidity of 55%, i.e. φ = 0.55 (b).
Figure 2.6: The domain mesh (a) and the solution of the Laplace equation for diffusion of the water vapor molecule with the concentration of Cv = 1.9×10−8 g/mm3 at the surface of the droplet into the ambient air with the relative humidity of 55%, i.e. φ = 0.55 (b).
Figure 3.1: The portable micro printing setup. A motorized linear stage from Zaber Technologies Inc. was used to control the place and speed of the micro nozzle.
Figure 3.1: The portable micro printing setup. A motorized linear stage from Zaber Technologies Inc. was used to control the place and speed of the micro nozzle.
Figure 4.6: Temperature contours inside the substrate adjacent to the droplet
Figure 4.6: Temperature contours inside the substrate adjacent to the droplet
Figure 4.7: The effect of substrate cooling on the evaporation rate, the basic model shows the same value for all substrates.
Figure 4.7: The effect of substrate cooling on the evaporation rate, the basic model shows the same value for all substrates.

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레이저 용접 수치해석 (FLOW-3D WELD)

FLOW-3D WELD Products

레이저 용접 수치해석 (FLOW-3D WELD)

FLOW-3D@ WELD는 레이저 용접 공정에 대한 정확한 시뮬레이션 기능을 제공하여 최적화된 공정을 개발하게 합니다. 더 나은 공정 제어를 통해 기공, 열 영향 영역을 최소화하고 미세 구조 변화를 제어할 수 있습니다.

레이저 용접 프로세스를 정확하게 시뮬레이션하기 위해 FLOW-3D@ WELD는 레이저 열원, 레이저-재료 상호 작용, 유체 흐름, 열 전달, 표면 장력, 응고, 다중 레이저 반사 및 위상 변화와 같은 모든 관련 물리 모델을 제공합니다.

Laser Welding

최근에는 뛰어난 생산성과 속도, 낮은 열 입력이 결합되어 기존의 용접 프로세스를 대체하는 레이저 용접 프로세스가 주목 받고 있습니다. 레이저 용접이 제공하는 장점은 용접강도가 좋고, 열 영향 부위가 작으며, 정밀도가 낮고 변형이 적으며, 강철, 알루미늄, 티타늄 및 이종 금속을 포함한 광범위한 금속 및 합금을 용접 할 수 있는 기능이 있습니다.

FLOW-3D@는 레이저 용접 공정에 대한 강력한 통찰력을 제공하고 궁극적으로 프로세스 최적화를 달성하는 데 도움이 됩니다.

보다 나은 프로세스 제어를 통해 기공을 최소화할 수 있습니다. 열 영향부위 및 미세조직을 제어가 가능합니다. FLOW-3D는 자유표면 추적 알고리즘을 통해 매우 복잡한 용접 POOL 시뮬레이션을 해석하는데 매우 적합합니다.

용접 모듈은 레이저 소스에 의해 생성된 Heat flux, 용융 금속에 대한 증발압력, shield gas 효과, 용융 풀의 반동압력 및 다중 레이저 반사와 같은 물리적 모델을 FLOW-3D에 적용하기 위해 개발되었습니다. 키홀 용접과 같은 현실적인 프로세스 시뮬레이션을 위해서는 모든 관련 물리적 현상을 적용하는 것이 중요합니다.

FLOW-3D는 레이저 용접의 conduction and keyhole 방식을 시뮬레이션 할 수 있습니다. 전 세계의 연구원들은 FLOW-3D를 사용하여 용접역학을 분석하고, 공정 매개 변수를 최적화하여 기공을 최소화하며, 레이저 용접공정에서의 dendrite 결정 성장 양상을 예측합니다.

Shallow penetration weld (top left); deep penetration weld with shield gas effects (top right); deep penetration weld with shield gas and evaporation pressure (bottom left); and deep penetration weld with shield gas, evaporation pressure and multiple laser reflections effects (bottom right).

Full Penetration Laser Welding Experiments

한국 카이스트와 독일 BAM은 16K kW레이저를 사용하여 10mm강판에 완전 침투 레이저 용접 실험을 수행하였습니다. CCD카메라의 도움을 받아 완전 용입 레이저 용접으로 형성된 상단 및 하단 용융풀 거동을 확인할 수 있었습니다. 그들은 또한 FLOW-3D 로 용접 공정 해석으로 해석과 실험결과의 경향이 일치하는 것을 알 수 있었습니다.

Experimental setup with CCD cameras observing the top and bottom molten pools
Schematic of computation domain in FLOW-3D

 

Simulation results at the top show melt pool lengths of 8mm and 15mm, whereas experiments indicated melt pool lengths of 7mm and 13mm

Laser Welding Porosity Case Study

General Motors, Michigan, 중국의 상하이 대학교는 용접 공정 변수, 즉 keyhole 용접에서 기공의 발생에 대해 용접 속도 및 용접 각도와 같은 공정 매개 변수가 미치는 영향을 알아보기 위해 협력하여 연구를 진행하였습니다.

레이저 용접된 Al 접합부 단면의 기공을 분석합니다. Keyhole이 유도 된 기공들은 유동 역학으로 인해 발생되고 균열을 일으킬 수 있습니다. 최적화 공정의 매개변수는 이러한 종류의 기공을 완화할 수 있습니다. FLOW-3D를 사용하여 연구원들은 증발 및 반동 압력, 용융풀, 온도에 따른 표면장력 및 Keyhole내의 다중 레이저 반사, 프레넬 흡수를 포함한 모든 중요한 물리적 현상을 설명했습니다.

연구진은 시뮬레이션 모델을 기반으로 Keyhole 용접에서 생성된 기공들의 주요 원인으로 불안정한 Keyhole을 규정하였습니다. 아래 이미지에서 볼 수 있듯이 뒤쪽 용융 풀의 과도한 재순환은 뒤쪽 용융 풀이 앞쪽 용융 풀 경계를 무너뜨리며 기공들을 생성시킵니다. 갇힌 공간이 증가하는 응고 전면에 의해 갇혔을때 기공들이 발생되었습니다.

Distribution of porosity in longitudinal welding sections as seen in simulations (top) and experiments (bottom)

용접 속도가 빠를수록 더 큰 keyhole이 생성되며 이로 인해, 보다 안정적인 keyhole이 생성됩니다. 연구진은 FLOW-3D를 사용하여 용접 속도와 용접 경사각으로 기공들의 생성을 완화시킬 수 있었습니다.


관련 기술자료

Ultrafast laser ablation of tungsten carbide: Quantification of threshold range and interpretation of feature transition

Ultrafast laser ablation of tungsten carbide: Quantification of threshold range and interpretation of feature transition

텅스텐 카바이드의 초고속 레이저 제거: 임계값 범위의 정량화 및 특징 전환 해석 Xiong Zhang, Chunjin Wang, Benny C. F. Cheung, Gaoyang Mi, Chunming WangFirst ...
Figure 1: Scheme of liquid metal printing process

Effect of Aging Heat Treatment in an Al-4008 Produced byLiquid Metal Printing

C. M. LadeiroDepartment of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Faculdade de Engenharia, Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. RobertoFrias, 4200-465 PORTO, Portugal ...
Coupled CFD-DEM simulation of interfacial fluid–particle interaction during binder jet 3D printing

Coupled CFD-DEM simulation of interfacial fluid–particle interaction during binder jet 3D printing

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Influences of the Powder Size and Process Parameters on the Quasi-Stability of Molten Pool Shape in Powder Bed Fusion-Laser Beam of Molybdenum

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Figure 3. The simulated temperature distribution and single-layer multi-track isothermograms of LPBF Hastelloy X, located at the bottom of the powder bed, are presented for various laser energy densities. (a) depicts the single-point temperature distribution at the bottom of the powder bed, followed by the isothermograms corresponding to laser energy densities of (b) 31 J/mm3 , (c) 43 J/mm3 , (d) 53 J/mm3 , (e) 67 J/mm3 , and (f) 91 J/mm3 .

An integrated multiscale simulation guiding the processing optimisation for additively manufactured nickel-based superalloys

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Printability disparities in heterogeneous materialcombinations via laser directed energy deposition:a comparative stud

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Fig. 3. (a–c) Snapshots of the CtFD simulation of laser-beam irradiation: (a) Top, (b) longitudinal vertical cross-sectional, and (c) transversal vertical cross-sectional views. (d) z-position of the solid/liquid interface during melting and solidification.

Solute segregation in a rapidly solidified Hastelloy-X Ni-based superalloy during laser powder bed fusion investigated by phase-field simulations and computational thermal-fluid dynamics

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Figure 5. Simulation of the molten pool under low-speed scanning (1.06 m/s). (a) Sequential solidification of the molten pool at the end of the melt track for laser powers of 190 and 340 W, respectively. (b) Recoil pressure on the molten pool at the keyhole for laser powers of 190 and 340 W, respectively. (c) The force diagram of the melt at the back of the keyhole at t = 750 μs in case B. (d) Temperature gradient at the solid–liquid interface of the molten pool at the moment the laser is deactivated in case A. (e) Temperature gradient at the solid–liquid interface of the molten pool at the moment the laser is deactivated in case B.

Revealing formation mechanism of end of processdepression in laser powder bed fusion by multiphysics meso-scale simulation

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Schematic diagram of HP-LPBF melting process.

Modeling and numerical studies of high-precision laser powder bed fusion

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Predicting solid-state phase transformations during metal additive manufacturing: A case study on electron-beam powder bed fusion of Inconel-738

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The realm of operations of FLOW-3D

ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING SIMULATIONS

Capabilities of FLOW-3D

FLOW-3D는 자유 표면 유체 흐름 시뮬레이션을 전문으로하는 다중 물리 CFD 소프트웨어입니다. 자유 표면의 동적 진화를 추적하는 소프트웨어의 알고리즘인 VOF (Volume of Fluid) 방법은 Flow Science의 설립자인 Tony Hirt 박사가 개척했습니다.

또한 FLOW-3D에는 금속 주조, 잉크젯 인쇄, 레이저 용접 및 적층 제조 (AM)와 같은 광범위한 응용 분야를 시뮬레이션하기위한 물리 모델이 내장되어 있습니다.
적층 제조 시뮬레이션 소프트웨어, 특히 L-PBF (레이저 파우더 베드 융합 공정)의 현상 유지는 열 왜곡, 잔류 응력 및지지 구조 생성과 같은 부분 규모 모델링에 도움이되는 열 기계 시뮬레이션에 초점을 맞추고 있습니다.

유용하지만 용융 풀 역학 및 볼링 및 다공성과 같은 관련 결함에 대한 정보는 일반적으로 이러한 접근 방식의 영역 밖에 있습니다. 용융 풀 내의 유체 흐름, 열 전달 및 표면 장력이 열 구배 및 냉각 속도에 영향을 미치며 이는 다시 미세 구조 진화에 영향을 미친다는 점을 명심하는 것도 중요합니다.

FLOW-3D와 이산 요소법 (DEM) 및 WELD 모듈을 사용하여 분말 및 용융 풀 규모에서 시뮬레이션 할 수 있습니다.
구현되는 관련 물리학에는 점성 흐름, 열 전달, 응고, 상 변화, 반동 압력, 차폐 가스 압력, 표면 장력, 움직이는 물체 및 분말 / 입자 역학이 포함됩니다. 이러한 접근 방식은 합금에 대한 공정을 성공적으로 개발할 수 있게 하고, AM 기계 제조업체와 AM 기술의 최종 사용자 모두에게 관심있는 미세 구조 진화에 대한 통찰력을 제공하는데 도움이 됩니다.

The realm of operations of FLOW-3D
The realm of operations of FLOW-3D

FLOW-3D는 레이저 분말 베드 융합 (L-PBF), 직접 에너지 증착 (DED) 및 바인더 제트 공정으로 확장되는 기능을 가지고 있습니다.
FLOW-3D를 사용하면 분말 확산 및 패킹, 레이저 / 입자 상호 작용, 용융 풀 역학, 표면 형태 및 후속 미세 구조 진화를 정확하게 시뮬레이션 할 수 있습니다. 이러한 기능은 FLOW-3D에 고유하며 계산 효율성이 높은 방식으로 달성됩니다.

예를 들어 1.0mm x 0.4mm x 0.3mm 크기의 계산 영역에서 레이저 빔의 단일 트랙을 시뮬레이션하기 위해 레이저 용융 모델은 단 8 개의 물리적 코어에서 약 2 시간이 걸립니다.
FLOW-3D는 모든 관련 물리 구현 간의 격차를 해소하는 동시에 업계 및 연구 표준에서 허용하는 시간 프레임으로 결과를 생성합니다. 분말 패킹, 롤러를 통한 파워 확산, 분말의 레이저 용융, 용융 풀 형성 및 응고를 고려하고 다층 분말 베드 융합 공정을 위해 이러한 단계를 순차적으로 반복하여 FLOW-3D에서 전체 AM 공정을 시뮬레이션 할 수 있습니다.

FLOW-3D의 다층 시뮬레이션은 이전에 응고된 층의 열 이력을 저장한다는 점에서 독특하며, 열 전달을 고려하여 이전에 응고된 층에 확산된 새로운 분말 입자 세트에 대해 시뮬레이션이 수행됩니다.
또한, 응고 된 베드의 열 왜곡 및 잔류 응력은 FLOW-3D를 사용하여 평가할 수 있으며, 보다 복잡한 분석을 수행하기 위해 FLOW-3D의 압력 및 온도 데이터를 Abaqus 및 MSC Nastran과 같은 FEA 소프트웨어로 내보낼 수 있습니다.

Sequence of a multi-layer L-PBF simulation setup in FLOW-3D

Ease of Use

FLOW-3D는 다양한 응용 분야에서 거의 40 년 동안 사용되어 왔습니다. 사용자 피드백을 기반으로 UI 개발자는 소프트웨어를 사용하기 매우 직관적으로 만들었으며 새로운 사용자는 시뮬레이션 설정의 순서를 거의 또는 전혀 어려움없이 이해합니다.
사용자는 FLOW3D에서 구현 된 다양한 모델의 이론에 정통하며 새로운 실험을 설계 할 수 있습니다. 실습 튜토리얼, 비디오 강의, 예제 시뮬레이션 및 기술 노트의 저장소도 사용할 수 있습니다.
사용자가 특정 수준의 경험에 도달하면 고급 수치 교육 및 소프트웨어 사용자 지정 교육을 사용할 수 있습니다.

Available Literature

실험 데이터에 대해 FLOW-3D 모델을 검증하는 몇 가지 독립적으로 발표된 연구가 있습니다. 여기에서 수록된 저널 논문은 레이저 용접 및 적층 제조 공정으로 제한됩니다. 더 많은 참조는 당사 웹 사이트에서 확인할 수 있습니다.

Laser Welding

  1. L.J.Zhang, J.X.Zhang, A.Gumenyuk, M.Rethmeier, S.J.Na, Numerical simulation of full penetration laser welding of thick steel plate with high power high brightness laser, Journal of Materials Processing Technology, Volume 214, Issue 8, 2014.
    A study by researchers from BAM in Germany, KAIST in Korea, and State Key Laboratory of Mechanical Behavior of Materials in China that focuses on keyhole dynamics and full penetration laser welding of steel plates.
  2. Runqi Lin, Hui-ping Wang, Fenggui Lu, Joshua Solomon, Blair E.
    Carlson, Numerical study of keyhole dynamics and keyhole-induced porosity formation in remote laser welding of Al alloys, International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, Volume 108, Part A, 2017.
    General Motors (GM) and Shangai University collaborated on a study on the influence of welding speed and weld angle of inclination on porosity occurrence in laser keyhole welding.
  3. Koji Tsukimoto, Masashi Kitamura, Shuji Tanigawa, Sachio Shimohata, and Masahiko Mega, Laser Welding Repair for Single Crystal Blades, International Gas Turbine Congress, Tokyo, 2015.
    Mitsubishi Heavy Industry’s study on laser welding repair using laser cladding for single Ni crystal alloys used in gas turbine blades.

Additive Manufacturing

  1. Yu-Che Wu, Cheng-Hung San, Chih-Hsiang Chang, Huey-Jiuan Lin, Raed Marwan, Shuhei Baba, Weng-Sing Hwang, Numerical modeling of melt-pool behavior in selective laser melting with random powder distribution and experimental validation, Journal of Materials Processing Technology, Volume 254, 2018
    This paper discusses powder bed compaction with random packing for different powder-size distributions, and the importance of considering evaporation effects in the melting process to validate the melt pool dimensions.
  2. Lee, Y.S., and W.Zhang, Mesoscopic simulation of heat transfer and fluid flow in laser powder bed additive manufacturing, Proceedings of the Annual International Solid Freeform Fabrication Symposium, Austin, TX, USA. 2015
    A study conducted by Ohio State University researchers to understand the influence of process parameters in formation of balling defects.
  3. Y.S. Lee, W.Zhang, Modeling of heat transfer, fluid flow and solidification microstructure of nickel-base superalloy fabricated by laser powder bed fusion, Additive Manufacturing, Volume 12, Part B, 2016
    A study conducted by Ohio State University researchers to understand the influence of solidification parameters, calculated from the temperature fields, on solidification morphology and grain size using existing theoretical models in laser powder bed fusion processes.

 

 

레이저 용접 수치해석(FLOW WELD)

Laser Welding

뛰어난 생산성과 속도, 낮은 열 입력이 결합되어 기존의 용접 프로세스를 대체하는 레이저 용접 프로세스가 있습니다. 레이저 용접이 제공하는 장점은 용접강도가 좋고, 열 영향 부위가 작으며, 정밀도가 높고 변형이 적으며 강철, 알루미늄, 티타늄 및 이종 금속을 포함한 광범위한 금속 및 합금을 용접 할 수 있는 기능이 있습니다.

FLOW-3D는 레이저 용접 공정에 대한 강력한 통찰력을 제공하고 궁극적으로 프로세스 최적화를 달성하는 데 도움이 됩니다. 보다 나은 프로세스 제어를 통해 다공성을 최소화할 수 있습니다. 열 영향부위 및 마이크로-구조를 제어합니다. FLOW-3D는 자유표면 추적 알고리즘으로 인해 매우 복잡한 용접 풀 시뮬레이션을 해석하는데 적합합니다. 용접의 추가 모듈은 레이저 소스에 의해 생성된 Heat flux, 용융 금속에 대한 증발압력, shield gas효과, 용융 풀의 반동압력 및 다중 레이저반사와 같은 물리적 모델을 FLOW-3D에 통합하기 위해 개발되었습니다. Keyhole 용접과 같은 현실적인 프로세스 시뮬레이션을 위해서는 모든 관련 물리적 현상을 포착하는 것이 중요합니다.

FLOW-3D는 레이저 용접의 conduction and keyhole 방식을 시뮬레이션 할 수 있습니다. 전 세계의 연구원들은 FLOW-3D를 사용하여 용접역학을 분석하고, 공정 매개 변수를 최적화하여 다공성을 최소화하며, 레이저 용접공정의 수지결정 성장을 예측합니다.

Shallow penetration weld (top left); deep penetration weld with shield gas effects (top right); deep penetration weld with shield gas and evaporation pressure (bottom left); and deep penetration weld with shield gas, evaporation pressure and multiple laser reflections effects (bottom right).

Full Penetration Laser Welding Experiments

한국 카이스트와 독일 BAM은 16KW레이저를 사용하여 10mm강판에 완전 침투 레이저 용접 실험을 수행하였습니다. CCD카메라의 도움을 받아 완전 용입 레이저 용접으로 형성된 상단 및 하단 용융지 역학을 포착할 수 있었습니다. 그들은 또한 FLOW-3D공정을 시뮬레이션하여 해석과 실험결과가 경향이 일치하는 것을 나타내었습니다.

Experimental setup with CCD cameras observing the top and bottom molten pools
 
Simulation results at the top show melt pool lengths of 8mm and 15mm, whereas experiments indicated melt pool lengths of 7mm and 13mm
 
 
 
 
Schematic of computation domain in FLOW-3D

 

Laser Welding Porosity Case Study

General Motors, Michigan, 중국의 상하이 대학교는 공정변수, 즉 keyhole 용접에서 다공성 발생 에 대해 용접속도 및 용접각도와 같은 공정 매개 변수가 미치는 영향을 이해하기 위해 협력하여 연구를 진행하였습니다.

 
레이저 용접된 Al 접합부 단면의 다공성을 용접합니다. Keyhole 유도 된 다공성은 유동 역학으로 인해 발생되고 균열을 일으킬 수 있습니다. 최적화 공정의 매개변수는 이러한 종류의 다공성을 완화할 수 있습니다. FLOW-3D를 사용하여 연구원들은 증발 및 반동 압력, 용융풀, 온도에 따른 표면장력 및 Keyhole내의 다중 레이저 반사, 프레넬 흡수를 포함한 모든 중요한 물리적 현상을 설명했습니다.

연구진은 시뮬레이션 모델을 기반으로 Keyhole용접에서 유도된 다공성의 주요 원인으로 불안정한Keyhole을 규정하였습니다. 아래 이미지에서 볼 수 있듯이 뒤쪽 용융 풀의 과도한 재순환은 뒤쪽 용융 풀이 앞쪽 용융 풀 경계를 무너뜨리며 다공성을 초래시킵니다. 갇힌 공간이 증가하는 응고 전면에 의해 포착되었을 때 다공성이 유도되었습니다.

용접 속도가 빠를수록 더 큰 keyhole이 생성되며 이로 인해보다 안정적인 keyhole이 구성됩니다. 연구진은 FLOW-3D를 사용하여 높은 용접 속도와 큰 용접 경사각으로 다공성을 완화시킬 수 있다고 예측했습니다.

 
 
Distribution of porosity in longitudinal welding sections as seen in simulations (top) and experiments (bottom)

용접분야 활용

Conduction 용접

하이브리드 레이저 용접

깊은 용접 레이저용접

레이저 적층 공법

TIG 용접

이종소재 레이저 용접

Additive Manufacturing & Welding Bibliography

Additive Manufacturing & Welding Bibliography

다음은 적층 제조 및 용접 참고 문헌의 기술 문서 모음입니다. 이 모든 논문에는 FLOW-3D AM 결과가 나와 있습니다. FLOW-3D AM을 사용하여 적층 제조, 레이저 용접 및 기타 용접 기술에서 발견되는 프로세스를 성공적으로 시뮬레이션하는 방법에 대해 자세히 알아보십시오.

