Flow velocity profiles for canals with a depth of 3 m and flow velocities of 5–5.3 m/s.

Optimization Algorithms and Engineering: Recent Advances and Applications

Mahdi Feizbahr,1 Navid Tonekaboni,2Guang-Jun Jiang,3,4 and Hong-Xia Chen3,4Show moreAcademic Editor: Mohammad YazdiReceived08 Apr 2021Revised18 Jun 2021Accepted17 Jul 2021Published11 Aug 2021

Abstract

Vegetation along the river increases the roughness and reduces the average flow velocity, reduces flow energy, and changes the flow velocity profile in the cross section of the river. Many canals and rivers in nature are covered with vegetation during the floods. Canal’s roughness is strongly affected by plants and therefore it has a great effect on flow resistance during flood. Roughness resistance against the flow due to the plants depends on the flow conditions and plant, so the model should simulate the current velocity by considering the effects of velocity, depth of flow, and type of vegetation along the canal. Total of 48 models have been simulated to investigate the effect of roughness in the canal. The results indicated that, by enhancing the velocity, the effect of vegetation in decreasing the bed velocity is negligible, while when the current has lower speed, the effect of vegetation on decreasing the bed velocity is obviously considerable.


강의 식생은 거칠기를 증가시키고 평균 유속을 감소시키며, 유속 에너지를 감소시키고 강의 단면에서 유속 프로파일을 변경합니다. 자연의 많은 운하와 강은 홍수 동안 초목으로 덮여 있습니다. 운하의 조도는 식물의 영향을 많이 받으므로 홍수시 유동저항에 큰 영향을 미칩니다. 식물로 인한 흐름에 대한 거칠기 저항은 흐름 조건 및 식물에 따라 다르므로 모델은 유속, 흐름 깊이 및 운하를 따라 식생 유형의 영향을 고려하여 현재 속도를 시뮬레이션해야 합니다. 근관의 거칠기의 영향을 조사하기 위해 총 48개의 모델이 시뮬레이션되었습니다. 결과는 유속을 높임으로써 유속을 감소시키는 식생의 영향은 무시할 수 있는 반면, 해류가 더 낮은 유속일 때 유속을 감소시키는 식생의 영향은 분명히 상당함을 나타냈다.

1. Introduction

Considering the impact of each variable is a very popular field within the analytical and statistical methods and intelligent systems [114]. This can help research for better modeling considering the relation of variables or interaction of them toward reaching a better condition for the objective function in control and engineering [1527]. Consequently, it is necessary to study the effects of the passive factors on the active domain [2836]. Because of the effect of vegetation on reducing the discharge capacity of rivers [37], pruning plants was necessary to improve the condition of rivers. One of the important effects of vegetation in river protection is the action of roots, which cause soil consolidation and soil structure improvement and, by enhancing the shear strength of soil, increase the resistance of canal walls against the erosive force of water. The outer limbs of the plant increase the roughness of the canal walls and reduce the flow velocity and deplete the flow energy in vicinity of the walls. Vegetation by reducing the shear stress of the canal bed reduces flood discharge and sedimentation in the intervals between vegetation and increases the stability of the walls [3841].

One of the main factors influencing the speed, depth, and extent of flood in this method is Manning’s roughness coefficient. On the other hand, soil cover [42], especially vegetation, is one of the most determining factors in Manning’s roughness coefficient. Therefore, it is expected that those seasonal changes in the vegetation of the region will play an important role in the calculated value of Manning’s roughness coefficient and ultimately in predicting the flood wave behavior [4345]. The roughness caused by plants’ resistance to flood current depends on the flow and plant conditions. Flow conditions include depth and velocity of the plant, and plant conditions include plant type, hardness or flexibility, dimensions, density, and shape of the plant [46]. In general, the issue discussed in this research is the optimization of flood-induced flow in canals by considering the effect of vegetation-induced roughness. Therefore, the effect of plants on the roughness coefficient and canal transmission coefficient and in consequence the flow depth should be evaluated [4748].

Current resistance is generally known by its roughness coefficient. The equation that is mainly used in this field is Manning equation. The ratio of shear velocity to average current velocity  is another form of current resistance. The reason for using the  ratio is that it is dimensionless and has a strong theoretical basis. The reason for using Manning roughness coefficient is its pervasiveness. According to Freeman et al. [49], the Manning roughness coefficient for plants was calculated according to the Kouwen and Unny [50] method for incremental resistance. This method involves increasing the roughness for various surface and plant irregularities. Manning’s roughness coefficient has all the factors affecting the resistance of the canal. Therefore, the appropriate way to more accurately estimate this coefficient is to know the factors affecting this coefficient [51].

To calculate the flow rate, velocity, and depth of flow in canals as well as flood and sediment estimation, it is important to evaluate the flow resistance. To determine the flow resistance in open ducts, Manning, Chézy, and Darcy–Weisbach relations are used [52]. In these relations, there are parameters such as Manning’s roughness coefficient (n), Chézy roughness coefficient (C), and Darcy–Weisbach coefficient (f). All three of these coefficients are a kind of flow resistance coefficient that is widely used in the equations governing flow in rivers [53].

The three relations that express the relationship between the average flow velocity (V) and the resistance and geometric and hydraulic coefficients of the canal are as follows:where nf, and c are Manning, Darcy–Weisbach, and Chézy coefficients, respectively. V = average flow velocity, R = hydraulic radius, Sf = slope of energy line, which in uniform flow is equal to the slope of the canal bed,  = gravitational acceleration, and Kn is a coefficient whose value is equal to 1 in the SI system and 1.486 in the English system. The coefficients of resistance in equations (1) to (3) are related as follows:

Based on the boundary layer theory, the flow resistance for rough substrates is determined from the following general relation:where f = Darcy–Weisbach coefficient of friction, y = flow depth, Ks = bed roughness size, and A = constant coefficient.

On the other hand, the relationship between the Darcy–Weisbach coefficient of friction and the shear velocity of the flow is as follows:

By using equation (6), equation (5) is converted as follows:

Investigation on the effect of vegetation arrangement on shear velocity of flow in laboratory conditions showed that, with increasing the shear Reynolds number (), the numerical value of the  ratio also increases; in other words the amount of roughness coefficient increases with a slight difference in the cases without vegetation, checkered arrangement, and cross arrangement, respectively [54].

Roughness in river vegetation is simulated in mathematical models with a variable floor slope flume by different densities and discharges. The vegetation considered submerged in the bed of the flume. Results showed that, with increasing vegetation density, canal roughness and flow shear speed increase and with increasing flow rate and depth, Manning’s roughness coefficient decreases. Factors affecting the roughness caused by vegetation include the effect of plant density and arrangement on flow resistance, the effect of flow velocity on flow resistance, and the effect of depth [4555].

One of the works that has been done on the effect of vegetation on the roughness coefficient is Darby [56] study, which investigates a flood wave model that considers all the effects of vegetation on the roughness coefficient. There are currently two methods for estimating vegetation roughness. One method is to add the thrust force effect to Manning’s equation [475758] and the other method is to increase the canal bed roughness (Manning-Strickler coefficient) [455961]. These two methods provide acceptable results in models designed to simulate floodplain flow. Wang et al. [62] simulate the floodplain with submerged vegetation using these two methods and to increase the accuracy of the results, they suggested using the effective height of the plant under running water instead of using the actual height of the plant. Freeman et al. [49] provided equations for determining the coefficient of vegetation roughness under different conditions. Lee et al. [63] proposed a method for calculating the Manning coefficient using the flow velocity ratio at different depths. Much research has been done on the Manning roughness coefficient in rivers, and researchers [496366] sought to obtain a specific number for n to use in river engineering. However, since the depth and geometric conditions of rivers are completely variable in different places, the values of Manning roughness coefficient have changed subsequently, and it has not been possible to choose a fixed number. In river engineering software, the Manning roughness coefficient is determined only for specific and constant conditions or normal flow. Lee et al. [63] stated that seasonal conditions, density, and type of vegetation should also be considered. Hydraulic roughness and Manning roughness coefficient n of the plant were obtained by estimating the total Manning roughness coefficient from the matching of the measured water surface curve and water surface height. The following equation is used for the flow surface curve:where  is the depth of water change, S0 is the slope of the canal floor, Sf is the slope of the energy line, and Fr is the Froude number which is obtained from the following equation:where D is the characteristic length of the canal. Flood flow velocity is one of the important parameters of flood waves, which is very important in calculating the water level profile and energy consumption. In the cases where there are many limitations for researchers due to the wide range of experimental dimensions and the variety of design parameters, the use of numerical methods that are able to estimate the rest of the unknown results with acceptable accuracy is economically justified.

FLOW-3D software uses Finite Difference Method (FDM) for numerical solution of two-dimensional and three-dimensional flow. This software is dedicated to computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and is provided by Flow Science [67]. The flow is divided into networks with tubular cells. For each cell there are values of dependent variables and all variables are calculated in the center of the cell, except for the velocity, which is calculated at the center of the cell. In this software, two numerical techniques have been used for geometric simulation, FAVOR™ (Fractional-Area-Volume-Obstacle-Representation) and the VOF (Volume-of-Fluid) method. The equations used at this model for this research include the principle of mass survival and the magnitude of motion as follows. The fluid motion equations in three dimensions, including the Navier–Stokes equations with some additional terms, are as follows:where  are mass accelerations in the directions xyz and  are viscosity accelerations in the directions xyz and are obtained from the following equations:

Shear stresses  in equation (11) are obtained from the following equations:

The standard model is used for high Reynolds currents, but in this model, RNG theory allows the analytical differential formula to be used for the effective viscosity that occurs at low Reynolds numbers. Therefore, the RNG model can be used for low and high Reynolds currents.

Weather changes are high and this affects many factors continuously. The presence of vegetation in any area reduces the velocity of surface flows and prevents soil erosion, so vegetation will have a significant impact on reducing destructive floods. One of the methods of erosion protection in floodplain watersheds is the use of biological methods. The presence of vegetation in watersheds reduces the flow rate during floods and prevents soil erosion. The external organs of plants increase the roughness and decrease the velocity of water flow and thus reduce its shear stress energy. One of the important factors with which the hydraulic resistance of plants is expressed is the roughness coefficient. Measuring the roughness coefficient of plants and investigating their effect on reducing velocity and shear stress of flow is of special importance.

Roughness coefficients in canals are affected by two main factors, namely, flow conditions and vegetation characteristics [68]. So far, much research has been done on the effect of the roughness factor created by vegetation, but the issue of plant density has received less attention. For this purpose, this study was conducted to investigate the effect of vegetation density on flow velocity changes.

In a study conducted using a software model on three density modes in the submerged state effect on flow velocity changes in 48 different modes was investigated (Table 1).Table 1 The studied models.

The number of cells used in this simulation is equal to 1955888 cells. The boundary conditions were introduced to the model as a constant speed and depth (Figure 1). At the output boundary, due to the presence of supercritical current, no parameter for the current is considered. Absolute roughness for floors and walls was introduced to the model (Figure 1). In this case, the flow was assumed to be nonviscous and air entry into the flow was not considered. After  seconds, this model reached a convergence accuracy of .

Figure 1 The simulated model and its boundary conditions.

Due to the fact that it is not possible to model the vegetation in FLOW-3D software, in this research, the vegetation of small soft plants was studied so that Manning’s coefficients can be entered into the canal bed in the form of roughness coefficients obtained from the studies of Chow [69] in similar conditions. In practice, in such modeling, the effect of plant height is eliminated due to the small height of herbaceous plants, and modeling can provide relatively acceptable results in these conditions.

48 models with input velocities proportional to the height of the regular semihexagonal canal were considered to create supercritical conditions. Manning coefficients were applied based on Chow [69] studies in order to control the canal bed. Speed profiles were drawn and discussed.

Any control and simulation system has some inputs that we should determine to test any technology [7077]. Determination and true implementation of such parameters is one of the key steps of any simulation [237881] and computing procedure [8286]. The input current is created by applying the flow rate through the VFR (Volume Flow Rate) option and the output flow is considered Output and for other borders the Symmetry option is considered.

Simulation of the models and checking their action and responses and observing how a process behaves is one of the accepted methods in engineering and science [8788]. For verification of FLOW-3D software, the results of computer simulations are compared with laboratory measurements and according to the values of computational error, convergence error, and the time required for convergence, the most appropriate option for real-time simulation is selected (Figures 2 and 3 ).

Figure 2 Modeling the plant with cylindrical tubes at the bottom of the canal.

Figure 3 Velocity profiles in positions 2 and 5.

The canal is 7 meters long, 0.5 meters wide, and 0.8 meters deep. This test was used to validate the application of the software to predict the flow rate parameters. In this experiment, instead of using the plant, cylindrical pipes were used in the bottom of the canal.

The conditions of this modeling are similar to the laboratory conditions and the boundary conditions used in the laboratory were used for numerical modeling. The critical flow enters the simulation model from the upstream boundary, so in the upstream boundary conditions, critical velocity and depth are considered. The flow at the downstream boundary is supercritical, so no parameters are applied to the downstream boundary.

The software well predicts the process of changing the speed profile in the open canal along with the considered obstacles. The error in the calculated speed values can be due to the complexity of the flow and the interaction of the turbulence caused by the roughness of the floor with the turbulence caused by the three-dimensional cycles in the hydraulic jump. As a result, the software is able to predict the speed distribution in open canals.

2. Modeling Results

After analyzing the models, the results were shown in graphs (Figures 414 ). The total number of experiments in this study was 48 due to the limitations of modeling.(a)
(a)(b)
(b)(c)
(c)(d)
(d)(a)
(a)(b)
(b)(c)
(c)(d)
(d)Figure 4 Flow velocity profiles for canals with a depth of 1 m and flow velocities of 3–3.3 m/s. Canal with a depth of 1 meter and a flow velocity of (a) 3 meters per second, (b) 3.1 meters per second, (c) 3.2 meters per second, and (d) 3.3 meters per second.

Figure 5 Canal diagram with a depth of 1 meter and a flow rate of 3 meters per second.

Figure 6 Canal diagram with a depth of 1 meter and a flow rate of 3.1 meters per second.

Figure 7 Canal diagram with a depth of 1 meter and a flow rate of 3.2 meters per second.

Figure 8 Canal diagram with a depth of 1 meter and a flow rate of 3.3 meters per second.(a)
(a)(b)
(b)(c)
(c)(d)
(d)(a)
(a)(b)
(b)(c)
(c)(d)
(d)Figure 9 Flow velocity profiles for canals with a depth of 2 m and flow velocities of 4–4.3 m/s. Canal with a depth of 2 meters and a flow rate of (a) 4 meters per second, (b) 4.1 meters per second, (c) 4.2 meters per second, and (d) 4.3 meters per second.

Figure 10 Canal diagram with a depth of 2 meters and a flow rate of 4 meters per second.

Figure 11 Canal diagram with a depth of 2 meters and a flow rate of 4.1 meters per second.

Figure 12 Canal diagram with a depth of 2 meters and a flow rate of 4.2 meters per second.

Figure 13 Canal diagram with a depth of 2 meters and a flow rate of 4.3 meters per second.(a)
(a)(b)
(b)(c)
(c)(d)
(d)(a)
(a)(b)
(b)(c)
(c)(d)
(d)Figure 14 Flow velocity profiles for canals with a depth of 3 m and flow velocities of 5–5.3 m/s. Canal with a depth of 2 meters and a flow rate of (a) 4 meters per second, (b) 4.1 meters per second, (c) 4.2 meters per second, and (d) 4.3 meters per second.

To investigate the effects of roughness with flow velocity, the trend of flow velocity changes at different depths and with supercritical flow to a Froude number proportional to the depth of the section has been obtained.

According to the velocity profiles of Figure 5, it can be seen that, with the increasing of Manning’s coefficient, the canal bed speed decreases.

According to Figures 5 to 8, it can be found that, with increasing the Manning’s coefficient, the canal bed speed decreases. But this deceleration is more noticeable than the deceleration of the models 1 to 12, which can be justified by increasing the speed and of course increasing the Froude number.

According to Figure 10, we see that, with increasing Manning’s coefficient, the canal bed speed decreases.

According to Figure 11, we see that, with increasing Manning’s coefficient, the canal bed speed decreases. But this deceleration is more noticeable than the deceleration of Figures 510, which can be justified by increasing the speed and, of course, increasing the Froude number.

With increasing Manning’s coefficient, the canal bed speed decreases (Figure 12). But this deceleration is more noticeable than the deceleration of the higher models (Figures 58 and 1011), which can be justified by increasing the speed and, of course, increasing the Froude number.

According to Figure 13, with increasing Manning’s coefficient, the canal bed speed decreases. But this deceleration is more noticeable than the deceleration of Figures 5 to 12, which can be justified by increasing the speed and, of course, increasing the Froude number.

According to Figure 15, with increasing Manning’s coefficient, the canal bed speed decreases.

Figure 15 Canal diagram with a depth of 3 meters and a flow rate of 5 meters per second.

According to Figure 16, with increasing Manning’s coefficient, the canal bed speed decreases. But this deceleration is more noticeable than the deceleration of the higher model, which can be justified by increasing the speed and, of course, increasing the Froude number.

Figure 16 Canal diagram with a depth of 3 meters and a flow rate of 5.1 meters per second.

According to Figure 17, it is clear that, with increasing Manning’s coefficient, the canal bed speed decreases. But this deceleration is more noticeable than the deceleration of the higher models, which can be justified by increasing the speed and, of course, increasing the Froude number.

Figure 17 Canal diagram with a depth of 3 meters and a flow rate of 5.2 meters per second.

According to Figure 18, with increasing Manning’s coefficient, the canal bed speed decreases. But this deceleration is more noticeable than the deceleration of the higher models, which can be justified by increasing the speed and, of course, increasing the Froude number.

Figure 18 Canal diagram with a depth of 3 meters and a flow rate of 5.3 meters per second.

According to Figure 19, it can be seen that the vegetation placed in front of the flow input velocity has negligible effect on the reduction of velocity, which of course can be justified due to the flexibility of the vegetation. The only unusual thing is the unexpected decrease in floor speed of 3 m/s compared to higher speeds.(a)
(a)(b)
(b)(c)
(c)(a)
(a)(b)
(b)(c)
(c)Figure 19 Comparison of velocity profiles with the same plant densities (depth 1 m). Comparison of velocity profiles with (a) plant densities of 25%, depth 1 m; (b) plant densities of 50%, depth 1 m; and (c) plant densities of 75%, depth 1 m.

According to Figure 20, by increasing the speed of vegetation, the effect of vegetation on reducing the flow rate becomes more noticeable. And the role of input current does not have much effect in reducing speed.(a)
(a)(b)
(b)(c)
(c)(a)
(a)(b)
(b)(c)
(c)Figure 20 Comparison of velocity profiles with the same plant densities (depth 2 m). Comparison of velocity profiles with (a) plant densities of 25%, depth 2 m; (b) plant densities of 50%, depth 2 m; and (c) plant densities of 75%, depth 2 m.

According to Figure 21, it can be seen that, with increasing speed, the effect of vegetation on reducing the bed flow rate becomes more noticeable and the role of the input current does not have much effect. In general, it can be seen that, by increasing the speed of the input current, the slope of the profiles increases from the bed to the water surface and due to the fact that, in software, the roughness coefficient applies to the channel floor only in the boundary conditions, this can be perfectly justified. Of course, it can be noted that, due to the flexible conditions of the vegetation of the bed, this modeling can show acceptable results for such grasses in the canal floor. In the next directions, we may try application of swarm-based optimization methods for modeling and finding the most effective factors in this research [27815188994]. In future, we can also apply the simulation logic and software of this research for other domains such as power engineering [9599].(a)
(a)(b)
(b)(c)
(c)(a)
(a)(b)
(b)(c)
(c)Figure 21 Comparison of velocity profiles with the same plant densities (depth 3 m). Comparison of velocity profiles with (a) plant densities of 25%, depth 3 m; (b) plant densities of 50%, depth 3 m; and (c) plant densities of 75%, depth 3 m.

3. Conclusion

The effects of vegetation on the flood canal were investigated by numerical modeling with FLOW-3D software. After analyzing the results, the following conclusions were reached:(i)Increasing the density of vegetation reduces the velocity of the canal floor but has no effect on the velocity of the canal surface.(ii)Increasing the Froude number is directly related to increasing the speed of the canal floor.(iii)In the canal with a depth of one meter, a sudden increase in speed can be observed from the lowest speed and higher speed, which is justified by the sudden increase in Froude number.(iv)As the inlet flow rate increases, the slope of the profiles from the bed to the water surface increases.(v)By reducing the Froude number, the effect of vegetation on reducing the flow bed rate becomes more noticeable. And the input velocity in reducing the velocity of the canal floor does not have much effect.(vi)At a flow rate between 3 and 3.3 meters per second due to the shallow depth of the canal and the higher landing number a more critical area is observed in which the flow bed velocity in this area is between 2.86 and 3.1 m/s.(vii)Due to the critical flow velocity and the slight effect of the roughness of the horseshoe vortex floor, it is not visible and is only partially observed in models 1-2-3 and 21.(viii)As the flow rate increases, the effect of vegetation on the rate of bed reduction decreases.(ix)In conditions where less current intensity is passing, vegetation has a greater effect on reducing current intensity and energy consumption increases.(x)In the case of using the flow rate of 0.8 cubic meters per second, the velocity distribution and flow regime show about 20% more energy consumption than in the case of using the flow rate of 1.3 cubic meters per second.

Nomenclature

n:Manning’s roughness coefficient
C:Chézy roughness coefficient
f:Darcy–Weisbach coefficient
V:Flow velocity
R:Hydraulic radius
g:Gravitational acceleration
y:Flow depth
Ks:Bed roughness
A:Constant coefficient
:Reynolds number
y/∂x:Depth of water change
S0:Slope of the canal floor
Sf:Slope of energy line
Fr:Froude number
D:Characteristic length of the canal
G:Mass acceleration
:Shear stresses.

Data Availability

All data are included within the paper.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest.

Acknowledgments

This work was partially supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Contract no. 71761030 and Natural Science Foundation of Inner Mongolia under Contract no. 2019LH07003.

References

  1. H. Yu, L. Jie, W. Gui et al., “Dynamic Gaussian bare-bones fruit fly optimizers with abandonment mechanism: method and analysis,” Engineering with Computers, vol. 20, pp. 1–29, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  2. X. Zhao, D. Li, B. Yang, C. Ma, Y. Zhu, and H. Chen, “Feature selection based on improved ant colony optimization for online detection of foreign fiber in cotton,” Applied Soft Computing, vol. 24, pp. 585–596, 2014.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  3. J. Hu, H. Chen, A. A. Heidari et al., “Orthogonal learning covariance matrix for defects of grey wolf optimizer: insights, balance, diversity, and feature selection,” Knowledge-Based Systems, vol. 213, Article ID 106684, 2021.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  4. C. Yu, M. Chen, K. Chen et al., “SGOA: annealing-behaved grasshopper optimizer for global tasks,” Engineering with Computers, vol. 4, pp. 1–28, 2021.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  5. W. Shan, Z. Qiao, A. A. Heidari, H. Chen, H. Turabieh, and Y. Teng, “Double adaptive weights for stabilization of moth flame optimizer: balance analysis, engineering cases, and medical diagnosis,” Knowledge-Based Systems, vol. 8, Article ID 106728, 2020.View at: Google Scholar
  6. J. Tu, H. Chen, J. Liu et al., “Evolutionary biogeography-based whale optimization methods with communication structure: towards measuring the balance,” Knowledge-Based Systems, vol. 212, Article ID 106642, 2021.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  7. Y. Zhang, R. Liu, X. Wang et al., “Towards augmented kernel extreme learning models for bankruptcy prediction: algorithmic behavior and comprehensive analysis,” Neurocomputing, vol. 430, 2020.View at: Google Scholar
  8. H.-L. Chen, G. Wang, C. Ma, Z.-N. Cai, W.-B. Liu, and S.-J. Wang, “An efficient hybrid kernel extreme learning machine approach for early diagnosis of Parkinson׳s disease,” Neurocomputing, vol. 184, pp. 131–144, 2016.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  9. J. Xia, H. Chen, Q. Li et al., “Ultrasound-based differentiation of malignant and benign thyroid Nodules: an extreme learning machine approach,” Computer Methods and Programs in Biomedicine, vol. 147, pp. 37–49, 2017.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  10. C. Li, L. Hou, B. Y. Sharma et al., “Developing a new intelligent system for the diagnosis of tuberculous pleural effusion,” Computer Methods and Programs in Biomedicine, vol. 153, pp. 211–225, 2018.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  11. X. Xu and H.-L. Chen, “Adaptive computational chemotaxis based on field in bacterial foraging optimization,” Soft Computing, vol. 18, no. 4, pp. 797–807, 2014.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  12. M. Wang, H. Chen, B. Yang et al., “Toward an optimal kernel extreme learning machine using a chaotic moth-flame optimization strategy with applications in medical diagnoses,” Neurocomputing, vol. 267, pp. 69–84, 2017.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  13. L. Chao, K. Zhang, Z. Li, Y. Zhu, J. Wang, and Z. Yu, “Geographically weighted regression based methods for merging satellite and gauge precipitation,” Journal of Hydrology, vol. 558, pp. 275–289, 2018.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  14. F. J. Golrokh, G. Azeem, and A. Hasan, “Eco-efficiency evaluation in cement industries: DEA malmquist productivity index using optimization models,” ENG Transactions, vol. 1, 2020.View at: Google Scholar
  15. D. Zhao, L. Lei, F. Yu et al., “Chaotic random spare ant colony optimization for multi-threshold image segmentation of 2D Kapur entropy,” Knowledge-Based Systems, vol. 8, Article ID 106510, 2020.View at: Google Scholar
  16. Y. Zhang, R. Liu, X. Wang, H. Chen, and C. Li, “Boosted binary Harris hawks optimizer and feature selection,” Engineering with Computers, vol. 517, pp. 1–30, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  17. L. Hu, G. Hong, J. Ma, X. Wang, and H. Chen, “An efficient machine learning approach for diagnosis of paraquat-poisoned patients,” Computers in Biology and Medicine, vol. 59, pp. 116–124, 2015.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  18. L. Shen, H. Chen, Z. Yu et al., “Evolving support vector machines using fruit fly optimization for medical data classification,” Knowledge-Based Systems, vol. 96, pp. 61–75, 2016.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  19. X. Zhao, X. Zhang, Z. Cai et al., “Chaos enhanced grey wolf optimization wrapped ELM for diagnosis of paraquat-poisoned patients,” Computational Biology and Chemistry, vol. 78, pp. 481–490, 2019.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  20. Y. Xu, H. Chen, J. Luo, Q. Zhang, S. Jiao, and X. Zhang, “Enhanced Moth-flame optimizer with mutation strategy for global optimization,” Information Sciences, vol. 492, pp. 181–203, 2019.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  21. M. Wang and H. Chen, “Chaotic multi-swarm whale optimizer boosted support vector machine for medical diagnosis,” Applied Soft Computing Journal, vol. 88, Article ID 105946, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  22. Y. Chen, J. Li, H. Lu, and P. Yan, “Coupling system dynamics analysis and risk aversion programming for optimizing the mixed noise-driven shale gas-water supply chains,” Journal of Cleaner Production, vol. 278, Article ID 123209, 2020.View at: Google Scholar
  23. H. Tang, Y. Xu, A. Lin et al., “Predicting green consumption behaviors of students using efficient firefly grey wolf-assisted K-nearest neighbor classifiers,” IEEE Access, vol. 8, pp. 35546–35562, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  24. H.-J. Ma and G.-H. Yang, “Adaptive fault tolerant control of cooperative heterogeneous systems with actuator faults and unreliable interconnections,” IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, vol. 61, no. 11, pp. 3240–3255, 2015.View at: Google Scholar
  25. H.-J. Ma and L.-X. Xu, “Decentralized adaptive fault-tolerant control for a class of strong interconnected nonlinear systems via graph theory,” IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, vol. 66, 2020.View at: Google Scholar
  26. H. J. Ma, L. X. Xu, and G. H. Yang, “Multiple environment integral reinforcement learning-based fault-tolerant control for affine nonlinear systems,” IEEE Transactions on Cybernetics, vol. 51, pp. 1–16, 2019.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  27. J. Hu, M. Wang, C. Zhao, Q. Pan, and C. Du, “Formation control and collision avoidance for multi-UAV systems based on Voronoi partition,” Science China Technological Sciences, vol. 63, no. 1, pp. 65–72, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  28. C. Zhang, H. Li, Y. Qian, C. Chen, and X. Zhou, “Locality-constrained discriminative matrix regression for robust face identification,” IEEE Transactions on Neural Networks and Learning Systems, vol. 99, pp. 1–15, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  29. X. Zhang, D. Wang, Z. Zhou, and Y. Ma, “Robust low-rank tensor recovery with rectification and alignment,” IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence, vol. 43, no. 1, pp. 238–255, 2019.View at: Google Scholar
  30. X. Zhang, J. Wang, T. Wang, R. Jiang, J. Xu, and L. Zhao, “Robust feature learning for adversarial defense via hierarchical feature alignment,” Information Sciences, vol. 560, 2020.View at: Google Scholar
  31. X. Zhang, R. Jiang, T. Wang, and J. Wang, “Recursive neural network for video deblurring,” IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems for Video Technology, vol. 03, p. 1, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  32. X. Zhang, T. Wang, J. Wang, G. Tang, and L. Zhao, “Pyramid channel-based feature attention network for image dehazing,” Computer Vision and Image Understanding, vol. 197-198, Article ID 103003, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  33. X. Zhang, T. Wang, W. Luo, and P. Huang, “Multi-level fusion and attention-guided CNN for image dehazing,” IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems for Video Technology, vol. 3, p. 1, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  34. L. He, J. Shen, and Y. Zhang, “Ecological vulnerability assessment for ecological conservation and environmental management,” Journal of Environmental Management, vol. 206, pp. 1115–1125, 2018.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  35. Y. Chen, W. Zheng, W. Li, and Y. Huang, “Large group Activity security risk assessment and risk early warning based on random forest algorithm,” Pattern Recognition Letters, vol. 144, pp. 1–5, 2021.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  36. J. Hu, H. Zhang, Z. Li, C. Zhao, Z. Xu, and Q. Pan, “Object traversing by monocular UAV in outdoor environment,” Asian Journal of Control, vol. 25, 2020.View at: Google Scholar
  37. P. Tian, H. Lu, W. Feng, Y. Guan, and Y. Xue, “Large decrease in streamflow and sediment load of Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau driven by future climate change: a case study in Lhasa River Basin,” Catena, vol. 187, Article ID 104340, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  38. A. Stokes, C. Atger, A. G. Bengough, T. Fourcaud, and R. C. Sidle, “Desirable plant root traits for protecting natural and engineered slopes against landslides,” Plant and Soil, vol. 324, no. 1, pp. 1–30, 2009.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  39. T. B. Devi, A. Sharma, and B. Kumar, “Studies on emergent flow over vegetative channel bed with downward seepage,” Hydrological Sciences Journal, vol. 62, no. 3, pp. 408–420, 2017.View at: Google Scholar
  40. G. Ireland, M. Volpi, and G. Petropoulos, “Examining the capability of supervised machine learning classifiers in extracting flooded areas from Landsat TM imagery: a case study from a Mediterranean flood,” Remote Sensing, vol. 7, no. 3, pp. 3372–3399, 2015.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  41. L. Goodarzi and S. Javadi, “Assessment of aquifer vulnerability using the DRASTIC model; a case study of the Dezful-Andimeshk Aquifer,” Computational Research Progress in Applied Science & Engineering, vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 17–22, 2016.View at: Google Scholar
  42. K. Zhang, Q. Wang, L. Chao et al., “Ground observation-based analysis of soil moisture spatiotemporal variability across a humid to semi-humid transitional zone in China,” Journal of Hydrology, vol. 574, pp. 903–914, 2019.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  43. L. De Doncker, P. Troch, R. Verhoeven, K. Bal, P. Meire, and J. Quintelier, “Determination of the Manning roughness coefficient influenced by vegetation in the river Aa and Biebrza river,” Environmental Fluid Mechanics, vol. 9, no. 5, pp. 549–567, 2009.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  44. M. Fathi-Moghadam and K. Drikvandi, “Manning roughness coefficient for rivers and flood plains with non-submerged vegetation,” International Journal of Hydraulic Engineering, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 1–4, 2012.View at: Google Scholar
  45. F.-C. Wu, H. W. Shen, and Y.-J. Chou, “Variation of roughness coefficients for unsubmerged and submerged vegetation,” Journal of Hydraulic Engineering, vol. 125, no. 9, pp. 934–942, 1999.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  46. M. K. Wood, “Rangeland vegetation-hydrologic interactions,” in Vegetation Science Applications for Rangeland Analysis and Management, vol. 3, pp. 469–491, Springer, 1988.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  47. C. Wilson, O. Yagci, H.-P. Rauch, and N. Olsen, “3D numerical modelling of a willow vegetated river/floodplain system,” Journal of Hydrology, vol. 327, no. 1-2, pp. 13–21, 2006.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  48. R. Yazarloo, M. Khamehchian, and M. R. Nikoodel, “Observational-computational 3d engineering geological model and geotechnical characteristics of young sediments of golestan province,” Computational Research Progress in Applied Science & Engineering (CRPASE), vol. 03, 2017.View at: Google Scholar
  49. G. E. Freeman, W. H. Rahmeyer, and R. R. Copeland, “Determination of resistance due to shrubs and woody vegetation,” International Journal of River Basin Management, vol. 19, 2000.View at: Google Scholar
  50. N. Kouwen and T. E. Unny, “Flexible roughness in open channels,” Journal of the Hydraulics Division, vol. 99, no. 5, pp. 713–728, 1973.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  51. S. Hosseini and J. Abrishami, Open Channel Hydraulics, Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 2007.
  52. C. S. James, A. L. Birkhead, A. A. Jordanova, and J. J. O’Sullivan, “Flow resistance of emergent vegetation,” Journal of Hydraulic Research, vol. 42, no. 4, pp. 390–398, 2004.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  53. F. Huthoff and D. Augustijn, “Channel roughness in 1D steady uniform flow: Manning or Chézy?,,” NCR-days, vol. 102, 2004.View at: Google Scholar
  54. M. S. Sabegh, M. Saneie, M. Habibi, A. A. Abbasi, and M. Ghadimkhani, “Experimental investigation on the effect of river bank tree planting array, on shear velocity,” Journal of Watershed Engineering and Management, vol. 2, no. 4, 2011.View at: Google Scholar
  55. A. Errico, V. Pasquino, M. Maxwald, G. B. Chirico, L. Solari, and F. Preti, “The effect of flexible vegetation on flow in drainage channels: estimation of roughness coefficients at the real scale,” Ecological Engineering, vol. 120, pp. 411–421, 2018.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  56. S. E. Darby, “Effect of riparian vegetation on flow resistance and flood potential,” Journal of Hydraulic Engineering, vol. 125, no. 5, pp. 443–454, 1999.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  57. V. Kutija and H. Thi Minh Hong, “A numerical model for assessing the additional resistance to flow introduced by flexible vegetation,” Journal of Hydraulic Research, vol. 34, no. 1, pp. 99–114, 1996.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  58. T. Fischer-Antze, T. Stoesser, P. Bates, and N. R. B. Olsen, “3D numerical modelling of open-channel flow with submerged vegetation,” Journal of Hydraulic Research, vol. 39, no. 3, pp. 303–310, 2001.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  59. U. Stephan and D. Gutknecht, “Hydraulic resistance of submerged flexible vegetation,” Journal of Hydrology, vol. 269, no. 1-2, pp. 27–43, 2002.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  60. F. G. Carollo, V. Ferro, and D. Termini, “Flow resistance law in channels with flexible submerged vegetation,” Journal of Hydraulic Engineering, vol. 131, no. 7, pp. 554–564, 2005.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  61. W. Fu-sheng, “Flow resistance of flexible vegetation in open channel,” Journal of Hydraulic Engineering, vol. S1, 2007.View at: Google Scholar
  62. P.-f. Wang, C. Wang, and D. Z. Zhu, “Hydraulic resistance of submerged vegetation related to effective height,” Journal of Hydrodynamics, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 265–273, 2010.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  63. J. K. Lee, L. C. Roig, H. L. Jenter, and H. M. Visser, “Drag coefficients for modeling flow through emergent vegetation in the Florida Everglades,” Ecological Engineering, vol. 22, no. 4-5, pp. 237–248, 2004.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  64. G. J. Arcement and V. R. Schneider, Guide for Selecting Manning’s Roughness Coefficients for Natural Channels and Flood Plains, US Government Printing Office, Washington, DC, USA, 1989.
  65. Y. Ding and S. S. Y. Wang, “Identification of Manning’s roughness coefficients in channel network using adjoint analysis,” International Journal of Computational Fluid Dynamics, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 3–13, 2005.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  66. E. T. Engman, “Roughness coefficients for routing surface runoff,” Journal of Irrigation and Drainage Engineering, vol. 112, no. 1, pp. 39–53, 1986.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  67. M. Feizbahr, C. Kok Keong, F. Rostami, and M. Shahrokhi, “Wave energy dissipation using perforated and non perforated piles,” International Journal of Engineering, vol. 31, no. 2, pp. 212–219, 2018.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  68. M. Farzadkhoo, A. Keshavarzi, H. Hamidifar, and M. Javan, “Sudden pollutant discharge in vegetated compound meandering rivers,” Catena, vol. 182, Article ID 104155, 2019.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  69. V. T. Chow, Open-channel Hydraulics, Mcgraw-Hill Civil Engineering Series, Chennai, TN, India, 1959.
  70. X. Zhang, R. Jing, Z. Li, Z. Li, X. Chen, and C.-Y. Su, “Adaptive pseudo inverse control for a class of nonlinear asymmetric and saturated nonlinear hysteretic systems,” IEEE/CAA Journal of Automatica Sinica, vol. 8, no. 4, pp. 916–928, 2020.View at: Google Scholar
  71. C. Zuo, Q. Chen, L. Tian, L. Waller, and A. Asundi, “Transport of intensity phase retrieval and computational imaging for partially coherent fields: the phase space perspective,” Optics and Lasers in Engineering, vol. 71, pp. 20–32, 2015.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  72. C. Zuo, J. Sun, J. Li, J. Zhang, A. Asundi, and Q. Chen, “High-resolution transport-of-intensity quantitative phase microscopy with annular illumination,” Scientific Reports, vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 7654–7722, 2017.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  73. B.-H. Li, Y. Liu, A.-M. Zhang, W.-H. Wang, and S. Wan, “A survey on blocking technology of entity resolution,” Journal of Computer Science and Technology, vol. 35, no. 4, pp. 769–793, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  74. Y. Liu, B. Zhang, Y. Feng et al., “Development of 340-GHz transceiver front end based on GaAs monolithic integration technology for THz active imaging array,” Applied Sciences, vol. 10, no. 21, p. 7924, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  75. J. Hu, H. Zhang, L. Liu, X. Zhu, C. Zhao, and Q. Pan, “Convergent multiagent formation control with collision avoidance,” IEEE Transactions on Robotics, vol. 36, no. 6, pp. 1805–1818, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  76. M. B. Movahhed, J. Ayoubinejad, F. N. Asl, and M. Feizbahr, “The effect of rain on pedestrians crossing speed,” Computational Research Progress in Applied Science & Engineering (CRPASE), vol. 6, no. 3, 2020.View at: Google Scholar
  77. A. Li, D. Spano, J. Krivochiza et al., “A tutorial on interference exploitation via symbol-level precoding: overview, state-of-the-art and future directions,” IEEE Communications Surveys & Tutorials, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 796–839, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  78. W. Zhu, C. Ma, X. Zhao et al., “Evaluation of sino foreign cooperative education project using orthogonal sine cosine optimized kernel extreme learning machine,” IEEE Access, vol. 8, pp. 61107–61123, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  79. G. Liu, W. Jia, M. Wang et al., “Predicting cervical hyperextension injury: a covariance guided sine cosine support vector machine,” IEEE Access, vol. 8, pp. 46895–46908, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  80. Y. Wei, H. Lv, M. Chen et al., “Predicting entrepreneurial intention of students: an extreme learning machine with Gaussian barebone harris hawks optimizer,” IEEE Access, vol. 8, pp. 76841–76855, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  81. A. Lin, Q. Wu, A. A. Heidari et al., “Predicting intentions of students for master programs using a chaos-induced sine cosine-based fuzzy K-Nearest neighbor classifier,” Ieee Access, vol. 7, pp. 67235–67248, 2019.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  82. Y. Fan, P. Wang, A. A. Heidari et al., “Rationalized fruit fly optimization with sine cosine algorithm: a comprehensive analysis,” Expert Systems with Applications, vol. 157, Article ID 113486, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  83. E. Rodríguez-Esparza, L. A. Zanella-Calzada, D. Oliva et al., “An efficient Harris hawks-inspired image segmentation method,” Expert Systems with Applications, vol. 155, Article ID 113428, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  84. S. Jiao, G. Chong, C. Huang et al., “Orthogonally adapted Harris hawks optimization for parameter estimation of photovoltaic models,” Energy, vol. 203, Article ID 117804, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  85. Z. Xu, Z. Hu, A. A. Heidari et al., “Orthogonally-designed adapted grasshopper optimization: a comprehensive analysis,” Expert Systems with Applications, vol. 150, Article ID 113282, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  86. A. Abbassi, R. Abbassi, A. A. Heidari et al., “Parameters identification of photovoltaic cell models using enhanced exploratory salp chains-based approach,” Energy, vol. 198, Article ID 117333, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  87. M. Mahmoodi and K. K. Aminjan, “Numerical simulation of flow through sukhoi 24 air inlet,” Computational Research Progress in Applied Science & Engineering (CRPASE), vol. 03, 2017.View at: Google Scholar
  88. F. J. Golrokh and A. Hasan, “A comparison of machine learning clustering algorithms based on the DEA optimization approach for pharmaceutical companies in developing countries,” ENG Transactions, vol. 1, 2020.View at: Google Scholar
  89. H. Chen, A. A. Heidari, H. Chen, M. Wang, Z. Pan, and A. H. Gandomi, “Multi-population differential evolution-assisted Harris hawks optimization: framework and case studies,” Future Generation Computer Systems, vol. 111, pp. 175–198, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  90. J. Guo, H. Zheng, B. Li, and G.-Z. Fu, “Bayesian hierarchical model-based information fusion for degradation analysis considering non-competing relationship,” IEEE Access, vol. 7, pp. 175222–175227, 2019.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  91. J. Guo, H. Zheng, B. Li, and G.-Z. Fu, “A Bayesian approach for degradation analysis with individual differences,” IEEE Access, vol. 7, pp. 175033–175040, 2019.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  92. M. M. A. Malakoutian, Y. Malakoutian, P. Mostafapour, and S. Z. D. Abed, “Prediction for monthly rainfall of six meteorological regions and TRNC (case study: north Cyprus),” ENG Transactions, vol. 2, no. 2, 2021.View at: Google Scholar
  93. H. Arslan, M. Ranjbar, and Z. Mutlum, “Maximum sound transmission loss in multi-chamber reactive silencers: are two chambers enough?,,” ENG Transactions, vol. 2, no. 1, 2021.View at: Google Scholar
  94. N. Tonekaboni, M. Feizbahr, N. Tonekaboni, G.-J. Jiang, and H.-X. Chen, “Optimization of solar CCHP systems with collector enhanced by porous media and nanofluid,” Mathematical Problems in Engineering, vol. 2021, Article ID 9984840, 12 pages, 2021.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  95. Z. Niu, B. Zhang, J. Wang et al., “The research on 220GHz multicarrier high-speed communication system,” China Communications, vol. 17, no. 3, pp. 131–139, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  96. B. Zhang, Z. Niu, J. Wang et al., “Four‐hundred gigahertz broadband multi‐branch waveguide coupler,” IET Microwaves, Antennas & Propagation, vol. 14, no. 11, pp. 1175–1179, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  97. Z.-Q. Niu, L. Yang, B. Zhang et al., “A mechanical reliability study of 3dB waveguide hybrid couplers in the submillimeter and terahertz band,” Journal of Zhejiang University Science, vol. 1, no. 1, 1998.View at: Google Scholar
  98. B. Zhang, D. Ji, D. Fang, S. Liang, Y. Fan, and X. Chen, “A novel 220-GHz GaN diode on-chip tripler with high driven power,” IEEE Electron Device Letters, vol. 40, no. 5, pp. 780–783, 2019.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  99. M. Taleghani and A. Taleghani, “Identification and ranking of factors affecting the implementation of knowledge management engineering based on TOPSIS technique,” ENG Transactions, vol. 1, no. 1, 2020.View at: Google Scholar
Fig. 1. (a) Dimensions of the casting with runners (unit: mm), (b) a melt flow simulation using Flow-3D software together with Reilly's model[44], predicted that a large amount of bifilms (denoted by the black particles) would be contained in the final casting. (c) A solidification simulation using Pro-cast software showed that no shrinkage defect was contained in the final casting.

AZ91 합금 주물 내 연행 결함에 대한 캐리어 가스의 영향

Effect of carrier gases on the entrainment defects within AZ91 alloy castings

Tian Liab J.M.T.Daviesa Xiangzhen Zhuc
aUniversity of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, United Kingdom
bGrainger and Worrall Ltd, Bridgnorth WV15 5HP, United Kingdom
cBrunel Centre for Advanced Solidification Technology, Brunel University London, Kingston Ln, London, Uxbridge UB8 3PH, United Kingdom

Abstract

An entrainment defect (also known as a double oxide film defect or bifilm) acts a void containing an entrapped gas when submerged into a light-alloy melt, thus reducing the quality and reproducibility of the final castings. Previous publications, carried out with Al-alloy castings, reported that this trapped gas could be subsequently consumed by the reaction with the surrounding melt, thus reducing the void volume and negative effect of entrainment defects. Compared with Al-alloys, the entrapped gas within Mg-alloy might be more efficiently consumed due to the relatively high reactivity of magnesium. However, research into the entrainment defects within Mg alloys has been significantly limited. In the present work, AZ91 alloy castings were produced under different carrier gas atmospheres (i.e., SF6/CO2, SF6/air). The evolution processes of the entrainment defects contained in AZ91 alloy were suggested according to the microstructure inspections and thermodynamic calculations. The defects formed in the different atmospheres have a similar sandwich-like structure, but their oxide films contained different combinations of compounds. The use of carrier gases, which were associated with different entrained-gas consumption rates, affected the reproducibility of AZ91 castings.