2024년 3월 20일 update

3-24 Kunjie Dai, Xing He, Decheng Kong, Chaofang Dong, Multi-physical field simulation to yield defect-free IN718 alloy fabricated by laser powder bed fusion, Materials Letters, 355; 135437, 2024. doi.org/10.1016/j.matlet.2023.135437

2-24 You Wang, Yinkai Xie, Huaixue Li, Caiyou Zeng, Ming Xu, Hongqiang Zhang, In-situ monitoring plume, spattering behavior and revealing their relationship with melt flow in laser powder bed fusion of nickel-based superalloy, Journal of Materials Science & Technology, 177; pp. 44-58, 2024. doi.org/10.1016/j.jmst.2023.07.068

1-24 Yukai Chen, Hongtu Xu, Yu Lu, Yin Wang, Shuangyuzhou Wang, Ke Huang, Qi Zhang, Prediction of microstructure for Inconel 718 laser welding process using multi-scale model, Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on the Technology of Plasticity – Current Trends in the Technology of Plasticity, pp. 713-722, 2024. doi.org/10.1007/978-3-031-41341-4_75

211-23 Giovanni Chianese, Qamar Hayat, Sharhid Jabar, Pasquale Franciosa, Darek Ceglarek, Stanislao Patalano, A multi-physics CFD study to investigate the impact of laser beam shaping on metal mixing and molten pool dynamics during laser welding of copper to steel for battery terminal-to-casing connections, Journal of Materials Processing Technology, 322; 118202, 2023. doi.org/10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2023.118202

207-23 Dong Liu, Jiaqi Pei, Hua Hou, Xiaofeng Niu, Yuhong Zhao, Optimizing solidification dendrites and process parameters for laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing of GH3536 superalloy by finite volume and phase-field method, Journal of Materials Research and Technology, 27; pp. 3323-3338, 2023. doi.org/10.1016/j.jmrt.2023.10.188

206-23 Houshang Yin, Jingfan Yang, Ralf D. Fischer, Zilong Zhang, Bart Prorok, Lang Yuan, Xiaoyuan Lou, Pulsed laser additive manufacturing for 316L stainless steel: a new approach to control subgrain cellular structure, JOM, 75; pp. 5027-5036, 2023. doi.org/10.1007/s11837-023-06177-8

205-23 Francis Ogoke, William Lee, Ning-Yu Kao, Alexander Myers, Jack Beuth, Jonathan Malen, Amir Barati Farimani, Convolutional neural networks for melt depth prediction and visualization in laser powder bed fusion, The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, 129; pp. 3047-3062, 2023. doi.org/10.1007/s00170-023-12384-z

202-23 Habib Hamed Zargari, Kazuhiro Ito, Abhay Sharma, Effect of workpiece vibration frequency on heat distribution and material flow in the molten pool in tandem-pulsed gas metal arc welding, The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, 129; pp. 2507-2522, 2023. doi.org/10.1007/s00170-023-12424-8

199-23 Yukai Chen, Yin Wang, Hao Li, Yu Lu, Bin Han, Qi Zhang, Effects of process parameters on the microstructure of Inconel 718 during powder bed fusion based on cellular automata approach, Virtual and Physical Prototyping, 18.1; e2251032, 2023. doi.org/10.1080/17452759.2023.2251032

197-23 Qiong Wu, Chuang Qiao, Yuhang Wu, Zhe Liu, Xiaodan Li, Ju Wang, Xizhong An, Aijun Huang, Chao Voon Samuel Lim, Numerical investigation on the reuse of recycled powders in powder bed fusion additive manufacturing, Additive Manufacturing, 77; 103821, 2023. doi.org/10.1016/j.addma.2023.103821

196-23 Daicong Zhang, Chunhui Jing, Wei Guo, Yuan Xiao, Jun Luo, Lehua Qi, Microchannels formed using metal microdroplets, Micromachines, 14.10; 1922, 2023. doi.org/10.3390/mi14101922

195-23 Trong-Nhan Le, Santosh Rauniyar, V.H. Nismath, Kevin Chou, An investigation into the effects of contouring process parameters on the up-skin surface characteristics in laser powder-bed fusion process, Manufacturing Letters, 35; Supplement, pp. 707-716, 2023. doi.org/10.1016/j.mfglet.2023.08.085

194-23 Kyubok Lee, Teresa J. Rinker, Masoud M. Pour, Wayne Cai, Wenkang Huang, Wenda Tan, Jennifer Bracey, Jingjing Li, A study on cracks and IMCs in laser welding of Al and Cu, Manufacturing Letters, 35; Supplement, pp. 221-231, 2023. doi.org/10.1016/j.mfglet.2023.08.026

192-23 Kunjie Dai, Xing He, Wei Zhang, Decheng Kong, Rong Guo, Minlei Hu, Ketai He, Chaofang Dong, Tailoring the microstructure and mechanical properties for Hastelloy X alloy by laser powder bed fusion via scanning strategy, Materials & Design, 235; 112386, 2023. doi.org/10.1016/j.matdes.2023.112386

191-23 Jun Du, Daqing Wang, Jimiao He, Yongheng Zhang, Zhike Peng, Influence of droplet size and ejection frequency on molten pool dynamics and deposition morphology in TIG-aided droplet deposition manufacturing, International Communications in Heat and Mass Transfer, 148; 107075, 2023. doi.org/10.1016/j.icheatmasstransfer.2023.107075

188-23 Jin-Hyeong Park, Du-Song Kim, Dae-Won Cho, Jaewoong Kim, Changmin Pyo, Influence of thermal flow and predicting phase transformation on various welding positions, Heat and Mass Transfer, 2023. doi.org/10.1007/s00231-023-03429-w

184-23 Lin Gao, Jishnu Bhattacharyya, Wenhao Lin, Zhongshu Ren, Andrew C. Chuang, Pavel D. Shevchenko, Viktor Nikitin, Ji Ma, Sean R. Agnew, Tao Sun, Tailoring material microstructure and property in wire-laser directed energy deposition through a wiggle deposition strategy, Additive Manufacturing, 77; 103801, 2023. doi.org/10.1016/j.addma.2023.103801

182-23 Liping Guo, Hanjie Liu, Hongze Wang, Qianglong Wei, Jiahui Zhang, Yingyan Chen, Chu Lun Alex Leung, Qing Lian, Yi Wu, Yu Zou, Haowei Wang, A high-fidelity comprehensive framework for the additive manufacturing printability assessment, Journal of Manufacturing Processes, 105; pp. 219-231, 2023. doi.org/10.1016/j.jmapro.2023.09.041

172-23 Liping Guo, Hanjie Liu, Hongze Wang, Qianglong Wei, Yakai Xiao, Zijue Tang, Yi Wu, Haowei Wang, Identifying the keyhole stability and pore formation mechanisms in laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing, Journal of Materials Processing Technology, 321; 118153, 2023. doi.org/10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2023.118153

171-23 Yuhang Wu, Qiong Wu, Meng Li, Ju Wang, Dengzhi Yao, Hao Luo, Xizhong An, Haitao Fu, Hao Zhang, Xiaohong Yang, Qingchuan Zou, Shujun Li, Haibin Ji, Xing Zhang, Numerical investigation on effects of operating conditions and final dimension predictions in laser powder bed fusion of molybdenum, Additive Manufacturing, 76; 103783, 2023. doi.org/10.1016/j.addma.2023.103783

158-23 K. El Abbaoui, I. Al Korachi, M.T. Mollah, J. Spangenberg, Numerical modelling of planned corner deposition in 3D concrete printing, Archives of Materials Science and Engineering, 121.2; pp. 71-79, 2023. doi.org/10.5604/01.3001.0053.8488

156-23 Liping Guo, Hanjie Liu, Hongze Wang, Valentino A.M. Cristino, C.T. Kwok, Qianglong Wei, Zijue Tang, Yi Wu, Haowei Wang, Deepening the scientific understanding of different phenomenology in laser powder bed fusion by an integrated framework, International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, 216; 124596, 2023. doi.org/10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2023.124596

154-23 Zhiyong Li, Xiuli He, Shaoxia Li, Xinfeng Kan, Yanjun Yin, Gang Yu, Sulfur-induced transitions of thermal behavior and flow dynamics in laser powder bed fusion of 316L powders, Thermal Science and Engineering Progress, 45; 102072, 2023. doi.org/10.1016/j.tsep.2023.102072

149-23 Shardul Kamat, Wayne Cai, Teresa J. Rinker, Jennifer Bracey, Liang Xi, Wenda Tan, A novel integrated process-performance model for laser welding of multi-layer battery foils and tabs, Journal of Materials Processing Technology, 320; 118121, 2023. doi.org/10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2023.118121

148-23 Reza Ghomashchi, Shahrooz Nafisi, Solidification of Al12Si melt pool in laser powder bed fusion, Journal of Materials En gineering and Performance, 2023. doi.org/10.1007/s11665-023-08502-3

133-23 Hesam Moghadasi, Md Tusher Mollah, Deepak Marla, Hamid Saffari, Jon Spangenberg, Computational fluid dynamics modeling of top-down digital light processing additive manufacturing, Polymers, 15.11; 2459, 2023. doi.org/10.3390/polym15112459

131-23 Luca Santoro, Raffaella Sesana, Rosario Molica Nardo, Francesca Curà, In line defect detection in steel welding process by means of thermography, Experimental Mechanics in Engineering and Biomechanics – Proceedings ICEM20, 19981, 2023.

128-23 Md Tusher Mollah, Raphaël Comminal, Wilson Ricardo Leal da Silva, Berin Šeta, Jon Spangenberg, Computational fluid dynamics modelling and experimental analysis of reinforcement bar integration in 3D concrete printing, Cement and Concrete Research, 173; 107263, 2023. doi.org/10.1016/j.cemconres.2023.107263

123-23 Arash Samaei, Zhongsheng Sang, Jennifer A. Glerum, Jon-Erik Mogonye, Gregory J. Wagner, Multiphysics modeling of mixing and material transport in additive manufacturing with multicomponent powder beds, Additive Manufacturing, 67; 103481, 2023. doi.org/10.1016/j.addma.2023.103481

122-23 Chu Han, Ping Jiang, Shaoning Geng, Lingyu Guo, Kun Liu, Inhomogeneous microstructure distribution and its formation mechanism in deep penetration laser welding of medium-thick aluminum-lithium alloy plates, Optics & Laser Technology, 167; 109783, 2023. doi.org/10.1016/j.optlastec.2023.109783

111-23 Alexander J. Myers, Guadalupe Quirarte, Francis Ogoke, Brandon M. Lane, Syed Zia Uddin, Amir Barati Farimani, Jack L. Beuth, Jonathan A. Malen, High-resolution melt pool thermal imaging for metals additive manufacturing using the two-color method with a color camera, Additive Manufacturing, 73; 103663, 2023. doi.org/10.1016/j.addma.2023.103663

107-23 M. Mohsin Raza, Yu-Lung Lo, Hua-Bin Lee, Chang Yu-Tsung, Computational modeling of laser welding for aluminum–copper joints using a circular strategy, Journal of Materials Research and Technology, 25; pp. 3350-3364, 2023. doi.org/10.1016/j.jmrt.2023.06.122

106-23 H.Z. Lu, L.H. Liu, X. Luo, H.W. Ma, W.S. Cai, R. Lupoi, S. Yin, C. Yang, Formation mechanism of heterogeneous microstructures and shape memory effect in NiTi shape memory alloy fabricated via laser powder bed fusion, Materials & Design, 232; 112107, 2023. doi.org/10.1016/j.matdes.2023.112107

105-23 Harun Kahya, Hakan Gurun, Gokhan Kucukturk, Experimental and analytical investigation of the re-melting effect in the manufacturing of 316L by direct energy deposition (DED) method, Metals, 13.6; 1144, 2023. doi.org/10.3390/met13061144

100-23 Dongju Chen, Gang Li, Peng Wang, Zhiqiang Zeng, Yuhang Tang, Numerical simulation of melt pool size and flow evolution for laser powder bed fusion of powder grade Ti6Al4V, Finite Elements in Analysis and Design, 223; 103971, 2023. doi.org/10.1016/j.finel.2023.103971

97-23 Mahyar Khorasani, Martin Leary, David Downing, Jason Rogers, Amirhossein Ghasemi, Ian Gibson, Simon Brudler, Bernard Rolfe, Milan Brandt, Stuart Bateman, Numerical and experimental investigations on manufacturability of Al–Si–10Mg thin wall structures made by LB-PBF, Thin-Walled Structures, 188; 110814, 2023. doi.org/10.1016/j.tws.2023.110814

95-23 M.S. Serdeczny, Laser welding of dissimilar materials – simulation driven optimization of process parameters, IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering, 1281; 012018, 2023. doi.org/10.1088/1757-899X/1281/1/012018

90-23 Lin Liu, Tubin Liu, Xi Dong, Min Huang, Fusheng Cao, Mingli Qin, Numerical simulation of thermal dynamic behavior and morphology evolution of the molten pool of selective laser melting BN/316L stainless steel composite, Journal of Materials Engineering and Performance, 2023. doi.org/10.1007/s11665-023-08210-y

89-23 M. P. Serdeczny, A. Jackman, High fidelity modelling of bead geometry in directed energy deposition – simulation driven optimization, Journal of Physics: Conference Series, NOLAMP19, 2023.

88-23 Lu Wang, Shuhao Wang, Yanming Zhang, Wentao Yan, Multi-phase flow simulation of powder streaming in laser-based directed energy deposition, International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, 212; 124240, 2023. doi.org/10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2023.124240

80-23 Mahyar Khorasani, AmirHossein Ghasemi, Martin Leary, David Downing, Ian Gibson, Elmira G. Sharabian, Jithin Kozuthala Veetil, Milan Brandt, Stuart Batement, Bernard Rolfe, Benchmark models for conduction and keyhole modes in laser-based powder bed fusion of Inconel 718, Optics & Laser Technology, 164; 109509, 2023. doi.org/10.1016/j.optlastec.2023.109509

78-23   Md. Tusher Mollah, Raphaël Comminal, Marcin P. Serdeczny, Berin Šeta, Jon Spangenberg, Computational analysis of yield stress buildup and stability of deposited layers in material extrusion additive manufacturing, Additive Manufacturing, 71; 103605, 2023. doi.org/10.1016/j.addma.2023.103605

76-23   Asif Ur Rehman, Kashif Azher, Abid Ullah, Celal Sami Tüfekci, Metin Uymaz Salamci, Binder jetting of SS316L: a computational approach for droplet-powder interaction, Rapid Prototyping Journal, 2023. doi.org/10.1108/RPJ-08-2022-0264

75-23   Dengzhi Yao, Ju Wang, Hao Luo, Yuhang Wu, Xizhong An, Thermal behavior and control during multi-track laser powder bed fusion of 316 L stainless steel, Additive Manufacturing, 70; 103562, 2023. doi.org/10.1016/j.addma.2023.103562

61-23   Yaqing Hou, Hang Su, Hao Zhang, Fafa Li, Xuandong Wang, Yazhou He, Dupeng He, An integrated simulation model towards laser powder bed fusion in-situ alloying technology, Materials & Design, 228; 111795, 2023. doi.org/10.1016/j.matdes.2023.111795

56-23   Maohong Yang, Guiyi Wu, Xiangwei Li, Shuyan Zhang, Honghong Wang, Jiankang Huang, Influence of heat source model on the behavior of laser cladding pool, Journal of Laser Applications, 35.2; 2023. doi.org/10.2351/7.0000963

45-23   Daniel Martinez, Philip King, Santosh Reddy Sama, Jay Sim, Hakan Toykoc, Guha Manogharan, Effect of freezing range on reducing casting defects through 3D sand-printed mold designs, The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, 2023. doi.org/10.1007/s00170-023-11112-x

39-23   Peter S. Cook, David J. Ritchie, Determining the laser absorptivity of Ti-6Al-4V during laser powder bed fusion by calibrated melt pool simulation, Optics & Laser Technology, 162; 109247. 2023. doi.org/10.1016/j.optlastec.2023.109247

36-23   Yixuan Chen, Weihao Wang, Yao Ou, Yingna Wu, Zirong Zhai, Rui Yang, Impact of laser power and scanning velocity on microstructure and mechanical properties of Inconel 738LC alloys fabricated by laser powder bed fusion, TMS 2023 152nd Annual Meeting & Exhibition Supplemental Proceedings, pp. 138-149, 2023. doi.org/10.1007/978-3-031-22524-6_15

34-23   Chao Kang, Ikki Ikeda, Motoki Sakaguchi, Recoil and solidification of a paraffin droplet impacted on a metal substrate: Numerical study and experimental verification, Journal of Fluids and Structures, 118; 103839, 2023. doi.org/10.1016/j.jfluidstructs.2023.103839

30-23   Fei Wang, Tiechui Yuan, Ruidi Li, Shiqi Lin, Zhonghao Xie, Lanbo Li, Valentino Cristino, Rong Xu, Bing liu, Comparative study on microstructures and mechanical properties of ultra ductility single-phase Nb40Ti40Ta20 refractory medium entropy alloy by selective laser melting and vacuum arc melting, Journal of Alloys and Compounds, 942; 169065, 2023. doi.org/10.1016/j.jallcom.2023.169065

29-23   Haejin Lee, Yeonghwan Song, Seungkyun Yim, Kenta Aoyagi, Akihiko Chiba, Byoungsoo Lee, Influence of linear energy on side surface roughness in powder bed fusion electron beam melting process: Coupled experimental and simulation study, Powder Technology, 418; 118292, 2023.

27-23   Yinan Chen, Bo Li, Double-phase refractory medium entropy alloy NbMoTi via selective laser melting (SLM) additive manufacturing, Journal of Physics: Conference Series, 2419; 012074, 2023. doi.org/10.1088/1742-6596/2419/1/012074

23-23   Yunwei Gui, Kenta Aoyagi, Akihiko Chiba, Development of macro-defect-free PBF-EB-processed Ti–6Al–4V alloys with superior plasticity using PREP-synthesized powder and machine learning-assisted process optimization, Materials Science and Engineering: A, 864; 144595, 2023. doi.org/10.1016/j.msea.2023.144595

21-23   Tatsuhiko Sakai, Yasuhiro Okamoto, Nozomi Taura, Riku Saito, Akira Okada, Effect of scanning speed on molten metal behaviour under angled irradiation with a continuous-wave laser, Journal of Materials Processing Technology, 313; 117866, 2023. doi.org/10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2023.117866

19-23   Gianna M. Valentino, Arunima Banerjee, Alexander lark, Christopher M. Barr, Seth H. Myers, Ian D. McCue, Influence of laser processing parameters on the density-ductility tradeoff in additively manufactured pure tantalum, Additive Manufacturing Letters, 4; 100117, 2023. doi.org/10.1016/j.addlet.2022.100117

15-23   Runbo Jiang, Zhongshu Ren, Joseph Aroh, Amir Mostafaei, Benjamin Gould, Tao Sun, Anthony D. Rollett, Quantifying equiaxed vs epitaxial solidification in laser melting of CMSX-4 single crystal superalloy, Metallurgical and Materials Transactions A, 54; pp. 808-822, 2023. doi.org/10.1007/s11661-022-06929-2

14-23   Nguyen Thi Tien, Yu-Lung Lo, M. Mohsin Raza, Cheng-Yen Chen, Chi-Pin Chiu, Optimization of processing parameters for pulsed laser welding of dissimilar metal interconnects, Optics & Laser Technology, 159; 109022, 2023. doi.org/10.1016/j.optlastec.2022.109022

9-23 Hou Yi Chia, Wentao Yan, High-fidelity modeling of metal additive manufacturing, Additive Manufacturing Technology: Design, Optimization, and Modeling, Ed. Kun Zhou, 2023.

8-23 Akash Aggarwal, Yung C. Shin, Arvind Kumar, Investigation of the transient coupling between the dynamic laser beam absorptance and the melt pool – vapor depression morphology in laser powder bed fusion process, International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, 201.2; 123663, 2023. doi.org/10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2022.123663

199-22 Md. Tusher Mollah, Raphaël Comminal, Marcin P. Serdeczny, David B. Pedersen, Jon Spangenberg, Numerical predictions of bottom layer stability in material extrusion additive manufacturing, JOM, 74; pp. 1096-1101, 2022. doi.org/10.1007/s11837-021-05035-9

198-22 Md. Tusher Mollah, Amirpasha Moetazedian, Andy Gleadall, Jiongyi Yan, Wayne Edgar Alphonso, Raphael Comminal, Berin Seta, Tony Lock, Jon Spangenberg, Investigation on corner precision at different corner angles in material extrusion additive manufacturing: An experimental and computational fluid dynamics analysis, Proceedings of the 33rd Annual Solid Freeform Fabrication Symposium, 2022.

197-22 Md. Tusher Mollah, Marcin P. Serdeczny, Raphaël Comminal, Berin Šeta, Marco Brander, David B. Pedersen, Jon Spangenberg, A numerical investigation of the inter-layer bond and surface roughness during the yield stress buildup in wet-on-wet material extrusion additive manufacturing, ASPE and euspen Summer Topical Meeting, 77, 2022.