Keywords

Magnesium alloyCastingOxide film, Bifilm, Entrainment defect, Reproducibility

연행 결함(이중 산화막 결함 또는 이중막 결함이라고도 함)은 경합금 용융물에 잠길 때 갇힌 가스를 포함하는 공극으로 작용하여 최종 주물의 품질과 재현성을 저하시킵니다. Al-합금 주조로 수행된 이전 간행물에서는 이 갇힌 가스가 주변 용융물과의 반응에 의해 후속적으로 소모되어 공극 부피와 연행 결함의 부정적인 영향을 줄일 수 있다고 보고했습니다. Al-합금에 비해 마그네슘의 상대적으로 높은 반응성으로 인해 Mg-합금 내에 포집된 가스가 더 효율적으로 소모될 수 있습니다. 그러나 Mg 합금 내 연행 결함에 대한 연구는 상당히 제한적이었습니다. 현재 작업에서 AZ91 합금 주물은 다양한 캐리어 가스 분위기(즉, SF 6 /CO2 , SF 6 / 공기). AZ91 합금에 포함된 엔트레인먼트 결함의 진화 과정은 미세조직 검사 및 열역학적 계산에 따라 제안되었습니다. 서로 다른 분위기에서 형성된 결함은 유사한 샌드위치 구조를 갖지만 산화막에는 서로 다른 화합물 조합이 포함되어 있습니다. 다른 동반 가스 소비율과 관련된 운반 가스의 사용은 AZ91 주물의 재현성에 영향을 미쳤습니다.

키워드

마그네슘 합금주조Oxide film, Bifilm, Entrainment 불량, 재현성

1 . 소개

지구상에서 가장 가벼운 구조용 금속인 마그네슘은 지난 수십 년 동안 가장 매력적인 경금속 중 하나가 되었습니다. 결과적으로 마그네슘 산업은 지난 20년 동안 급속한 발전을 경험했으며 [1 , 2] , 이는 전 세계적으로 Mg 합금에 대한 수요가 크게 증가했음을 나타냅니다. 오늘날 Mg 합금의 사용은 자동차, 항공 우주, 전자 등의 분야에서 볼 수 있습니다. [3 , 4] . Mg 금속의 전 세계 소비는 특히 자동차 산업에서 앞으로 더욱 증가할 것으로 예측되었습니다. 기존 자동차와 전기 자동차 모두의 에너지 효율성 요구 사항이 설계를 경량화하도록 더욱 밀어붙이기 때문입니다 [3 , 56] .

Mg 합금에 대한 수요의 지속적인 성장은 Mg 합금 주조의 품질 및 기계적 특성 개선에 대한 광범위한 관심을 불러일으켰습니다. Mg 합금 주조 공정 동안 용융물의 표면 난류는 소량의 주변 대기를 포함하는 이중 표면 필름의 포획으로 이어질 수 있으므로 동반 결함(이중 산화막 결함 또는 이중막 결함이라고도 함)을 형성합니다. ) [7] , [8] , [9] , [10] . 무작위 크기, 수량, 방향 및 연행 결함의 배치는 주조 특성의 변화와 관련된 중요한 요인으로 널리 받아들여지고 있습니다 [7] . 또한 Peng et al. [11]AZ91 합금 용융물에 동반된 산화물 필름이 Al 8 Mn 5 입자에 대한 필터 역할을 하여 침전될 때 가두는 것을 발견했습니다 . Mackie et al. [12]는 또한 동반된 산화막이 금속간 입자를 트롤(trawl)하는 작용을 하여 입자가 클러스터링되어 매우 큰 결함을 형성할 수 있다고 제안했습니다. 금속간 화합물의 클러스터링은 비말동반 결함을 주조 특성에 더 해롭게 만들었습니다.

연행 결함에 관한 이전 연구의 대부분은 Al-합금에 대해 수행되었으며 [7 , [13] , [14] , [15] , [16] , [17] , [18] 몇 가지 잠재적인 방법이 제안되었습니다. 알루미늄 합금 주물의 품질에 대한 부정적인 영향을 줄이기 위해. Nyahumwa et al., [16] 은 연행 결함 내의 공극 체적이 열간 등방압 압축(HIP) 공정에 의해 감소될 수 있음을 보여줍니다. Campbell [7] 은 결함 내부의 동반된 가스가 주변 용융물과의 반응으로 인해 소모될 수 있다고 제안했으며, 이는 Raiszedeh와 Griffiths [19]에 의해 추가로 확인되었습니다 ..혼입 가스 소비가 Al-합금 주물의 기계적 특성에 미치는 영향은 [8 , 9]에 의해 조사되었으며 , 이는 혼입 가스의 소비가 주조 재현성의 개선을 촉진함을 시사합니다.

Al-합금 내 결함에 대한 조사와 비교하여 Mg-합금 내 연행 결함에 대한 연구는 상당히 제한적입니다. 연행 결함의 존재는 Mg 합금 주물 [20 , 21] 에서 입증 되었지만 그 거동, 진화 및 연행 가스 소비는 여전히 명확하지 않습니다.

Mg 합금 주조 공정에서 용융물은 일반적으로 마그네슘 점화를 피하기 위해 커버 가스로 보호됩니다. 따라서 모래 또는 매몰 몰드의 공동은 용융물을 붓기 전에 커버 가스로 세척해야 합니다 [22] . 따라서, Mg 합금 주물 내의 연행 가스는 공기만이 아니라 주조 공정에 사용되는 커버 가스를 포함해야 하며, 이는 구조 및 해당 연행 결함의 전개를 복잡하게 만들 수 있습니다.

SF 6 은 Mg 합금 주조 공정에 널리 사용되는 대표적인 커버 가스입니다 [23] , [24] , [25] . 이 커버 가스는 유럽의 마그네슘 합금 주조 공장에서 사용하도록 제한되었지만 상업 보고서에 따르면 이 커버는 전 세계 마그네슘 합금 산업, 특히 다음과 같은 글로벌 마그네슘 합금 생산을 지배한 국가에서 여전히 인기가 있습니다. 중국, 브라질, 인도 등 [26] . 또한, 최근 학술지 조사에서도 이 커버가스가 최근 마그네슘 합금 연구에서 널리 사용된 것으로 나타났다 [27] . SF 6 커버 가스 의 보호 메커니즘 (즉, 액체 Mg 합금과 SF 6 사이의 반응Cover gas)에 대한 연구는 여러 선행연구자들에 의해 이루어졌으나 표면 산화막의 형성과정이 아직 명확하게 밝혀지지 않았으며, 일부 발표된 결과들도 상충되고 있다. 1970년대 초 Fruehling [28] 은 SF 6 아래에 형성된 표면 피막이 주로 미량의 불화물과 함께 MgO 임을 발견 하고 SF 6 이 Mg 합금 표면 피막에 흡수 된다고 제안했습니다 . Couling [29] 은 흡수된 SF 6 이 Mg 합금 용융물과 반응하여 MgF 2 를 형성함을 추가로 확인했습니다 . 지난 20년 동안 아래에 자세히 설명된 것처럼 Mg 합금 표면 필름의 다양한 구조가 보고되었습니다.(1)

단층 필름 . Cashion [30 , 31] 은 X선 광전자 분광법(XPS)과 오제 분광법(AES)을 사용하여 표면 필름을 MgO 및 MgF 2 로 식별했습니다 . 그는 또한 필름의 구성이 두께와 전체 실험 유지 시간에 걸쳐 일정하다는 것을 발견했습니다. Cashion이 관찰한 필름은 10분에서 100분의 유지 시간으로 생성된 단층 구조를 가졌다.(2)

이중층 필름 . Aarstad et. al [32] 은 2003년에 이중층 표면 산화막을 보고했습니다. 그들은 예비 MgO 막에 부착된 잘 분포된 여러 MgF 2 입자를 관찰 하고 전체 표면적의 25-50%를 덮을 때까지 성장했습니다. 외부 MgO 필름을 통한 F의 내부 확산은 진화 과정의 원동력이었습니다. 이 이중층 구조는 Xiong의 그룹 [25 , 33] 과 Shih et al. 도 지지했습니다 . [34] .(삼)

트리플 레이어 필름 . 3층 필름과 그 진화 과정은 Pettersen [35]에 의해 2002년에 보고되었습니다 . Pettersen은 초기 표면 필름이 MgO 상이었고 F의 내부 확산에 의해 점차적으로 안정적인 MgF 2 상 으로 진화한다는 것을 발견했습니다 . 두꺼운 상부 및 하부 MgF 2 층.(4)

산화물 필름은 개별 입자로 구성 됩니다. Wang et al [36] 은 Mg-alloy 표면 필름을 SF 6 커버 가스 하에서 용융물에 교반 한 다음 응고 후 동반된 표면 필름을 검사했습니다. 그들은 동반된 표면 필름이 다른 연구자들이 보고한 보호 표면 필름처럼 계속되지 않고 개별 입자로 구성된다는 것을 발견했습니다. 젊은 산화막은 MgO 나노 크기의 산화물 입자로 구성되어 있는 반면, 오래된 산화막은 한쪽 면에 불화물과 질화물이 포함된 거친 입자(평균 크기 약 1μm)로 구성되어 있습니다.

Mg 합금 용융 표면의 산화막 또는 동반 가스는 모두 액체 Mg 합금과 커버 가스 사이의 반응으로 인해 형성되므로 Mg 합금 표면막에 대한 위에서 언급한 연구는 진화에 대한 귀중한 통찰력을 제공합니다. 연행 결함. 따라서 SF 6 커버 가스 의 보호 메커니즘 (즉, Mg-합금 표면 필름의 형성)은 해당 동반 결함의 잠재적인 복잡한 진화 과정을 나타냅니다.

그러나 Mg 합금 용융물에 표면 필름을 형성하는 것은 용융물에 잠긴 동반된 가스의 소비와 다른 상황에 있다는 점에 유의해야 합니다. 예를 들어, 앞서 언급한 연구에서 표면 성막 동안 충분한 양의 커버 가스가 담지되어 커버 가스의 고갈을 억제했습니다. 대조적으로, Mg 합금 용융물 내의 동반된 가스의 양은 유한하며, 동반된 가스는 완전히 고갈될 수 있습니다. Mirak [37] 은 3.5% SF 6 /기포를 특별히 설계된 영구 금형에서 응고되는 순수한 Mg 합금 용융물에 도입했습니다. 기포가 완전히 소모되었으며, 해당 산화막은 MgO와 MgF 2 의 혼합물임을 알 수 있었다.. 그러나 Aarstad [32] 및 Xiong [25 , 33]에 의해 관찰된 MgF 2 스팟 과 같은 핵 생성 사이트 는 관찰되지 않았습니다. Mirak은 또한 조성 분석을 기반으로 산화막에서 MgO 이전에 MgF 2 가 형성 되었다고 추측했는데 , 이는 이전 문헌에서 보고된 표면 필름 형성 과정(즉, MgF 2 이전에 형성된 MgO)과 반대 입니다. Mirak의 연구는 동반된 가스의 산화막 형성이 표면막의 산화막 형성과 상당히 다를 수 있음을 나타내었지만 산화막의 구조와 진화에 대해서는 밝히지 않았습니다.

또한 커버 가스에 캐리어 가스를 사용하는 것도 커버 가스와 액체 Mg 합금 사이의 반응에 영향을 미쳤습니다. SF 6 /air 는 용융 마그네슘의 점화를 피하기 위해 SF 6 /CO 2 운반 가스 [38] 보다 더 높은 함량의 SF 6을 필요로 하여 다른 가스 소비율을 나타냅니다. Liang et.al [39] 은 CO 2 가 캐리어 가스로 사용될 때 표면 필름에 탄소가 형성된다고 제안했는데 , 이는 SF 6 /air 에서 형성된 필름과 다릅니다 . Mg 연소 [40]에 대한 조사 에서 Mg 2 C 3 검출이 보고되었습니다.CO 2 연소 후 Mg 합금 샘플 에서 이는 Liang의 결과를 뒷받침할 뿐만 아니라 이중 산화막 결함에서 Mg 탄화물의 잠재적 형성을 나타냅니다.

여기에 보고된 작업은 다양한 커버 가스(즉, SF 6 /air 및 SF 6 /CO 2 )로 보호되는 AZ91 Mg 합금 주물에서 형성된 연행 결함의 거동과 진화에 대한 조사 입니다. 이러한 캐리어 가스는 액체 Mg 합금에 대해 다른 보호성을 가지며, 따라서 상응하는 동반 가스의 다른 소비율 및 발생 프로세스와 관련될 수 있습니다. AZ91 주물의 재현성에 대한 동반 가스 소비의 영향도 연구되었습니다.

2 . 실험

2.1 . 용융 및 주조

3kg의 AZ91 합금을 700 ± 5 °C의 연강 도가니에서 녹였습니다. AZ91 합금의 조성은 표 1 에 나타내었다 . 가열하기 전에 잉곳 표면의 모든 산화물 스케일을 기계가공으로 제거했습니다. 사용 된 커버 가스는 0.5 %이었다 SF 6 / 공기 또는 0.5 % SF 6 / CO 2 (부피. %) 다른 주물 6L / 분의 유량. 용융물은 15분 동안 0.3L/min의 유속으로 아르곤으로 가스를 제거한 다음 [41 , 42] , 모래 주형에 부었습니다. 붓기 전에 샌드 몰드 캐비티를 20분 동안 커버 가스로 플러싱했습니다 [22] . 잔류 용융물(약 1kg)이 도가니에서 응고되었습니다.

표 1 . 본 연구에 사용된 AZ91 합금의 조성(wt%).

아연미네소타마그네슘
9.40.610.150.020.0050.0017잔여

그림 1 (a)는 러너가 있는 주물의 치수를 보여줍니다. 탑 필링 시스템은 최종 주물에서 연행 결함을 생성하기 위해 의도적으로 사용되었습니다. Green과 Campbell [7 , 43] 은 탑 필링 시스템이 바텀 필링 시스템에 비해 주조 과정에서 더 많은 연행 현상(즉, 이중 필름)을 유발한다고 제안했습니다. 이 금형의 용융 흐름 시뮬레이션(Flow-3D 소프트웨어)은 연행 현상에 관한 Reilly의 모델 [44] 을 사용하여 최종 주조에 많은 양의 이중막이 포함될 것이라고 예측했습니다( 그림 1 에서 검은색 입자로 표시됨) . NS).

그림 1

수축 결함은 또한 주물의 기계적 특성과 재현성에 영향을 미칩니다. 이 연구는 주조 품질에 대한 이중 필름의 영향에 초점을 맞추었기 때문에 수축 결함이 발생하지 않도록 금형을 의도적으로 설계했습니다. ProCAST 소프트웨어를 사용한 응고 시뮬레이션은 그림 1c 와 같이 최종 주조에 수축 결함이 포함되지 않음을 보여주었습니다 . 캐스팅 건전함도 테스트바 가공 전 실시간 X-ray를 통해 확인했다.

모래 주형은 1wt를 함유한 수지 결합된 규사로 만들어졌습니다. % PEPSET 5230 수지 및 1wt. % PEPSET 5112 촉매. 모래는 또한 억제제로 작용하기 위해 2중량%의 Na 2 SiF 6 을 함유했습니다 .. 주입 온도는 700 ± 5 °C였습니다. 응고 후 러너바의 단면을 Sci-Lab Analytical Ltd로 보내 H 함량 분석(LECO 분석)을 하였고, 모든 H 함량 측정은 주조 공정 후 5일째에 실시하였다. 각각의 주물은 인장 강도 시험을 위해 클립 신장계가 있는 Zwick 1484 인장 시험기를 사용하여 40개의 시험 막대로 가공되었습니다. 파손된 시험봉의 파단면을 주사전자현미경(SEM, Philips JEOL7000)을 이용하여 가속전압 5~15kV로 조사하였다. 파손된 시험 막대, 도가니에서 응고된 잔류 Mg 합금 및 주조 러너를 동일한 SEM을 사용하여 단면화하고 연마하고 검사했습니다. CFEI Quanta 3D FEG FIB-SEM을 사용하여 FIB(집속 이온 빔 밀링 기술)에 의해 테스트 막대 파괴 표면에서 발견된 산화막의 단면을 노출했습니다. 분석에 필요한 산화막은 백금층으로 코팅하였다. 그런 다음 30kV로 가속된 갈륨 이온 빔이 산화막의 단면을 노출시키기 위해 백금 코팅 영역을 둘러싼 재료 기판을 밀링했습니다. 산화막 단면의 EDS 분석은 30kV의 가속 전압에서 FIB 장비를 사용하여 수행되었습니다.

2.2 . 산화 세포

전술 한 바와 같이, 몇몇 최근 연구자들은 마그네슘 합금의 용탕 표면에 형성된 보호막 조사 [38 , 39 , [46] , [47] , [48] , [49] , [50] , [51] , [52 ] . 이 실험 동안 사용된 커버 가스의 양이 충분하여 커버 가스에서 불화물의 고갈을 억제했습니다. 이 섹션에서 설명하는 실험은 엔트레인먼트 결함의 산화막의 진화를 연구하기 위해 커버 가스의 공급을 제한하는 밀봉된 산화 셀을 사용했습니다. 산화 셀에 포함된 커버 가스는 큰 크기의 “동반된 기포”로 간주되었습니다.

도 2에 도시된 바와 같이 , 산화셀의 본체는 내부 길이가 400mm, 내경이 32mm인 폐쇄형 연강관이었다. 수냉식 동관을 전지의 상부에 감았습니다. 튜브가 가열될 때 냉각 시스템은 상부와 하부 사이에 온도 차이를 만들어 내부 가스가 튜브 내에서 대류하도록 했습니다. 온도는 도가니 상단에 위치한 K형 열전대로 모니터링했습니다. Nieet al. [53] 은 Mg 합금 용융물의 표면 피막을 조사할 때 SF 6 커버 가스가 유지로의 강철 벽과 반응할 것이라고 제안했습니다 . 이 반응을 피하기 위해 강철 산화 전지의 내부 표면(그림 2 참조)) 및 열전대의 상반부는 질화붕소로 코팅되었습니다(Mg 합금은 질화붕소와 ​​접촉하지 않았습니다).

그림 2

실험 중에 고체 AZ91 합금 블록을 산화 셀 바닥에 위치한 마그네시아 도가니에 넣었습니다. 전지는 1L/min의 가스 유속으로 전기 저항로에서 100℃로 가열되었다. 원래의 갇힌 대기(즉, 공기)를 대체하기 위해 셀을 이 온도에서 20분 동안 유지했습니다. 그런 다음, 산화 셀을 700°C로 더 가열하여 AZ91 샘플을 녹였습니다. 그런 다음 가스 입구 및 출구 밸브가 닫혀 제한된 커버 가스 공급 하에서 산화를 위한 밀폐된 환경이 생성되었습니다. 그런 다음 산화 전지를 5분 간격으로 5분에서 30분 동안 700 ± 10°C에서 유지했습니다. 각 유지 시간이 끝날 때 세포를 물로 켄칭했습니다. 실온으로 냉각한 후 산화된 샘플을 절단하고 연마한 다음 SEM으로 검사했습니다.

3 . 결과

3.1 . SF 6 /air 에서 형성된 엔트레인먼트 결함의 구조 및 구성

0.5 % SF의 커버 가스 하에서 AZ91 주물에 형성된 유입 결함의 구조 및 조성 6 / 공기는 SEM 및 EDS에 의해 관찰되었다. 결과는 그림 3에 스케치된 엔트레인먼트 결함의 두 가지 유형이 있음을 나타냅니다 . (1) 산화막이 전통적인 단층 구조를 갖는 유형 A 결함 및 (2) 산화막이 2개 층을 갖는 유형 B 결함. 이러한 결함의 세부 사항은 다음에 소개되었습니다. 여기에서 비말동반 결함은 생물막 또는 이중 산화막으로도 알려져 있기 때문에 B형 결함의 산화막은 본 연구에서 “다층 산화막” 또는 “다층 구조”로 언급되었습니다. “이중 산화막 결함의 이중층 산화막”과 같은 혼란스러운 설명을 피하기 위해.

그림 3

그림 4 (ab)는 약 0.4μm 두께의 조밀한 단일층 산화막을 갖는 Type A 결함을 보여줍니다. 이 필름에서 산소, 불소, 마그네슘 및 알루미늄이 검출되었습니다( 그림 4c). 산화막은 마그네슘과 알루미늄의 산화물과 불화물의 혼합물로 추측됩니다. 불소의 검출은 동반된 커버 가스가 이 결함의 형성에 포함되어 있음을 보여주었습니다. 즉, Fig. 4 (a)에 나타난 기공 은 수축결함이나 수소기공도가 아니라 연행결함이었다. 알루미늄의 검출은 Xiong과 Wang의 이전 연구 [47 , 48] 와 다르며 , SF 6으로 보호된 AZ91 용융물의 표면 필름에 알루미늄이 포함되어 있지 않음을 보여주었습니다.커버 가스. 유황은 원소 맵에서 명확하게 인식할 수 없었지만 해당 ESD 스펙트럼에서 S-피크가 있었습니다.

그림 4

도 5 (ab)는 다층 산화막을 갖는 Type B 엔트레인먼트 결함을 나타낸다. 산화막의 조밀한 외부 층은 불소와 산소가 풍부하지만( 그림 5c) 상대적으로 다공성인 내부 층은 산소만 풍부하고(즉, 불소가 부족) 부분적으로 함께 성장하여 샌드위치 모양을 형성합니다. 구조. 따라서 외층은 불화물과 산화물의 혼합물이며 내층은 주로 산화물로 추정된다. 황은 EDX 스펙트럼에서만 인식될 수 있었고 요소 맵에서 명확하게 식별할 수 없었습니다. 이는 커버 가스의 작은 S 함량(즉, SF 6 의 0.5% 부피 함량 때문일 수 있음)커버 가스). 이 산화막에서는 이 산화막의 외층에 알루미늄이 포함되어 있지만 내층에서는 명확하게 검출할 수 없었다. 또한 Al의 분포가 고르지 않은 것으로 보입니다. 결함의 우측에는 필름에 알루미늄이 존재하지만 그 농도는 매트릭스보다 높은 것으로 식별할 수 없음을 알 수 있다. 그러나 결함의 왼쪽에는 알루미늄 농도가 훨씬 높은 작은 영역이 있습니다. 이러한 알루미늄의 불균일한 분포는 다른 결함(아래 참조)에서도 관찰되었으며, 이는 필름 내부 또는 아래에 일부 산화물 입자가 형성된 결과입니다.

그림 5

무화과 도 4 및 5 는 SF 6 /air 의 커버 가스 하에 주조된 AZ91 합금 샘플에서 형성된 연행 결함의 횡단면 관찰을 나타낸다 . 2차원 단면에서 관찰된 수치만으로 연행 결함을 특성화하는 것만으로는 충분하지 않습니다. 더 많은 이해를 돕기 위해 테스트 바의 파단면을 관찰하여 엔트레인먼트 결함(즉, 산화막)의 표면을 더 연구했습니다.