182-22   Chan Kyu Kim, Dae-Won Cho, Seok Kim, Sang Woo Song, Kang Myung Seo, Young Tae Cho, High-throughput metal 3D printing pen enabled by a continuous molten droplet transfer, Advanced Science, 2205085, 2022. doi.org/10.1002/advs.202205085

180-22 Xu Kaikai, Gong Yadong, Zhang Qiang, Numerical simulation of dynamic analysis of molten pool in the process of direct energy deposition, The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, 2022. doi.org/10.1007/s00170-022-10271-7

179-22 Yasuhiro Okamoto, Nozomi Taura, Akira Okada, Study on laser drilling process of solid metal on its liquid, International Journal of Electrical Machining, 27; 2022. doi.org/10.2526/ijem.27.35

175-22 Lu Min, Xhi Xiaojie, Lu Peipei, Wu Meiping, Forming quality and wettability of surface texture on CuSn10 fabricated by laser powder bed fusion, AIP Advances, 12.12; 125114, 2022. doi.org/10.1063/5.0122076

174-22 Thinus Van Rhijn, Willie Du Preez, Maina Maringa, Dean Kouprianoff, An investigation into the optimization of the selective laser melting process parameters for Ti6Al4V through numerical modelling, JOM, 2022. doi.org/10.1007/s11837-022-05608-2

171-22 Jonathan Yoshioka, Mohsen Eshraghi, Temporal evolution of temperature gradient and solidification rate in laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing, Heat and Mass Transfer, 2022. doi.org/10.1007/s00231-022-03318-8

170-22 Subin Shrestha and Kevin Chou, Residual heat effect on the melt pool geometry during the laser powder bed fusion process, Journal of Manufacturing and Materials Processing, 6.6; 153, 2022. doi.org/10.3390/jmmp6060153

169-22 Aryan Aryan, Obinna Chukwubuzo, Desmond Bourgeois, Wei Zhang, Hardness prediction by incorporating heat transfer and molten pool fluid flow in a mult-pass, multi-layer weld for onsite repair of Grade 91 steel, U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information, DOE-OSU-0032067, 2022. doi.org/10.2172/1898594

158-22 Dafan Du, Lu Wang, Anping Dong, Wentao Yan, Guoliang Zhu, Baode Sun, Promoting the densification and grain refinement with assistance of static magnetic field in laser powder bed fusion, International Journal of Machine Tools and Manufacture, 183; 103965, 2022. doi.org/10.1016/j.ijmachtools.2022.103965

157-22 Han Chu, Jiang Ping, Geng Shaoning, Liu Kun, Nucleation mechanism in oscillating laser welds of 2024 aluminium alloy: A combined experimental and numerical study, Optics & Laser Technology, 158.A; 108812, 2022. doi.org/10.1016/j.optlastec.2022.108812

153-22 Zixiang Li, Yinan Cui, Baohua Chang, Guan Liu, Ze Pu, Haoyu Zhang, Zhiyue Liang, Changmeng Liu, Li Wang, Dong Du, Manipulating molten pool in in-situ additive manufacturing of Ti-22Al-25 Nb through alternating dual-electron beams, Additive Manufacturing, 60.A; 103230, 2022. doi.org/10.1016/j.addma.2022.103230

149-22   Qian Chen, Yao Fu, Albert C. To, Multiphysics modeling of particle spattering and induced defect formation mechanism in Inconel 718 laser powder bed fusion, The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, 123; pp. 783-791, 2022. doi.org/10.1007/s00170-022-10201-7

146-22   Zixuan Wan, Hui-ping Wang, Jingjing Li, Baixuan Yang, Joshua Solomon, Blair Carlson, Effect of welding mode on remote laser stitch welding of zinc-coated steel with different sheet thickness combinations, Journal of Manufacturing Science and Engineering, MANU-21-1598, 2022. doi.org/10.1115/1.4055792

143-22   Du-Rim Eo, Seong-Gyu Chung, JeongHo Yang, Won Tae Cho, Sun-Hong Park, Jung-Wook Cho, Surface modification of high-Mn steel via laser-DED: Microstructural characterization and hot crack susceptibility of clad layer, Materials & Design, 223; 111188, 2022. doi.org/10.1016/j.matdes.2022.111188

142-22   Zichuan Fu, Xiangman Zhou, Bin Luo, Qihua Tian, Numerical simulation study of the effect of weld current on WAAM welding pool dynamic and weld bead morphology, International Conference on Mechanical Design and Simulation, Proceedings, 12261; 122614G, 2022. doi.org/10.1117/12.2639074

132-22   Yiyu Huang, Zhonghao Xie, Wenshu Li, Haoyu Chen, Bin Liu, Bingfeng Wang, Dynamic mechanical properties of the selective laser melting NiCrFeCoMo0.2 high entropy alloy and the microstructure of molten pool, Journal of Alloys and Compounds, 927; 167011, 2022. doi.org/10.1016/j.jallcom.2022.167011

126-22   Jingqi Zhang, Yingang Liu, Gang Sha, Shenbao Jin, Ziyong Hou, Mohamad Bayat, Nan Yang, Qiyang Tan, Yu Yin, Shiyang Liu, Jesper Henri Hattel, Matthew Dargusch, Xiaoxu Huang, Ming-Xing Zhang, Designing against phase and property heterogeneities in additively manufactured titanium alloys, Nature Communications, 13; 4660, 2022. doi.org/10.1038/s41467-022-32446-2

119-22   Xu Kaikai, Gong Yadong, Zhao Qiang, Numerical simulation on molten pool flow of Inconel718 alloy based on VOF during additive manufacturing, Materials Today Communications, 33; 104147, 2022. doi.org/10.1016/j.mtcomm.2022.104147

118-22   AmirPouya Hemmasian, Francis Ogoke, Parand Akbari, Jonathan Malen, Jack Beuth, Amir Barati Farimani, Surrogate modeling of melt pool thermal field using deep learning, SSRN, 2022. doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.4190835

117-22   Chiara Ransenigo, Marialaura Tocci, Filippo Palo, Paola Ginestra, Elisabetta Ceretti, Marcello Gelfi, Annalisa Pola, Evolution of melt pool and porosity during laser powder bed fusion of Ti6Al4V alloy: Numerical modelling and experimental validation, Lasers in Manufacturing and Materials Processing, 2022. doi.org/10.1007/s40516-022-00185-3

112-22   Chris Jasien, Alec Saville, Chandler Gus Becker, Jonah Klemm-Toole, Kamel Fezzaa, Tao Sun, Tresa Pollock, Amy J. Clarke, In situ x-ray radiography and computational modeling to predict grain morphology in β-titanium during simulated additive manufacturing, Metals, 12.7; 1217, 2022. doi.org/10.3390/met12071217

110-22   Haotian Zhou, Haijun Su, Yinuo Guo, Peixin Yang, Yuan Liu, Zhonglin Shen, Di Zhao, Haifang Liu, Taiwen Huang, Min Guo, Jun Zhang, Lin Liu, Hengzhi Fu, Formation and evolution mechanisms of pores in Inconel 718 during selective laser melting: Meso-scale modeling and experimental investigations, Journal of Manufacturing Processes, 81; pp. 202-213, 2022. doi.org/10.1016/j.jmapro.2022.06.072

109-22   Yufan Zhao, Huakang Bian, Hao Wang, Aoyagi Kenta, Yamanaka Kenta, Akihiko Chiba, Non-equilibrium solidification behavior associated with powder characteristics during electron beam additive manufacturing, Materials & Design, 221; 110915, 2022. doi.org/10.1016/j.matdes.2022.110915

107-22   Dan Lönn, David Spångberg, Study of process parameters in laser beam welding of copper hairpins, Thesis, University of Skövde, 2022.

106-22   Liping Guo, Hongze Wang, Qianglong Wei, Hanjie Liu, An Wang, Yi Wu, Haowei Wang, A comprehensive model to quantify the effects of additional nano-particles on the printability in laser powder bed fusion of aluminum alloy and composite, Additive Manufacturing, 58; 103011, 2022. doi.org/10.1016/j.addma.2022.103011

104-22   Hongjiang Pan, Thomas Dahmen, Mohamad Bayat, Kang Lin, Xiaodan Zhang, Independent effects of laser power and scanning speed on IN718’s precipitation and mechanical properties produced by LBPF plus heat treatment, Materials Science and Engineering: A, 849; 143530, 2022. doi.org/10.1016/j.msea.2022.143530

101-22   Yufan Zhao, Kenta Aoyagi, Kenta Yamanaka, Akihiko Chiba, A survey on basic influencing factors of solidified grain morphology during electron beam melting, Materials & Design, 221; 110927, 2022. doi.org/10.1016/j.matdes.2022.110927

98-22   Jon Spangenberg, Wilson Ricardo Leal da Silva, Md. Tusher Mollah, Raphaël Comminal, Thomas Juul Andersen, Henrik Stang, Integrating reinforcement with 3D concrete printing: Experiments and numerical modelling, Third RILEM International Conference on Concrete and Digital Fabrication, Eds. Ana Blanco, Peter Kinnell, Richard Buswell, Sergio Cavalaro, pp. 379-384, 2022.

93-22   Minglei Qu, Qilin Guo, Luis I. Escano, Samuel J. Clark Kamel Fezzaa, Lianyi Chen, Mitigating keyhole pore formation by nanoparticles during laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing, Additive Manufacturing Letters, 100068, 2022. doi.org/10.1016/j.addlet.2022.100068

86-22   Patiparn Ninpetch, Prasert Chalermkarnnon, Pruet Kowitwarangkul, Multiphysics simulation of thermal-fluid behavior in laser powder bed fusion of H13 steel: Influence of layer thickness and energy input, Metals and Materials International, 2022. doi.org/10.1007/s12540-022-01239-z

85-22   Merve Biyikli, Taner Karagoz, Metin Calli, Talha Muslim, A. Alper Ozalp, Ali Bayram, Single track geometry prediction of laser metal deposited 316L-Si via multi-physics modelling and regression analysis with experimental validation, Metals and Materials International, 2022. doi.org/10.1007/s12540-022-01243-3

76-22   Zhichao Yang, Shuhao Wang, Lida Zhu, Jinsheng Ning, Bo Xin, Yichao Dun, Wentao Yan, Manipulating molten pool dynamics during metal 3D printing by ultrasound, Applied Physics Reviews, 9; 021416, 2022. doi.org/10.1063/5.0082461

73-22   Yu Sun, Liqun Li, Yu Hao, Sanbao Lin, Xinhua Tang, Fenggui Lu, Numerical modeling on formation of periodic chain-like pores in high power laser welding of thick steel plate, Journal of Materials Processing Technology, 306; 117638, 2022. doi.org/10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2022.117638

67-22   Yu Hao, Hiu-Ping Wang, Yu Sun, Liqun Li, Yihan Wu, Fenggui Lu, The evaporation behavior of zince and its effect on spattering in laser overlap welding of galvanized steels, Journal of Materials Processing Technology, 306; 117625, 2022. doi.org/10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2022.117625

65-22   Yanhua Zhao, Chuanbin Du, Peifu Wang, Wei Meng, Changming Li, The mechanism of in-situ laser polishing and its effect on the surface quality of nickel-based alloy fabricated by selective laser melting, Metals, 12.5; 778, 2022. doi.org/10.3390/met12050778

58-22   W.E. Alphonso, M. Bayat, M. Baier, S. Carmignato, J.H. Hattel, Multi-physics numerical modelling of 316L Austenitic stainless steel in laser powder bed fusion process at meso-scale, 17th UK Heat Transfer Conference (UKHTC2021), Manchester, UK, April 4-6, 2022.

57-22   Brandon Hayes, Travis Hainsworth, Robert MacCurdy, Liquid-solid co-printing of multi-material 3D fluidic devices via material jetting, Additive Manufacturing, in press, 102785, 2022. doi.org/10.1016/j.addma.2022.102785

55-22   Xiang Wang, Lin-Jie Zhang, Jie Ning, Suck-joo Na, Fluid thermodynamic simulation of Ti-6Al-4V alloy in laser wire deposition, 3D Printing and Additive Manufacturing, 2022. doi.org/10.1089/3dp.2021.0159

54-22   Junhao Zhao, Binbin Wang, Tong Liu, Liangshu Luo, Yanan Wang, Xiaonan Zheng, Liang Wang, Yanqing Su, Jingjie Guo, Hengzhi Fu, Dayong Chen, Study of in situ formed quasicrystals in Al-Mn based alloys fabricated by SLM, Journal of Alloys and Compounds, 909; 164847, 2022. doi.org/10.1016/j.jallcom.2022.164847

48-22   Yueming Sun, Jianxing Ma, Fei Peng, Konstantin G. Kornev, Making droplets from highly viscous liquids by pushing a wire through a tube, Physics of Fluids, 34; 032119, 2022. doi.org/10.1063/5.0082003

46-22   H.Z. Lu, T. Chen, H. Liu, H. Wang, X. Luo, C.H. Song, Constructing function domains in NiTi shape memory alloys by additive manufacturing, Virtual and Physical Prototyping, 17.3; 2022. doi.org/10.1080/17452759.2022.2053821

42-22   Islam Hassan, P. Ravi Selvaganapathy, Microfluidic printheads for highly switchable multimaterial 3D printing of soft materials, Advanced Materials Technologies, 2101709, 2022. doi.org/10.1002/admt.202101709

41-22   Nan Yang, Youping Gong, Honghao Chen, Wenxin Li, Chuanping Zhou, Rougang Zhou, Huifeng Shao, Personalized artificial tibia bone structure design and processing based on laser powder bed fusion, Machines, 10.3; 205, 2022. doi.org/10.3390/machines10030205

31-22   Bo Shen, Raghav Gnanasambandam, Rongxuan Wang, Zhenyu (James) Kong, Multi-Task Gaussian process upper confidence bound for hyperparameter tuning and its application for simulation studies of additive manufacturing, IISE Transactions, 2022. doi.org/10.1080/24725854.2022.2039813

27-22   Lida Zhu, Shuhao Wang, Hao Lu, Dongxing Qi, Dan Wang, Zhichao Yang, Investigation on synergism between additive and subtractive manufacturing for curved thin-walled structure, Virtual and Physical Prototyping, 17.2; 2022. doi.org/10.1080/17452759.2022.2029009

24-22   Hoon Sohn, Peipei Liu, Hansol Yoon, Kiyoon Yi, Liu Yang, Sangjun Kim, Real-time porosity reduction during metal directed energy deposition using a pulse laser, Journal of Materials Science & Technology, 116; pp. 214-223. doi.org/10.1016/j.jmst.2021.12.013

18-22   Yaohong Xiao, Zixuan Wan, Pengwei Liu, Zhuo Wang, Jingjing Li, Lei Chen, Quantitative simulations of grain nucleation and growth at additively manufactured bimetallic interfaces of SS316L and IN625, Journal of Materials Processing Technology, 302; 117506, 2022. doi.org/10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2022.117506

06-22   Amal Charles, Mohamad Bayat, Ahmed Elkaseer, Lore Thijs, Jesper Henri Hattel, Steffen Scholz, Elucidation of dross formation in laser powder bed fusion at down-facing surfaces: Phenomenon-oriented multiphysics simulation and experimental validation, Additive Manufacturing, 50; 102551, 2022. doi.org/10.1016/j.addma.2021.102551

05-22   Feilong Ji, Xunpeng Qin, Zeqi Hu, Xiaochen Xiong, Mao Ni, Mengwu Wu, Influence of ultrasonic vibration on molten pool behavior and deposition layer forming morphology for wire and arc additive manufacturing, International Communications in Heat and Mass Transfer, 130; 105789, 2022. doi.org/10.1016/j.icheatmasstransfer.2021.105789

150-21   Daniel Knüttel, Stefano Baraldo, Anna Valente, Konrad Wegener, Emanuele Carpanzano, Model based learning for efficient modelling of heat transfer dynamics, Procedia CIRP, 102; pp. 252-257, 2021. doi.org/10.1016/j.procir.2021.09.043

149-21   T. van Rhijn, W. du Preez, M. Maringa, D. Kouprianoff, Towards predicting process parameters for selective laser melting of titanium alloys through the modelling of melt pool characteristics, Suid-Afrikaanse Tydskrif vir Natuurwetenskap en Tegnologie, 40.1; 2021. 

148-21   Qian Chen, Multiscale process modeling of residual deformation and defect formation for laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing, Thesis, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA USA, 2021. 

147-21   Pareekshith Allu, Developing process parameters through CFD simulations, Lasers in Manufacturing Conference, 2021.

143-21   Asif Ur Rehman, Muhammad Arif Mahmood, Fatih Pitir, Metin Uymaz Salamci, Andrei C. Popescu, Ion N. Mihailescu, Spatter formation and splashing induced defects in laser-based powder bed fusion of AlSi10Mg alloy: A novel hydrodynamics modelling with empirical testing, Metals, 11.12; 2023, 2021. doi.org/10.3390/met11122023

142-21   Islam Hassan, Ponnambalam Ravi Selvaganapathy, A microfluidic printhead with integrated hybrid mixing by sequential injection for multimaterial 3D printing, Additive Manufacturing, 102559, 2021. doi.org/10.1016/j.addma.2021.102559

137-21   Ting-Yu Cheng, Ying-Chih Liao, Enhancing drop mixing in powder bed by alternative particle arrangements with contradictory hydrophilicity, Journal of the Taiwan Institute of Chemical Engineers, 104160, 2021. doi.org/10.1016/j.jtice.2021.104160

134-21   Asif Ur Rehman, Muhammad Arif Mahmood, Fatih Pitir, Metin Uymaz Salamci, Andrei C. Popescu, Ion N. Mihailescu, Keyhole formation by laser drilling in laser powder bed fusion of Ti6Al4V biomedical alloy: Mesoscopic computational fluid dynamics simulation versus mathematical modelling using empirical validation, Nanomaterials, 11.2; 3284, 2021. doi.org/10.3390/nano11123284

128-21   Sang-Woo Han, Won-Ik Cho, Lin-Jie Zhang, Suck-Joo Na, Coupled simulation of thermal-metallurgical-mechanical behavior in laser keyhole welding of AH36 steel, Materials & Design, 212; 110275, 2021. doi.org/10.1016/j.matdes.2021.110275

127-21   Jiankang Huang, Zhuoxuan Li, Shurong Yu, Xiaoquan Yu, Ding Fan, Real-time observation and numerical simulation of the molten pool flow and mass transfer behavior during wire arc additive manufacturing, Welding in the World, 2021. doi.org/10.1007/s40194-021-01214-z

123-21   Boxue Song, Tianbiao Yu, Xingyu Jiang, Wenchao Xi, Xiaoli Lin, Zhelun Ma, ZhaoWang, Development of the molten pool and solidification characterization in single bead multilayer direct energy deposition, Additive Manufacturing, 102479, 2021. doi.org/10.1016/j.addma.2021.102479

112-21   Kathryn Small, Ian D. McCue, Katrina Johnston, Ian Donaldson, Mitra L. Taheri, Precision modification of microstructure and properties through laser engraving, JOM, 2021. doi.org/10.1007/s11837-021-04959-6

111-21   Yongki Lee, Jason Cheon, Byung-Kwon Min, Cheolhee Kim, Modelling of fume particle behaviour and coupling glass contamination during vacuum laser beam welding, Science and Technology of Welding and Joining, 2021. doi.org/10.1080/13621718.2021.1990658

110-21   Menglin Liu, Hao Yi, Huajun Cao, Rufeng Huang, Le Jia, Heat accumulation effect in metal droplet-based 3D printing: Evolution mechanism and elimination strategy, Additive Manufacturing, 48.A; 102413, 2021. doi.org/10.1016/j.addma.2021.102413

108-21   Nozomi Taura, Akiya Mitsunobu, Tatsuhiko Sakai, Yasuhiro Okamoto, Akira Okada, Formation and its mechanism of high-speed micro-grooving on metal surface by angled CW laser irradiation, Journal of Laser Micro/Nanoengineering, 16.2, 2021. doi.org/10.2961/jlmn.2021.02.2006

105-21   Jon Spangenberg, Wilson Ricardo Leal da Silva, Raphaël Comminal, Md. Tusher Mollah, Thomas Juul Andersen, Henrik Stang, Numerical simulation of multi-layer 3D concrete printing, RILEM Technical Letters, 6; pp. 119-123, 2021. doi.org/10.21809/rilemtechlett.2021.142

104-21   Lin Chen, Chunming Wang, Gaoyang Mi, Xiong Zhang, Effects of laser oscillating frequency on energy distribution, molten pool morphology and grain structure of AA6061/AA5182 aluminum alloys lap welding, Journal of Materials Research and Technology, 15; pp. 3133-3148, 2021. doi.org/10.1016/j.jmrt.2021.09.141

101-21   R.J.M. Wolfs, T.A.M. Salet, N. Roussel, Filament geometry control in extrusion-based additive manufacturing of concrete: The good, the bad and the ugly, Cement and Concrete Research, 150; 106615, 2021. doi.org/10.1016/j.cemconres.2021.106615

89-21   Wenlin Ye, Jin Bao, Jie Lei, Yichang Huang, Zhihao Li, Peisheng Li, Ying Zhang, Multiphysics modeling of thermal behavior of commercial pure titanium powder during selective laser melting, Metals and Materials International, 2021. doi.org/10.1007/s12540-021-01019-1

81-21   Lin Chen, Gaoyang Mi, Xiong Zhang, Chunming Wang, Effects of sinusoidal oscillating laser beam on weld formation, melt flow and grain structure during aluminum alloys lap welding, Journals of Materials Processing Technology, 298; 117314, 2021. doi.org/10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2021.117314

77-21   Yujie Cui, Yufan Zhao, Haruko Numata, Kenta Yamanaka, Huakang Bian, Kenta Aoyagi, Akihiko Chiba, Effects of process parameters and cooling gas on powder formation during the plasma rotating electrode process, Powder Technology, 393; pp. 301-311, 2021. doi.org/10.1016/j.powtec.2021.07.062

76-21   Md Tusher Mollah, Raphaël Comminal, Marcin P. Serdeczny, David B. Pedersen, Jon Spangenberg, Stability and deformations of deposited layers in material extrusion additive manufacturing, Additive Manufacturing, 46; 102193, 2021. doi.org/10.1016/j.addma.2021.102193

72-21   S. Sabooni, A. Chabok, S.C. Feng, H. Blaauw, T.C. Pijper, H.J. Yang, Y.T. Pei, Laser powder bed fusion of 17–4 PH stainless steel: A comparative study on the effect of heat treatment on the microstructure evolution and mechanical properties, Additive Manufacturing, 46; 102176, 2021. doi.org/10.1016/j.addma.2021.102176

71-21   Yu Hao, Nannan Chena, Hui-Ping Wang, Blair E. Carlson, Fenggui Lu, Effect of zinc vapor forces on spattering in partial penetration laser welding of zinc-coated steels, Journal of Materials Processing Technology, 298; 117282, 2021. doi.org/10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2021.117282

67-21   Lu Wang, Wentao Yan, Thermoelectric magnetohydrodynamic model for laser-based metal additive manufacturing, Physical Review Applied, 15.6; 064051, 2021. doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevApplied.15.064051

61-21   Ian D. McCue, Gianna M. Valentino, Douglas B. Trigg, Andrew M. Lennon, Chuck E. Hebert, Drew P. Seker, Salahudin M. Nimer, James P. Mastrandrea, Morgana M. Trexler, Steven M. Storck, Controlled shape-morphing metallic components for deployable structures, Materials & Design, 208; 109935, 2021. doi.org/10.1016/j.matdes.2021.109935

60-21   Mahyar Khorasani, AmirHossein Ghasemi, Martin Leary, William O’Neil, Ian Gibson, Laura Cordova, Bernard Rolfe, Numerical and analytical investigation on meltpool temperature of laser-based powder bed fusion of IN718, International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, 177; 121477, 2021. doi.org/10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2021.121477

57-21   Dae-Won Cho, Yeong-Do Park, Muralimohan Cheepu, Numerical simulation of slag movement from Marangoni flow for GMAW with computational fluid dynamics, International Communications in Heat and Mass Transfer, 125; 105243, 2021. doi.org/10.1016/j.icheatmasstransfer.2021.105243

55-21   Won-Sang Shin, Dae-Won Cho, Donghyuck Jung, Heeshin Kang, Jeng O Kim, Yoon-Jun Kim, Changkyoo Park, Investigation on laser welding of Al ribbon to Cu sheet: Weldability, microstructure and mechanical and electrical properties, Metals, 11.5; 831, 2021. doi.org/10.3390/met11050831

50-21   Mohamad Bayat, Venkata K. Nadimpalli, Francesco G. Biondani, Sina Jafarzadeh, Jesper Thorborg, Niels S. Tiedje, Giuliano Bissacco, David B. Pedersen, Jesper H. Hattel, On the role of the powder stream on the heat and fluid flow conditions during directed energy deposition of maraging steel—Multiphysics modeling and experimental validation, Additive Manufacturing, 43;102021, 2021. doi.org/10.1016/j.addma.2021.102021

47-21   Subin Shrestha, Kevin Chou, An investigation into melting modes in selective laser melting of Inconel 625 powder: single track geometry and porosity, The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, 2021. doi.org/10.1007/s00170-021-07105-3

34-21   Haokun Sun, Xin Chu, Cheng Luo, Haoxiu Chen, Zhiying Liu, Yansong Zhang, Yu Zou, Selective laser melting for joining dissimilar materials: Investigations ofiInterfacial characteristics and in situ alloying, Metallurgical and Materials Transactions A, 52; pp. 1540-1550, 2021. doi.org/10.1007/s11661-021-06178-9

32-21   Shanshan Zhang, Subin Shrestha, Kevin Chou, On mesoscopic surface formation in metal laser powder-bed fusion process, Supplimental Proceedings, TMS 150th Annual Meeting & Exhibition (Virtual), pp. 149-161, 2021. doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-65261-6_14

22-21   Patiparn Ninpetch, Pruet Kowitwarangkul, Sitthipong Mahathanabodee, Prasert Chalermkarnnon, Phadungsak Rattanadecho, Computational investigation of thermal behavior and molten metal flow with moving laser heat source for selective laser melting process, Case Studies in Thermal Engineering, 24; 100860, 2021. doi.org/10.1016/j.csite.2021.100860

19-21   M.B. Abrami, C. Ransenigo, M. Tocci, A. Pola, M. Obeidi, D. Brabazon, Numerical simulation of laser powder bed fusion processes, La Metallurgia Italiana, February; pp. 81-89, 2021.