Fig. 6 (a)는 SF 6 /air 에서 생산된 AZ91 합금 인장시험봉의 파단면을 보여준다 . 파단면의 양쪽에서 대칭적인 어두운 영역을 볼 수 있습니다. 그림 6 (b)는 어두운 영역과 밝은 영역 사이의 경계를 보여줍니다. 밝은 영역은 들쭉날쭉하고 부서진 특징으로 구성되어 있는 반면, 어두운 영역의 표면은 비교적 매끄럽고 평평했습니다. 또한 EDS 결과( Fig. 6 c-d 및 Table 2) 불소, 산소, 황 및 질소는 어두운 영역에서만 검출되었으며, 이는 어두운 영역이 용융물에 동반된 표면 보호 필름임을 나타냅니다. 따라서 어두운 영역은 대칭적인 특성을 고려할 때 연행 결함이라고 제안할 수 있습니다. Al-합금 주조물의 파단면에서 유사한 결함이 이전에 보고되었습니다 [7] . 질화물은 테스트 바 파단면의 산화막에서만 발견되었지만 그림 1과 그림 4에 표시된 단면 샘플에서는 검출되지 않았습니다 4 및 5 . 근본적인 이유는 이러한 샘플에 포함된 질화물이 샘플 연마 과정에서 가수분해되었을 수 있기 때문입니다 [54] .

그림 6

표 2 . EDS 결과(wt.%)는 그림 6에 표시된 영역에 해당합니다 (커버 가스: SF 6 /공기).

영형마그네슘NS아연NSNS
그림 6 (b)의 어두운 영역3.481.3279.130.4713.630.570.080.73
그림 6 (b)의 밝은 영역3.5884.4811.250.68

도 1 및 도 2에 도시된 결함의 단면 관찰과 함께 도 4 및 도 5 를 참조하면, 인장 시험봉에 포함된 연행 결함의 구조를 도 6 (e) 와 같이 스케치하였다 . 결함에는 산화막으로 둘러싸인 동반된 가스가 포함되어 있어 테스트 바 내부에 보이드 섹션이 생성되었습니다. 파괴 과정에서 결함에 인장력이 가해지면 균열이 가장 약한 경로를 따라 전파되기 때문에 보이드 섹션에서 균열이 시작되어 연행 결함을 따라 전파됩니다 [55] . 따라서 최종적으로 시험봉이 파단되었을 때 Fig. 6 (a) 와 같이 시험봉의 양 파단면에 연행결함의 산화피막이 나타났다 .

3.2 . SF 6 /CO 2 에 형성된 연행 결함의 구조 및 조성

SF 6 /air 에서 형성된 엔트레인먼트 결함과 유사하게, 0.5% SF 6 /CO 2 의 커버 가스 아래에서 형성된 결함 도 두 가지 유형의 산화막(즉, 단층 및 다층 유형)을 가졌다. 도 7 (a)는 다층 산화막을 포함하는 엔트레인먼트 결함의 예를 도시한다. 결함에 대한 확대 관찰( 그림 7b )은 산화막의 내부 층이 함께 성장하여 SF 6 /air 의 분위기에서 형성된 결함과 유사한 샌드위치 같은 구조를 나타냄을 보여줍니다 ( 그림 7b). 5 나 ). EDS 스펙트럼( 그림 7c) 이 샌드위치형 구조의 접합부(내층)는 주로 산화마그네슘을 함유하고 있음을 보여주었다. 이 EDS 스펙트럼에서는 불소, 황, 알루미늄의 피크가 확인되었으나 그 양은 상대적으로 적었다. 대조적으로, 산화막의 외부 층은 조밀하고 불화물과 산화물의 혼합물로 구성되어 있습니다( 그림 7d-e).

그림 7

Fig. 8 (a)는 0.5%SF 6 /CO 2 분위기에서 제작된 AZ91 합금 인장시험봉의 파단면의 연행결함을 보여준다 . 상응하는 EDS 결과(표 3)는 산화막이 불화물과 산화물을 함유함을 보여주었다. 황과 질소는 검출되지 않았습니다. 게다가, 확대 관찰(  8b)은 산화막 표면에 반점을 나타내었다. 반점의 직경은 수백 나노미터에서 수 마이크론 미터까지 다양했습니다.

그림 8

산화막의 구조와 조성을 보다 명확하게 나타내기 위해 테스트 바 파단면의 산화막 단면을 FIB 기법을 사용하여 현장에서 노출시켰다( 그림 9 ). 도 9a에 도시된 바와 같이 , 백금 코팅층과 Mg-Al 합금 기재 사이에 연속적인 산화피막이 발견되었다. 그림 9 (bc)는 다층 구조( 그림 9c 에서 빨간색 상자로 표시)를 나타내는 산화막에 대한 확대 관찰을 보여줍니다 . 바닥층은 불소와 산소가 풍부하고 불소와 산화물의 혼합물이어야 합니다 . 5 와 7, 유일한 산소가 풍부한 최상층은 도 1 및 도 2에 도시 된 “내층”과 유사하였다 5 및 7 .

그림 9

연속 필름을 제외하고 도 9 에 도시된 바와 같이 연속 필름 내부 또는 하부에서도 일부 개별 입자가 관찰되었다 . 그림 9( b) 의 산화막 좌측에서 Al이 풍부한 입자가 검출되었으며, 마그네슘과 산소 원소도 풍부하게 함유하고 있어 스피넬 Mg 2 AlO 4 로 추측할 수 있다 . 이러한 Mg 2 AlO 4 입자의 존재는 Fig. 5 와 같이 관찰된 필름의 작은 영역에 높은 알루미늄 농도와 알루미늄의 불균일한 분포의 원인이 된다 .(씨). 여기서 강조되어야 할 것은 연속 산화막의 바닥층의 다른 부분이 이 Al이 풍부한 입자보다 적은 양의 알루미늄을 함유하고 있지만, 그림 9c는 이 바닥층의 알루미늄 양이 여전히 무시할 수 없는 수준임을 나타냅니다 . , 특히 필름의 외층과 비교할 때. 도 9b에 도시된 산화막의 우측 아래에서 입자가 검출되어 Mg와 O가 풍부하여 MgO인 것으로 추측되었다. Wang의 결과에 따르면 [56], Mg 용융물과 Mg 증기의 산화에 의해 Mg 용융물의 표면에 많은 이산 MgO 입자가 형성될 수 있다. 우리의 현재 연구에서 관찰된 MgO 입자는 같은 이유로 인해 형성될 수 있습니다. 실험 조건의 차이로 인해 더 적은 Mg 용융물이 기화되거나 O2와 반응할 수 있으므로 우리 작업에서 형성되는 MgO 입자는 소수에 불과합니다. 또한 필름에서 풍부한 탄소가 발견되어 CO 2 가 용융물과 반응하여 탄소 또는 탄화물을 형성할 수 있음을 보여줍니다 . 이 탄소 농도는 표 3에 나타낸 산화막의 상대적으로 높은 탄소 함량 (즉, 어두운 영역) 과 일치하였다 . 산화막 옆 영역.

표 3 . 도 8에 도시된 영역에 상응하는 EDS 결과(wt.%) (커버 가스: SF 6 / CO 2 ).

영형마그네슘NS아연NSNS
그림 8 (a)의 어두운 영역7.253.6469.823.827.030.86
그림 8 (a)의 밝은 영역2.100.4482.8313.261.36

테스트 바 파단면( 도 9 ) 에서 산화막의 이 단면 관찰은 도 6 (e)에 도시된 엔트레인먼트 결함의 개략도를 추가로 확인했다 . SF 6 /CO 2 와 SF 6 /air 의 서로 다른 분위기에서 형성된 엔트레인먼트 결함 은 유사한 구조를 가졌지만 그 조성은 달랐다.

3.3 . 산화 전지에서 산화막의 진화

섹션 3.1 및 3.2 의 결과 는 SF 6 /air 및 SF 6 /CO 2 의 커버 가스 아래에서 AZ91 주조에서 형성된 연행 결함의 구조 및 구성을 보여줍니다 . 산화 반응의 다른 단계는 연행 결함의 다른 구조와 조성으로 이어질 수 있습니다. Campbell은 동반된 가스가 주변 용융물과 반응할 수 있다고 추측했지만 Mg 합금 용융물과 포획된 커버 가스 사이에 반응이 발생했다는 보고는 거의 없습니다. 이전 연구자들은 일반적으로 개방된 환경에서 Mg 합금 용융물과 커버 가스 사이의 반응에 초점을 맞췄습니다 [38 , 39 , [46] , [47][48] , [49] , [50] , [51] , [52] , 이는 용융물에 갇힌 커버 가스의 상황과 다릅니다. AZ91 합금에서 엔트레인먼트 결함의 형성을 더 이해하기 위해 엔트레인먼트 결함의 산화막의 진화 과정을 산화 셀을 사용하여 추가로 연구했습니다.

.도 10 (a 및 d) 0.5 % 방송 SF 보호 산화 셀에서 5 분 동안 유지 된 표면 막 (6) / 공기. 불화물과 산화물(MgF 2 와 MgO) 로 이루어진 단 하나의 층이 있었습니다 . 이 표면 필름에서. 황은 EDS 스펙트럼에서 검출되었지만 그 양이 너무 적어 원소 맵에서 인식되지 않았습니다. 이 산화막의 구조 및 조성은 도 4 에 나타낸 엔트레인먼트 결함의 단층막과 유사하였다 .

그림 10

10분의 유지 시간 후, 얇은 (O,S)가 풍부한 상부층(약 700nm)이 예비 F-농축 필름에 나타나 그림 10 (b 및 e) 에서와 같이 다층 구조를 형성했습니다 . ). (O, S)가 풍부한 최상층의 두께는 유지 시간이 증가함에 따라 증가했습니다. Fig. 10 (c, f) 에서 보는 바와 같이 30분간 유지한 산화막도 다층구조를 가지고 있으나 (O,S)가 풍부한 최상층(약 2.5μm)의 두께가 10분 산화막의 그것. 도 10 (bc) 에 도시 된 다층 산화막 은 도 5에 도시된 샌드위치형 결함의 막과 유사한 외관을 나타냈다 .

도 10에 도시된 산화막의 상이한 구조는 커버 가스의 불화물이 AZ91 합금 용융물과의 반응으로 인해 우선적으로 소모될 것임을 나타내었다. 불화물이 고갈된 후, 잔류 커버 가스는 액체 AZ91 합금과 추가로 반응하여 산화막에 상부 (O, S)가 풍부한 층을 형성했습니다. 따라서 도 1 및 도 3에 도시된 연행 결함의 상이한 구조 및 조성 4 와 5 는 용융물과 갇힌 커버 가스 사이의 진행 중인 산화 반응 때문일 수 있습니다.

이 다층 구조는 Mg 합금 용융물에 형성된 보호 표면 필름에 관한 이전 간행물 [38 , [46] , [47] , [48] , [49] , [50] , [51] 에서 보고되지 않았습니다 . . 이는 이전 연구원들이 무제한의 커버 가스로 실험을 수행했기 때문에 커버 가스의 불화물이 고갈되지 않는 상황을 만들었기 때문일 수 있습니다. 따라서 엔트레인먼트 결함의 산화피막은 도 10에 도시된 산화피막과 유사한 거동특성을 가지나 [38 ,[46] , [47] , [48] , [49] , [50] , [51] .

SF 유지 산화막와 마찬가지로 6 / 공기, SF에 형성된 산화물 막 (6) / CO 2는 또한 세포 산화 다른 유지 시간과 다른 구조를 가지고 있었다. .도 11 (a)는 AZ91 개최 산화막, 0.5 %의 커버 가스 하에서 SF 표면 용융 도시 6 / CO 2, 5 분. 이 필름은 MgF 2 로 이루어진 단층 구조를 가졌다 . 이 영화에서는 MgO의 존재를 확인할 수 없었다. 30분의 유지 시간 후, 필름은 다층 구조를 가졌다; 내부 층은 조밀하고 균일한 외관을 가지며 MgF 2 로 구성 되고 외부 층은 MgF 2 혼합물및 MgO. 0.5%SF 6 /air 에서 형성된 표면막과 다른 이 막에서는 황이 검출되지 않았다 . 따라서, 0.5%SF 6 /CO 2 의 커버 가스 내의 불화물 도 막 성장 과정의 초기 단계에서 우선적으로 소모되었다. SF 6 /air 에서 형성된 막과 비교하여 SF 6 /CO 2 에서 형성된 막에서 MgO 는 나중에 나타났고 황화물은 30분 이내에 나타나지 않았다. 이는 SF 6 /air 에서 필름의 형성과 진화 가 SF 6 /CO 2 보다 빠르다 는 것을 의미할 수 있습니다 . CO 2 후속적으로 용융물과 반응하여 MgO를 형성하는 반면, 황 함유 화합물은 커버 가스에 축적되어 반응하여 매우 늦은 단계에서 황화물을 형성할 수 있습니다(산화 셀에서 30분 후).

그림 11

4 . 논의

4.1 . SF 6 /air 에서 형성된 연행 결함의 진화

Outokumpu HSC Chemistry for Windows( http://www.hsc-chemistry.net/ )의 HSC 소프트웨어를 사용하여 갇힌 기체와 액체 AZ91 합금 사이에서 발생할 수 있는 반응을 탐색하는 데 필요한 열역학 계산을 수행했습니다. 계산에 대한 솔루션은 소량의 커버 가스(즉, 갇힌 기포 내의 양)와 AZ91 합금 용융물 사이의 반응 과정에서 어떤 생성물이 가장 형성될 가능성이 있는지 제안합니다.

실험에서 압력은 1기압으로, 온도는 700°C로 설정했습니다. 커버 가스의 사용량은 7 × 10으로 가정 하였다 -7  약 0.57 cm의 양으로 kg 3 (3.14 × 10 -6  0.5 % SF위한 kmol) 6 / 공기, 0.35 cm (3) (3.12 × 10 – 8  kmol) 0.5%SF 6 /CO 2 . 포획된 가스와 접촉하는 AZ91 합금 용융물의 양은 모든 반응을 완료하기에 충분한 것으로 가정되었습니다. SF 6 의 분해 생성물 은 SF 5 , SF 4 , SF 3 , SF 2 , F 2 , S(g), S 2(g) 및 F(g) [57] , [58] , [59] , [60] .

그림 12 는 AZ91 합금과 0.5%SF 6 /air 사이의 반응에 대한 열역학적 계산의 평형 다이어그램을 보여줍니다 . 다이어그램에서 10 -15  kmol 미만의 반응물 및 생성물은 표시되지 않았습니다. 이는 존재 하는 SF 6 의 양 (≈ 1.57 × 10 -10  kmol) 보다 5배 적 으므로 영향을 미치지 않습니다. 실제적인 방법으로 과정을 관찰했습니다.

그림 12

이 반응 과정은 3단계로 나눌 수 있다.

1단계 : 불화물의 형성. AZ91 용융물은 SF 6 및 그 분해 생성물과 우선적으로 반응하여 MgF 2 , AlF 3 및 ZnF 2 를 생성 합니다. 그러나 ZnF 2 의 양 이 너무 적어서 실제적으로 검출되지  않았을 수 있습니다(  MgF 2 의 3 × 10 -10 kmol에 비해 ZnF 2 1.25 × 10 -12 kmol ). 섹션 3.1 – 3.3에 표시된 모든 산화막 . 한편, 잔류 가스에 황이 SO 2 로 축적되었다 .

2단계 : 산화물의 형성. 액체 AZ91 합금이 포획된 가스에서 사용 가능한 모든 불화물을 고갈시킨 후, Mg와의 반응으로 인해 AlF 3 및 ZnF 2 의 양이 빠르게 감소했습니다. O 2 (g) 및 SO 2 는 AZ91 용융물과 반응하여 MgO, Al 2 O 3 , MgAl 2 O 4 , ZnO, ZnSO 4 및 MgSO 4 를 형성 합니다. 그러나 ZnO 및 ZnSO 4 의 양은 EDS에 의해 실제로 발견되기에는 너무 적었을 것입니다(예: 9.5 × 10 -12  kmol의 ZnO, 1.38 × 10 -14  kmol의 ZnSO 4 , 대조적으로 4.68 × 10−10  kmol의 MgF 2 , X 축의 AZ91 양 이 2.5 × 10 -9  kmol일 때). 실험 사례에서 커버 가스의 F 농도는 매우 낮고 전체 농도 f O는 훨씬 높습니다. 따라서 1단계와 2단계, 즉 불화물과 산화물의 형성은 반응 초기에 동시에 일어나 그림 1과 2와 같이 불화물과 산화물의 가수층 혼합물이 형성될 수 있다 . 4 및 10 (a). 내부 층은 산화물로 구성되어 있지만 불화물은 커버 가스에서 F 원소가 완전히 고갈된 후에 형성될 수 있습니다.

단계 1-2는 도 10 에 도시 된 다층 구조의 형성 과정을 이론적으로 검증하였다 .

산화막 내의 MgAl 2 O 4 및 Al 2 O 3 의 양은 도 4에 도시된 산화막과 일치하는 검출하기에 충분한 양이었다 . 그러나, 도 10 에 도시된 바와 같이, 산화셀에서 성장된 산화막에서는 알루미늄의 존재를 인식할 수 없었다 . 이러한 Al의 부재는 표면 필름과 AZ91 합금 용융물 사이의 다음 반응으로 인한 것일 수 있습니다.(1)

Al 2 O 3  + 3Mg + = 3MgO + 2Al, △G(700°C) = -119.82 kJ/mol(2)

Mg + MgAl 2 O 4  = MgO + Al, △G(700°C) = -106.34 kJ/mol이는 반응물이 서로 완전히 접촉한다는 가정 하에 열역학적 계산이 수행되었기 때문에 HSC 소프트웨어로 시뮬레이션할 수 없었습니다. 그러나 실제 공정에서 AZ91 용융물과 커버 가스는 보호 표면 필름의 존재로 인해 서로 완전히 접촉할 수 없습니다.

3단계 : 황화물과 질화물의 형성. 30분의 유지 시간 후, 산화 셀의 기상 불화물 및 산화물이 고갈되어 잔류 가스와 용융 반응을 허용하여 초기 F-농축 또는 (F, O )이 풍부한 표면 필름, 따라서 그림 10 (b 및 c)에 표시된 관찰된 다층 구조를 생성합니다 . 게다가, 질소는 모든 반응이 완료될 때까지 AZ91 용융물과 반응했습니다. 도 6 에 도시 된 산화막 은 질화물 함량으로 인해 이 반응 단계에 해당할 수 있다. 그러나, 그 결과는 도 1 및 도 5에 도시 된 연마된 샘플에서 질화물이 검출되지 않음을 보여준다. 4 와 5, 그러나 테스트 바 파단면에서만 발견됩니다. 질화물은 다음과 같이 샘플 준비 과정에서 가수분해될 수 있습니다 [54] .(삼)

Mg 3 N 2  + 6H 2 O = 3Mg(OH) 2  + 2NH 3 ↑(4)

AlN+ 3H 2 O = Al(OH) 3  + NH 3 ↑

또한 Schmidt et al. [61] 은 Mg 3 N 2 와 AlN이 반응하여 3원 질화물(Mg 3 Al n N n+2, n=1, 2, 3…) 을 형성할 수 있음을 발견했습니다 . HSC 소프트웨어에는 삼원 질화물 데이터베이스가 포함되어 있지 않아 계산에 추가할 수 없습니다. 이 단계의 산화막은 또한 삼원 질화물을 포함할 수 있습니다.

4.2 . SF 6 /CO 2 에서 형성된 연행 결함의 진화

도 13 은 AZ91 합금과 0.5%SF 6 /CO 2 사이의 열역학적 계산 결과를 보여준다 . 이 반응 과정도 세 단계로 나눌 수 있습니다.

그림 13

1단계 : 불화물의 형성. SF 6 및 그 분해 생성물은 AZ91 용융물에 의해 소비되어 MgF 2 , AlF 3 및 ZnF 2 를 형성했습니다 . 0.5% SF 6 /air 에서 AZ91의 반응에서와 같이 ZnF 2 의 양 이 너무 작아서 실제적으로 감지되지  않았습니다( 2.67 x 10 -10  kmol의 MgF 2 에 비해 ZnF 2 1.51 x 10 -13 kmol ). S와 같은 잔류 가스 트랩에 축적 유황 2 (g) 및 (S)의 일부분 (2) (g)가 CO와 반응하여 2 SO 형성하는 2및 CO. 이 반응 단계의 생성물은 도 11 (a)에 도시된 필름과 일치하며 , 이는 불화물만을 함유하는 단일 층 구조를 갖는다.

2단계 : 산화물의 형성. ALF 3 및 ZnF 2 MgF로 형성 용융 AZ91 마그네슘의 반응 2 , Al 및 Zn으로한다. SO 2 는 소모되기 시작하여 표면 필름에 산화물을 생성 하고 커버 가스에 S 2 (g)를 생성했습니다. 한편, CO 2 는 AZ91 용융물과 직접 반응하여 CO, MgO, ZnO 및 Al 2 O 3 를 형성 합니다. 도 1에 도시 된 산화막 9 및 11 (b)는 산소가 풍부한 층과 다층 구조로 인해 이 반응 단계에 해당할 수 있습니다.

커버 가스의 CO는 AZ91 용융물과 추가로 반응하여 C를 생성할 수 있습니다. 이 탄소는 온도가 감소할 때(응고 기간 동안) Mg와 추가로 반응하여 Mg 탄화물을 형성할 수 있습니다 [62] . 이것은 도 4에 도시된 산화막의 탄소 함량이 높은 이유일 수 있다 8 – 9 . Liang et al. [39] 또한 SO 2 /CO 2 로 보호된 AZ91 합금 표면 필름에서 탄소 검출을 보고했습니다 . 생성된 Al 2 O 3 는 MgO와 더 결합하여 MgAl 2 O [63]를 형성할 수 있습니다 . 섹션 4.1 에서 논의된 바와 같이, 알루미나 및 스피넬은 도 11 에 도시된 바와 같이 표면 필름에 알루미늄 부재를 야기하는 Mg와 반응할 수 있다 .

3단계 : 황화물의 형성. AZ91은 용융물 S 소비하기 시작 2 인 ZnS와 MGS 형성 갇힌 잔류 가스 (g)를. 이러한 반응은 반응 과정의 마지막 단계까지 일어나지 않았으며, 이는 Fig. 7 (c)에 나타난 결함의 S-함량 이 적은 이유일 수 있다 .

요약하면, 열역학적 계산은 AZ91 용융물이 커버 가스와 반응하여 먼저 불화물을 형성한 다음 마지막에 산화물과 황화물을 형성할 것임을 나타냅니다. 다른 반응 단계에서 산화막은 다른 구조와 조성을 가질 것입니다.

4.3 . 운반 가스가 동반 가스 소비 및 AZ91 주물의 재현성에 미치는 영향

SF 6 /air 및 SF 6 /CO 2 에서 형성된 연행 결함의 진화 과정은 4.1절 과 4.2  에서 제안되었습니다 . 이론적인 계산은 실제 샘플에서 발견되는 해당 산화막과 관련하여 검증되었습니다. 연행 결함 내의 대기는 Al-합금 시스템과 다른 시나리오에서 액체 Mg-합금과의 반응으로 인해 효율적으로 소모될 수 있습니다(즉, 연행된 기포의 질소가 Al-합금 용융물과 효율적으로 반응하지 않을 것입니다 [64 , 65] 그러나 일반적으로 “질소 연소”라고 하는 액체 Mg 합금에서 질소가 더 쉽게 소모될 것입니다 [66] ).

동반된 가스와 주변 액체 Mg-합금 사이의 반응은 동반된 가스를 산화막 내에서 고체 화합물(예: MgO)로 전환하여 동반 결함의 공극 부피를 감소시켜 결함(예: 공기의 동반된 가스가 주변의 액체 Mg 합금에 의해 고갈되면 용융 온도가 700 °C이고 액체 Mg 합금의 깊이가 10 cm라고 가정할 때 최종 고체 제품의 총 부피는 0.044가 됩니다. 갇힌 공기가 취한 초기 부피의 %).

연행 결함의 보이드 부피 감소와 해당 주조 특성 사이의 관계는 알루미늄 합금 주조에서 널리 연구되었습니다. Nyahumwa와 Campbell [16] 은 HIP(Hot Isostatic Pressing) 공정이 Al-합금 주물의 연행 결함이 붕괴되고 산화물 표면이 접촉하게 되었다고 보고했습니다. 주물의 피로 수명은 HIP 이후 개선되었습니다. Nyahumwa와 Campbell [16] 도 서로 접촉하고 있는 이중 산화막의 잠재적인 결합을 제안했지만 이를 뒷받침하는 직접적인 증거는 없었습니다. 이 결합 현상은 Aryafar et.al에 의해 추가로 조사되었습니다. [8], 그는 강철 튜브에서 산화물 스킨이 있는 두 개의 Al-합금 막대를 다시 녹인 다음 응고된 샘플에 대해 인장 강도 테스트를 수행했습니다. 그들은 Al-합금 봉의 산화물 스킨이 서로 강하게 결합되어 용융 유지 시간이 연장됨에 따라 더욱 강해짐을 발견했으며, 이는 이중 산화막 내 동반된 가스의 소비로 인한 잠재적인 “치유” 현상을 나타냅니다. 구조. 또한 Raidszadeh와 Griffiths [9 , 19] 는 연행 가스가 반응하는 데 더 긴 시간을 갖도록 함으로써 응고 전 용융 유지 시간을 연장함으로써 Al-합금 주물의 재현성에 대한 연행 결함의 부정적인 영향을 성공적으로 줄였습니다. 주변이 녹습니다.

앞서 언급한 연구를 고려할 때, Mg 합금 주물에서 혼입 가스의 소비는 다음 두 가지 방식으로 혼입 결함의 부정적인 영향을 감소시킬 수 있습니다.

(1) 이중 산화막의 결합 현상 . 도 5 및 도 7 에 도시 된 샌드위치형 구조 는 이중 산화막 구조의 잠재적인 결합을 나타내었다. 그러나 산화막의 결합으로 인한 강도 증가를 정량화하기 위해서는 더 많은 증거가 필요합니다.

(2) 연행 결함의 보이드 체적 감소 . 주조품의 품질에 대한 보이드 부피 감소의 긍정적인 효과는 HIP 프로세스 [67]에 의해 널리 입증되었습니다 . 섹션 4.1 – 4.2 에서 논의된 진화 과정과 같이 , 동반된 가스와 주변 AZ91 합금 용융물 사이의 지속적인 반응으로 인해 동반 결함의 산화막이 함께 성장할 수 있습니다. 최종 고체 생성물의 부피는 동반된 기체에 비해 상당히 작았다(즉, 이전에 언급된 바와 같이 0.044%).

따라서, 혼입 가스의 소모율(즉, 산화막의 성장 속도)은 AZ91 합금 주물의 품질을 향상시키는 중요한 매개변수가 될 수 있습니다. 이에 따라 산화 셀의 산화막 성장 속도를 추가로 조사했습니다.

도 14 는 상이한 커버 가스(즉, 0.5%SF 6 /air 및 0.5%SF 6 /CO 2 ) 에서의 표면 필름 성장 속도의 비교를 보여준다 . 필름 두께 측정을 위해 각 샘플의 15개의 임의 지점을 선택했습니다. 95% 신뢰구간(95%CI)은 막두께의 변화가 가우시안 분포를 따른다는 가정하에 계산하였다. 0.5%SF 6 /air 에서 형성된 모든 표면막이 0.5%SF 6 /CO 2 에서 형성된 것보다 빠르게 성장함을 알 수 있다 . 다른 성장률은 0.5%SF 6 /air 의 연행 가스 소비율 이 0.5%SF 6 /CO 2 보다 더 높음 을 시사했습니다., 이는 동반된 가스의 소비에 더 유리했습니다.

그림 14

산화 셀에서 액체 AZ91 합금과 커버 가스의 접촉 면적(즉, 도가니의 크기)은 많은 양의 용융물과 가스를 고려할 때 상대적으로 작았다는 점에 유의해야 합니다. 결과적으로, 산화 셀 내에서 산화막 성장을 위한 유지 시간은 비교적 길었다(즉, 5-30분). 하지만, 실제 주조에 함유 된 혼입 결함은 (상대적으로 매우 적은, 즉, 수 미크론의 크기에 도시 된 바와 같이 ,도 3. – 6 및 [7]), 동반된 가스는 주변 용융물로 완전히 둘러싸여 상대적으로 큰 접촉 영역을 생성합니다. 따라서 커버 가스와 AZ91 합금 용융물의 반응 시간은 비교적 짧을 수 있습니다. 또한 실제 Mg 합금 모래 주조의 응고 시간은 몇 분일 수 있습니다(예: Guo [68] 은 직경 60mm의 Mg 합금 모래 주조가 응고되는 데 4분이 필요하다고 보고했습니다). 따라서 Mg-합금 용융주조 과정에서 포획된 동반된 가스는 특히 응고 시간이 긴 모래 주물 및 대형 주물의 경우 주변 용융물에 의해 쉽게 소모될 것으로 예상할 수 있습니다.

따라서, 동반 가스의 다른 소비율과 관련된 다른 커버 가스(0.5%SF 6 /air 및 0.5%SF 6 /CO 2 )가 최종 주물의 재현성에 영향을 미칠 수 있습니다. 이 가정을 검증하기 위해 0.5%SF 6 /air 및 0.5%SF 6 /CO 2 에서 생산된 AZ91 주물 을 기계적 평가를 위해 테스트 막대로 가공했습니다. Weibull 분석은 선형 최소 자승(LLS) 방법과 비선형 최소 자승(비 LLS) 방법을 모두 사용하여 수행되었습니다 [69] .

그림 15 (ab)는 LLS 방법으로 얻은 UTS 및 AZ91 합금 주물의 연신율의 전통적인 2-p 선형 Weibull 플롯을 보여줍니다. 사용된 추정기는 P= (i-0.5)/N이며, 이는 모든 인기 있는 추정기 중 가장 낮은 편향을 유발하는 것으로 제안되었습니다 [69 , 70] . SF 6 /air 에서 생산된 주물 은 UTS Weibull 계수가 16.9이고 연신율 Weibull 계수가 5.0입니다. 대조적으로, SF 6 /CO 2 에서 생산된 주물의 UTS 및 연신 Weibull 계수는 각각 7.7과 2.7로, SF 6 /CO 2 에 의해 보호된 주물의 재현성이 SF 6 /air 에서 생산된 것보다 훨씬 낮음을 시사합니다. .

그림 15

또한 저자의 이전 출판물 [69] 은 선형화된 Weibull 플롯의 단점을 보여주었으며, 이는 Weibull 추정 의 더 높은 편향과 잘못된 2 중단을 유발할 수 있습니다 . 따라서 그림 15 (cd) 와 같이 Non-LLS Weibull 추정이 수행되었습니다 . SF 6 /공기주조물 의 UTS Weibull 계수 는 20.8인 반면, SF 6 /CO 2 하에서 생산된 주조물의 UTS Weibull 계수는 11.4로 낮아 재현성에서 분명한 차이를 보였다. 또한 SF 6 /air elongation(El%) 데이터 세트는 SF 6 /CO 2 의 elongation 데이터 세트보다 더 높은 Weibull 계수(모양 = 5.8)를 가졌습니다.(모양 = 3.1). 따라서 LLS 및 Non-LLS 추정 모두 SF 6 /공기 주조가 SF 6 /CO 2 주조 보다 더 높은 재현성을 갖는다고 제안했습니다 . CO 2 대신 공기를 사용 하면 혼입된 가스의 더 빠른 소비에 기여하여 결함 내의 공극 부피를 줄일 수 있다는 방법을 지원합니다 . 따라서 0.5%SF 6 /CO 2 대신 0.5%SF 6 /air를 사용 하면(동반된 가스의 소비율이 증가함) AZ91 주물의 재현성이 향상되었습니다.

그러나 모든 Mg 합금 주조 공장이 현재 작업에서 사용되는 주조 공정을 따랐던 것은 아니라는 점에 유의해야 합니다. Mg의 합금 용탕 본 작업은 탈기에 따라서, 동반 가스의 소비에 수소의 영향을 감소 (즉, 수소 잠재적 동반 가스의 고갈 억제, 동반 된 기체로 확산 될 수있다 [7 , 71 , 72] ). 대조적으로, 마그네슘 합금 주조 공장에서는 마그네슘을 주조할 때 ‘가스 문제’가 없고 따라서 인장 특성에 큰 변화가 없다고 널리 믿어지기 때문에 마그네슘 합금 용융물은 일반적으로 탈기되지 않습니다 [73] . 연구에 따르면 Mg 합금 주물의 기계적 특성에 대한 수소의 부정적인 영향 [41 ,42 , 73] , 탈기 공정은 마그네슘 합금 주조 공장에서 여전히 인기가 없습니다.

또한 현재 작업에서 모래 주형 공동은 붓기 전에 SF 6 커버 가스 로 플러싱되었습니다 [22] . 그러나 모든 Mg 합금 주조 공장이 이러한 방식으로 금형 캐비티를 플러싱한 것은 아닙니다. 예를 들어, Stone Foundry Ltd(영국)는 커버 가스 플러싱 대신 유황 분말을 사용했습니다. 그들의 주물 내의 동반된 가스 는 보호 가스라기 보다는 SO 2 /공기일 수 있습니다 .

따라서 본 연구의 결과는 CO 2 대신 공기를 사용 하는 것이 최종 주조의 재현성을 향상시키는 것으로 나타났지만 다른 산업용 Mg 합금 주조 공정과 관련하여 캐리어 가스의 영향을 확인하기 위해서는 여전히 추가 조사가 필요합니다.

7 . 결론

1.

AZ91 합금에 형성된 연행 결함이 관찰되었습니다. 그들의 산화막은 단층과 다층의 두 가지 유형의 구조를 가지고 있습니다. 다층 산화막은 함께 성장하여 최종 주조에서 샌드위치 같은 구조를 형성할 수 있습니다.2.

실험 결과와 이론적인 열역학적 계산은 모두 갇힌 가스의 불화물이 황을 소비하기 전에 고갈되었음을 보여주었습니다. 이중 산화막 결함의 3단계 진화 과정이 제안되었습니다. 산화막은 진화 단계에 따라 다양한 화합물 조합을 포함했습니다. SF 6 /air 에서 형성된 결함 은 SF 6 /CO 2 에서 형성된 것과 유사한 구조를 갖지만 산화막의 조성은 달랐다. 엔트레인먼트 결함의 산화막 형성 및 진화 과정은 이전에 보고된 Mg 합금 표면막(즉, MgF 2 이전에 형성된 MgO)의 것과 달랐다 .삼.

산화막의 성장 속도는 SF하에 큰 것으로 입증되었다 (6) / SF보다 공기 6 / CO 2 손상 봉입 가스의 빠른 소비에 기여한다. AZ91 합금 주물의 재현성은 SF 6 /CO 2 대신 SF 6 /air를 사용할 때 향상되었습니다 .

감사의 말

저자는 EPSRC LiME 보조금 EP/H026177/1의 자금 지원 과 WD Griffiths 박사와 Adrian Carden(버밍엄 대학교)의 도움을 인정합니다. 주조 작업은 University of Birmingham에서 수행되었습니다.

참조
[1]
MK McNutt , SALAZAR K.
마그네슘, 화합물 및 금속, 미국 지질 조사국 및 미국 내무부
레 스톤 , 버지니아 ( 2013 )
Google 학술검색
[2]
마그네슘
화합물 및 금속, 미국 지질 조사국 및 미국 내무부
( 1996 )
Google 학술검색
[삼]
I. Ostrovsky , Y. Henn
ASTEC’07 International Conference-New Challenges in Aeronautics , Moscow ( 2007 ) , pp. 1 – 5
8월 19-22일
Scopus에서 레코드 보기Google 학술검색
[4]
Y. Wan , B. Tang , Y. Gao , L. Tang , G. Sha , B. Zhang , N. Liang , C. Liu , S. Jiang , Z. Chen , X. Guo , Y. Zhao
액타 메이터. , 200 ( 2020 ) , 274 – 286 페이지
기사PDF 다운로드Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[5]
JTJ Burd , EA Moore , H. Ezzat , R. Kirchain , R. Roth
적용 에너지 , 283 ( 2021 ) , 제 116269 조
기사PDF 다운로드Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[6]
AM 루이스 , JC 켈리 , 조지아주 Keoleian
적용 에너지 , 126 ( 2014 ) , pp. 13 – 20
기사PDF 다운로드Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[7]
J. 캠벨
주물
버터워스-하이네만 , 옥스퍼드 ( 2004 )
Google 학술검색
[8]
M. Aryafar , R. Raiszadeh , A. Shalbafzadeh
J. 메이터. 과학. , 45 ( 2010 년 ) , PP. (3041) – 3051
교차 참조Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[9]
R. 라이자데 , WD 그리피스
메탈. 메이터. 트랜스. B-프로세스 메탈. 메이터. 프로세스. 과학. , 42 ( 2011 ) , 133 ~ 143페이지
교차 참조Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[10]
R. 라이자데 , WD 그리피스
J. 합금. Compd. , 491 ( 2010 ) , 575 ~ 580 쪽
기사PDF 다운로드Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[11]
L. Peng , G. Zeng , TC Su , H. Yasuda , K. Nogita , CM Gourlay
JOM , 71 ( 2019 ) , pp. 2235 – 2244
교차 참조Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[12]
S. Ganguly , AK Mondal , S. Sarkar , A. Basu , S. Kumar , C. Blawert
코로스. 과학. , 166 ( 2020 )
[13]
GE Bozchaloei , N. Varahram , P. Davami , SK 김
메이터. 과학. 영어 A-구조체. 메이터. 소품 Microstruct. 프로세스. , 548 ( 2012 ) , 99 ~ 105페이지
Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[14]
S. 폭스 , J. 캠벨
Scr. 메이터. , 43 ( 2000 ) , PP. 881 – 886
기사PDF 다운로드Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[15]
M. 콕스 , RA 하딩 , J. 캠벨
메이터. 과학. 기술. , 19 ( 2003 ) , 613 ~ 625페이지
Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[16]
C. Nyahumwa , NR Green , J. Campbell
메탈. 메이터. 트랜스. A-Phys. 메탈. 메이터. 과학. , 32 ( 2001 ) , 349 ~ 358 쪽
Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[17]
A. Ardekhani , R. Raiszadeh
J. 메이터. 영어 공연하다. , 21 ( 2012 ) , pp. 1352 – 1362
교차 참조Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[18]
X. Dai , X. Yang , J. Campbell , J. Wood
메이터. 과학. 기술. , 20 ( 2004 ) , 505 ~ 513 쪽
Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[19]
EM 엘갈라드 , MF 이브라힘 , HW 도티 , FH 사무엘
필로스. 잡지. , 98 ( 2018 ) , PP. 1337 – 1359
교차 참조Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[20]
WD 그리피스 , NW 라이
메탈. 메이터. 트랜스. A-Phys. 메탈. 메이터. 과학. , 38A ( 2007 ) , PP. 190 – 196
교차 참조Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[21]
AR Mirak , M. Divandari , SMA Boutorabi , J. 캠벨
국제 J. 캐스트 만났습니다. 해상도 , 20 ( 2007 ) , PP. 215 – 220
교차 참조Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[22]
C. 칭기
주조공학 연구실
Helsinki University of Technology , Espoo, Finland ( 2006 )
Google 학술검색
[23]
Y. Jia , J. Hou , H. Wang , Q. Le , Q. Lan , X. Chen , L. Bao
J. 메이터. 프로세스. 기술. , 278 ( 2020 ) , 제 116542 조
기사PDF 다운로드Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[24]
S. Ouyang , G. Yang , H. Qin , S. Luo , L. Xiao , W. Jie
메이터. 과학. 영어 A , 780 ( 2020 ) , 제 139138 조
기사PDF 다운로드Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[25]
에스엠. Xiong , X.-F. 왕
트랜스. 비철금속 사회 중국 , 20 ( 2010 ) , pp. 1228 – 1234
기사PDF 다운로드Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[26]
지브이리서치
그랜드뷰 리서치
( 2018 )
미국
Google 학술검색
[27]
T. 리 , J. 데이비스
메탈. 메이터. 트랜스. , 51 ( 2020 ) , PP. 5,389 – (5400)
교차 참조Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[28]
JF Fruehling, 미시간 대학, 1970.
Google 학술검색
[29]
S. 쿨링
제36회 세계 마그네슘 연례 회의 , 노르웨이 ( 1979 ) , pp. 54 – 57
Scopus에서 레코드 보기Google 학술검색
[30]
S. Cashion , N. Ricketts , P. Hayes
J. 가벼운 만남. , 2 ( 2002 ) , 43 ~ 47페이지
기사PDF 다운로드Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[31]
S. Cashion , N. Ricketts , P. Hayes
J. 가벼운 만남. , 2 ( 2002 ) , PP. 37 – 42
기사PDF 다운로드Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[32]
K. Aarstad , G. Tranell , G. Pettersen , TA Engh
SF6에 의해 보호되는 마그네슘의 표면을 연구하는 다양한 기술
TMS ( 2003년 )
Google 학술검색
[33]
에스엠 Xiong , X.-L. 리우
메탈. 메이터. 트랜스. , 38 ( 2007 년 ) , PP. (428) – (434)
교차 참조Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[34]
T.-S. 시 , J.-B. Liu , P.-S. 웨이
메이터. 화학 물리. , 104 ( 2007 ) , 497 ~ 504페이지
기사PDF 다운로드Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[35]
G. Pettersen , E. Øvrelid , G. Tranell , J. Fenstad , H. Gjestland
메이터. 과학. 영어 , 332 ( 2002 ) , PP. (285) – (294)
기사PDF 다운로드Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[36]
H. Bo , LB Liu , ZP Jin
J. 합금. Compd. , 490 ( 2010 ) , 318 ~ 325 쪽
기사PDF 다운로드Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[37]
A. 미락 , C. 데이비슨 , J. 테일러
코로스. 과학. , 52 ( 2010 ) , PP. 1992 년 – 2000
기사PDF 다운로드Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[38]
BD 리 , UH 부리 , KW 리 , GS 한강 , JW 한
메이터. 트랜스. , 54 ( 2013 ) , 66 ~ 73페이지
Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[39]
WZ Liang , Q. Gao , F. Chen , HH Liu , ZH Zhao
China Foundry , 9 ( 2012 ) , pp. 226 – 230
교차 참조Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[40]
UI 골드슐레거 , EY 샤피로비치
연소. 폭발 충격파 , 35 ( 1999 ) , 637 ~ 644페이지
Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[41]
A. Elsayed , SL Sin , E. Vandersluis , J. Hill , S. Ahmad , C. Ravindran , S. Amer Foundry
트랜스. 오전. 파운드리 Soc. , 120 ( 2012 ) , 423 ~ 429페이지
Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[42]
E. Zhang , GJ Wang , ZC Hu
메이터. 과학. 기술. , 26 ( 2010 ) , 1253 ~ 1258페이지
Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[43]
NR 그린 , J. 캠벨
메이터. 과학. 영어 A-구조체. 메이터. 소품 Microstruct. 프로세스. , 173 ( 1993 ) , 261 ~ 266 쪽
기사PDF 다운로드Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[44]
C 라일리 , MR 졸리 , NR 그린
MCWASP XII 논문집 – 주조, 용접 및 고급 Solidifcation 프로세스의 12 모델링 , 밴쿠버, 캐나다 ( 2009 )
Google 학술검색
[45]
HE Friedrich, BL Mordike, Springer, 독일, 2006.
Google 학술검색
[46]
C. Zheng , BR Qin , XB Lou
기계, 산업 및 제조 기술에 관한 2010 국제 회의 , ASME ( 2010 ) , pp. 383 – 388
2010년 미트
교차 참조Scopus에서 레코드 보기Google 학술검색
[47]
SM Xiong , XF 왕
트랜스. 비철금속 사회 중국 , 20 ( 2010 ) , pp. 1228 – 1234
기사PDF 다운로드Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[48]
SM Xiong , XL Liu
메탈. 메이터. 트랜스. A-Phys. 메탈. 메이터. 과학. , 38A ( 2007 ) , PP. (428) – (434)
교차 참조Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[49]
TS Shih , JB Liu , PS Wei
메이터. 화학 물리. , 104 ( 2007 ) , 497 ~ 504페이지
기사PDF 다운로드Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[50]
K. Aarstad , G. Tranell , G. Pettersen , TA Engh
매그. 기술. ( 2003 ) , PP. (5) – (10)
Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[51]
G. Pettersen , E. Ovrelid , G. Tranell , J. Fenstad , H. Gjestland
메이터. 과학. 영어 A-구조체. 메이터. 소품 Microstruct. 프로세스. , 332 ( 2002 ) , 285 ~ 294페이지
기사PDF 다운로드Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[52]
XF 왕 , SM Xiong
코로스. 과학. , 66 ( 2013 ) , PP. 300 – 307
기사PDF 다운로드Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[53]
SH Nie , SM Xiong , BC Liu
메이터. 과학. 영어 A-구조체. 메이터. 소품 Microstruct. 프로세스. , 422 ( 2006 ) , 346 ~ 351페이지
기사PDF 다운로드Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[54]
C. Bauer , A. Mogessie , U. Galovsky
Zeitschrift 모피 Metallkunde , 97 ( 2006 ) , PP. (164) – (168)
교차 참조Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[55]
QG 왕 , D. Apelian , DA Lados
J. 가벼운 만남. , 1 ( 2001 ) , PP. (73) – 84
기사PDF 다운로드Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[56]
S. Wang , Y. Wang , Q. Ramasse , Z. Fan
메탈. 메이터. 트랜스. , 51 ( 2020 ) , PP. 2957 – 2974
교차 참조Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[57]
S. Hayashi , W. Minami , T. Oguchi , HJ Kim
카그. 코그. 론분슈 , 35 ( 2009 ) , 411 ~ 415페이지
교차 참조Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[58]
K. 아르스타드
노르웨이 과학 기술 대학교
( 2004년 )
Google 학술검색
[59]
RL 윌킨스
J. Chem. 물리. , 51 ( 1969 ) , p. 853
-&
Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[60]
O. Kubaschewski , K. Hesselemam
무기물의 열화학적 성질
Springer-Verlag , 벨린 ( 1991 )
Google 학술검색
[61]
R. Schmidt , M. Strobele , K. Eichele , HJ Meyer
유로 J. Inorg. 화학 ( 2017 ) , PP. 2727 – 2735
교차 참조Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[62]
B. Hu , Y. Du , H. Xu , W. Sun , WW Zhang , D. Zhao
제이민 메탈. 분파. B-금속. , 46 ( 2010 ) , 97 ~ 103페이지
Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[63]
O. Salas , H. Ni , V. Jayaram , KC Vlach , CG Levi , R. Mehrabian
J. 메이터. 해상도 , 6 ( 1991 ) , 1964 ~ 1981페이지
Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[64]
SSS Kumari , UTS Pillai , BC 빠이
J. 합금. Compd. , 509 ( 2011 ) , pp. 2503 – 2509
기사PDF 다운로드Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[65]
H. Scholz , P. Greil
J. 메이터. 과학. , 26 ( 1991 ) , 669 ~ 677 쪽
Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[66]
P. Biedenkopf , A. Karger , M. Laukotter , W. Schneider
매그. 기술. , 2005년 ( 2005년 ) , 39 ~ 42 쪽
Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[67]
HV 앳킨슨 , S. 데이비스
메탈. 메이터. 트랜스. , 31 ( 2000 ) , PP. 2981 – 3000
교차 참조Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[68]
EJ Guo , L. Wang , YC Feng , LP Wang , YH Chen
J. 썸. 항문. 칼로리. , 135 ( 2019 ) , PP. 2001 년 – 2008 년
교차 참조Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[69]
T. Li , WD Griffiths , J. Chen
메탈. 메이터. 트랜스. A-Phys. 메탈. 메이터. 과학. , 48A ( 2017 ) , PP. 5516 – 5528
교차 참조Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[70]
M. Tiryakioglu , D. Hudak는
J. 메이터. 과학. , 42 ( 2007 ) , pp. 10173 – 10179
교차 참조Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[71]
Y. Yue , WD Griffiths , JL Fife , NR Green
제1회 3d 재료과학 국제학술대회 논문집 ( 2012 ) , pp. 131 – 136
교차 참조Scopus에서 레코드 보기Google 학술검색
[72]
R. 라이자데 , WD 그리피스
메탈. 메이터. 트랜스. B-프로세스 메탈. 메이터. 프로세스. 과학. , 37 ( 2006 ) , PP. (865) – (871)
Scopus에서 레코드 보기
[73]
ZC Hu , EL Zhang , SY Zeng
메이터. 과학. 기술. , 24 ( 2008 ) , 1304 ~ 1308페이지
교차 참조Scopus에서 레코드 보기

Fig. 1. Hydraulic jump flow structure.