16-21   Wenjun Ge, Jerry Y.H. Fuh, Suck Joo Na, Numerical modelling of keyhole formation in selective laser melting of Ti6Al4V, Journal of Manufacturing Processes, 62; pp. 646-654, 2021. doi.org/10.1016/j.jmapro.2021.01.005

11-21   Mohamad Bayat, Venkata K. Nadimpalli, David B. Pedersen, Jesper H. Hattel, A fundamental investigation of thermo-capillarity in laser powder bed fusion of metals and alloys, International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, 166; 120766, 2021. doi.org/10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2020.120766

10-21   Yufan Zhao, Yuichiro Koizumi, Kenta Aoyagi, Kenta Yamanaka, Akihiko Chiba, Thermal properties of powder beds in energy absorption and heat transfer during additive manufacturing with electron beam, Powder Technology, 381; pp. 44-54, 2021. doi.org/10.1016/j.powtec.2020.11.082

9-21   Subin Shrestha, Kevin Chou, A study of transient and steady-state regions from single-track deposition in laser powder bed fusion, Journal of Manufacturing Processes, 61; pp. 226-235, 2021. doi.org/10.1016/j.jmapro.2020.11.023

6-21   Qian Chen, Yunhao Zhao, Seth Strayer, Yufan Zhao, Kenta Aoyagi, Yuichiro Koizumi, Akihiko Chiba, Wei Xiong, Albert C. To, Elucidating the effect of preheating temperature on melt pool morphology variation in Inconel 718 laser powder bed fusion via simulation and experiment, Additive Manufacturing, 37; 101642, 2021. doi.org/10.1016/j.addma.2020.101642

04-21   Won-Ik Cho, Peer Woizeschke, Analysis of molten pool dynamics in laser welding with beam oscillation and filler wire feeding, International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, 164; 120623, 2021. doi.org/10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2020.120623

128-20   Mahmood Al Bashir, Rajeev Nair, Martina M. Sanchez, Anil Mahapatro, Improving fluid retention properties of 316L stainless steel using nanosecond pulsed laser surface texturing, Journal of Laser Applications, 32.4, 2020. doi.org/10.2351/7.0000199

127-20   Eric Riedel, Niklas Bergedieck, Stefan Scharf, CFD simulation based investigation of cavitation cynamics during high intensity ultrasonic treatment of A356, Metals, 10.11; 1529, 2020. doi.org/10.3390/met10111529

126-20   Benjamin Himmel, Material jetting of aluminium: Analysis of a novel additive manufacturing process, Thesis, Technical University of Munich, Munich, Germany, 2020. 

121-20   Yufan Zhao, Yujie Cui, Haruko Numata, Huakang Bian, Kimio Wako, Kenta Yamanaka, Kenta Aoyagi, Akihiko Chiba, Centrifugal granulation behavior in metallic powder fabrication by plasma rotating electrode process, Scientific Reports, 10; 18446, 2020. doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-75503-w

116-20   Raphael Comminal, Wilson Ricardo Leal da Silva, Thomas Juul Andersen, Henrik Stang, Jon Spangenberg, Modelling of 3D concrete printing based on computational fluid dynamics, Cement and Concrete Research, 138; 106256, 2020. doi.org/10.1016/j.cemconres.2020.106256

112-20   Peng Liu, Lijin Huan, Yu Gan, Yuyu Lei, Effect of plate thickness on weld pool dynamics and keyhole-induced porosity formation in laser welding of Al alloy, The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, 111; pp. 735-747, 2020. doi.org/10.1007/s00170-020-05818-5

108-20   Fan Chen, Wentao Yan, High-fidelity modelling of thermal stress for additive manufacturing by linking thermal-fluid and mechanical models, Materials & Design, 196; 109185, 2020. doi.org/10.1016/j.matdes.2020.109185

104-20   Yunfu Tian, Lijun Yang, Dejin Zhao, Yiming Huang, Jiajing Pan, Numerical analysis of powder bed generation and single track forming for selective laser melting of SS316L stainless steel, Journal of Manufacturing Processes, 58; pp. 964-974, 2020. doi.org/10.1016/j.jmapro.2020.09.002

100-20   Raphaël Comminal, Sina Jafarzadeh, Marcin Serdeczny, Jon Spangenberg, Estimations of interlayer contacts in extrusion additive manufacturing using a CFD model, International Conference on Additive Manufacturing in Products and Applications (AMPA), Zurich, Switzerland, September 1-3: Industrializing Additive Manufacturing, pp. 241-250, 2020. doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-54334-1_17

97-20   Paree Allu, CFD simulation for metal Additive Manufacturing: Applications in laser- and sinter-based processes, Metal AM, 6.4; pp. 151-158, 2020.

95-20   Yufan Zhao, Kenta Aoyagi, Kenta Yamanaka, Akihiko Chiba, Role of operating and environmental conditions in determining molten pool dynamics during electron beam melting and selective laser melting, Additive Manufacturing, 36; 101559, 2020. doi.org/10.1016/j.addma.2020.101559

94-20   Yan Zeng, David Himmler, Peter Randelzhofer, Carolin Körner, Processing of in situ Al3Ti/Al composites by advanced high shear technology: influence of mixing speed, The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, 110; pp. 1589-1599, 2020. doi.org/10.1007/s00170-020-05956-w

93-20   H. Hamed Zargari, K. Ito, M. Kumar, A. Sharma, Visualizing the vibration effect on the tandem-pulsed gas metal arc welding in the presence of surface tension active elements, International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, 161; 120310, 2020. doi.org/10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2020.120310

90-20   Guangxi Zhao, Jun Du, Zhengying Wei, Siyuan Xu, Ruwei Geng, Numerical analysis of aluminum alloy fused coating process, Journal of the Brazilian Society of Mechanical Science and Engineering, 42; 483, 2020. doi.org/10.1007/s40430-020-02569-y

85-20   Wenkang Huang, Hongliang Wang, Teresa Rinker, Wenda Tan, Investigation of metal mixing in laser keyhold welding of dissimilar metals, Materials & Design, 195; 109056, 2020. doi.org/10.1016/j.matdes.2020.109056

82-20   Pan Lu, Zhang Cheng-Lin, Wang Liang, Liu Tong, Liu Jiang-lin, Molten pool structure, temperature and velocity flow in selective laser melting AlCu5MnCdVA alloy, Materials Research Express, 7; 086516, 2020. doi.org/10.1088/2053-1591/abadcf

80-20   Yujie Cui, Yufan Zhao, Haruko Numata, Huakang Bian, Kimio Wako, Kento Yamanaka, Kenta Aoyagi, Chen Zhang, Akihiko Chiba, Effects of plasma rotating electrode process parameters on the particle size distribution and microstructure of Ti-6Al-4 V alloy powder, Powder Technology, 376; pp. 363-372, 2020. doi.org/10.1016/j.powtec.2020.08.027

78-20   F.Q. Liu, L. Wei, S.Q. Shi, H.L. Wei, On the varieties of build features during multi-layer laser directed energy deposition, Additive Manufacturing, 36; 101491, 2020. doi.org/10.1016/j.addma.2020.101491

75-20   Nannan Chen, Zixuan Wan, Hui-Ping Wang, Jingjing Li, Joshua Solomon, Blair E. Carlson, Effect of Al single bond Si coating on laser spot welding of press hardened steel and process improvement with annular stirring, Materials & Design, 195; 108986, 2020. doi.org/10.1016/j.matdes.2020.108986

72-20   Yujie Cui, Kenta Aoyagi, Yufan Zhao, Kenta Yamanaka, Yuichiro Hayasaka, Yuichiro Koizumi, Tadashi Fujieda, Akihiko Chiba, Manufacturing of a nanosized TiB strengthened Ti-based alloy via electron beam powder bed fusion, Additive Manufacturing, 36; 101472, 2020. doi.org/10.1016/j.addma.2020.101472

64-20   Dong-Rong Liu, Shuhao Wang, Wentao Yan, Grain structure evolution in transition-mode melting in direct energy deposition, Materials & Design, 194; 108919, 2020. doi.org/10.1016/j.matdes.2020.108919

61-20   Raphael Comminal, Wilson Ricardo Leal da Silva, Thomas Juul Andersen, Henrik Stang, Jon Spangenberg, Influence of processing parameters on the layer geometry in 3D concrete printing: Experiments and modelling, 2nd RILEM International Conference on Concrete and Digital Fabrication, RILEM Bookseries, 28; pp. 852-862, 2020. doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-49916-7_83

60-20   Marcin P. Serdeczny, Raphaël Comminal, Md. Tusher Mollah, David B. Pedersen, Jon Spangenberg, Numerical modeling of the polymer flow through the hot-end in filament-based material extrusion additive manufacturing, Additive Manufacturing, 36; 101454, 2020. doi.org/10.1016/j.addma.2020.101454

58-20   H.L. Wei, T. Mukherjee, W. Zhang, J.S. Zuback, G.L. Knapp, A. De, T. DebRoy, Mechanistic models for additive manufacturing of metallic components, Progress in Materials Science, 116; 100703, 2020. doi.org/10.1016/j.pmatsci.2020.100703

55-20   Masoud Mohammadpour, Experimental study and numerical simulation of heat transfer and fluid flow in laser welded and brazed joints, Thesis, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX, US; Available in Mechanical Engineering Research Theses and Dissertations, 24, 2020.

48-20   Masoud Mohammadpour, Baixuan Yang, Hui-Ping Wang, John Forrest, Michael Poss, Blair Carlson, Radovan Kovacevica, Influence of laser beam inclination angle on galvanized steel laser braze quality, Optics and Laser Technology, 129; 106303, 2020. doi.org/10.1016/j.optlastec.2020.106303

34-20   Binqi Liu, Gang Fang, Liping Lei, Wei Liu, A new ray tracing heat source model for mesoscale CFD simulation of selective laser melting (SLM), Applied Mathematical Modeling, 79; pp. 506-520, 2020. doi.org/10.1016/j.apm.2019.10.049

27-20   Xuesong Gao, Guilherme Abreu Farira, Wei Zhang and Kevin Wheeler, Numerical analysis of non-spherical particle effect on molten pool dynamics in laser-powder bed fusion additive manufacturing, Computational Materials Science, 179, art. no. 109648, 2020. doi.org/10.1016/j.commatsci.2020.109648

26-20   Yufan Zhao, Yuichiro Koizumi, Kenta Aoyagi, Kenta Yamanaka and Akihiko Chiba, Isothermal γ → ε phase transformation behavior in a Co-Cr-Mo alloy depending on thermal history during electron beam powder-bed additive manufacturing, Journal of Materials Science & Technology, 50, pp. 162-170, 2020. doi.org/10.1016/j.jmst.2019.11.040

21-20   Won-Ik Cho and Peer Woizeschke, Analysis of molten pool behavior with buttonhole formation in laser keyhole welding of sheet metal, International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, 152, art. no. 119528, 2020. doi.org/10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2020.119528

06-20  Wei Xing, Di Ouyang, Zhen Chen and Lin Liu, Effect of energy density on defect evolution in 3D printed Zr-based metallic glasses by selective laser melting, Science China Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy, 63, art. no. 226111, 2020. doi.org/10.1007/s11433-019-1485-8

04-20   Santosh Reddy Sama, Tony Badamo, Paul Lynch and Guha Manogharan, Novel sprue designs in metal casting via 3D sand-printing, Additive Manufacturing, 25, pp. 563-578, 2019. doi.org/10.1016/j.addma.2018.12.009

02-20   Dongsheng Wu, Shinichi Tashiro, Ziang Wu, Kazufumi Nomura, Xueming Hua, and Manabu Tanaka, Analysis of heat transfer and material flow in hybrid KPAW-GMAW process based on the novel three dimensional CFD simulation, International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, 147, art. no. 118921, 2020. doi.org/10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2019.118921

01-20   Xiang Huang, Siying Lin, Zhenxiang Bu, Xiaolong Lin, Weijin Yi, Zhihong Lin, Peiqin Xie, and Lingyun Wang, Research on nozzle and needle combination for high frequency piezostack-driven dispenser, International Journal of Adhesion and Adhesives, 96, 2020. doi.org/10.1016/j.ijadhadh.2019.102453

88-19   Bo Cheng and Charles Tuffile, Numerical study of porosity formation with implementation of laser multiple reflection in selective laser melting, Proceedings Volume 1: Additive Manufacturing; Manufacturing Equipment and Systems; Bio and Sustainable Manufacturing, ASME 2019 14th International Manufacturing Science and Engineering Conference, Erie, Pennsylvania, USA, June 10-14, 2019. doi.org/10.1115/MSEC2019-2891

87-19   Shuhao Wang, Lida Zhu, Jerry Ying His Fuh, Haiquan Zhang, and Wentao Yan, Multi-physics modeling and Gaussian process regression analysis of cladding track geometry for direct energy deposition, Optics and Lasers in Engineering, 127:105950, 2019. doi.org/10.1016/j.optlaseng.2019.105950

78-19   Bo Cheng, Lukas Loeber, Hannes Willeck, Udo Hartel, and Charles Tuffile, Computational investigation of melt pool process dynamics and pore formation in laser powder bed fusion, Journal of Materials Engineering and Performance, 28:11, 6565-6578, 2019. doi.org/10.1007/s11665-019-04435-y

77-19   David Souders, Pareekshith Allu, Anurag Chandorkar, and Ruendy Castillo, Application of computational fluid dynamics in developing process parameters for additive manufacturing, Additive Manufacturing Journal, 9th International Conference on 3D Printing and Additive Manufacturing Technologies (AM 2019), Bangalore, India, September 7-9, 2019.

75-19   Raphaël Comminal, Marcin Piotr Serdeczny, Navid Ranjbar, Mehdi Mehrali, David Bue Pedersen, Henrik Stang, Jon Spangenberg, Modelling of material deposition in big area additive manufacturing and 3D concrete printing, Proceedings, Advancing Precision in Additive Manufacturing, Nantes, France, September 16-18, 2019.

73-19   Baohua Chang, Zhang Yuan, Hao Cheng, Haigang Li, Dong Du 1, and Jiguo Shan, A study on the influences of welding position on the keyhole and molten pool behavior in laser welding of a titanium alloy, Metals, 9:1082, 2019. doi.org/10.3390/met9101082

57-19     Shengjie Deng, Hui-Ping Wang, Fenggui Lu, Joshua Solomon, and Blair E. Carlson, Investigation of spatter occurrence in remote laser spiral welding of zinc-coated steels, International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, Vol. 140, pp. 269-280, 2019. doi.org/10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2019.06.009

53-19     Mohamad Bayat, Aditi Thanki, Sankhya Mohanty, Ann Witvrouw, Shoufeng Yang, Jesper Thorborg, Niels Skat Tieldje, and Jesper Henri Hattel, Keyhole-induced porosities in Laser-based Powder Bed Fusion (L-PBF) of Ti6Al4V: High-fidelity modelling and experimental validation, Additive Manufacturing, Vol. 30, 2019. doi.org/10.1016/j.addma.2019.100835

51-19     P. Ninpetch, P. Kowitwarangkul, S. Mahathanabodee, R. Tongsri, and P. Ratanadecho, Thermal and melting track simulations of laser powder bed fusion (L-PBF), International Conference on Materials Research and Innovation (ICMARI), Bangkok, Thailand, December 17-21, 2018. IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering, Vol. 526, 2019. doi.org/10.1088/1757-899X/526/1/012030

46-19     Hongze Wang and Yu Zou, Microscale interaction between laser and metal powder in powder-bed additive manufacturing: Conduction mode versus keyhole mode, International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, Vol. 142, 2019. doi.org/10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2019.118473

45-19     Yufan Zhao, Yuichiro Koizumi, Kenta Aoyagi, Kenta Yamanaka, and Akihiko Chiba, Manipulating local heat accumulation towards controlled quality and microstructure of a Co-Cr-Mo alloy in powder bed fusion with electron beam, Materials Letters, Vol. 254, pp. 269-272, 2019. doi.org/10.1016/j.matlet.2019.07.078

44-19     Guoxiang Xu, Lin Li, Houxiao Wang, Pengfei Li, Qinghu Guo, Qingxian Hu, and Baoshuai Du, Simulation and experimental studies of keyhole induced porosity in laser-MIG hybrid fillet welding of aluminum alloy in the horizontal position, Optics & Laser Technology, Vol. 119, 2019. doi.org/10.1016/j.optlastec.2019.105667

38-19     Subin Shrestha and Y. Kevin Chou, A numerical study on the keyhole formation during laser powder bed fusion process, Journal of Manufacturing Science and Engineering, Vol. 141, No. 10, 2019. doi.org/10.1115/1.4044100

34-19     Dae-Won Cho, Jin-Hyeong Park, and Hyeong-Soon Moon, A study on molten pool behavior in the one pulse one drop GMAW process using computational fluid dynamics, International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, Vol. 139, pp. 848-859, 2019. doi.org/10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2019.05.038

30-19     Mohamad Bayat, Sankhya Mohanty, and Jesper Henri Hattel, Multiphysics modelling of lack-of-fusion voids formation and evolution in IN718 made by multi-track/multi-layer L-PBF, International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, Vol. 139, pp. 95-114, 2019. doi.org/10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2019.05.003

29-19     Yufan Zhao, Yuichiro Koizumi, Kenta Aoyagi, Daixiu Wei, Kenta Yamanaka, and Akihiko Chiba, Comprehensive study on mechanisms for grain morphology evolution and texture development in powder bed fusion with electron beam of Co–Cr–Mo alloy, Materialia, Vol. 6, 2019. doi.org/10.1016/j.mtla.2019.100346

28-19     Pareekshith Allu, Computational fluid dynamics modeling in additive manufacturing processes, The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society (TMS) 148th Annual Meeting & Exhibition, San Antonio, Texas, USA, March 10-14, 2019.

24-19     Simulation Software: Use, Advantages & Limitations, The Additive Manufacturing and Welding Magazine, Vol. 2, No. 2, 2019

22-19     Hunchul Jeong, Kyungbae Park, Sungjin Baek, and Jungho Cho, Thermal efficiency decision of variable polarity aluminum arc welding through molten pool analysis, International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, Vol. 138, pp. 729-737, 2019. doi.org/10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2019.04.089

07-19   Guangxi Zhao, Jun Du, Zhengying Wei, Ruwei Geng and Siyuan Xu, Numerical analysis of arc driving forces and temperature distribution in pulsed TIG welding, Journal of the Brazilian Society of Mechanical Sciences and Engineering, Vol. 41, No. 60, 2019. doi.org/10.1007/s40430-018-1563-0

04-19   Santosh Reddy Sama, Tony Badamo, Paul Lynch and Guha Manogharan, Novel sprue designs in metal casting via 3D sand-printing, Additive Manufacturing, Vol. 25, pp. 563-578, 2019. doi.org/10.1016/j.addma.2018.12.009

03-19   Dongsheng Wu, Anh Van Nguyen, Shinichi Tashiro, Xueming Hua and Manabu Tanaka, Elucidation of the weld pool convection and keyhole formation mechanism in the keyhold plasma arc welding, International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, Vol. 131, pp. 920-931, 2019. doi.org/10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2018.11.108

97-18   Wentao Yan, Ya Qian, Wenjun Ge, Stephen Lin, Wing Kam Liu, Feng Lin, Gregory J. Wagner, Meso-scale modeling of multiple-layer fabrication process in Selective Electron Beam Melting: Inter-layer/track voids formation, Materials & Design, 2018. doi.org/10.1016/j.matdes.2017.12.031

84-18   Bo Cheng, Xiaobai Li, Charles Tuffile, Alexander Ilin, Hannes Willeck and Udo Hartel, Multi-physics modeling of single track scanning in selective laser melting: Powder compaction effect, Proceedings of the 29th Annual International Solid Freeform Fabrication Symposium, pp. 1887-1902, 2018.