Performance assessment of OpenFOAM and FLOW-3D in the numerical modeling of a low Reynolds number hydraulic jump

낮은 레이놀즈 수 유압 점프의 수치 모델링에서 OpenFOAM 및 FLOW-3D의 성능 평가

ArnauBayona DanielValerob RafaelGarcía-Bartuala Francisco ​JoséVallés-Morána P. AmparoLópez-Jiméneza

Abstract

A comparative performance analysis of the CFD platforms OpenFOAM and FLOW-3D is presented, focusing on a 3D swirling turbulent flow: a steady hydraulic jump at low Reynolds number. Turbulence is treated using RANS approach RNG k-ε. A Volume Of Fluid (VOF) method is used to track the air–water interface, consequently aeration is modeled using an Eulerian–Eulerian approach. Structured meshes of cubic elements are used to discretize the channel geometry. The numerical model accuracy is assessed comparing representative hydraulic jump variables (sequent depth ratio, roller length, mean velocity profiles, velocity decay or free surface profile) to experimental data. The model results are also compared to previous studies to broaden the result validation. Both codes reproduced the phenomenon under study concurring with experimental data, although special care must be taken when swirling flows occur. Both models can be used to reproduce the hydraulic performance of energy dissipation structures at low Reynolds numbers.

CFD 플랫폼 OpenFOAM 및 FLOW-3D의 비교 성능 분석이 3D 소용돌이치는 난류인 낮은 레이놀즈 수에서 안정적인 유압 점프에 초점을 맞춰 제시됩니다. 난류는 RANS 접근법 RNG k-ε을 사용하여 처리됩니다.

VOF(Volume Of Fluid) 방법은 공기-물 계면을 추적하는 데 사용되며 결과적으로 Eulerian-Eulerian 접근 방식을 사용하여 폭기가 모델링됩니다. 입방체 요소의 구조화된 메쉬는 채널 형상을 이산화하는 데 사용됩니다. 수치 모델 정확도는 대표적인 유압 점프 변수(연속 깊이 비율, 롤러 길이, 평균 속도 프로파일, 속도 감쇠 또는 자유 표면 프로파일)를 실험 데이터와 비교하여 평가됩니다.

모델 결과는 또한 결과 검증을 확장하기 위해 이전 연구와 비교됩니다. 소용돌이 흐름이 발생할 때 특별한 주의가 필요하지만 두 코드 모두 실험 데이터와 일치하는 연구 중인 현상을 재현했습니다. 두 모델 모두 낮은 레이놀즈 수에서 에너지 소산 구조의 수리 성능을 재현하는 데 사용할 수 있습니다.

Keywords

CFDRANS, OpenFOAM, FLOW-3D ,Hydraulic jump, Air–water flow, Low Reynolds number

References

Ahmed, F., Rajaratnam, N., 1997. Three-dimensional turbulent boundary layers: a
review. J. Hydraulic Res. 35 (1), 81e98.
Ashgriz, N., Poo, J., 1991. FLAIR: Flux line-segment model for advection and interface
reconstruction. Elsevier J. Comput. Phys. 93 (2), 449e468.
Bakhmeteff, B.A., Matzke, A.E., 1936. .The hydraulic jump in terms dynamic similarity. ASCE Trans. Am. Soc. Civ. Eng. 101 (1), 630e647.
Balachandar, S., Eaton, J.K., 2010. Turbulent dispersed multiphase flow. Annu. Rev.
Fluid Mech. 42 (2010), 111e133.
Bayon, A., Lopez-Jimenez, P.A., 2015. Numerical analysis of hydraulic jumps using

OpenFOAM. J. Hydroinformatics 17 (4), 662e678.
Belanger, J., 1841. Notes surl’Hydraulique, Ecole Royale des Ponts et Chaussees
(Paris, France).
Bennett, N.D., Crok, B.F.W., Guariso, G., Guillaume, J.H.A., Hamilton, S.H.,
Jakeman, A.J., Marsili-Libelli, S., Newhama, L.T.H., Norton, J.P., Perrin, C.,
Pierce, S.A., Robson, B., Seppelt, R., Voinov, A.A., Fath, B.D., Andreassian, V., 2013.
Characterising performance of environmental models. Environ. Model. Softw.
40, 1e20.
Berberovic, E., 2010. Investigation of Free-surface Flow Associated with Drop
Impact: Numerical Simulations and Theoretical Modeling. Imperial College of
Science, Technology and Medicine, UK.
Bidone, G., 1819. Report to Academie Royale des Sciences de Turin, s  eance. Le 
Remou et sur la Propagation des Ondes, 12, pp. 21e112.
Biswas, R., Strawn, R.C., 1998. Tetrahedral and hexahedral mesh adaptation for CFD
problems. Elsevier Appl. Numer. Math. 26 (1), 135e151.
Blocken, B., Gualtieri, C., 2012. Ten iterative steps for model development and
evaluation applied to computational fluid dynamics for environmental fluid
mechanics. Environ. Model. Softw. 33, 1e22.
Bombardelli, F.A., Meireles, I., Matos, J., 2011. Laboratory measurements and multiblock numerical simulations of the mean flow and turbulence in the nonaerated skimming flow region of steep stepped spillways. Springer Environ.
Fluid Mech. 11 (3), 263e288.
Bombardelli, F.A., 2012. Computational multi-phase fluid dynamics to address flows
past hydraulic structures. In: 4th IAHR International Symposium on Hydraulic
Structures, 9e11 February 2012, Porto, Portugal, 978-989-8509-01-7.
Borges, J.E., Pereira, N.H., Matos, J., Frizell, K.H., 2010. Performance of a combined
three-hole conductivity probe for void fraction and velocity measurement in
airewater flows. Exp. fluids 48 (1), 17e31.
Borue, V., Orszag, S., Staroslesky, I., 1995. Interaction of surface waves with turbulence: direct numerical simulations of turbulent open channel flow. J. Fluid
Mech. 286, 1e23.
Boussinesq, J., 1871. Theorie de l’intumescence liquide, applelee onde solitaire ou de
translation, se propageantdans un canal rectangulaire. Comptes Rendus l’Academie Sci. 72, 755e759.
Bradley, J.N., Peterka, A.J., 1957. The hydraulic design of stilling Basins : hydraulic
jumps on a horizontal Apron (Basin I). In: Proceedings ASCE, J. Hydraulics
Division.
Bradshaw, P., 1996. Understanding and prediction of turbulent flow. Elsevier Int. J.
heat fluid flow 18 (1), 45e54.
Bung, D.B., 2013. Non-intrusive detection of airewater surface roughness in selfaerated chute flows. J. Hydraulic Res. 51 (3), 322e329.
Bung, D., Schlenkhoff, A., 2010. Self-aerated Skimming Flow on Embankment
Stepped Spillways-the Effect of Additional Micro-roughness on Energy Dissipation and Oxygen Transfer. IAHR European Congress.
Caisley, M.E., Bombardelli, F.A., Garcia, M.H., 1999. Hydraulic Model Study of a Canoe
Chute for Low-head Dams in Illinois. Civil Engineering Studies, Hydraulic Engineering Series No-63. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
Carvalho, R., Lemos, C., Ramos, C., 2008. Numerical computation of the flow in
hydraulic jump stilling basins. J. Hydraulic Res. 46 (6), 739e752.
Celik, I.B., Ghia, U., Roache, P.J., 2008. Procedure for estimation and reporting of
uncertainty due to discretization in CFD applications. ASME J. Fluids Eng. 130
(7), 1e4.
Chachereau, Y., Chanson, H., 2011. .Free-surface fluctuations and turbulence in hydraulic jumps. Exp. Therm. Fluid Sci. 35 (6), 896e909.
Chanson, H. (Ed.), 2015. Energy Dissipation in Hydraulic Structures. CRC Press.
Chanson, H., 2007. Bubbly flow structure in hydraulic jump. Eur. J. Mechanics-B/
Fluids 26.3(2007) 367e384.
Chanson, H., Carvalho, R., 2015. Hydraulic jumps and stilling basins. Chapter 4. In:
Chanson, H. (Ed.), Energy Dissipation in Hydraulic Structures. CRC Press, Taylor
& Francis Group, ABalkema Book.
Chanson, H., Gualtieri, C., 2008. Similitude and scale effects of air entrainment in
hydraulic jumps. J. Hydraulic Res. 46 (1), 35e44.
Chanson, H., Lubin, P., 2010. Discussion of “Verification and validation of a
computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model for air entrainment at spillway
aerators” Appears in the Canadian Journal of Civil Engineering 36(5): 826-838.
Can. J. Civ. Eng. 37 (1), 135e138.
Chanson, H., 1994. Drag reduction in open channel flow by aeration and suspended
load. Taylor & Francis J. Hydraulic Res. 32, 87e101.
Chanson, H., Montes, J.S., 1995. Characteristics of undular hydraulic jumps: experimental apparatus and flow patterns. J. hydraulic Eng. 121 (2), 129e144.
Chanson, H., Brattberg, T., 2000. Experimental study of the airewater shear flow in
a hydraulic jump. Int. J. Multiph. Flow 26 (4), 583e607.
Chanson, H., 2013. Hydraulics of aerated flows: qui pro quo? Taylor & Francis
J. Hydraulic Res. 51 (3), 223e243.
Chaudhry, M.H., 2007. Open-channel Flow, Springer Science & Business Media.
Chen, L., Li, Y., 1998. .A numerical method for two-phase flows with an interface.
Environ. Model. Softw. 13 (3), 247e255.
Chow, V.T., 1959. Open Channel Hydraulics. McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc, New
York.
Daly, B.J., 1969. A technique for including surface tension effects in hydrodynamic
calculations. Elsevier J. Comput. Phys. 4 (1), 97e117.
De Padova, D., Mossa, M., Sibilla, S., Torti, E., 2013. 3D SPH modeling of hydraulic
jump in a very large channel. Taylor & Francis J. Hydraulic Res. 51 (2), 158e173.
Dewals, B., Andre, S., Schleiss, A., Pirotton, M., 2004. Validation of a quasi-2D model 
for aerated flows over stepped spillways for mild and steep slopes. Proc. 6th Int.
Conf. Hydroinformatics 1, 63e70.
Falvey, H.T., 1980. Air-water flow in hydraulic structures. NASA STI Recon Tech. Rep.
N. 81, 26429.
Fawer, C., 1937. Etude de quelquesecoulements permanents 
a filets courbes (‘Study
of some Steady Flows with Curved Streamlines’). Thesis. Imprimerie La Concorde, Lausanne, Switzerland, 127 pages (in French).
Gualtieri, C., Chanson, H., 2007. .Experimental analysis of Froude number effect on
air entrainment in the hydraulic jump. Springer Environ. Fluid Mech. 7 (3),
217e238.
Gualtieri, C., Chanson, H., 2010. Effect of Froude number on bubble clustering in a
hydraulic jump. J. Hydraulic Res. 48 (4), 504e508.
Hager, W., Sinniger, R., 1985. Flow characteristics of the hydraulic jump in a stilling
basin with an abrupt bottom rise. Taylor & Francis J. Hydraulic Res. 23 (2),
101e113.
Hager, W.H., 1992. Energy Dissipators and Hydraulic Jump, Springer.
Hager, W.H., Bremen, R., 1989. Classical hydraulic jump: sequent depths. J. Hydraulic
Res. 27 (5), 565e583.
Hartanto, I.M., Beevers, L., Popescu, I., Wright, N.G., 2011. Application of a coastal
modelling code in fluvial environments. Environ. Model. Softw. 26 (12),
1685e1695.
Hirsch, C., 2007. Numerical Computation of Internal and External Flows: the Fundamentals of Computational Fluid Dynamics. Butterworth-Heinemann, 1.
Hirt, C., Nichols, B., 1981. .Volume of fluid (VOF) method for the dynamics of free
boundaries. J. Comput. Phys. 39 (1), 201e225.
Hyman, J.M., 1984. Numerical methods for tracking interfaces. Elsevier Phys. D.
Nonlinear Phenom. 12 (1), 396e407.
Juez, C., Murillo, J., Garcia-Navarro, P., 2013. Numerical assessment of bed-load
discharge formulations for transient flow in 1D and 2D situations.
J. Hydroinformatics 15 (4).
Keyes, D., Ecer, A., Satofuka, N., Fox, P., Periaux, J., 2000. Parallel Computational Fluid
Dynamics’ 99: towards Teraflops, Optimization and Novel Formulations.
Elsevier.
Kim, J.J., Baik, J.J., 2004. A numerical study of the effects of ambient wind direction
on flow and dispersion in urban street canyons using the RNG keε turbulence
model. Atmos. Environ. 38 (19), 3039e3048.
Kim, S.-E., Boysan, F., 1999. Application of CFD to environmental flows. Elsevier
J. Wind Eng. Industrial Aerodynamics 81 (1), 145e158.
Liu, M., Rajaratnam, N., Zhu, D.Z., 2004. Turbulence structure of hydraulic jumps of
low Froude numbers. J. Hydraulic Eng. 130 (6), 511e520.
Lobosco, R., Schulz, H., Simoes, A., 2011. Analysis of Two Phase Flows on Stepped
Spillways, Hydrodynamics – Optimizing Methods and Tools. Available from. :
http://www.intechopen.com/books/hyd rodynamics-optimizing-methods-andtools/analysis-of-two-phase-flows-on-stepped-spillways. Accessed February
27th 2014.
Long, D., Rajaratnam, N., Steffler, P.M., Smy, P.R., 1991. Structure of flow in hydraulic
jumps. Taylor & Francis J. Hydraulic Res. 29 (2), 207e218.
Ma, J., Oberai, A.A., Lahey Jr., R.T., Drew, D.A., 2011. Modeling air entrainment and
transport in a hydraulic jump using two-fluid RANS and DES turbulence
models. Heat Mass Transf. 47 (8), 911e919.
Matos, J., Frizell, K., Andre, S., Frizell, K., 2002. On the performance of velocity 
measurement techniques in air-water flows. Hydraulic Meas. Exp. Methods
2002, 1e11. http://dx.doi.org/10.1061/40655(2002)58.
Meireles, I.C., Bombardelli, F.A., Matos, J., 2014. .Air entrainment onset in skimming
flows on steep stepped spillways: an analysis. J. Hydraulic Res. 52 (3), 375e385.
McDonald, P., 1971. The Computation of Transonic Flow through Two-dimensional
Gas Turbine Cascades.
Mossa, M., 1999. On the oscillating characteristics of hydraulic jumps, Journal of
Hydraulic Research. Taylor &Francis 37 (4), 541e558.
Murzyn, F., Chanson, H., 2009a. Two-phase Gas-liquid Flow Properties in the Hydraulic Jump: Review and Perspectives. Nova Science Publishers.
Murzyn, F., Chanson, H., 2009b. Experimental investigation of bubbly flow and
turbulence in hydraulic jumps. Environ. Fluid Mech. 2, 143e159.
Murzyn, F., Mouaze, D., Chaplin, J.R., 2007. Airewater interface dynamic and free
surface features in hydraulic jumps. J. Hydraulic Res. 45 (5), 679e685.
Murzyn, F., Mouaze, D., Chaplin, J., 2005. Optical fiber probe measurements of
bubbly flow in hydraulic jumps. Elsevier Int. J. Multiph. Flow 31 (1), 141e154.
Nagosa, R., 1999. Direct numerical simulation of vortex structures and turbulence
scalar transfer across a free surface in a fully developed turbulence. Phys. Fluids
11, 1581e1595.
Noh, W.F., Woodward, P., 1976. SLIC (Simple Line Interface Calculation), Proceedings
of the Fifth International Conference on Numerical Methods in Fluid Dynamics
June 28-July 2. 1976 Twente University, Enschede, pp. 330e340.
Oertel, M., Bung, D.B., 2012. Initial stage of two-dimensional dam-break waves:
laboratory versus VOF. J. Hydraulic Res. 50 (1), 89e97.
Olivari, D., Benocci, C., 2010. Introduction to Mechanics of Turbulence. Von Karman
Institute for Fluid Dynamics.
Omid, M.H., Omid, M., Varaki, M.E., 2005. Modelling hydraulic jumps with artificial
neural networks. Thomas Telford Proc. ICE-Water Manag. 158 (2), 65e70.
OpenFOAM, 2011. OpenFOAM: the Open Source CFD Toolbox User Guide. The Free
Software Foundation Inc.
Peterka, A.J., 1984. Hydraulic design of spillways and energy dissipators. A water
resources technical publication. Eng. Monogr. 25.
Pope, S.B., 2000. Turbulent Flows. Cambridge university press.
Pfister, M., 2011. Chute aerators: steep deflectors and cavity subpressure, Journal of
hydraulic engineering. Am. Soc. Civ. Eng. 137 (10), 1208e1215.
Prosperetti, A., Tryggvason, G., 2007. Computational Methods for Multiphase Flow.
Cambridge University Press.
Rajaratnam, N., 1965. The hydraulic jump as a Wall Jet. Proc. ASCE, J. Hydraul. Div. 91
(HY5), 107e132.
Resch, F., Leutheusser, H., 1972. Reynolds stress measurements in hydraulic jumps.
Taylor & Francis J. Hydraulic Res. 10 (4), 409e430.
Romagnoli, M., Portapila, M., Morvan, H., 2009. Computational simulation of a
hydraulic jump (original title, in Spanish: “Simulacioncomputacional del
resaltohidraulico”), MecanicaComputacional, XXVIII, pp. 1661e1672.
Rouse, H., Siao, T.T., Nagaratnam, S., 1959. Turbulence characteristics of the hydraulic jump. Trans. ASCE 124, 926e966.
Rusche, H., 2002. Computational Fluid Dynamics of Dispersed Two-phase Flows at
High Phase Fractions. Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, UK.
Saint-Venant, A., 1871. Theorie du movement non permanent des eaux, avec
application aux crues des riviereset a l’introduction de mareesdansleurslits.
Comptesrendus des seances de l’Academie des Sciences.
Schlichting, H., Gersten, K., 2000. Boundary-layer Theory. Springer.
Spalart, P.R., 2000. Strategies for turbulence modelling and simulations. Int. J. Heat
Fluid Flow 21 (3), 252e263.
Speziale, C.G., Thangam, S., 1992. Analysis of an RNG based turbulence model for
separated flows. Int. J. Eng. Sci. 30 (10), 1379eIN4.
Toge, G.E., 2012. The Significance of Froude Number in Vertical Pipes: a CFD Study.
University of Stavanger, Norway.
Ubbink, O., 1997. Numerical Prediction of Two Fluid Systems with Sharp Interfaces.
Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, UK.
Valero, D., García-Bartual, R., 2016. Calibration of an air entrainment model for CFD
spillway applications. Adv. Hydroinformatics 571e582. http://dx.doi.org/
10.1007/978-981-287-615-7_38. P. Gourbesville et al. Springer Water.
Valero, D., Bung, D.B., 2015. Hybrid investigations of air transport processes in
moderately sloped stepped spillway flows. In: E-Proceedings of the 36th IAHR
World Congress, 28 June e 3 July, 2015 (The Hague, the Netherlands).
Van Leer, B., 1977. Towards the ultimate conservative difference scheme III. Upstream-centered finite-difference schemes for ideal compressible flow. J.
Comput. Phys 23 (3), 263e275.
Von Karman, T., 1930. MechanischeAhnlichkeit und Turbulenz, Nachrichten von der
Gesellschaft der WissenschaftenzuGottingen. Fachgr. 1 Math. 5, 58 € e76.
Wang, H., Murzyn, F., Chanson, H., 2014a. Total pressure fluctuations and two-phase
flow turbulence in hydraulic jumps. Exp. Fluids 55.11(2014) Pap. 1847, 1e16
(DOI: 10.1007/s00348-014-1847-9).
Wang, H., Felder, S., Chanson, H., 2014b. An experimental study of turbulent twophase flow in hydraulic jumps and application of a triple decomposition
technique. Exp. Fluids 55.7(2014) Pap. 1775, 1e18. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/
s00348-014-1775-8.
Wang, H., Chanson, H., 2015a. .Experimental study of turbulent fluctuations in
hydraulic jumps. J. Hydraul. Eng. 141 (7) http://dx.doi.org/10.1061/(ASCE)
HY.1943-7900.0001010. Paper 04015010, 10 pages.
Wang, H., Chanson, H., 2015b. Integral turbulent length and time scales in hydraulic
jumps: an experimental investigation at large Reynolds numbers. In: E-Proceedings of the 36th IAHR World Congress 28 June e 3 July, 2015, The
Netherlands.
Weller, H., Tabor, G., Jasak, H., Fureby, C., 1998. A tensorial approach to computational continuum mechanics using object-oriented techniques. Comput. Phys.
12, 620e631.
Wilcox, D., 1998. Turbulence Modeling for CFD, DCW Industries. La Canada, California (USA).
Witt, A., Gulliver, J., Shen, L., June 2015. Simulating air entrainment and vortex
dynamics in a hydraulic jump. Int. J. Multiph. Flow 72, 165e180. ISSN 0301-

  1. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijmultiphaseflow.2015.02.012. http://www.
    sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0301932215000336.
    Wood, I.R., 1991. Air Entrainment in Free-surface Flows, IAHR Hydraulic Design
    Manual No.4, Hydraulic Design Considerations. Balkema Publications, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Yakhot, V., Orszag, S., Thangam, S., Gatski, T., Speziale, C., 1992. Development of
    turbulence models for shear flows by a double expansion technique, Physics of
    Fluids A: fluid Dynamics (1989-1993). AIP Publ. 4 (7), 1510e1520.
    Youngs, D.L., 1984. An interface tracking method for a 3D Eulerian hydrodynamics
    code. Tech. Rep. 44 (92), 35e35.
    Zhang, G., Wang, H., Chanson, H., 2013. Turbulence and aeration in hydraulic jumps:
    free-surface fluctuation and integral turbulent scale measurements. Environ.
    fluid Mech. 13 (2), 189e204.
    Zhang, W., Liu, M., Zhu, D.Z., Rajaratnam, N., 2014. Mean and turbulent bubble
    velocities in free hydraulic jumps for small to intermediate froude numbers.
    J. Hydraulic Eng.

FLOW DEM

FLOW-3D DEM Module 개요

FLOW DEM 은 FLOW-3D 의 기체 및 액체 유동 해석에 DEM(Discrete Element Method : 개별 요소법)공법인 입자의 거동을 분석해주는 모듈입니다.

dem9

dem10
주요 기능 : 고체 요소의 충돌, 스프링(Spring) / 대시 포트(Dash Pot) 모델 적용 Void, 1 fluid, 2 fluid(자유 계면 포함) 각각의 모드에 대응 가변 밀도 / 가변 직경 입자 크기조절로 입자 특성을 유지하면서 입자 수를 감소 독립적인 DEM의 Sub Time Step 이용

Discrete Element Method : 개별 요소법

다수의 고체 요소의 충돌 운동을 분석하는 데 유용합니다. 유동 해석과 함께 사용하면 광범위한 용도에 응용을 할 수 있습니다.

dem1

입자 간의 충돌

Voigt model은 스프링(Spring) 및 대시 포트(Dash pot)의 조합에 의해 입자 충돌 시의 힘을 평가합니다. 탄성력 부분은 스프링 모델에서,
비탄성 충돌의 에너지 소산부분은 대시 포트 모델에서 시뮬레이션되고 있으며, 중량 및 항력은 작용하는 외력으로 고려 될 수 있습니다.

분석 모드

기본적으로 이용하는 운동 방정식은 FLOW-3D 에 사용되는 질량 입자의 운동 방정식과 같은 것이지만, 여기에 DEM으로
평가되는 항목이 추가되기 형태로되어 있으며, 실제 시뮬레이션으로는 ‘void + DEM’, ‘1 Fluid + DEM’ , ‘ 1 Fluid 자유계면 + DEM ‘을 기본 유동 모드로 취급이 가능합니다.

dem4

입자 유형

입자 타입도 표준 기능의 질량 입자 모델처럼 입자 크기 (반경)와 밀도가 동일한 것 외, 크기는 같지만 밀도가 다른 것이나 밀도는 같지만 크기가 다른 것 등도 취급 가능합니다. 이로 인해 표준 질량 입자 모델에서는 입자 간의 상호 작용이 고려되어 있지 않기 때문에 모든 아래에 가라 앉아 버리고 있었지만, FLOW DEM을 이용하여 기하학적 관계를 평가하는 것이 가능합니다.

dem7

응용 분야

1. Mechanical Engineering 분야

수지 충전, 스쿠류 이송, 분말 이송 / Resin filling, screw conveyance, powder conveyance

2. Civil Engineering분야

3. Civil Engineering 분야

파편, 자갈, 낙 성/ Debris flow, gravel, falling rock

dem11

3. Chemical Engineering, Pharmaceutics 분야

유동층, 사이클론, 교반기 / Fluidized bed, cyclone, stirrer

dem12

4. MEMS, Electrical Engineering 분야

하전 입자를 포함한 전기장 해석 등

dem15

입자 그룹 가시화

그룹 가시화

DEM은 일반적으로 다수의 입자를 필요로하는 분석을 상정하고 있습니다. 
다만 이 경우, 계산 부하가 높아 지므로 현실적인 계산자원을 고려하면, 입자 수가 너무 많아 현실적으로 취급 할 수 없는 경우 입자의 특성은 유지하고 숫자를 줄여 가시화할 필요가 있습니다 .
일반적인 유동해석 계산의 메쉬 해상도에 해당합니다.
메쉬 수 많음 (계산 부하 큼) → 소 (계산 부하 적음)
입자 수 다 (계산 부하 큼) → 소 (계산 부하 적음)

원래 입자수

입자 사이즈를 키운경우

그룹 가시화

  • 입자 수를 줄이기 위해 그대로 입경을 크게했을 경우와 그룹 가시화 한 경우의 비교.
  • 입자 크기를 크게하면 개별 입자 특성이 달라지기 때문에 거동이 달라진다. (본 사례에서는 부력이 커진다.)
  • 그룹 가시화의 경우 개별 특성은 동일 원래의 거동과 대체로 일치한다.

주조 시뮬레이션에 DEM 적용

그룹 가시화 비교 예

그룹 가시화한 경우와 입경을 크게하여 수를 줄인 경우, 입경을 크게하면
개별 입자 특성이 변화하여 거동이 바뀌어 버리기 때문에 실제 계산으로는 사용할 수 어렵습니다.

중자 모래 분사 분석

DEM에서의 계산부하를 생각할 때는 입자모델에 의한 안정제한을 고려해야 하지만 서브타임스텝이라는 개념을 도입함으로써 입자의 경우와 유체의 경우의 타임스텝을 바꾸고 필요이상으로 계산시간을 들이지 않고 효율적으로 계산하는 것을 가능하게 하고 있습니다.

이를 통해 예를 들어 중자사 분사 시뮬레이션 실험에서는 이러한 문제로 자주 이용되는 빙엄 유체에서는 실험과의 정합성이 별로 좋지 않기 때문에 당사에서는 이전부터 입상류 모델이라는 모델을 개발하고 연속체로부터의 접근에서도 실험과의 높은 정합성을 실현할 수 있는 모델화를 해왔는데, 이번에 DEM을 사용해도 그것과 거의 같은 결과를 얻습니다. 할 수 있음을 확인할 수 있었다.

Reference :

  • Lefebvre D., Mackenbrock A., Vidal V., Pavan V. and Haigh PM, 2004,
  • Development and use of simulation in the Design of Blown Cores and Moulds

FLOW-3D AM

flow3d AM-product
FLOW-3D AM-product

와이어 파우더 기반 DED | Wire Powder Based DED

일부 연구자들은 부품을 만들기 위해 더 넓은 범위의 처리 조건을 사용하여 하이브리드 와이어 분말 기반 DED 시스템을 찾고 있습니다. 예를 들어, 이 시뮬레이션은 다양한 분말 및 와이어 이송 속도를 가진 하이브리드 시스템을 살펴봅니다.

와이어 기반 DED | Wire Based DED

와이어 기반 DED는 분말 기반 DED보다 처리량이 높고 낭비가 적지만 재료 구성 및 증착 방향 측면에서 유연성이 떨어집니다. FLOW-3D AM 은 와이어 기반 DED의 처리 결과를 이해하는데 유용하며 최적화 연구를 통해 빌드에 대한 와이어 이송 속도 및 직경과 같은 최상의 처리 매개 변수를 찾을 수 있습니다.

FLOW-3D AM은 레이저 파우더 베드 융합 (L-PBF), 바인더 제트 및 DED (Directed Energy Deposition)와 같은 적층 제조 공정 ( additive manufacturing )을 시뮬레이션하고 분석하는 CFD 소프트웨어입니다. FLOW-3D AM 의 다중 물리 기능은 공정 매개 변수의 분석 및 최적화를 위해 분말 확산 및 압축, 용융 풀 역학, L-PBF 및 DED에 대한 다공성 형성, 바인더 분사 공정을 위한 수지 침투 및 확산에 대해 매우 정확한 시뮬레이션을 제공합니다.

3D 프린팅이라고도하는 적층 제조(additive manufacturing)는 일반적으로 층별 접근 방식을 사용하여, 분말 또는 와이어로 부품을 제조하는 방법입니다. 금속 기반 적층 제조 공정에 대한 관심은 지난 몇 년 동안 시작되었습니다. 오늘날 사용되는 3 대 금속 적층 제조 공정은 PBF (Powder Bed Fusion), DED (Directed Energy Deposition) 및 바인더 제트 ( Binder jetting ) 공정입니다.  FLOW-3D  AM  은 이러한 각 프로세스에 대한 고유 한 시뮬레이션 통찰력을 제공합니다.

파우더 베드 융합 및 직접 에너지 증착 공정에서 레이저 또는 전자 빔을 열원으로 사용할 수 있습니다. 두 경우 모두 PBF용 분말 형태와 DED 공정용 분말 또는 와이어 형태의 금속을 완전히 녹여 융합하여 층별로 부품을 형성합니다. 그러나 바인더 젯팅(Binder jetting)에서는 결합제 역할을 하는 수지가 금속 분말에 선택적으로 증착되어 층별로 부품을 형성합니다. 이러한 부품은 더 나은 치밀화를 달성하기 위해 소결됩니다.

FLOW-3D AM 의 자유 표면 추적 알고리즘과 다중 물리 모델은 이러한 각 프로세스를 높은 정확도로 시뮬레이션 할 수 있습니다. 레이저 파우더 베드 융합 (L-PBF) 공정 모델링 단계는 여기에서 자세히 설명합니다. DED 및 바인더 분사 공정에 대한 몇 가지 개념 증명 시뮬레이션도 표시됩니다.

레이저 파우더 베드 퓨전 (L-PBF)

LPBF 공정에는 유체 흐름, 열 전달, 표면 장력, 상 변화 및 응고와 같은 복잡한 다중 물리학 현상이 포함되어 공정 및 궁극적으로 빌드 품질에 상당한 영향을 미칩니다. FLOW-3D AM 의 물리적 모델은 질량, 운동량 및 에너지 보존 방정식을 동시에 해결하는 동시에 입자 크기 분포 및 패킹 비율을 고려하여 중규모에서 용융 풀 현상을 시뮬레이션합니다.

FLOW-3D DEM FLOW-3D WELD 는 전체 파우더 베드 융합 공정을 시뮬레이션하는 데 사용됩니다. L-PBF 공정의 다양한 단계는 분말 베드 놓기, 분말 용융 및 응고,이어서 이전에 응고 된 층에 신선한 분말을 놓는 것, 그리고 다시 한번 새 층을 이전 층에 녹이고 융합시키는 것입니다. FLOW-3D AM  은 이러한 각 단계를 시뮬레이션하는 데 사용할 수 있습니다.

파우더 베드 부설 공정

FLOW-3D DEM을 통해 분말 크기 분포, 재료 특성, 응집 효과는 물론 롤러 또는 블레이드 움직임 및 상호 작용과 같은 기하학적 효과와 관련된 분말 확산 및 압축을 이해할 수 있습니다. 이러한 시뮬레이션은 공정 매개 변수가 후속 인쇄 공정에서 용융 풀 역학에 직접적인 영향을 미치는 패킹 밀도와 같은 분말 베드 특성에 어떻게 영향을 미치는지에 대한 정확한 이해를 제공합니다.

다양한 파우더 베드 압축을 달성하는 한 가지 방법은 베드를 놓는 동안 다양한 입자 크기 분포를 선택하는 것입니다. 아래에서 볼 수 있듯이 세 가지 크기의 입자 크기 분포가 있으며, 이는 가장 높은 압축을 제공하는 Case 2와 함께 다양한 분말 베드 압축을 초래합니다.

파우더 베드 분포 다양한 입자 크기 분포
세 가지 다른 입자 크기 분포를 사용하여 파우더 베드 배치
파우더 베드 압축 결과
세 가지 다른 입자 크기 분포를 사용한 분말 베드 압축

입자-입자 상호 작용, 유체-입자 결합 및 입자 이동 물체 상호 작용은 FLOW-3D DEM을 사용하여 자세히 분석 할 수도 있습니다 . 또한 입자간 힘을 지정하여 분말 살포 응용 분야를 보다 정확하게 연구 할 수도 있습니다.

FLOW-3D AM  시뮬레이션은 이산 요소 방법 (DEM)을 사용하여 역 회전하는 원통형 롤러로 인한 분말 확산을 연구합니다. 비디오 시작 부분에서 빌드 플랫폼이 위로 이동하는 동안 분말 저장소가 아래로 이동합니다. 그 직후, 롤러는 분말 입자 (초기 위치에 따라 색상이 지정됨)를 다음 층이 녹고 구축 될 준비를 위해 구축 플랫폼으로 펼칩니다. 이러한 시뮬레이션은 저장소에서 빌드 플랫폼으로 전송되는 분말 입자의 선호 크기에 대한 추가 통찰력을 제공 할 수 있습니다.

Melting | 파우더 베드 용해

DEM 시뮬레이션에서 파우더 베드가 생성되면 STL 파일로 추출됩니다. 다음 단계는 CFD를 사용하여 레이저 용융 공정을 시뮬레이션하는 것입니다. 여기서는 레이저 빔과 파우더 베드의 상호 작용을 모델링 합니다. 이 프로세스를 정확하게 포착하기 위해 물리학에는 점성 흐름, 용융 풀 내의 레이저 반사 (광선 추적을 통해), 열 전달, 응고, 상 변화 및 기화, 반동 압력, 차폐 가스 압력 및 표면 장력이 포함됩니다. 이 모든 물리학은 이 복잡한 프로세스를 정확하게 시뮬레이션하기 위해 TruVOF 방법을 기반으로 개발되었습니다.

레이저 출력 200W, 스캔 속도 3.0m / s, 스폿 반경 100μm에서 파우더 베드의 용융 풀 분석.

용융 풀이 응고되면 FLOW-3D AM  압력 및 온도 데이터를 Abaqus 또는 MSC Nastran과 같은 FEA 도구로 가져와 응력 윤곽 및 변위 프로파일을 분석 할 수도 있습니다.

Multilayer | 다층 적층 제조

용융 풀 트랙이 응고되면 DEM을 사용하여 이전에 응고된 층에 새로운 분말 층의 확산을 시뮬레이션 할 수 있습니다. 유사하게, 레이저 용융은 새로운 분말 층에서 수행되어 후속 층 간의 융합 조건을 분석 할 수 있습니다.

해석 진행 절차는 첫 번째 용융층이 응고되면 입자의 두 번째 층이 응고 층에 증착됩니다. 새로운 분말 입자 층에 레이저 공정 매개 변수를 지정하여 용융 풀 시뮬레이션을 다시 수행합니다. 이 프로세스를 여러 번 반복하여 연속적으로 응고된 층 간의 융합, 빌드 내 온도 구배를 평가하는 동시에 다공성 또는 기타 결함의 형성을 모니터링 할 수 있습니다.

다층 적층 적층 제조 시뮬레이션

LPBF의 키홀 링 | Keyholing in LPBF

키홀링 중 다공성은 어떻게 형성됩니까? 이것은 TU Denmark의 연구원들이 FLOW-3D AM을 사용하여 답변한 질문이었습니다. 레이저 빔의 적용으로 기판이 녹으면 기화 및 상 변화로 인한 반동 압력이 용융 풀을 압박합니다. 반동 압력으로 인한 하향 흐름과 레이저 반사로 인한 추가 레이저 에너지 흡수가 공존하면 폭주 효과가 발생하여 용융 풀이 Keyholing으로 전환됩니다. 결국, 키홀 벽을 따라 온도가 변하기 때문에 표면 장력으로 인해 벽이 뭉쳐져서 진행되는 응고 전선에 의해 갇힐 수 있는 공극이 생겨 다공성이 발생합니다. FLOW-3D AM 레이저 파우더 베드 융합 공정 모듈은 키홀링 및 다공성 형성을 시뮬레이션 하는데 필요한 모든 물리 모델을 보유하고 있습니다.

바인더 분사 (Binder jetting)

Binder jetting 시뮬레이션은 모세관 힘의 영향을받는 파우더 베드에서 바인더의 확산 및 침투에 대한 통찰력을 제공합니다. 공정 매개 변수와 재료 특성은 증착 및 확산 공정에 직접적인 영향을 미칩니다.

Scan Strategy | 스캔 전략

스캔 전략은 온도 구배 및 냉각 속도에 영향을 미치기 때문에 미세 구조에 직접적인 영향을 미칩니다. 연구원들은 FLOW-3D AM 을 사용하여 결함 형성과 응고된 금속의 미세 구조에 영향을 줄 수 있는 트랙 사이에서 발생하는 재 용융을 이해하기 위한 최적의 스캔 전략을 탐색하고 있습니다. FLOW-3D AM 은 하나 또는 여러 레이저에 대해 시간에 따른 방향 속도를 구현할 때 완전한 유연성을 제공합니다.

Beam Shaping | 빔 형성

레이저 출력 및 스캔 전략 외에도 레이저 빔 모양과 열유속 분포는 LPBF 공정에서 용융 풀 역학에 큰 영향을 미칩니다. AM 기계 제조업체는 공정 안정성 및 처리량에 대해 다중 코어 및 임의 모양의 레이저 빔 사용을 모색하고 있습니다. FLOW-3D AM을 사용하면 멀티 코어 및 임의 모양의 빔 프로파일을 구현할 수 있으므로 생산량을 늘리고 부품 품질을 개선하기 위한 최상의 구성에 대한 통찰력을 제공 할 수 있습니다.

이 영역에서 수행 된 일부 작업에 대해 자세히 알아 보려면 “The Next Frontier of Metal AM”웨비나를 시청하십시오.

Multi-material Powder Bed Fusion | 다중 재료 분말 베드 융합

이 시뮬레이션에서 스테인리스 강 및 알루미늄 분말은 FLOW-3D AM 이 용융 풀 역학을 정확하게 포착하기 위해 추적하는 독립적으로 정의 된 온도 의존 재료 특성을 가지고 있습니다. 시뮬레이션은 용융 풀에서 재료 혼합을 이해하는 데 도움이됩니다.

다중 재료 용접 사례 연구

이종 금속의 레이저 키홀 용접에서 금속 혼합 조사

GM과 University of Utah의 연구원들은 FLOW-3D WELD 를 사용 하여 레이저 키홀 용접을 통한 이종 금속의 혼합을 이해했습니다. 그들은 반동 압력 및 Marangoni 대류와 관련하여 구리와 알루미늄의 혼합 농도에 대한 레이저 출력 및 스캔 속도의 영향을 조사했습니다. 그들은 시뮬레이션을 실험 결과와 비교했으며 샘플 내의 절단 단면에서 재료 농도 사이에 좋은 일치를 발견했습니다.

이종 금속의 레이저 키홀 용접에서 금속 혼합 조사
이종 금속의 레이저 키홀 용접에서 금속 혼합 조사
참조 : Wenkang Huang, Hongliang Wang, Teresa Rinker, Wenda Tan, 이종 금속의 레이저 키홀 용접에서 금속 혼합 조사 , Materials & Design, Volume 195, (2020). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.matdes.2020.109056
참조 : Wenkang Huang, Hongliang Wang, Teresa Rinker, Wenda Tan, 이종 금속의 레이저 키홀 용접에서 금속 혼합 조사 , Materials & Design, Volume 195, (2020). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.matdes.2020.109056

방향성 에너지 증착

FLOW-3D AM 의 내장 입자 모델 을 사용하여 직접 에너지 증착 프로세스를 시뮬레이션 할 수 있습니다. 분말 주입 속도와 고체 기질에 입사되는 열유속을 지정함으로써 고체 입자는 용융 풀에 질량, 운동량 및 에너지를 추가 할 수 있습니다. 다음 비디오에서 고체 금속 입자가 용융 풀에 주입되고 기판에서 용융 풀의 후속 응고가 관찰됩니다.

Fig. 1. A) Computational domain showing the cylinder, the profiles PF1, PF2 and the mining pit as set-up in the laboratory (B).

Numerical analysis of water flow around a bridge pier in a sand mined channel

모래 채굴 수로에서 교각 주변의 물 흐름에 대한 수치 해석

Oscar HERRERA-GRANADOS1,, Abhijit LADE2, , Bimlesh KUMAR3
1 Faculty of Civil Engineering, Wroclaw University of Science and Technology, Poland
email: Oscar.Herrera-Granados@pwr.edu.pl
2 3Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Guwahati, India
email: lade176104013@iitg.ac.in
email: bimk@iitg.ac.in

ABSTRACT

Extraction of sand from river beds has a variety of effects on the hydraulic and morphological characteristicsof the fluvial systems. Recent studies on mining pit have revealed that downstream reaches of the mining pitare more prone to erosion due to increased bed shear stresses. Bridge piers in the vicinity of such mining pitsare also prone to streambed instabilities due to turbulence alterations as suggested by a few recent studies.Thus, a numerical study was carried out to study the effects of a mining pit on the hydrodynamics around acircular pier. The numerical experiments were conducted with the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codeFlow-3D, which can run several turbulence model closures. In this contribution, the authors applied theclassical RANS equations with the volume of fluid (VOF) method (Savage and Johnson, 2001).

강바닥에서 모래를 추출하는 것은 하강 시스템의 수력 학적 및 형태 학적 특성에 다양한 영향을 미칩니다. 광산 구덩이에 대한 최근 연구에 따르면 광산 구덩이의 하류 도달은 베드 전단 응력 증가로 인해 침식되기 쉽습니다. 이러한 광산 구덩이 근처의 교각은 최근 몇 가지 연구에서 제안한 바와 같이 난류 변화로 인해 유동 불안정성이 발생하기 쉽습니다. 따라서 원형 부두 주변의 유체 역학에 대한 광산 구덩이의 영향을 연구하기 위해 수치 연구가 수행되었습니다. 수치 실험은 CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) 코드 Flow-3D로 수행되었으며, 여러 난류 모델 폐쇄를 실행할 수 있습니다. 이 공헌에서 저자는 VOF (volume of fluid) 방법 (Savage and Johnson, 2001)과 함께 고전적인 RANS 방정식을 적용했습니다.

1. Set-up and boundary conditions

두 번의 수치 실행 결과가 이 기여도에서 비교됩니다. 첫 번째 실험에서 0.044 [m3-s-1]의 정상 유량이 원통 부두가 있는 1.0 [m] 폭의 채널을 따라 흐르는 상류 경계 조건으로 설정되었습니다. 계산 영역은 IIT Guwahati 수력학 실험실 (Lade et al., 2019b)의 틸팅 유체 크기를 기반으로 정의됩니다. 두 번째 실행에서는 동일한 배출물이 실린더의 상류에 있는 준설 사다리꼴 구덩이와 함께 실린더 주위로 통과되었습니다. 구덩이의 깊이는 0.1 [m]이고 수로 전체에 걸쳐 확장되었습니다. 수로의 길이 방향을 따라 피트의 상단 너비는 0.67 [m], 하단 너비는 0.33 [m]였습니다.

이 연구의 주요 초점은 채굴 구덩이 (그림 1의 PF2)가있을 때 구덩이 하류 (그림 1의 PF1)와 실린더 하류의 흐름 특성의 변화를 조사하는 것이 었습니다. 따라서 채널 베드는 고정 베드 모델을 사용하여 시뮬레이션 되었습니다. 두 실험의 수압 조건은 CFD 경계 조건으로 설정된 표 1에 나와 있습니다. 배출구 (하류 경계 조건)는 실험실 기록 중에 측정된 수심을 사용하여 설정되었습니다 (Lade et al., 2019a).