81-18 Yufan Zhao, Yuichiro Koizumi, Kenta Aoyagi, Daixiu Wei, Kenta Yamanaka and Akihiko Chiba, Molten pool behavior and effect of fluid flow on solidification conditions in selective electron beam melting (SEBM) of a biomedical Co-Cr-Mo alloy, Additive Manufacturing, Vol. 26, pp. 202-214, 2019. doi.org/10.1016/j.addma.2018.12.002

77-18   Jun Du and Zhengying Wei, Numerical investigation of thermocapillary-induced deposited shape in fused-coating additive manufacturing process of aluminum alloy, Journal of Physics Communications, Vol. 2, No. 11, 2018. doi.org/10.1088/2399-6528/aaedc7

76-18   Yu Xiang, Shuzhe Zhang, Zhengying We, Junfeng Li, Pei Wei, Zhen Chen, Lixiang Yang and Lihao Jiang, Forming and defect analysis for single track scanning in selective laser melting of Ti6Al4V, Applied Physics A, 124:685, 2018. doi.org/10.1007/s00339-018-2056-9

74-18   Paree Allu, CFD simulations for laser welding of Al Alloys, Proceedings, Die Casting Congress & Exposition, Indianapolis, IN, October 15-17, 2018.

72-18   Hunchul Jeong, Kyungbae Park, Sungjin Baek, Dong-Yoon Kim, Moon-Jin Kang and Jungho Cho, Three-dimensional numerical analysis of weld pool in GMAW with fillet joint, International Journal of Precision Engineering and Manufacturing, Vol. 19, No. 8, pp. 1171-1177, 2018. doi.org/10.1007/s12541-018-0138-4

60-18   R.W. Geng, J. Du, Z.Y. Wei and G.X. Zhao, An adaptive-domain-growth method for phase field simulation of dendrite growth in arc preheated fused-coating additive manufacturing, IOP Conference Series: Journal of Physics: Conference Series 1063, 012077, 2018. doi.org/10.1088/1742-6596/1063/1/012077

59-18   Guangxi Zhao, Jun Du, Zhengying Wei, Ruwei Geng and Siyuan Xu, Coupling analysis of molten pool during fused coating process with arc preheating, IOP Conference Series: Journal of Physics: Conference Series 1063, 012076, 2018. doi.org/10.1088/1742-6596/1063/1/012076 (Available at http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1742-6596/1063/1/012076/pdf and in shared drive)

58-18   Siyuan Xu, Zhengying Wei, Jun Du, Guangxi Zhao and Wei Liu, Numerical simulation and analysis of metal fused coating forming, IOP Conference Series: Journal of Physics: Conference Series 1063, 012075, 2018. doi.org/10.1088/1742-6596/1063/1/012075

55-18   Jason Cheon, Jin-Young Yoon, Cheolhee Kim and Suck-Joo Na, A study on transient flow characteristic in friction stir welding with realtime interface tracking by direct surface calculation, Journal of Materials Processing Tech., vol. 255, pp. 621-634, 2018.

54-18   V. Sukhotskiy, P. Vishnoi, I. H. Karampelas, S. Vader, Z. Vader, and E. P. Furlani, Magnetohydrodynamic drop-on-demand liquid metal additive manufacturing: System overview and modeling, Proceedings of the 5th International Conference of Fluid Flow, Heat and Mass Transfer, Niagara Falls, Canada, June 7 – 9, 2018; Paper no. 155, 2018. doi.org/10.11159/ffhmt18.155

52-18   Michael Hilbinger, Claudia Stadelmann, Matthias List and Robert F. Singer, Temconex® – Kontinuierliche Pulverextrusion: Verbessertes Verständnis mit Hilfe der numerischen Simulation, Hochleistungsmetalle und Prozesse für den Leichtbau der Zukunft, Tagungsband 10. Ranshofener Leichtmetalltage, 13-14 Juni 2018, Linz, pp. 175-186, 2018.

38-18   Zhen Chen, Yu Xiang, Zhengying Wei, Pei Wei, Bingheng Lu, Lijuan Zhang and Jun Du, Thermal dynamic behavior during selective laser melting of K418 superalloy: numerical simulation and experimental verification, Applied Physics A, vol. 124, pp. 313, 2018. doi.org/10.1007/s00339-018-1737-8

19-18   Chenxiao Zhu, Jason Cheon, Xinhua Tang, Suck-Joo Na, and Haichao Cui, Molten pool behaviors and their influences on welding defects in narrow gap GMAW of 5083 Al-alloy, International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, vol. 126:A, pp.1206-1221, 2018. doi.org/10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2018.05.132

16-18   P. Schneider, V. Sukhotskiy, T. Siskar, L. Christie and I.H. Karampelas, Additive Manufacturing of Microfluidic Components via Wax Extrusion, Biotech, Biomaterials and Biomedical TechConnect Briefs, vol. 3, pp. 162 – 165, 2018.

09-18   The Furlani Research Group, Magnetohydrodynamic Liquid Metal 3D Printing, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, © University at Buffalo, May 2018.

08-18   Benjamin Himmel, Dominik Rumschöttel and Wolfram Volk, Thermal process simulation of droplet based metal printing with aluminium, Production Engineering, March 2018 © German Academic Society for Production Engineering (WGP) 2018.

07-18   Yu-Che Wu, Cheng-Hung San, Chih-Hsiang Chang, Huey-Jiuan Lin, Raed Marwan, Shuhei Baba and Weng-Sing Hwang, Numerical modeling of melt-pool behavior in selective laser melting with random powder distribution and experimental validation, Journal of Materials Processing Tech. 254 (2018) 72–78.

60-17   Pei Wei, Zhengying Wei, Zhen Chen, Yuyang He and Jun Du, Thermal behavior in single track during selective laser melting of AlSi10Mg powder, Applied Physics A: Materials Science & Processing, 123:604, 2017. doi.org/10.1007/z00339-017-1194-9

51-17   Koichi Ishizaka, Keijiro Saitoh, Eisaku Ito, Masanori Yuri, and Junichiro Masada, Key Technologies for 1700°C Class Ultra High Temperature Gas Turbine, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Technical Review, vol. 54, no. 3, 2017.

49-17   Yu-Che Wu, Weng-Sing Hwang, Cheng-Hung San, Chih-Hsiang Chang and Huey-Jiuan Lin, Parametric study of surface morphology for selective laser melting on Ti6Al4V powder bed with numerical and experimental methods, International Journal of Material Forming, © Springer-Verlag France SAS, part of Springer Nature 2017. doi.org/10.1007/s12289-017-1391-2.

37-17   V. Sukhotskiy, I. H. Karampelas, G. Garg, A. Verma, M. Tong, S. Vader, Z. Vader, and E. P. Furlani, Magnetohydrodynamic Drop-on-Demand Liquid Metal 3D Printing, Solid Freeform Fabrication 2017: Proceedings of the 28th Annual International Solid Freeform Fabrication Symposium – An Additive Manufacturing Conference

15-17   I.H. Karampelas, S. Vader, Z. Vader, V. Sukhotskiy, A. Verma, G. Garg, M. Tong and E.P. Furlani, Drop-on-Demand 3D Metal Printing, Informatics, Electronics and Microsystems TechConnect Briefs 2017, Vol. 4

14-17   Jason Cheon and Suck-Joo Na, Prediction of welding residual stress with real-time phase transformation by CFD thermal analysis, International Journal of Mechanical Sciences 131–132 (2017) 37–51.

91-16   Y. S. Lee and D. F. Farson, Surface tension-powered build dimension control in laser additive manufacturing process, Int J Adv Manuf Technol (2016) 85:1035–1044, doi.org/10.1007/s00170-015-7974-5.

84-16   Runqi Lin, Hui-ping Wang, Fenggui Lu, Joshua Solomon, Blair E. Carlson, Numerical study of keyhole dynamics and keyhole-induced porosity formation in remote laser welding of Al alloys, International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer 108 (2017) 244–256, Available online December 2016.

68-16   Dongsheng Wu, Xueming Hua, Dingjian Ye and Fang Li, Understanding of humping formation and suppression mechanisms using the numerical simulation, International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, Volume 104, January 2017, Pages 634–643, Published online 2016.

39-16   Chien-Hsun Wang, Ho-Lin Tsai, Yu-Che Wu and Weng-Sing Hwang, Investigation of molten metal droplet deposition and solidification for 3D printing techniques, IOP Publishing, J. Micromech. Microeng. 26 (2016) 095012 (14pp), doi: 10.1088/0960-1317/26/9/095012, July 8, 2016

29-16   Scott Vader, Zachary Vader, Ioannis H. Karampelas and Edward P. Furlani, Advances in Magnetohydrodynamic Liquid Metal Jet Printing, Nanotech 2016 Conference & Expo, May 22-25, Washington, DC.

26-16   Y.S. Lee and W. Zhang, Modeling of heat transfer, fluid flow and solidification microstructure of nickel-base superalloy fabricated by laser powder bed fusion, S2214-8604(16)30087-2, doi.org/10.1016/j.addma.2016.05.003, ADDMA 86.

123-15   Koji Tsukimoto, Masashi Kitamura, Shuji Tanigawa, Sachio Shimohata, and Masahiko Mega, Laser welding repair for single crystal blades, Proceedings of International Gas Turbine Congress, pp. 1354-1358, 2015.

122-15   Y.S. Lee, W. Zhang, Mesoscopic simulation of heat transfer and fluid flow in laser powder bed additive manufacturing, Proceedings, 26th Solid Freeform Fabrication Symposium, Austin, Texas, 2015. 

116-15   Yousub Lee, Simulation of Laser Additive Manufacturing and its Applications, Ph.D. Thesis: Graduate Program in Welding Engineering, The Ohio State University, 2015, Copyright by Yousub Lee 2015

103-15   Ligang Wu, Jason Cheon, Degala Venkata Kiran, and Suck-Joo Na, CFD Simulations of GMA Welding of Horizontal Fillet Joints based on Coordinate Rotation of Arc Models, Journal of Materials Processing Technology, Available online December 29, 2015

96-15   Jason Cheon, Degala Venkata Kiran, and Suck-Joo Na, Thermal metallurgical analysis of GMA welded AH36 steel using CFD – FEM framework, Materials & Design, Volume 91, February 5 2016, Pages 230-241, published online November 2015

86-15   Yousub Lee and Dave F. Farson, Simulation of transport phenomena and melt pool shape for multiple layer additive manufacturing, J. Laser Appl. 28, 012006 (2016). doi: 10.2351/1.4935711, published online 2015.

63-15   Scott Vader, Zachary Vader, Ioannis H. Karampelas and Edward P. Furlani, Magnetohydrodynamic Liquid Metal Jet Printing, TechConnect World Innovation Conference & Expo, Washington, D.C., June 14-17, 2015

46-15   Adwaith Gupta, 3D Printing Multi-Material, Single Printhead Simulation, Advanced Qualification of Additive Manufacturing Materials Workshop, July 20 – 21, 2015, Santa Fe, NM

25-15   Dae-Won Cho and Suck-Joo Na, Molten pool behaviors for second pass V-groove GMAW, International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer 88 (2015) 945–956.

21-15   Jungho Cho, Dave F. Farson, Kendall J. Hollis and John O. Milewski, Numerical analysis of weld pool oscillation in laser welding, Journal of Mechanical Science and Technology 29 (4) (2015) 1715~1722, www.springerlink.com/content/1738-494x, doi.org/10.1007/s12206-015-0344-2.

82-14  Yousub Lee, Mark Nordin, Sudarsanam Suresh Babu, and Dave F. Farson, Effect of Fluid Convection on Dendrite Arm Spacing in Laser Deposition, Metallurgical and Materials Transactions B, August 2014, Volume 45, Issue 4, pp 1520-1529

59-14   Y.S. Lee, M. Nordin, S.S. Babu, and D.F. Farson, Influence of Fluid Convection on Weld Pool Formation in Laser Cladding, Welding Research/ August 2014, VOL. 93

18-14  L.J. Zhang, J.X. Zhang, A. Gumenyuk, M. Rethmeier, and S.J. Na, Numerical simulation of full penetration laser welding of thick steel plate with high power high brightness laser, Journal of Materials Processing Technology (2014), doi.org/10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2014.03.016.

36-13  Dae-Won Cho,Woo-Hyun Song, Min-Hyun Cho, and Suck-Joo Na, Analysis of Submerged Arc Welding Process by Three-Dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations, Journal of Materials Processing Technology, 2013. doi.org/10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2013.06.017

12-13 D.W. Cho, S.J. Na, M.H. Cho, J.S. Lee, A study on V-groove GMAW for various welding positions, Journal of Materials Processing Technology, April 2013, doi.org/10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2013.02.015.

01-13  Dae-Won Cho & Suck-Joo Na & Min-Hyun Cho & Jong-Sub Lee, Simulations of weld pool dynamics in V-groove GTA and GMA welding, Weld World, doi.org/10.1007/s40194-012-0017-z, © International Institute of Welding 2013.

63-12  D.W. Cho, S.H. Lee, S.J. Na, Characterization of welding arc and weld pool formation in vacuum gas hollow tungsten arc welding, Journal of Materials Processing Technology, doi.org/10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2012.09.024, September 2012.

77-10  Lim, Y. C.; Yu, X.; Cho, J. H.; et al., Effect of magnetic stirring on grain structure refinement Part 1-Autogenous nickel alloy welds, Science and Technology of Welding and Joining, Volume: 15 Issue: 7, Pages: 583-589, doi.org/10.1179/136217110X12720264008277, October 2010

18-10 K Saida, H Ohnishi, K Nishimoto, Fluxless laser brazing of aluminium alloy to galvanized steel using a tandem beam–dissimilar laser brazing of aluminium alloy and steels, Welding International, 2010

58-09  Cho, Jung-Ho; Farson, Dave F.; Milewski, John O.; et al., Weld pool flows during initial stages of keyhole formation in laser welding, Journal of Physics D-Applied Physics, Volume: 42 Issue: 17 Article Number: 175502 ; doi.org/10.1088/0022-3727/42/17/175502, September 2009

57-09  Lim, Y. C.; Farson, D. F.; Cho, M. H.; et al., Stationary GMAW-P weld metal deposit spreading, Science and Technology of Welding and Joining, Volume: 14 Issue: 7 ;Pages: 626-635, doi.org/10.1179/136217109X441173, October 2009

1-09 J.-H. Cho and S.-J. Na, Three-Dimensional Analysis of Molten Pool in GMA-Laser Hybrid Welding, Welding Journal, February 2009, Vol. 88

52-07   Huey-Jiuan Lin and Wei-Kuo Chang, Design of a sheet forming apparatus for overflow fusion process by numerical simulation, Journal of Non-Crystalline Solids 353 (2007) 2817–2825.

50-07  Cho, Min Hyun; Farson, Dave F., Understanding bead hump formation in gas metal arc welding using a numerical simulation, Metallurgical and Mateials Transactions B-Process Metallurgy and Materials Processing Science, Volume: 38, Issue: 2, Pages: 305-319, doi.org/10.1007/s11663-007-9034-5, April 2007

49-07  Cho, M. H.; Farson, D. F., Simulation study of a hybrid process for the prevention of weld bead hump formation, Welding Journal Volume: 86, Issue: 9, Pages: 253S-262S, September 2007

48-07  Cho, M. H.; Farson, D. F.; Lim, Y. C.; et al., Hybrid laser/arc welding process for controlling bead profile, Science and Technology of Welding and Joining, Volume: 12 Issue: 8, Pages: 677-688, doi.org/10.1179/174329307X236878, November 2007

47-07   Min Hyun Cho, Dave F. Farson, Understanding Bead Hump Formation in Gas Metal Arc Welding Using a Numerical Simulation, Metallurgical and Materials Transactions B, Volume 38, Issue 2, pp 305-319, April 2007

36-06  Cho, M. H.; Lim, Y. C.; Farson, D. F., Simulation of weld pool dynamics in the stationary pulsed gas metal arc welding process and final weld shape, Welding Journal, Volume: 85 Issue: 12, Pages: 271S-283S, December 2006

FLOW-3D CAST Suites

FLOW-3D CAST Suites

FLOW-3D CAST v5 comes in Suites of relevant casting processes: 

HIGH PRESSURE DIE CASTING SUITE

Process Workspace

High Pressure Die Casting

Features

Thermal Die Cycling
– Cooling/heating channels
– Spray cooling
Filling
– Shot sleeve with Plunger
– Shot motion
– Ladles, stoppers
– Venting efficiency
– PQ^2 analysis
– HPDC machine database
Solidification
– Squeeze pins
Cooling


PERMANENT MOLD CASTING SUITE

Process Workspaces

Permanent Mold Casting
Low Pressure Die Casting
Tilt Pour Casting

Features

Thermal Die Cycling
– Cooling/heating channels
Filling
– Tilt pouring
Solidification
– Squeeze pins
Cooling


SAND CASTING SUITE

Process Workspaces

Sand Casting
Low Pressure Sand Casting

Features

Filling
– Permeable molds
– Moisture evaporation in molds
– Gas generation in cores
– Ladle model
Solidification
– Exothermic sleeves
– Chills
– Cast iron solidification
Cooling


LOST FOAM CASTING SUITE

Process Workspaces

Lost Foam
Sand Casting
Low Pressure Sand Casting

Features

Filling
– Permeable molds
– Moisture evaporation in molds
– Gas generation in cores
– Ladle model
– Lost foam pattern evaporation models (Fast model and Full model)
– Lost foam defect prediction
Solidification
– Exothermic sleeves
– Chills
– Cast iron solidification
Cooling

 


ALL SUITES INCLUDE THESE CORE FEATURES:

Solver Engine

  • TruVOF – The most accurate filling simulation tool in the industry
  • Heat transfer and solidification
  • Shrinkage – Rapid Shrinkage model and Shrinkage with flow model
  • Temperature dependent properties
  • Multi-block meshing including conforming meshes
  • Turbulence models
  • Non-Newtonian viscosity (shear thinning/thickening, thixotropic)
  • Flow tracers
  • Active Simulation Control with Global Conditions
  • Surface tension model
  • Thermal stress analysis with warpage
  • General moving geometry w/6 DOF

FlowSight

  • Multi-case analysis
  • Porosity analysis tool

Defect Prediction Tools

  • Gas entrainment model
  • Thermal Modulus output
  • Hot Spot identification
  • Micro and macro porosity prediction
  • Surface defect prediction
  • Shrinkage
  • Cavitation and Cavitation Potential
  • Particle models (Inclusion modeling, collapsed bubble tracking)

User Conveniences

  • Process-oriented workspaces
  • Configurable Simulation Monitor
  • Metal and solid material databases
  • Heat transfer database
  • Filter database
  • Remote solving queues
  • Quick Analyze/Display tool

FSR-05-14_moisture drying model [수분/습기 건조 모델]

Introduction
In the manufacture of paper it is necessary to remove all water from the paper before it is rolled up. The majority of water is typically removed by squeezing the paper between large rollers. The remaining moisture can be removed by forcing hot air through the paper to accelerate its evaporation.
Using heated air can be an expensive process so there is interest in investigating optimum arrangements for achieving the fastest and least expensive means of removing the residual water from paper. A prototype arrangement using heated air is shown in the following figure: (그림은 첨부파일 참조)

Both the paper and the fabric backing are porous materials. The support blocks may not be porous. It is expected that the permeability of the fabric and paper will be a function of their water content.
This report describes a software development that allows for a realistic treatment of the drying process in porous media such as that shown in Fig. 1. A description is given of the new model, which has been validated with available data. This data does not cover the entire range of moisture content or airflow rates that are typically encountered in practice. Consequently, it may be found necessary to make some small model adjustments. It is hoped that the formulation of the model, which is based on simple physical principles, will be easy to adjust to fit a larger range of observations.
Before describing the new model, a better perspective of its capabilities can be appreciated by noting some of the ways that it differs from previous work on paper drying. Most importantly, the new model considers the paper as having finite thickness and properties such as moisture content, temperature and vapor concentration that vary through the thickness. Thus, the paper may have dried on the upstream side, but still be completely wet on the opposite side. Another difference is that air and water vapor constitute a two-component gas that is compressible. Compressibility means, for
example, that the gas velocity in the paper must increase in the direction of flow because of the decrease in pressure through the paper (i.e., density and/or temperature must decrease by expansion to give a pressure decrease). Since flow velocity has an important effect on drying rate, compressibility can influence local drying conditions in the paper.

Finally, by computing transient conditions throughout the paper, this model could be used to investigate arbitrary non-uniform initial conditions or paper with a non-uniform thickness and/or porosity distribution.

 

[다운로드]

FSR-05-14_moisture drying model

Simulating the Residue left by Evaporating Drops

Background
The “coffee ring” effect is the name given to a well known observation where the evaporative drying of a drop of coffee leaves behind a ring of dark material at the edge of the original drop. On first thought one would expect that the coffee particles, which are uniformly distributed in the drop, would simply be deposited uniformly over the area wetted by the drop. It has only been in recent years that researchers have uncovered the mechanisms that produce the ring effect (Deegan, R.D., et al).
As currently understood, the edges of drops can become pinned because of roughness or chemical elements on the surface on which they lie. Heat transfer to the drops from the substrate or the air induces evaporation, which is usually greater near the drop edge. Surface tension forces then adjust the curvature of the remaining liquid consistent with the pinned edge, which results in a net flow of liquid toward the edge. This flow replenishes the evaporative loss but also moves solute to the edge where it is concentrated by evaporation. Eventually, this mechanism builds up a ring deposit of solute at the original edge of the drop.
The residue from dried drops has implications for many useful applications, including general coating processes, formation of pixel arrays of organic materials for video displays and for a variety of micro-electro-mechanical (MEMS) devices.
Because many factors control the distribution of dried residue it is desirable to have some means to model the fluid dynamics of the process to aid engineers in making the best choices for each specific application. Such a capability has been incorporated into FLOW-3D1 making it possible to computationally investigate the influence of such parameters as the initial solute concentration, fluid viscosity, volatility of the solvent, evaporation rate, surface tension and initial shape of the drop.
This technical note presents a brief description of the residue formation model and illustrates it with several computations of an evaporating drop subject to different physical conditions.

Microfluidics Bibliography

Microfluidics Bibliography

다음은 Microfluidics Bibliography의 기술 문서 모음입니다.
이 모든 논문은 FLOW-3D  결과를 특징으로  합니다. 미세 유체 공정 및 장치 를 성공적으로 시뮬레이션하기 위해 FLOW-3D 를 사용 하는 방법에 대해 자세히 알아보십시오  .

2024년 3월 20일 Update

196-23 Daicong Zhang, Chunhui Jing, Wei Guo, Yuan Xiao, Jun Luo, Lehua Qi, Microchannels formed using metal microdroplets, Micromachines, 14.10; 1922, 2023. doi.org/10.3390/mi14101922

121-23 Feng Lin Ng, Zhanhong Cen, Yi-Chin Toh, Lay Poh Tan, A 3D-printed micro-perfused culture device with embedded 3D fibrous scaffold for enhanced biomimicry, International Journal of Bioprinting, 2023. doi.org/10.36922/ijb.0226

104-23 Cristina González-Fernández, Jenifer Gómez-Pastora, Eugenio Bringas, Inmaculada Ortiz, Computer-aided design of magnetophoretic microfluidic systems for enhanced recovery of target products, 33rd European Symposium on Computer-Aided Engineering (ESCAPE), 2023.

64-23   Tihomir Tjankov, Dimitar Trifonov, Conceptual design and 3D modeling of a microfluidic device for liver cells investigation, Industry 4.0, 8.2; pp. 39-41, 2023.

34-23   Chao Kang, Ikki Ikeda, Motoki Sakaguchi, Recoil and solidification of a paraffin droplet impacted on a metal substrate: Numerical study and experimental verification, Journal of Fluids and Structures, 118; 103839, 2023. doi.org/10.1016/j.jfluidstructs.2023.103839

64-22   Babatunde Aramide, Computational modelling of electrohydrodynamic jetting (Taylor cone formation, dripping & jet evolution): Case study of electrospinning, Thesis, University College London, 2022.

42-22   Islam Hassan, P. Ravi Selvaganapathy, Microfluidic printheads for highly switchable multimaterial 3D printing of soft materials, Advanced Materials Technologies, 2101709, 2022. doi.org/10.1002/admt.202101709

138-21   Enver Guler, Mine Eti, Aydin Cihanoglu, Esra Altiok, Kadriye Ozlem Hamaloglu, Burcu Gokcal, Ali Tuncel, Nalan Kabay, Ion exchange membranes with enhanced antifouling properties to produce energy from renewable sources, Proceedings of the 6th International Symposium on Green and Smart Technologies for a Sustainable Society, Santander, Cantabria, Spain, December 9-10, 2021.

45-21   Navid Tonekaboni, Mahdi Feizbahr, Nima Tonekaboni, Guang-Jun Jiang, Hong-Xia Chen, Optimization of solar CCHP systems with collector enhanced by porous media and nanofluid, Mathematical Problems in Engineering, 2021; 9984940, 2021. doi.org/10.1155/2021/9984840

40-21   B. Hayes, G.L. Whiting, R. MacCurdy, Modeling of contactless bubble–bubble interactions in microchannels with integrated inertial pumps, Physics of Fluids, 33.4; 042002, 2021. doi.org/10.1063/5.0041924

Below is a collection of technical papers in our Microfluidics Bibliography. All of these papers feature FLOW-3D results. Learn more about how FLOW-3D can be used to successfully simulate microfluidic processes and devices.

14-21   Jian-Chiun Liou, Chih-Wei Peng, Philippe Basset, Zhen-Xi Chen, DNA printing integrated multiplexer driver microelectronic mechanical system head (IDMH) and microfluidic flow estimation, Micromachines, 12.1; 25, 2021. doi.org/10.3390/mi12010025

08-20   Li Yong-Qiang, Dong Jun-Yan and Rui Wei, Numerical simulation for capillary driven flow in capsule-type vane tank with clearances under microgravity, Microgravity Science and Technology, 2020. doi.org/10.1007/s12217-019-09773-z

89-19   Tim Dreckmann, Julien Boeuf, Imke-Sonja Ludwig, Jorg Lumkemann, and Jorg Huwyler, Low volume aseptic filling: impact of pump systems on shear stress, European Journal of Pharmeceutics and Biopharmeceutics, in press, 2019. doi:10.1016/j.ejpb.2019.12.006

88-19   V. Amiri Roodan, J. Gomez-Pastora, C. Gonzalez-Fernandez, I.H. Karampelas, E. Bringas, E.P. Furlani, and I. Ortiz, CFD analysis of the generation and manipulation of ferrofluid droplets, TechConnect Briefs, pp. 182-185, 2019. TechConnect World Innovation Conference & Expo, Boston, Massachussetts, USA, June 17-19, 2019.

55-19     Julio Aleman, Sunil K. George, Samuel Herberg, Mahesh Devarasetty, Christopher D. Porada, Aleksander Skardal, and Graça Almeida‐Porada, Deconstructed microfluidic bone marrow on‐a‐chip to study normal and malignant hemopoietic cell–niche interactions, Small, 2019. doi: 10.1002/smll.201902971

37-19     Feng Lin Ng, Miniaturized 3D fibrous scaffold on stereolithography-printed microfluidic perfusion culture, Doctoral Thesis, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, 2019.

32-19     Jenifer Gómez-Pastora, Ioannis H. Karampelas, Eugenio Bringas, Edward P. Furlani, and Inmaculada Ortiz, Numerical analysis of bead magnetophoresis from flowing blood in a continuous-flow microchannel: Implications to the bead-fluid interactions, Nature: Scientific Reports, Vol. 9, No. 7265, 2019. doi: 10.1038/s41598-019-43827-x

01-19  Jelena Dinic and Vivek Sharma, Computational analysis of self-similar capillary-driven thinning and pinch-off dynamics during dripping using the volume-of-fluid method, Physics of Fluids, Vol. 31, 2019. doi: 10.1063/1.5061715

75-18   Tobias Ladner, Sebastian Odenwald, Kevin Kerls, Gerald Zieres, Adeline Boillon and Julien Bœuf, CFD supported investigation of shear induced by bottom-mounted magnetic stirrer in monoclonal antibody formulation, Pharmaceutical Research, Vol. 35, 2018. doi: 10.1007/s11095-018-2492-4

53-18   Venoos Amiri Roodan, Jenifer Gómez-Pastora, Aditi Verma, Eugenio Bringas, Inmaculada Ortiz and Edward P. Furlani, Computational analysis of magnetic droplet generation and manipulation in microfluidic devices, Proceedings of the 5th International Conference of Fluid Flow, Heat and Mass Transfer, Niagara Falls, Canada, June 7 – 9, 2018; Paper no. 154, 2018.  doi: 10.11159/ffhmt18.154

35-18   Jenifer Gómez-Pastora, Cristina González Fernández, Marcos Fallanza, Eugenio Bringas and Inmaculada Ortiz, Flow patterns and mass transfer performance of miscible liquid-liquid flows in various microchannels: Numerical and experimental studies, Chemical Engineering Journal, vol. 344, pp. 487-497, 2018. doi: 10.1016/j.cej.2018.03.110

16-18   P. Schneider, V. Sukhotskiy, T. Siskar, L. Christie and I.H. Karampelas, Additive Manufacturing of Microfluidic Components via Wax Extrusion, Biotech, Biomaterials and Biomedical TechConnect Briefs, vol. 3, pp. 162 – 165, 2018.

15-18   J. Gómez-Pastora, I.H. Karampelas, A.Q. Alorabi, M.D. Tarn, E. Bringas, A. Iles, V.N. Paunov, N. Pamme, E.P. Furlani, I. Ortiz, CFD analysis and experimental validation of magnetic droplet generation and deflection across multilaminar flow streams, Biotech, Biomaterials and Biomedical TechConnect Briefs, vol. 3, pp. 182-185, 2018.

14-18   J. Gómez-Pastora, C. González-Fernández, I.H. Karampelas, E. Bringas, E.P. Furlani, and I. Ortiz, Design of Magnetic Blood Cleansing Microdevices through Experimentally Validated CFD Modeling, Biotech, Biomaterials and Biomedical TechConnect Briefs, vol. 3, pp. 170-173, 2018.

10-18   A. Gupta, I.H. Karampelas, J. Kitting, Numerical modeling of the formation of dynamically configurable L2 lens in a microchannel, Biotech, Biomaterials and Biomedical TechConnect Briefs, Vol. 3, pp. 186 – 189, 2018.

17-17   I.H. Karampelas, J. Gómez-Pastora, M.J. Cowan, E. Bringas, I. Ortiz and E.P. Furlani, Numerical Analysis of Acoustophoretic Discrete Particle Focusing in Microchannels, Biotech, Biomaterials and Biomedical TechConnect Briefs 2017, Vol. 3

16-17   J. Gómez-Pastora, I.H. Karampelas, E. Bringas, E.P. Furlani and I. Ortiz, CFD analysis of particle magnetophoresis in multiphase continuous-flow bioseparators, Biotech, Biomaterials and Biomedical TechConnect Briefs 2017, Vol. 3

15-17   I.H. Karampelas, S. Vader, Z. Vader, V. Sukhotskiy, A. Verma, G. Garg, M. Tong and E.P. Furlani, Drop-on-Demand 3D Metal Printing, Informatics, Electronics and Microsystems TechConnect Briefs 2017, Vol. 4

102-16   J. Brindha, RA.G. Privita Edwina, P.K. Rajesh and P.Rani, “Influence of rheological properties of protein bio-inks on printability: A simulation and validation study,” Materials Today: Proceedings, vol. 3, no.10, pp. 3285-3295, 2016. doi: 10.1016/j.matpr.2016.10.010

99-16   Ioannis H. Karampelas, Kai Liu, Fatema Alali, and Edward P. Furlani, Plasmonic Nanoframes for Photothermal Energy Conversion, J. Phys. Chem. C, 2016, 120 (13), pp 7256–7264

98-16   Jelena Dinic and Vivek Sharma, Drop formation, pinch-off dynamics and liquid transfer of simple and complex fluidshttp://meetings.aps.org/link/BAPS.2016.MAR.B53.12, APS March Meeting 2016, Volume 61, Number 2, March 14–18, 2016, Baltimore, Maryland

67-16  Vahid Bazargan and Boris Stoeber, Effect of substrate conductivity on the evaporation of small sessile droplets, PHYSICAL REVIEW E 94, 033103 (2016), doi: 10.1103/PhysRevE.94.033103

57-16   Ioannis Karampelas, Computational analysis of pulsed-laser plasmon-enhanced photothermal energy conversion and nanobubble generation in the nanoscale, PhD Dissertation: Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, July 2016

44-16   Takeshi Sawada et al., Prognostic impact of circulating tumor cell detected using a novel fluidic cell microarray chip system in patients with breast cancer, EBioMedicine, Available online 27 July 2016, doi: 10.1016/j.ebiom.2016.07.027.

39-16   Chien-Hsun Wang, Ho-Lin Tsai, Yu-Che Wu and Weng-Sing Hwang, Investigation of molten metal droplet deposition and solidification for 3D printing techniques, IOP Publishing, J. Micromech. Microeng. 26 (2016) 095012 (14pp), doi: 10.1088/0960-1317/26/9/095012, July 8, 2016

30-16   Ioannis H. Karampelas, Kai Liu and Edward P. Furlani, Plasmonic Nanocages as Photothermal Transducers for Nanobubble Cancer Therapy, Nanotech 2016 Conference & Expo, May 22-25, Washington, DC.

29-16   Scott Vader, Zachary Vader, Ioannis H. Karampelas and Edward P. Furlani, Advances in Magnetohydrodynamic Liquid Metal Jet Printing, Nanotech 2016 Conference & Expo, May 22-25, Washington, DC.

02-16  Stephen D. Hoath (Editor), Fundamentals of Inkjet Printing: The Science of Inkjet and Droplets, ISBN: 978-3-527-33785-9, 472 pages, February 2016 (see chapters 2 and 3 for FLOW-3D results)

125-15   J. Berthier, K.A. Brakke, E.P. Furlani, I.H. Karampelas, V. Poher, D. Gosselin, M. Cubinzolles and P. Pouteau, Whole blood spontaneous capillary flow in narrow V-groove microchannels, Sensors and Actuators B: Chemical, 206, pp. 258-267, 2015.

86-15   Yousub Lee and Dave F. Farson, Simulation of transport phenomena and melt pool shape for multiple layer additive manufacturing, J. Laser Appl. 28, 012006 (2016). doi: 10.2351/1.4935711, published online 2015.

77-15   Ho-Lin Tsai, Weng-Sing Hwang, Jhih-Kai Wang, Wen-Chih Peng and Shin-Hau Chen, Fabrication of Microdots Using Piezoelectric Dispensing Technique for Viscous Fluids, Materials 2015, 8(10), 7006-7016. doi: 10.3390/ma8105355

63-15   Scott Vader, Zachary Vader, Ioannis H. Karampelas and Edward P. Furlani, Magnetohydrodynamic Liquid Metal Jet Printing, TechConnect World Innovation Conference & Expo, Washington, D.C., June 14-17, 2015

46-15   Adwaith Gupta, 3D Printing Multi-Material, Single Printhead Simulation, Advanced Qualification of Additive Manufacturing Materials Workshop, July 20 – 21, 2015, Santa Fe, NM

28-15   Yongqiang Li, Mingzhu Hu, Ling Liu, Yin-Yin Su, Li Duan, and Qi Kang, Study of Capillary Driven Flow in an Interior Corner of Rounded Wall Under MicrogravityMicrogravity Science and Technology, June 2015

20-15   Pamela J. Waterman, Diversity in Medical Simulation Applications, Desktop Engineering, May 2015, pp 22-26,

16-15   Saurabh Singh, Ann Junghans, Erik Watkins, Yash Kapoor, Ryan Toomey, and Jaroslaw Majewski, Effects of Fluid Shear Stress on Polyelectrolyte Multilayers by Neutron Scattering Studies, © 2015 American Chemical Society, DOI: 10.1021/acs.langmuir.5b00037, Langmuir 2015, 31, 2870−2878, February 17, 2015

11-15   Cheng-Han Wu and Weng-Sing Hwang, The effect of process condition of the ink-jet printing process on the molten metallic droplet formation through the analysis of fluid propagation direction, Canadian Journal of Physics, 2015. doi: 10.1139/cjp-2014-0259

03-15 Hanchul Cho, Sivasubramanian Somu, Jin Young Lee, Hobin Jeong and Ahmed Busnaina, High-Rate Nanoscale Offset Printing Process Using Directed Assembly and Transfer of Nanomaterials, Adv. Materials, doi: 10.1002/adma.201404769, February 2015

122-14  Albert Chi, Sebastian Curi, Kevin Clayton, David Luciano, Kameron Klauber, Alfredo Alexander-Katz, Sebastián D’hers and Noel M Elman, Rapid Reconstitution Packages (RRPs) implemented by integration of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and 3D printed microfluidics, Research Gate, doi: 10.1007/s13346-014-0198-7, July 2014

113-14 Cihan Yilmaz, Arif E. Cetin, Georgia Goutzamanidis, Jun Huang, Sivasubramanian Somu, Hatice Altug, Dongguang Wei and Ahmed Busnaina, Three-Dimensional Crystalline and Homogeneous Metallic Nanostructures Using Directed Assembly of Nanoparticles, 10.1021/nn500084g, © 2014 American Chemical Society, April 2014

110-14 Koushik Ponnuru, Jincheng Wu, Preeti Ashok, Emmanuel S. Tzanakakis and Edward P. Furlani, Analysis of Stem Cell Culture Performance in a Microcarrier Bioreactor System, Nanotech, Washington, D.C., June 15-18, 2014

109-14   Ioannis H. Karampelas, Young Hwa Kim and Edward P. Furlani, Numerical Analysis of Laser Induced Photothermal Effects using Colloidal Plasmonic Nanostructures, Nanotech, Washington, D.C., June 15-18, 2014

108-14   Chenxu Liu, Xiaozheng Xue and Edward P. Furlani, Numerical Analysis of Fully-Coupled Particle-Fluid Transport and Free-Flow Magnetophoretic Sorting in Microfluidic Systems, Nanotech, Washington, D.C., June 15-18, 2014

95-14   Cheng-Han Wu, Weng-Sing Hwang, The effect of the echo-time of a bipolar pulse waveform on molten metallic droplet formation by squeeze mode piezoelectric inkjet printing, Accepted November 2014, Microelectronics Reliability (2014) , © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

85-14   Sudhir Srivastava, Lattice Boltzmann method for contact line dynamics, ISBN: 978-90-386-3608-5, Copyright © 2014 S. Srivastava

61-14   Chenxu Liu, A Computational Model for Predicting Fully-Coupled Particle-Fluid Dynamics and Self-Assembly for Magnetic Particle Applications, Master’s Thesis: State University of New York at Buffalo, 2014, 75 pages; 1561583, http://gradworks.umi.com/15/61/1561583.html

41-14 Albert Chi, Sebastian Curi, Kevin Clayton, David Luciano, Kameron Klauber, Alfredo Alexander-Katz, Sebastian D’hers, and Noel M. Elman, Rapid Reconstitution Packages (RRPs) implemented by integration of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and 3D printed microfluidics, Drug Deliv. and Transl. Res., DOI 10.1007/s13346-014-0198-7, # Controlled Release Society 2014. Available for purchase online at SpringerLink.

21-14  Suk-Hee Park, Ung Hyun Koh, Mina Kim, Dong-Yol Yang, Kahp-Yang Suh and Jennifer Hyunjong Shin, Hierarchical multilayer assembly of an ordered nanofibrous scaffold via thermal fusion bonding, Biofabrication 6 (2014) 024107 (10pp), doi:10.1088/1758-5082/6/2/024107, IOP Publishing, 2014. Available for purchase online at IOP.

17-14   Vahid Bazargan, Effect of substrate cooling and droplet shape and composition on the droplet evaporation and the deposition of particles, Ph.D. Thesis: Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of British Columbia, March 2014, © Vahid Bazargan, 2014

73-13  Oliver G. Harlen, J. Rafael Castrejón-Pita, and Arturo Castrejon-Pita, Asymmetric Detachment from Angled Nozzles Plates in Drop-on Demand Inkjet Printing, NIP & Digital Fabrication Conference, 2013 International Conference on Digital Printing Technologies. Pages 253-549, pp. 277-280(4)

63-13  Fatema Alali, Ioannis H. Karampelas, Young Hwa Kim, and Edward P. Furlani, Photonic and Thermofluidic Analysis of Colloidal Plasmonic Nanorings and Nanotori for Pulsed-Laser Photothermal ApplicationsJ. Phys. Chem. C, Article ASAP, DOI: 10.1021/jp406986y, Copyright © 2013 American Chemical Society, September 2013.

25-13  Sudhir Srivastava, Theo Driessen, Roger Jeurissen, Herma Wijshoff, and Federico Toschi, Lattice Boltzmann Method to Study the Contraction of a Viscous Ligament, International Journal of Modern Physics © World Scientific Publishing Company, May 2013.

11-13  Li-Chieh Hsu, Yong-Jhih Chen, Jia-Huang Liou, Numerical Investigation in the Factors on the Pool Boiling, Applied Mechanics and Materials Vol. 311 (2013) pp 456-461, © (2013) Trans Tech Publications, Switzerland, doi:10.4028/www.scientific.net/AMM.311.456. Available for purchase online at Scientific.Net.

10-13 Pamela J. Waterman, CFD: Shaping the Medical World, Desktop Engineering, April 2013. Full article available online at Desktop Engineering.

90-12 Charles R. Ortloff and Martin Vogel, Spray Cooling Heat Transfer- Test and CFD Analysis, Electronics Cooling, June 2012. Available online at Electronics Cooling.

79-12    Daniel Parsaoran Siregar, Numerical simulation of evaporation and absorption of inkjet printed droplets, Ph.D. Thesis: Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, September 18, 2012, Copyright 2012 by D.P. Siregar, ISBN: 978-90-386-3190-5.

71-12   Jong-hyeon Chang, Kyu-Dong Jung, Eunsung Lee, Minseog Choi, Seungwan Lee, and Woonbae Kim, Varifocal liquid lens based on microelectrofluidic technology, Optics Letters, Vol. 37, Issue 21, pp. 4377-4379 (2012) http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OL.37.004377

70-12   Jong-hyeon Chang, Kyu-Dong Jung, Eunsung Lee, Minseog Choi, and Seunwan Lee, Microelectrofluidic Iris for Variable ApertureProc. SPIE 8252, MOEMS and Miniaturized Systems XI, 82520O (February 9, 2012); doi:10.1117/12.906587

69-12   Jong-hyeon Chang, Eunsung Lee, Kyu-Dong Jung, Seungwan Lee, Minseog Choi, and  Woonbae Kim, Microelectrofluidic Lens for Variable CurvatureProc. SPIE 8486, Current Developments in Lens Design and Optical Engineering XIII, 84860X (October 11, 2012); doi:10.1117/12.925852.

61-12  Biddut Bhattacharjee, Study of Droplet Splitting in an Electrowetting Based Digital Microfluidic System, Thesis: Doctor of Philosophy in the College of Graduate Studies (Applied Sciences), The University of British Columbia, September 2012, © Biddut Bhattacharjee.

55-12 Hejun Li, Pengyun Wang, Lehua Qi, Hansong Zuo, Songyi Zhong, Xianghui Hou, 3D numerical simulation of successive deposition of uniform molten Al droplets on a moving substrate and experimental validation, Computational Materials Science, Volume 65, December 2012, Pages 291–301. Available for purchase online at SciVerse.

54-12   Edward P. Furlani, Anthony Nunez, Gianmarco Vizzeri, Modeling Fluid Structure-Interactions for Biomechanical Analysis of the Human Eye, Nanotech Conference & Expo, June 18-21, 2012, Santa Clara, CA.

53-12   Xinyun Wu, Richard D. Oleschuk and Natalie M. Cann, Characterization of microstructured fibre emitters in pursuit of improved nano electrospray ionization performance, The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012, http://pubs.rsc.org, DOI: 10.1039/c2an35249d, May 2012

25-12    Edward P. Furlani, Ioannis H. Karampelas and Qian Xie, Analysis of Pulsed Laser Plasmon-assisted Photothermal Heating and Bubble Generation at the Nanoscale, Lab on a Chip, 10.1039/C2LC40495H, Received 01 May 2012, Accepted 07 Jun 2012. First published on the web 13 Jun 2012.

22-12  R.A. Sultanov, D. Guster, Numerical Modeling and Simulations of Pulsatile Human Blood Flow in Different 3D-Geometries, Book chapter #21 in Fluid Dynamics, Computational Modeling and Applications (2012), ISBN: 978-953-51-0052-2, p. 475 [18 pages]. Available online at INTECH.

21-12  Guo-Wei Huang, Tzu-Yi Hung, and Chin-Tai Chen, Design, Simulation, and Verification of Fluidic Light-Guide Chips with Various Geometries of Micro Polymer Channels, NEMS 2012, Kyoto, Japan, March 5-8, 2012. Available for purchase online at IEEE.

103-11   Suk-Hee Park, Development of Three-Dimensional Scaffolds containing Electrospun Nanofibers and their Applications to Tissue Regeneration, Ph.D. Thesis: School of Mechanical, Aersospace and Systems Engineering, Division of Mechanical Engineering, KAIST, 2011.

81-11   Xinyun Wu, Modeling and Characterization of Microfabricated Emitters-In Pursuit of Improved ESI-MS Performance, thesis: Department of Chemistry, Queen’s University, December 2011, Copyright © Xinyun Wu, 2011

79-11  Cong Lu, A Cell Preparation Stage for Automatic Cell Injection, thesis: Graduate Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, Copyright © Cong Lu, 2011

77-11 Ge Bai, W. Thomas Leach, Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) insights into agitation stress methods in biopharmaceutical development, International Journal of Pharmaceutics, Available online 8 December 2011, ISSN 0378-5173, 10.1016/j.ijpharm.2011.11.044. Available online at SciVerse.

72-11  M.R. Barkhudarov, C.W. Hirt, D. Milano, and G. Wei, Comments on a Comparison of CFD Software for Microfluidic Applications, Flow Science Technical Note #93, FSI-11-TN93, December 2011

45-11  Chang-Wei Kang, Jiak Kwang Tan, Lunsheng Pan, Cheng Yee Low and Ahmed Jaffar, Numerical and experimental investigations of splat geometric characteristics during oblique impact of plasma spraying, Applied Surface Science, In Press, Corrected Proof, Available online 20 July 2011, ISSN 0169-4332, DOI: 10.1016/j.apsusc.2011.06.081. Available to purchase online at SciVers

33-11  Edward P. Furlani, Mark T. Swihart, Natalia Litchinitser, Christopher N. Delametter and Melissa Carter, Modeling Nanoscale Plasmon-assisted Bubble Nucleation and Applications, Nanotech Conference and Expo 2011, Boston, MA, June 13-16, 2011

32-11  Lu, Cong and Mills, James K., Three cell separation design for realizing automatic cell injection, Complex Medical Engineering (CME), 2011 IEEE/ICME, pp: 599 – 603, Harbin, China, 10.1109/ICCME.2011.5876811, June 2011. Available online at IEEEXplore.

25-11 Issam M. Bahadur, James K. Mills, Fluidic vacuum-based biological cell holding device with piezoelectrically induced vibration, Complex Medical Engineering (CME), 2011 IEEE/ICME International Conference on, 22-25 May 2011, pp: 85 – 90, Harbin, China. Available online at: IEEE Xplore.

14-11  Edward P. Furlani, Roshni Biswas, Alexander N. Cartwright and Natalia M. Litchinitser, Antiresonant guiding optofluidic biosensor, doi:10.1016/j.optcom.2011.04.014, Optics Communication, April 2011

05-11 Hyeju Eom and Keun Park, Integrated numerical analysis to evaluate replication characteristics of micro channels in a locally heated mold by selective induction, International Journal of Precision Engineering and Manufacturing, Volume 12, Number 1, 53-60, DOI: 10.1007/s12541-011-0007-x, 2011. Available online at: SpringerLink.

70-10  I.N. Volnov, V.S. Nagornyi, Modeling Processes for Generation of Streams of Monodispersed Fluid Droplets in Electro-inkjet Applications, Science and Technology News, St. Petersburg State Polytechnic University, 4, pp 294-300, 2010. In Russian.

62-10  F. Mobadersani, M. Eskandarzade, S. Azizi and S. Abbasnezhad, Effect of Ambient Pressure on Bubble Growth in Micro-Channel and Its Pumping Effect, ESDA2010-24436, pp. 577-584, doi:10.1115/ESDA2010-24436, ASME 2010 10th Biennial Conference on Engineering Systems Design and Analysis (ESDA2010), Istanbul, Turkey, July 12–14, 2010. Available online at the ASME Digital Library.

58-10 Tsung-Yi Ho, Jun Zeng, and Chakrabarty, K, Digital microfluidic biochips: A vision for functional diversity and more than moore, Computer-Aided Design (ICCAD), 2010 IEEE/ACM International Conference on, DOI: 10.1109/ICCAD.2010.5654199, © IEEE, November 2010. Available online at IEEE Explore.

51-10  Regina Bleul, Marion Ritzi-Lehnert, Julian Höth, Nico Scharpfenecker, Ines Frese, Dominik Düchs, Sabine Brunklaus, Thomas E. Hansen-Hagge, Franz-Josef Meyer-Almes, Klaus S. Drese, Compact, cost-efficient microfluidics-based stopped-flow device, Anal Bioanal Chem, DOI 10.1007/s00216-010-4446-5, Available online at Springer, November 2010

22-10    Krishendu Chakrabarty, Richard B. Fair and Jun Zeng, Design Tools for Digital Microfluidic Biochips Toward Functional Diversification and More than Moore, IEEE Transactions on Computer-Aided Design of Integrated Circuits and Systems, Vol. 29, No. 7, July 2010

14-10 E. P. Furlani and M. S. Hanchak, Nonlinear analysis of the deformation and breakup of viscous microjets using the method of lines, International Journal for Numerical Methods in Fluids (2010), © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., Published online in Wiley InterScience. DOI: 10.1002/fld.2205

55-09 R.A. Sultanov, and D. Guster, Computer simulations of  pulsatile human blood flow through 3D models of the human aortic arch, vessels of simple geometry and a bifurcated artery, Proceedings of the 31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE EMBS (Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society), Minneapolis, September 2-6, 2009, p.p. 4704-4710.

30-09 Anurag Chandorkar and Shayan Palit, Simulation of Droplet Dynamics and Mixing in Microfluidic Devices using a VOF-Based Method, Sensors & Transducers journal, ISSN 1726-5479 © 2009 by IFSA, Vol.7, Special Issue “MEMS: From Micro Devices to Wireless Systems,” October 2009, pp. 136-149.

13-09 E.P. Furlani, M.C. Carter, Analysis of an Electrostatically Actuated MEMS Drop Ejector, Presented at Nanotech Conference & Expo 2009, Houston, Texas, USA, May 3-7, 2009

12-09 A. Chandorkar, S. Palit, Simulation of Droplet-Based Microfluidics Devices Using a Volume-of-Fluid Approach, Presented at Nanotech Conference & Expo 2009, Houston, Texas, USA, May 3-7, 2009

3-09 Christopher N. Delametter, FLOW-3D Speeds MEMS Inkjet Development, Desktop Engineering, January 2009

42-08  Tien-Li Chang, Jung-Chang Wang, Chun-Chi Chen, Ya-Wei Lee, Ta-Hsin Chou, A non-fluorine mold release agent for Ni stamp in nanoimprint process, Microelectronic Engineering 85 (2008) 1608–1612

26-08 Pamela J. Waterman, First-Pass CFD Analyses – Part 2, Desktop Engineering, November 2008

09-08 M. Ren and H. Wijshoff, Thermal effect on the penetration of an ink droplet onto a porous medium, Proc. Eurotherm2008 MNH, 1 (2008)

04-08 Delametter, Christopher N., MEMS development in less than half the time, Small Times, Online Edition, May 2008

02-08 Renat A. Sultanov, Dennis Guster, Brent Engelbrekt and Richard Blankenbecler, 3D Computer Simulations of Pulsatile Human Blood Flows in Vessels and in the Aortic Arch – Investigation of Non-Newtonian Characteristics of Human Blood, The Journal of Computational Physics, arXiv:0802.2362v1 [physics.comp-ph], February 2008

01-08 Herman Wijshoff, thesis: University of Twente, Structure- and fluid dynamics in piezo inkjet printheads, ISBN 978-90-365-2582-4, Venlo, The Netherlands January 2008.

30-07 A. K. Sen, J. Darabi, and D. R. Knapp, Simulation and parametric study of a novel multi-spray emitter for ESI–MS applications, Microfluidics and Nanofluidics, Volume 3, Number 3, June 2007, pp. 283-298(16)

28-07 Dan Soltman and Vivek Subramanian, Inkjet-Printed Line Morphologies and Temperature Control of the Coffee Ring Effect, Langmuir; 2008; ASAP Web Release Date: 16-Jan-2008; (Research Article) DOI: 10.1021/la7026847

23-07 A K Sen and J Darabi, Droplet ejection performance of a monolithic thermal inkjet print head, Journal of Micromechanical and Microengineering,vol.17, pp.1420-1427 (2007) doi:10.1088/0960-1317/17/8/002; Abstract only.

18-07 Herman Wisjhoff, Better Printheads Via Simulation, Desktop Engineering, October 2007, Vol. 13, Issue 2

17-07 Jos de Jong, Ph.D. Thesis: University of Twente, Air entrapment in piezo inkjet printing, ISBN 978-90-365-2483-4, April 2007

15-07 Krishnendu Chakrabarty and Jun Zeng, (Ed.), Design Automation Methods and Tools for Microfluidics-Based Biochips, Springer, September 2006.

14-07 Fei Su and Jun Zeng, Computer-aided design and test for digital microfluidics, IEEE Design & Test of Computers, 24(1), 2007, 60-70.

13-07 Jun Zeng, Modeling and simulation of electrified droplets and its application to computer-aided design of digital microfluidics, IEEE Transactions on Computer-Aided Design of Integrated Circuits and Systems, 25(2), 2006, 224-233.

12-07 Krishnendu Chakrabarty and Jun Zeng, (2005), Automated top-down design for microfluidic biochips, ACM Journal on Emerging Technologies in Computing Systems, 1(3), 2005, 186–223.

01-07 Wijshoff, Herman, Drop formation mechanisms in piezo-acoustic inkjet, NSTI-Nanotech 2007, ISBN 1420061844 Vol. 3, 2007)

23-06 John J. Uebbing, Stephan Hengstler, Dale Schroeder, Shalini Venkatesh, and Rick Haven, Heat and Fluid Flow in an Optical Switch Bubble, Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems, Vol. 15, No. 6, December 2006

21-06 Wijshoff, Herman, Manipulating Drop Formation in Piezo Acoustic Inkjet, Proc. IS&T’s NIP22, 79 (2006)

20-06 J. de Jong, H. Reinten, M. van den Berg, H. Wijshoff, M. Versluis, G. de Bruin, A. Prosperetti and D. Lohse, Air entrapment in piezo-driven inkjet printheads, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 120(3), 1257 (2006)

11-06 A. K. Sen, J. Darabi, D. R. Knapp and J. Liu, Modeling and Characterization of a Carbon Fiber Emitter for Electrospray Ionization, 1 MEMS and Microsystems Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of South Carolina, 300 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29208, USA, 2 Department of Pharmacology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC

5-06 E. P. Furlani, B. G. Price, G. Hawkins, and A. G. Lopez, Thermally Induced Marangoni Instability of Liquid Microjets with Application to Continuous Inkjet Printing, Proceedings of NSTI Nanotech Conference 2006, Vol. 2, pp 534-537.

28-05 O B Fawehinmi, P H Gaskell, P K Jimack, N Kapur, and H M Thompson, A combined experimental and computational fluid dynamics analysis of the dynamics of drop formation, May 2005. DOI: 10.1243/095440605X31788

5-05 E. P. Furlani, Thermal Modulation and Instability of Newtonian Liquid Microjets, presented at Nanotech 2005, Anaheim, CA, May 8-12, 2005.

1-05 C.W. Hirt, Electro-Hydrodynamics of Semi-Conductive Fluids: With Application to Electro-Spraying, Flow Science Technical Note #70, FSI-05-TN70

19-04 G. F. Yao, Modeling of Electroosmosis Without Resolving Physics Inside a Electric Double Layer, Flow Science Technical Note (FSI-04-TN69)

12-04 Jun Zeng and Tom Korsmeyer, Principles of Droplet Electrohydrodynamics for Lab-on-a-Chip, Lab. Chip. Journal, 2004, 4(4), 265-277

9-04 Constantine N. Anagnostopoulos, James M. Chwalek, Christopher N. Delametter, Gilbert A. Hawkins, David L. Jeanmaire, John A. Lebens, Ali Lopez, and David P. Trauernicht, Micro-Jet Nozzle Array for Precise Droplet Metering and Steering Having Increased Droplet Deflection, Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Solid State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems, sponsored by IEEE, Boston, June 8-12, 2003, pp. 368-71

8-04 Christopher N. Delametter, David P. Trauernicht, James M. Chwalek, Novel Microfluidic Jet Deflection – Significant Modeling Challenge with Great Application Potential, Technical Proceedings of the 2002 International Conference on Modeling and Simulation of Microsystems sponsored by NSTI, San Juan, Puerto Rico, April 21-25, 2002, pp. 44-47

6-04 D. Vadillo*, G. Desie**, A Soucemarianadin*, Spreading Behavior of Single and Multiple Drops, *Laboratoire des Ecoulements Geophysiques et Industriels (LEGI), and **AGFA-Gevaert Group N.V., XXI ICTAM, 15-21 August 2004, Warsaw, Poland

2-04 Herman Wijshoff, Free Surface Flow and Acousto-Elastic Interaction in Piezo Inkjet, Nanotech 2004, sponsored by the Nano Science & Technology Institute, Boston, MA, March 2004

30-03 D Souders, I Khan and GF Yao, Alessandro Incognito, and Matteo Corrado, A Numerical Model for Simulation of Combined Electroosmotic and Pressure Driven Flow in Microdevices, 7th International Symposium on Fluid Control, Measurement and Visualization

27-03 Jun Zeng, Daniel Sobek and Tom Korsmeyer, Electro-Hydrodynamic Modeling of Electrospray Ionization – CAD for a µFluidic Device-Mass Spectrometer Interface, Agilent Technologies Inc, paper presented at Transducers 2003, June 03 Boston (note: Reference #10 is to FLOW-3D)

17-03 John Uebbing, Switching Fiber-optic Circuits with Microscopic Bubbles, Sensors Magazine, May 2003, Vol 20, No 5, p 36-42

16-03 CFD Speeds Development of MEMS-based Printing Technology, MicroNano Magazine, June 2003, Vol 8, No 6, p 16

3-03 Simulation Speeds Design of Microfluidic Medical Devices, R&D Magazine, March 2003, pp 18-19

1-03 Simulations Help Microscopic Bubbles Switch Fiber-Optic Circuits, Agilent Technologies, Fiberoptic Product News, January 2003, pp 22-23

27-02 Feng, James Q., A General Fluid Dynamic Analysis of Drop Ejection in Drop-on-Demand Ink Jet Devices, Journal of Imaging Science and Technology®, Volume 46, Number 5, September/October 2002

1-02 Feixia Pan, Joel Kubby, and Jingkuang Chen, Numerical Simulation of Fluid Structure Interaction in a MEMS Diaphragm Drop Ejector, Xerox Wilson Research Center, Institute of Physics Publishing, Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering, 12 (2002), PII: SO960-1317(02)27439-2, pp. 70-76

48-01   Rainer Gruber, Radial Mass Transfer Enhancement in Bubble-Train Flow, PhD thesis in Engineering Sciences, Rheinisch- Westf alischen Technische Hochschule Aachen, December 2001.

34-01 Furlani, E.P., Delametter, C.N., Chwalek, J.M., and Trauernicht, D., Surface Tension Induced Instability of Viscous Liquid Jets, Fourth International Conference on Modeling and Simulation of Microsystems, April 2001

12-01 C. N. Delametter, Eastman Kodak Company, Micro Resolution, Mechanical Engineering, Col 123/No 7, July 2001, pp 70-72

11-01 C. N. Delametter, Eastman Kodak Company, Surface Tension Induced Instability of Viscous Liquid Jets, Technical Proceeding of the Fourth International Conference on Modeling and Simulation of Microsystems, April 2001

9-01 Aman Khan, Unipath Limited Research and Development, Effects of Reynolds Number on Surface Rolling in Small Drops, PVP-Col 431, Emerging Technologies for Fluids, Structures and Fluids, Structures and Fluid Structure Interaction — 2001

2-00 Narayan V. Deshpande, Significance of Inertance and Resistance in Fluidics of Thermal Ink-Jet Transducers, Journal of Imaging Science and Technology, Volume 40, Number 5, Sept./Oct. 1996, pp.457-461

4-98 D. Deitz, Connecting the Dots with CFD, Mechanical Engineering Magazine, pp. 90-91, March 1998

14-94 M. P. O’Hare, N. V. Deshpande, and D. J. Drake, Drop Generation Processes in TIJ Printheads, Xerox Corporation, Adv. Imaging Business Unit, IS&T’s Tenth International Congress on Advances in Non-Impact Printing, Tech. 1994

14-92 Asai, A.,Three-Dimensional Calculation of Bubble Growth and Drop Ejection in a Bubble Jet Printer, Journal of Fluids Engineering Vol. 114 December 1992:638-641

Contact Line Insights

Contact Line Insights

FLOW-3D의 수치 모델링 기능은 코팅 성능 향상에 관심이 있는 엔지니어에게 이상적입니다. 계산 시뮬레이션은 코팅 흐름에 영향을 미치는 다양한 물리적 공정의 상대적 중요성과 효과를 연구하는 훌륭한 방법입니다. 물리적 테스트에서 프로세스를 분리하거나 해당 프로세스의 규모를 임의로 조정하는 것이 항상 가능한 것은 아닙니다. 이 섹션에서는 리 블릿 형성(rivulet formation), 핑거링(fingering), 증발, 거친 표면 위의 접촉선 이동 및 유체 흡수와 관련하여 FLOW-3D의 정적 및 동적 접촉각 처리에 대해 설명합니다.

Static and Dynamic Contact Angles

FLOW-3D는 입력으로 설정된 정적 접촉각의 함수로 동적 접촉각과 자유 표면 인터페이스에서 작용하는 관련 힘을 정확하게 계산하여 유체의 소수성을 캡처 할 수 있습니다. 아래 시뮬레이션은 물방울이 경사면 아래로 이동함에 따라 정적 접촉각이 동적 접촉각에 미치는 영향을 보여줍니다.

L.M. Hocking 박사는 그의 저서 [“A moving fluid interface on a rough surface,” J. Fluid Mech., 76, 801, (1976)]에서 표면에 미세한 요철이 흐름 구조를 유도하기 때문에 Contact line이 고체 표면을 통해 이동할 수 있으며 이는 거시적 관점에서 “velocity slip”로 해석 될 수 있다고 했습니다.

이 가설에 대한 전산 해석은 FLOW-3D를 이용하여 쉽게 수행됩니다. 선택된 테스트는 가로, 규칙적으로 이격 된 직사각형 슬롯 패턴 이차원 고체 표면 구성됩니다. 슬롯은 2mm 깊이 10mm 폭, 그리고 그들 사이 폭 10mm 고체 조각을 갖고 이격 됩니다. 이 크기는 전형적으로 상대적으로 부드러운 표면에 긁힌 모양입니다. 액체와 고체 사이의 정적인 접촉각이 60 °가 되도록 선택 하였습니다. 작동 유체는 물로 선정되었고 시험은 채널을 통해 속도30cm / s의 평균 물높이 15mm의 채널의 바닥에 있는 거친 표면을 두고 구동 이루어져 있습니다. 채널의 상단은 free-slip boundary로 정해집니다.

Hocking의 주장대로 micro-scale 교란이 Large scale 관점에서 보았을 때 계산된 속도장으로 보면 velocity slip의 한 종류로서 해석 될 수 있습니다. 아래는 계산된 수평 속도 분포를 나타내고 있습니다. 이것은 표면 바로 위에 제어 볼륨 층의 계산 된 수평 속도 분포를 제공하는 X-Y 플롯에 그래픽으로 보여 주고 있습니다. 격자 미세화에 의해 표면의 고체 부분의 윗쪽 속도가 영이 되는 경향이 있지만, 슬롯들 위에 있는 속도는 영이 안되게 유지됩니다. 많은 요철 위의 이러한 속도의 평균은 효과적인 슬립으로 해석 될 수 있는 non-zero 수평 이송 속도를 일으킵니다.

Evaporative Effects

분산된 고체 물질을 포함하는 액체 방울이 고체 표면에서 건조되면 고체 물질이 침전물로 남습니다. 이 퇴적물의 패턴은 많은 인쇄, 청소 및 코팅 공정에 중요한 의미를 갖습니다. 한 가지 유형의 침전물의 전형적인 예는 왼쪽 이미지와 같이 유출 된 커피 조각의 둘레를 따라 링 얼룩이 형성되는 “커피 링”문제입니다. 이러한 유형의 링 침전물은 액체의 증발로 인한 표면 장력 구동 흐름의 결과로 발생하며, 특히 방울 주변에서 발생합니다 [1].

Drying

건조는 코팅 공정의 중요한 부분입니다. 잘 도포된 코팅은 건조 결함으로 인해 완전히 손상될 수 있습니다. 건조 중에 온도 및 용질 구배는 밀도 및 표면 장력 구배로 인해 코팅 내 흐름을 유도 할 수 있으며, 이로 인해 잠재적으로 코팅 품질이 손상 될 수 있습니다. FLOW-3D의 증발 잔류물 모델을 통해 사용자는 건조로 인한 흐름을 시뮬레이션하고 값 비싼 물리적 실험에 소요되는 시간을 줄일 수 있습니다.

FLOW-3D’s evaporation residue model simulates a 3D view of residue formed from toluene after drying (magnified 30x)

Modeling Ring Formation

FLOW-3D는 증발이 가장 큰 접촉 라인에서의 증착으로 인해 에지 고정이 발생 함을 보여줍니다.

링 형성 모델링
증발에 의해 접촉 라인에서 생성 된 흐름 시뮬레이션
증발은 증발로 인한 열 손실로 인해 액체를 냉각시킵니다 (색상은 온도를 나타냄). 동시에 고체 표면은 전도에 의해 액체를 가열합니다. 증발은 접촉 라인 근처에서 가장 크므로 액체가 접촉 라인을 향해 흐르게하여 정적 상태를 다시 설정합니다. 최종 결과는 액체가 완전히 증발하는 액체 가장자리에 부유 고체가 증착됩니다.

FLOW-3D의 접촉 선 고정 모델에 대해 자세히 알아보십시오.

Simulation of flow generated at a contact line by evaporation

Dip Coating

Dip Coating

딥 코팅은 코팅 재료가 들어있는 탱크에 기판을 담그고 탱크에서 조각을 제거하여 배수하는 것입니다. 이와 같은 일시적인 코팅 문제는 고정 메쉬 내에서 유체의 움직임이 결정되기 때문에 FLOW-3D를 사용하여 간단하고 효율적으로 해결할 수 있습니다 (메쉬를 따르는 유체의 움직임이 아님). 

이 3D 시뮬레이션은 증발이 수반되는 딥 코팅 공정을 보여줍니다. 습식 필름은 용액에서 작은 개별 기판을 제거하여 증착됩니다. 모델은 추가적으로 용매의 증발을 설명합니다. 이는 필름 증착 중에 증발이 유체 역학과 겹치는 휘발성 용매의 경우와 관련이 있습니다. 잔류 물 모델은 코팅 된 건조 필름의 프로파일을 계산하는 고유 한 기능을 제공합니다. “가장자리 효과”의 정확한 평가를 통해 엔지니어는 최종 박막 형상 및 균질성에 대한 공정 매개 변수 또는 유체 특성의 영향을 분석 할 수 있습니다.

Dr. Julien Boeuf of Roche Diagnostics GmbH. 제공.

딥 코팅 공정에 대한 프레젠테이션은 Roche Diagnostics GmbH의 Julien Boeuf 박사의 2013 Conference Proceedings, “Model of dip coating with concomitant evaporation,”에서 확인할 수 있습니다.

FLOW-3D/MP Features List

FLOW-3D/MP Features

FLOW-3D/MP v6.1 은 FLOW-3D v11.1 솔버에 기초하여 물리 모델, 특징 및 그래픽 사용자 인터페이스가 동일합니다. FLOW-3D v11.1의 새로운 기능은 아래 파란색으로 표시되어 있으며 FLOW-3D/MP v6.1 에서 사용할 수 있습니다. 새로운 개발 기능에 대한 자세한 설명은 FLOW-3D v11.1에서 새로운 기능을 참조하십시오.

Meshing & Geometry

  • Structured finite difference/control volume meshes for fluid and thermal solutions
  • Finite element meshes in Cartesian and cylindrical coordinates for structural analysis
  • Multi-Block gridding with nested, linked, partially overlapping and conforming mesh blocks
  • Fractional areas/volumes (FAVOR™) for efficient & accurate geometry definition
  • Mesh quality checking
  • Basic Solids Modeler
  • Import CAD data
  • Import/export finite element meshes via Exodus-II file format
  • Grid & geometry independence
  • Cartesian or cylindrical coordinates
Flow Type Options
  • Internal, external & free-surface flows
  • 3D, 2D & 1D problems
  • Transient flows
  • Inviscid, viscous laminar & turbulent flows
  • Hybrid shallow water/3D flows
  • Non-inertial reference frame motion
  • Multiple scalar species
  • Two-phase flows
  • Heat transfer with phase change
  • Saturated & unsaturated porous media
Physical Modeling Options
  • Fluid structure interaction
  • Thermally-induced stresses
  • Plastic deformation of solids
  • Granular flow
  • Moisture drying
  • Solid solute dissolution
  • Sediment transport and scour
  • Cavitation (potential, passive tracking, active tracking)
  • Phase change (liquid-vapor, liquid-solid)
  • Surface tension
  • Thermocapillary effects
  • Wall adhesion
  • Wall roughness
  • Vapor & gas bubbles
  • Solidification & melting
  • Mass/momentum/energy sources
  • Shear, density & temperature-dependent viscosity
  • Thixotropic viscosity
  • Visco-elastic-plastic fluids
  • Elastic membranes & walls
  • Evaporation residue
  • Electro-mechanical effects
  • Dielectric phenomena
  • Electro-osmosis
  • Electrostatic particles
  • Joule heating
  • Air entrainment
  • Molecular & turbulent diffusion
  • Temperature-dependent material properties
  • Spray cooling
Flow Definition Options
  • General boundary conditions
    • Symmetry
    • Rigid and flexible walls
    • Continuative
    • Periodic
    • Specified pressure
    • Specified velocity
    • Outflow
    • Grid overlay
    • Hydrostatic pressure
    • Volume flow rate
    • Non-linear periodic and solitary surface waves
    • Rating curve and natural hydraulics
    • Wave absorbing layer
  • Restart from previous simulation
  • Continuation of a simulation
  • Overlay boundary conditions
  • Change mesh and modeling options
  • Change model parameters
Thermal Modeling Options
  • Natural convection
  • Forced convection
  • Conduction in fluid & solid
  • Fluid-solid heat transfer
  • Distributed energy sources/sinks in fluids and solids
  • Radiation
  • Viscous heating
  • Orthotropic thermal conductivity
  • Thermally-induced stresses
Turbulence Models
  • RNG model
  • Two-equation k-epsilon model
  • Two-equation k-omega model
  • Large eddy simulation
Metal Casting Models
  • Thermal stress & deformations
  • Iron solidification
  • Sand core blowing
  • Sand core drying
  • Permeable molds
  • Solidification & melting
  • Solidification shrinkage with interdendritic feeding
  • Micro & macro porosity
  • Binary alloy segregation
  • Thermal die cycling
  • Surface oxide defects
  • Cavitation potential
  • Lost-foam casting
  • Semi-solid material
  • Core gas generation
  • Back pressure & vents
  • Shot sleeves
  • PQ2 diagram
  • Squeeze pins
  • Filters
  • Air entrainment
  • Temperature-dependent material properties
  • Cooling channels
  • Fluid/wall contact time
Numerical Modeling Options
  • TruVOF Volume-of-Fluid (VOF) method for fluid interfaces
  • First and second order advection
  • Sharp and diffuse interface tracking
  • Implicit & explicit numerical methods
  • GMRES, point and line relaxation pressure solvers
  • User-defined variables, subroutines & output
  • Utilities for runtime interaction during execution
Fluid Modeling Options
  • One incompressible fluid – confined or with free surfaces
  • Two incompressible fluids – miscible or with sharp interfaces
  • Compressible fluid – subsonic, transonic, supersonic
  • Stratified fluid
  • Acoustic phenomena
  • Mass particles with variable density or diameter
Shallow Flow Models
  • General topography
  • Raster data interface
  • Subcomponent-specific surface roughness
  • Wind shear
  • Ground roughness effects
  • Laminar & turbulent flow
  • Sediment transport and scour
  • Surface tension
  • Heat transfer
  • Wetting & drying
Advanced Physical Models
  • General Moving Object model with 6 DOF–prescribed and fully-coupled motion
  • Rotating/spinning objects
  • Collision model
  • Tethered moving objects (springs, ropes, mooring lines)
  • Flexing membranes and walls
  • Porosity
  • Finite element based elastic-plastic deformation
  • Finite element based thermal stress evolution due to thermal changes in a solidifying fluid
  • Combusting solid components
Chemistry Models
  • Stiff equation solver for chemical rate equations
  • Stationary or advected species
Porous Media Models
  • Saturated and unsaturated flow
  • Variable porosity
  • Directional porosity
  • General flow losses (linear & quadratic)
  • Capillary pressure
  • Heat transfer in porous media
  • Van Genunchten model for unsaturated flow
Discrete Particle Models
  • Massless marker particles
  • Mass particles of variable size/mass
  • Linear & quadratic fluid-dynamic drag
  • Monte-Carlo diffusion
  • Particle-Fluid momentum coupling
  • Coefficient of restitution or sticky particles
  • Point or volumetric particle sources
  • Charged particles
  • Probe particles
Two-Phase & Two-Component Models
  • Liquid/liquid & gas/liquid interfaces
  • Variable density mixtures
  • Compressible fluid with a dispersed incompressible component
  • Drift flux
  • Two-component, vapor/non-condensable gases
  • Phase transformations for gas-liquid & liquid-solid
  • Adiabatic bubbles
  • Bubbles with phase change
  • Continuum fluid with discrete particles
  • Scalar transport
  • Homogeneous bubbles
  • Super-cooling
Coupling with Other Programs
  • Geometry input from Stereolithography (STL) files – binary or ASCII
  • Direct interfaces with EnSight®, FieldView® & Tecplot® visualization software
  • Finite element solution import/export via Exodus-II file format
  • PLOT3D output
  • Neutral file output
  • Extensive customization possibilities
  • Solid Properties Materials Database
Data Processing Options
  • State-of-the-art post-processing tool, FlowSight™
  • Batch post-processing
  • Report generation
  • Automatic or custom results analysis
  • High-quality OpenGL-based graphics
  • Color or B/W vector, contour, 3D surface & particle plots
  • Moving and stationary probes
  • Measurement baffles
  • Arbitrary sampling volumes
  • Force & moment output
  • Animation output
  • PostScript, JPEG & Bitmap output
  • Streamlines
  • Flow tracers
User Conveniences
  • Active simulation control (based on measurement of probes)
  • Mesh generators
  • Mesh quality checking
  • Tabular time-dependent input using external files
  • Automatic time-step control for accuracy & stability
  • Automatic convergence control
  • Mentor help to optimize efficiency
  • Change simulation parameters while solver runs
  • Launch and manage multiple simulations
  • Automatic simulation termination based on user-defined criteria
  • Run simulation on remote servers using remote solving
Multi-Processor Computing

FLOW-3D Features

The features in blue are newly-released in FLOW-3D v12.0.

Meshing & Geometry

  • Structured finite difference/control volume meshes for fluid and thermal solutions
  • Finite element meshes in Cartesian and cylindrical coordinates for structural analysis
  • Multi-Block gridding with nested, linked, partially overlapping and conforming mesh blocks
  • Conforming meshes extended to arbitrary shapes
  • Fractional areas/volumes (FAVOR™) for efficient & accurate geometry definition
  • Closing gaps in geometry
  • Mesh quality checking
  • Basic Solids Modeler
  • Import CAD data
  • Import/export finite element meshes via Exodus-II file format
  • Grid & geometry independence
  • Cartesian or cylindrical coordinates

Flow Type Options

  • Internal, external & free-surface flows
  • 3D, 2D & 1D problems
  • Transient flows
  • Inviscid, viscous laminar & turbulent flows
  • Hybrid shallow water/3D flows
  • Non-inertial reference frame motion
  • Multiple scalar species
  • Two-phase flows
  • Heat transfer with phase change
  • Saturated & unsaturated porous media

Physical Modeling Options

  • Fluid structure interaction
  • Thermally-induced stresses
  • Plastic deformation of solids
  • Granular flow
  • Moisture drying
  • Solid solute dissolution
  • Sediment transport and scour
  • Sludge settling
  • Cavitation (potential, passive tracking, active tracking)
  • Phase change (liquid-vapor, liquid-solid)
  • Surface tension
  • Thermocapillary effects
  • Wall adhesion
  • Wall roughness
  • Vapor & gas bubbles
  • Solidification & melting
  • Mass/momentum/energy sources
  • Shear, density & temperature-dependent viscosity
  • Thixotropic viscosity
  • Visco-elastic-plastic fluids
  • Elastic membranes & walls
  • Evaporation residue
  • Electro-mechanical effects
  • Dielectric phenomena
  • Electro-osmosis
  • Electrostatic particles
  • Joule heating
  • Air entrainment
  • Molecular & turbulent diffusion
  • Temperature-dependent material properties
  • Spray cooling

Flow Definition Options

  • General boundary conditions
    • Symmetry
    • Rigid and flexible walls
    • Continuative
    • Periodic
    • Specified pressure
    • Specified velocity
    • Outflow
    • Outflow pressure
    • Outflow boundaries with wave absorbing layers
    • Grid overlay
    • Hydrostatic pressure
    • Volume flow rate
    • Non-linear periodic and solitary surface waves
    • Rating curve and natural hydraulics
    • Wave absorbing layer
  • Restart from previous simulation
  • Continuation of a simulation
  • Overlay boundary conditions
  • Change mesh and modeling options
  • Change model parameters

Thermal Modeling Options

  • Natural convection
  • Forced convection
  • Conduction in fluid & solid
  • Fluid-solid heat transfer
  • Distributed energy sources/sinks in fluids and solids
  • Radiation
  • Viscous heating
  • Orthotropic thermal conductivity
  • Thermally-induced stresses

Numerical Modeling Options

  • TruVOF Volume-of-Fluid (VOF) method for fluid interfaces
  • Steady state accelerator for free-surface flows
  • First and second order advection
  • Sharp and diffuse interface tracking
  • Implicit & explicit numerical methods
  • Immersed boundary method
  • GMRES, point and line relaxation pressure solvers
  • User-defined variables, subroutines & output
  • Utilities for runtime interaction during execution

Fluid Modeling Options

  • One incompressible fluid – confined or with free surfaces
  • Two incompressible fluids – miscible or with sharp interfaces
  • Compressible fluid – subsonic, transonic, supersonic
  • Stratified fluid
  • Acoustic phenomena
  • Mass particles with variable density or diameter

Shallow Flow Models

  • General topography
  • Raster data interface
  • Subcomponent-specific surface roughness
  • Wind shear
  • Ground roughness effects
  • Manning’s roughness
  • Laminar & turbulent flow
  • Sediment transport and scour
  • Surface tension
  • Heat transfer
  • Wetting & drying

Turbulence Models

  • RNG model
  • Two-equation k-epsilon model
  • Two-equation k-omega model
  • Large eddy simulation

Advanced Physical Models

  • General Moving Object model with 6 DOF–prescribed and fully-coupled motion
  • Rotating/spinning objects
  • Collision model
  • Tethered moving objects (springs, ropes, breaking mooring lines)
  • Flexing membranes and walls
  • Porosity
  • Finite element based elastic-plastic deformation
  • Finite element based thermal stress evolution due to thermal changes in a solidifying fluid
  • Combusting solid components

Chemistry Models

  • Stiff equation solver for chemical rate equations
  • Stationary or advected species

Porous Media Models

  • Saturated and unsaturated flow
  • Variable porosity
  • Directional porosity
  • General flow losses (linear & quadratic)
  • Capillary pressure
  • Heat transfer in porous media
  • Van Genunchten model for unsaturated flow

Discrete Particle Models

  • Massless marker particles
  • Multi-species material particles of variable size and mass
  • Solid, fluid, gas particles
  • Void particles tracking collapsed void regions
  • Non-linear fluid-dynamic drag
  • Added mass effects
  • Monte-Carlo diffusion
  • Particle-fluid momentum coupling
  • Coefficient of restitution or sticky particles
  • Point or volumetric particle sources
  • Initial particle blocks
  • Heat transfer with fluid
  • Evaporation and condensation
  • Solidification and melting
  • Coulomb and dielectric forces
  • Probe particles

Two-Phase & Two-Component Models

  • Liquid/liquid & gas/liquid interfaces
  • Variable density mixtures
  • Compressible fluid with a dispersed incompressible component
  • Drift flux with dynamic droplet size
  • Two-component, vapor/non-condensable gases
  • Phase transformations for gas-liquid & liquid-solid
  • Adiabatic bubbles
  • Bubbles with phase change
  • Continuum fluid with discrete particles
  • Scalar transport
  • Homogeneous bubbles
  • Super-cooling
  • Two-field temperature

Coupling with Other Programs

  • Geometry input from Stereolithography (STL) files – binary or ASCII
  • Direct interfaces with EnSight®, FieldView® & Tecplot® visualization software
  • Finite element solution import/export via Exodus-II file format
  • PLOT3D output
  • Neutral file output
  • Extensive customization possibilities
  • Solid Properties Materials Database

Data Processing Options

  • State-of-the-art post-processing tool, FlowSight™
  • Batch post-processing
  • Report generation
  • Automatic or custom results analysis
  • High-quality OpenGL-based graphics
  • Color or B/W vector, contour, 3D surface & particle plots
  • Moving and stationary probes
  • Visualization of non-inertial reference frame motion
  • Measurement baffles
  • Arbitrary sampling volumes
  • Force & moment output
  • Animation output
  • PostScript, JPEG & Bitmap output
  • Streamlines
  • Flow tracers

User Conveniences

  • Active simulation control (based on measurement of probes)
  • Mesh generators
  • Mesh quality checking
  • Tabular time-dependent input using external files
  • Automatic time-step control for accuracy & stability
  • Automatic convergence control
  • Mentor help to optimize efficiency
  • Units on all variables
  • Custom units
  • Component transformations
  • Moving particle sources
  • Change simulation parameters while solver runs
  • Launch and manage multiple simulations
  • Automatic simulation termination based on user-defined criteria
  • Run simulation on remote servers using remote solving
  • Copy boundary conditions to other mesh blocks

Multi-Processor Computing

  • Shared memory computers
  • Distributed memory clusters

FlowSight

  • Particle visualization
  • Velocity vector fields
  • Streamlines & pathlines
  • Iso-surfaces
  • 2D, 3D and arbitrary clips
  • Volume render
  • Probe data
  • History data
  • Vortex cores
  • Link multiple results
  • Multiple data views
  • Non-inertial reference frame
  • Spline clip

MEMS/WELD 분야

Microfluidics

Microfluidics는 집적 회로 산업에서 사용되는 것과 유사한 공정을 사용하여 소형 기기의 제조에 급격하게 성장하는 기술입니다. Microfluidics 기술은 0.1 미크론에서 1mm에 이르기까지 매우 작은 장치로 기계, 유체, 광학, 전자 기능을 통합 할 수있는 방법을 제공합니다. Microfluidics는 기존의 방법과 비교하면 두 가지 중요한 장점이 있습니다. 첫째, 대량으로 제조 될 수 있으므로, 생산의 비용이 실질적으로 감소 될 수 있습니다. 둘째, 집적 회로에 통합 될 수 있어서 다른 기술보다 훨씬 더 복잡한 시스템으로 제조 될 수 있습니다.

Chip packaging simulation. Results generated by FLOW-3D/MP, FLOW-3D‘s HPC solution.

엔지니어 및 과학자가 설계, 시험 제작하고 그 성능을 최적화하기 위해 장치를 재 설계하는 등, 다른 제조 방법에서와 같이 microfluidics 설계 프로세스는 매우 고가 일 수 있습니다. 그러나, 수치 시뮬레이션은 전자, 기계, 화학, 열 과학 및 유체 과학 등의 분야에 걸쳐 정량 분석과 중요한 통찰력을 제공 할 수 있습니다.

laser-sintering

 

코팅분야

Coating

FLOW-3D는 산업계 및 학계의 코팅 연구원들이 기계 설계 연구, Display 공정개발 및 최적화를 위해 사용했습니다. 미크론 규모의 코팅 물리학을 이해하는 것은 코팅 유체 유변학의 복잡한 특성과 기판 및 Die와의 상호 작용으로 인해 어려울 수 있습니다.

FLOW-3D 는 비용이 많이 드는 실제 실험에 의존하지 않고, 코팅 프로세스를 분석할 수 있는 편리한 방법을 제공합니다. FLOW-3D는 표면 장력, Wall 접착, 용액 운반, 밀도 기반 흐름 및 상 변화의 영향을 이해하기위한 고밀도 모델링을 제공합니다.

Forward roll coating 공정에 대한 FLOW-3D의 시뮬레이션은 high capillary number수로 인한ribbing 결함을 포착합니다. 이 모델은 backing rollers가 400 micron nip을 통해 유체를 끌어 당길 때 표면 장력과 점도의 효과를 통합합니다. 시뮬레이션은 Lee, et al [1]의 연구를 기반으로합니다.

ribbing 시작에 대한 정확한 예측을 통해 엔지니어는 결함을 방지하기 위한 공정 매개 변수를 식별하고 수정할 수 있습니다.

Reference

[1] Lee, J. H., Han, S. K., Lee, J. S., Jung, H. W., & Hyun, J. C. (2010). Ribbing instability in rigid and deformable forward roll coating flows. Korea Australia Rheology Journal, 22(1), 75-80.

Bibliography

Models

  • Air Entrainment
  • Porous Media
  • Surface Tension
  • More Modeling Capabilities

Conference Proceedings


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Year 2021, Volume 7, Issue 6, 1489 - 1505, 02.09.2021 N. TONEKABONI H. SALARIAN M. Eshagh NIMVARI J. KHALEGHINIA https://doi.org/10.18186/thermal.990897 ...
Fig.1 Schematic diagram of the novel cytometric device

Fabrication and Experimental Investigation of a Novel 3D Hydrodynamic Focusing Micro Cytometric Device

Yongquan Wang*a , Jingyuan Wangb, Hualing Chenc School of Mechanical Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi, 710049, P. R. Chinaa ...
Figure 1. (a) Top view of the microfluidic-magnetophoretic device, (b) Schematic representation of the channel cross-sections studied in this work, and (c) the magnet position relative to the channel location (Sepy and Sepz are the magnet separation distances in y and z, respectively).

Continuous-Flow Separation of Magnetic Particles from Biofluids: How Does the Microdevice Geometry Determine the Separation Performance?

by  Cristina González Fernández1, Jenifer Gómez Pastora2, Arantza Basauri1, Marcos Fallanza1, Eugenio Bringas1, Jeffrey J. Chalmers2 and Inmaculada Ortiz1,* 1Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, ETSIIT, ...