Fig. 1. A) Computational domain showing the cylinder, the profiles PF1, PF2 and the mining pit as set-up in the laboratory (B).
Fig. 1. A) Computational domain showing the cylinder, the profiles PF1, PF2 and the mining pit as set-up in the laboratory (B).
Fig. 2. Output of the CFD model (velocity magnitude) without the sand pit (left side) and with the trapezoidal sand pit (right side).
Fig. 2. Output of the CFD model (velocity magnitude) without the sand pit (left side) and with the trapezoidal sand pit (right side).
Fig. 3. Output of the CFD model. Streamwise velocity ux, TKE as well as Lt profiles along the locations PF1 and PF2
Fig. 3. Output of the CFD model. Streamwise velocity ux, TKE as well as Lt profiles along the locations PF1 and PF2

References

Herrera-Granados O (2018) Turbulence flow modeling of one-sharp-groyne field. In Free surface flows and transport processes :
36th International School of Hydraulics. Geoplanet: Earth and Planetary Series. Springer IP AG, 207-218.
Lade AD, Deshpande V, Kumar B (2019a) Study of flow turbulence around a circular bridge pier in sand-mined stream channel.
Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers – Water Management,https://doi.org/10.1680/jwama.19.00041
Lade AD, A, DT, Kumar B (2019b) Randomness in flow turbulence around a bridge pier in a sand
mined channel..Physica A 535 122426
Savage, BM, Johnson, M.C (2001). Flow over ogee spillway: Physical and numerical model case study. J. Hydraulic Eng.,
127(8), 640–649.

Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Civil, Offshore and Environmental Engineering (ICCOEE2020)

Numerical Simulation to Assess Floating Instability of Small Passenger Vehicle Under Sub-critical Flow

미 임계 흐름에서 소형 승용차의 부동 불안정성을 평가하기 위한 수치 시뮬레이션

Proceedings of the International Conference on Civil, Offshore and Environmental Engineering
ICCOEE 2021: ICCOEE2020 pp 258-265| Cite as

  • Ebrahim Hamid Hussein Al-Qadami
  • Zahiraniza Mustaffa
  • Eduardo Martínez-Gomariz
  • Khamaruzaman Wan Yusof
  • Abdurrasheed S. Abdurrasheed
  • Syed Muzzamil Hussain Shah

Conference paperFirst Online: 01 January 2021

  • 355Downloads

Part of the Lecture Notes in Civil Engineering book series (LNCE, volume 132)

Abstract

Parked vehicles can be directly affected by the floods and at a certain flow velocity and depth, vehicles can be easily swept away. Therefore, studying flooded vehicles stability limits is required. Herein, an attempt has been done to assess numerically the floating instability mode of a small passenger car with a scaled-down ratio of 1:10 using FLOW-3D. The 3D car model was placed inside a closed box and the six degrees of freedom numerical simulation was conducted. Later, numerical results validated experimentally and analytically. Results showed that buoyancy depths were 3.6 and 3.8 cm numerically and experimentally, respectively with a percentage difference of 5.4%. Further, the buoyancy forces were 8.95 N and 8.97 N numerically and analytically, respectively with a percentage difference of 0.2%. With this small difference, it can be concluded that the numerical modeling for such cases using FLOW-3D software can give an acceptable prediction on the vehicle stability limits.

주차된 차량은 홍수의 직접적인 영향을 받을 수 있으며 특정 유속과 깊이에서 차량을 쉽게 쓸어 버릴 수 있습니다. 따라서 침수 차량 안정성 한계를 연구해야 합니다. 여기에서는 FLOW-3D를 사용하여 축소 비율이 1:10 인 소형 승용차의 부동 불안정 모드를 수치 적으로 평가하려는 시도가 이루어졌습니다. 3D 자동차 모델은 닫힌 상자 안에 배치되었고 6 개의 자유도 수치 시뮬레이션이 수행되었습니다. 나중에 수치 결과는 실험적으로 그리고 분석적으로 검증되었습니다. 결과는 부력 깊이가 각각 5.4 %의 백분율 차이로 수치 및 실험적으로 3.6 및 3.8 cm임을 보여 주었다. 또한 부력은 수치적으로 8.95N과 분석적으로 8.97N이었고 백분율 차이는 0.2 %였다. 이 작은 차이로 인해 FLOW-3D 소프트웨어를 사용한 이러한 경우의 수치 모델링은 차량 안정성 한계에 대한 허용 가능한 예측을 제공 할 수 있다는 결론을 내릴 수 있습니다.

Keywords

Floating instability Small passenger car Numerical simulation FLOW-3D Subcritical flowe 

References

  1. 1.Hung, C.L.J., James, L.A., Carbone, G.J., Williams, J.M.: Impacts of combined land-use and climate change on streamflow in two nested catchments in the southeastern united states. Ecol. Eng. 143, 105665 (2020)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.Bui, D.T., Hoang, N.D., Martínez-Álvarez, F., Ngo, P.T.T., Hoa, P.V., Pham, T.D., Samui, P., Costache, R.: A novel deep learning neural network approach for predicting flash flood susceptibility: a case study at a high frequency tropical storm area. Sci. Total Environ. 701, 134413 (2020)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.Shah, S.M.H., Mustaffa, Z., Martínez-Gomariz, E., Yusof, K.W., Al-Qadami, E.H.H.: A review of safety guidelines for vehicles in floodwaters. Int. J. River Basin Manage. 1–17 (2019)Google Scholar
  4. 4.Shah, S.M.H., Mustaffa, Z., Yusof, K.W.: Disasters worldwide and floods in the malaysian region: a brief review. Indian J. Sci. Technol. 10(2), (2017)Google Scholar
  5. 5.Xia, J., Falconer, R.A., Lin, B., Tan, G.: Numerical assessment of flood hazard risk to people and vehicles in flash floods. Environ. Model Softw. 26(8), 987–998 (2011)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.Bonham, A.J., Hattersley, R.T.: Low level causeways. Technical report, University of New South Wales, Water Research Laboratory (1967)Google Scholar
  7. 7.Gordon, A.D., Stone, P.B.: Car stability on road causeways. Technical report No. 73/12, Institution (1973)Google Scholar
  8. 8.Keller, R.J., Mitsch, B.: Safety aspects of the design of roadways as floodways. Research Report No. 69, Urban Water Research Association of Australia, Melbourne (1993)Google Scholar
  9. 9.Shah, S.M.H., Mustaffa, Z., Martinez-Gomariz, E., Kim, D.K., Yusof, K.W.: Criterion of vehicle instability in floodwaters: past, present and future. Int. J. River Basin Manage. 1–23 (2019)Google Scholar
  10. 10.Teo, F.Y.: Study of the hydrodynamic processes Ofrivers and flood- plains with obstructions. Ph.D. thesis (2010). https://orca.cf.ac.uk/54161/1/U517543.pdf
  11. 11.Xia, J., Teo, F.Y., Lin, B., Falconer, R.A.: Formula of incipient velocity for flooded vehicles. Nat. Hazards 58(1), 1–14 (2011)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.Shu, C., Xia, J., Falconer, R.A., Lin, B.: Incipient velocity for partially submerged vehicles in floodwaters. J. Hydraul. Res. 49(6), 709–717 (2011)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.Toda, K., Ishigaki, T., Ozaki, T.: Experiments study on floating car in flooding. In: International Conference on Flood Resilience: Experiences in Asia and Europe (2013)Google Scholar
  14. 14.Xia, J., Falconer, R.A., Xiao, X., Wang, Y.: Criterion of vehicle stability in floodwaters based on theoretical and experimental studies. Nat. Hazards 70(2), 1619–1630 (2014)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.Martínez-Gomariz, E., Gómez, M., Russo, B., Djordjević, S.: A new experiments-based methodology to define the stability threshold for any vehicle exposed to flooding. Urban Water J. 14(9), 930–939 (2017)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.Smith, G.P., Modra, B.D., Tucker, T.A., Cox, R.J.: Vehicle stability testing for flood flows. Technical report 7, Water Research Laboratory, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering (2017)Google Scholar
  17. 17.Xia, J., Falconer, R.A., Lin, B., Tan, G.: Modelling flash flood risk in urban areas. In: Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers-Water Management, vol. 164 (6), pp. 267–282. Thomas Telford Ltd, (2011)Google Scholar
  18. 18.Arrighi, C., Alcèrreca-Huerta, J.C., Oumeraci, H., Castelli, F.: Drag and lift contribution to the incipient motion of partly submerged flooded vehicles. J. Fluids Struct. 57, 170–184 (2015)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.Gómez, M., Martínez, E., Russo, B.: Experimental and numerical study of stability of vehicles exposed to flooding. In: Advances in Hydroinformatics, pp. 595–605. Springer, Singapore (2018). http://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-10-7218-5_42
  20. 20.Al-Qadami, E.H.H., Abdurrasheed, A.S.I., Mustaffa, Z., Yusof, K.W., Malek, M.A., Ab Ghani, A.: Numerical modelling of flow characteristics over sharp crested triangular hump. Results Eng. 4, 100052 (2019)Google Scholar
Figure 6. Evolution of melt pool in the overhang region (θ = 45°, P = 100 W, v = 1000 mm/s, the streamlines are shown by arrows).

Experimental and numerical investigation of the origin of surface roughness in laser powder bed fused overhang regions

레이저 파우더 베드 융합 오버행 영역에서 표면 거칠기의 원인에 대한 실험 및 수치 조사

Shaochuan Feng,Amar M. Kamat,Soheil Sabooni &Yutao PeiPages S66-S84 | Received 18 Jan 2021, Accepted 25 Feb 2021, Published online: 10 Mar 2021

ABSTRACT

Surface roughness of laser powder bed fusion (L-PBF) printed overhang regions is a major contributor to deteriorated shape accuracy/surface quality. This study investigates the mechanisms behind the evolution of surface roughness (Ra) in overhang regions. The evolution of surface morphology is the result of a combination of border track contour, powder adhesion, warp deformation, and dross formation, which is strongly related to the overhang angle (θ). When 0° ≤ θ ≤ 15°, the overhang angle does not affect Ra significantly since only a small area of the melt pool boundaries contacts the powder bed resulting in slight powder adhesion. When 15° < θ ≤ 50°, powder adhesion is enhanced by the melt pool sinking and the increased contact area between the melt pool boundary and powder bed. When θ > 50°, large waviness of the overhang contour, adhesion of powder clusters, severe warp deformation and dross formation increase Ra sharply.

레이저 파우더 베드 퓨전 (L-PBF) 프린팅 오버행 영역의 표면 거칠기는 형상 정확도 / 표면 품질 저하의 주요 원인입니다. 이 연구 는 오버행 영역에서 표면 거칠기 (Ra ) 의 진화 뒤에 있는 메커니즘을 조사합니다 . 표면 형태의 진화는 오버행 각도 ( θ ) 와 밀접한 관련이있는 경계 트랙 윤곽, 분말 접착, 뒤틀림 변형 및 드로스 형성의 조합의 결과입니다 . 0° ≤  θ  ≤ 15° 인 경우 , 용융풀 경계의 작은 영역 만 분말 베드와 접촉하여 약간의 분말 접착이 발생하기 때문에 오버행 각도가 R a에 큰 영향을 주지 않습니다 . 15° < θ 일 때  ≤ 50°, 용융 풀 싱킹 및 용융 풀 경계와 분말 베드 사이의 증가된 접촉 면적으로 분말 접착력이 향상됩니다. θ  > 50° 일 때 오버행 윤곽의 큰 파형, 분말 클러스터의 접착, 심한 휨 변형 및 드 로스 형성이 Ra 급격히 증가 합니다.

KEYWORDS: Laser powder bed fusion (L-PBF), melt pool dynamics, overhang region, shape deviation, surface roughness

1. Introduction

레이저 분말 베드 융합 (L-PBF)은 첨단 적층 제조 (AM) 기술로, 집중된 레이저 빔을 사용하여 금속 분말을 선택적으로 융합하여 슬라이스 된 3D 컴퓨터 지원에 따라 층별로 3 차원 (3D) 금속 부품을 구축합니다. 설계 (CAD) 모델 (Chatham, Long 및 Williams 2019 ; Tan, Zhu 및 Zhou 2020 ). 재료가 인쇄 층 아래에 ​​존재하는지 여부에 따라 인쇄 영역은 각각 솔리드 영역 또는 돌출 영역으로 분류 될 수 있습니다. 따라서 오버행 영역은 고체 기판이 아니라 분말 베드 바로 위에 건설되는 특수 구조입니다 (Patterson, Messimer 및 Farrington 2017). 오버행 영역은지지 구조를 포함하거나 포함하지 않고 구축 할 수 있으며, 지지대가있는 돌출 영역의 L-PBF는 지지체가 더 낮은 밀도로 구축된다는 점을 제외 하고 (Wang and Chou 2018 ) 고체 기판의 공정과 유사합니다 (따라서 기계적 강도가 낮기 때문에 L-PBF 공정 후 기계적으로 쉽게 제거 할 수 있습니다. 따라서지지 구조로 인쇄 된 오버행 영역은 L-PBF 공정 후 지지물 제거, 연삭 및 연마와 같은 추가 후 처리 단계가 필요합니다.

수평 내부 채널의 제작과 같은 일부 특정 경우에는 공정 후 지지대를 제거하기가 어려우므로 채널 상단 절반의 돌출부 영역을 지지대없이 건설해야합니다 (Hopkinson and Dickens 2000 ). 수평 내부 채널에 사용할 수없는지지 구조 외에도 내부 표면, 특히 등각 냉각 채널 (Feng, Kamat 및 Pei 2021 ) 에서 발생하는 복잡한 3D 채널 네트워크의 경우 표면 마감 프로세스를 구현하는 것도 어렵습니다 . 결과적으로 오버행 영역은 (i) 잔류 응력에 의한 변형, (ii) 계단 효과 (Kuo et al. 2020 ; Li et al. 2020 )로 인해 설계된 모양에서 벗어날 수 있습니다 .) 및 (iii) 원하지 않는 분말 소결로 인한 향상된 표면 거칠기; 여기서, 앞의 두 요소는 일반적으로 mm 길이 스케일에서 ‘매크로’편차로 분류되고 후자는 일반적으로 µm 길이 스케일에서 ‘마이크로’편차로 인식됩니다.

열 응력에 의한 변형은 오버행 영역에서 발생하는 중요한 문제입니다 (Patterson, Messimer 및 Farrington 2017 ). 국부적 인 용융 / 냉각은 용융 풀 내부 및 주변에서 큰 온도 구배를 유도하여 응고 된 층에 집중적 인 열 응력을 유발합니다. 열 응력에 의한 뒤틀림은 고체 영역을 현저하게 변형하지 않습니다. 이러한 영역은 아래의 여러 레이어에 의해 제한되기 때문입니다. 반면에 오버행 영역은 구속되지 않고 공정 중 응력 완화로 인해 상당한 변형이 발생합니다 (Kamat 및 Pei 2019 ). 더욱이 용융 깊이는 레이어 두께보다 큽니다 (이전 레이어도 재용 해되어 빌드 된 레이어간에 충분한 결합을 보장하기 때문입니다 [Yadroitsev et al. 2013 ; Kamath et al.2014 ]),응고 된 두께가 설계된 두께보다 크기 때문에형태 편차 (예 : 드 로스 [Charles et al. 2020 ; Feng et al. 2020 ])가 발생합니다. 마이크로 스케일에서 인쇄 된 표면 (R a 및 S a ∼ 10 μm)은 기계적으로 가공 된 표면보다 거칠다 (Duval-Chaneac et al. 2018 ; Wen et al. 2018 ). 이 문제는고형화 된 용융 풀의 가장자리에 부착 된 용융되지 않은 분말의 결과로 표면 거칠기 (R a )가 일반적으로 약 20 μm인 오버행 영역에서 특히 심각합니다 (Mazur et al. 2016 ; Pakkanen et al. 2016 ).

오버행 각도 ( θ , 빌드 방향과 관련하여 측정)는 오버행 영역의 뒤틀림 편향과 표면 거칠기에 영향을 미치는 중요한 매개 변수입니다 (Kamat and Pei 2019 ; Mingear et al. 2019 ). θ ∼ 45 ° 의 오버행 각도 는 일반적으로지지 구조없이 오버행 영역을 인쇄 할 수있는 임계 값으로 합의됩니다 (Pakkanen et al. 2016 ; Kadirgama et al. 2018 ). θ 일 때이 임계 값보다 크면 오버행 영역을 허용 가능한 표면 품질로 인쇄 할 수 없습니다. 오버행 각도 외에도 레이저 매개 변수 (레이저 에너지 밀도와 관련된)는 용융 풀의 모양 / 크기 및 용융 풀 역학에 영향을줌으로써 오버행 영역의 표면 거칠기에 영향을줍니다 (Wang et al. 2013 ; Mingear et al . 2019 ).

용융 풀 역학은 고체 (Shrestha 및 Chou 2018 ) 및 오버행 (Le et al. 2020 ) 영역 모두에서 수행되는 L-PBF 공정을 포함한 레이저 재료 가공의 일반적인 물리적 현상입니다 . 용융 풀 모양, 크기 및 냉각 속도는 잔류 응력으로 인한 변형과 ​​표면 거칠기에 모두 영향을 미치므로 처리 매개 변수와 표면 형태 / 품질 사이의 다리 역할을하며 용융 풀을 이해하기 위해 수치 시뮬레이션을 사용하여 추가 조사를 수행 할 수 있습니다. 거동과 표면 거칠기에 미치는 영향. 현재까지 고체 영역의 L-PBF 동안 용융 풀 동작을 시뮬레이션하기 위해 여러 연구가 수행되었습니다. 유한 요소 방법 (FEM)과 같은 시뮬레이션 기술 (Roberts et al. 2009 ; Du et al.2019 ), 유한 차분 법 (FDM) (Wu et al. 2018 ), 전산 유체 역학 (CFD) (Lee and Zhang 2016 ), 임의의 Lagrangian-Eulerian 방법 (ALE) (Khairallah and Anderson 2014 )을 사용하여 증발 반동 압력 (Hu et al. 2018 ) 및 Marangoni 대류 (Zhang et al. 2018 ) 현상을포함하는 열 전달 (온도 장) 및 물질 전달 (용융 흐름) 프로세스. 또한 이산 요소법 (DEM)을 사용하여 무작위 분산 분말 베드를 생성했습니다 (Lee and Zhang 2016 ; Wu et al. 2018 ). 이 모델은 분말 규모의 L-PBF 공정을 시뮬레이션했습니다 (Khairallah et al. 2016) 메조 스케일 (Khairallah 및 Anderson 2014 ), 단일 트랙 (Leitz et al. 2017 )에서 다중 트랙 (Foroozmehr et al. 2016 ) 및 다중 레이어 (Huang, Khamesee 및 Toyserkani 2019 )로.

그러나 결과적인 표면 거칠기를 결정하는 오버행 영역의 용융 풀 역학은 문헌에서 거의 관심을받지 못했습니다. 솔리드 영역의 L-PBF에 대한 기존 시뮬레이션 모델이 어느 정도 참조가 될 수 있지만 오버행 영역과 솔리드 영역 간의 용융 풀 역학에는 상당한 차이가 있습니다. 오버행 영역에서 용융 금속은 분말 입자 사이의 틈새로 아래로 흘러 용융 풀이 다공성 분말 베드가 제공하는 약한 지지체 아래로 가라 앉습니다. 이것은 중력과 표면 장력의 영향이 용융 풀의 결과적인 모양 / 크기를 결정하는 데 중요하며, 결과적으로 오버행 영역의 마이크로 스케일 형태의 진화에 중요합니다. 또한 분말 입자 사이의 공극, 열 조건 (예 : 에너지 흡수,2019 ; Karimi et al. 2020 ; 노래와 영 2020 ). 표면 거칠기는 (마이크로) 형상 편차를 증가시킬뿐만 아니라 주기적 하중 동안 미세 균열의 시작 지점 역할을함으로써 기계적 강도를 저하시킵니다 (Günther et al. 2018 ). 오버행 영역의 높은 표면 거칠기는 (마이크로) 정확도 / 품질에 대한 엄격한 요구 사항이있는 부품 제조에서 L-PBF의 적용을 제한합니다.

본 연구는 실험 및 시뮬레이션 연구를 사용하여 오버행 영역 (지지물없이 제작)의 미세 형상 편차 형성 메커니즘과 표면 거칠기의 기원을 체계적이고 포괄적으로 조사합니다. 결합 된 DEM-CFD 시뮬레이션 모델은 경계 트랙 윤곽, 분말 접착 및 뒤틀림 변형의 효과를 고려하여 오버행 영역의 용융 풀 역학과 표면 형태의 형성 메커니즘을 나타 내기 위해 개발되었습니다. 표면 거칠기 R의 시뮬레이션 및 단일 요인 L-PBF 인쇄 실험을 사용하여 오버행 각도의 함수로 연구됩니다. 용융 풀의 침몰과 관련된 오버행 영역에서 분말 접착의 세 가지 메커니즘이 식별되고 자세히 설명됩니다. 마지막으로, 인쇄 된 오버행 영역에서 높은 표면 거칠기 문제를 완화 할 수 있는 잠재적 솔루션에 대해 간략하게 설명합니다.

The shape and size of the L-PBF printed samples are illustrated in Figure 1
The shape and size of the L-PBF printed samples are illustrated in Figure 1
Figure 2. Borders in the overhang region depending on the overhang angle θ
Figure 2. Borders in the overhang region depending on the overhang angle θ
Figure 3. (a) Profile of the volumetric heat source, (b) the model geometry of single-track printing on a solid substrate (unit: µm), and (c) the comparison of melt pool dimensions obtained from the experiment (right half) and simulation (left half) for a calibrated optical penetration depth of 110 µm (laser power 200 W and scan speed 800 mm/s, solidified layer thickness 30 µm, powder size 10–45 µm).
Figure 3. (a) Profile of the volumetric heat source, (b) the model geometry of single-track printing on a solid substrate (unit: µm), and (c) the comparison of melt pool dimensions obtained from the experiment (right half) and simulation (left half) for a calibrated optical penetration depth of 110 µm (laser power 200 W and scan speed 800 mm/s, solidified layer thickness 30 µm, powder size 10–45 µm).
Figure 4. The model geometry of an overhang being L-PBF processed: (a) 3D view and (b) right view.
Figure 4. The model geometry of an overhang being L-PBF processed: (a) 3D view and (b) right view.
Figure 5. The cross-sectional contour of border tracks in a 45° overhang region.
Figure 5. The cross-sectional contour of border tracks in a 45° overhang region.
Figure 6. Evolution of melt pool in the overhang region (θ = 45°, P = 100 W, v = 1000 mm/s, the streamlines are shown by arrows).
Figure 6. Evolution of melt pool in the overhang region (θ = 45°, P = 100 W, v = 1000 mm/s, the streamlines are shown by arrows).
Figure 7. The overhang contour is contributed by (a) only outer borders when θ ≤ 60° (b) both inner borders and outer borders when θ > 60°.
Figure 7. The overhang contour is contributed by (a) only outer borders when θ ≤ 60° (b) both inner borders and outer borders when θ > 60°.
Figure 8. Schematic of powder adhesion on a 45° overhang region.
Figure 8. Schematic of powder adhesion on a 45° overhang region.
Figure 9. The L-PBF printed samples with various overhang angle (a) θ = 0° (cube), (b) θ = 30°, (c) θ = 45°, (d) θ = 55° and (e) θ = 60°.
Figure 9. The L-PBF printed samples with various overhang angle (a) θ = 0° (cube), (b) θ = 30°, (c) θ = 45°, (d) θ = 55° and (e) θ = 60°.
Figure 10. Two mechanisms of powder adhesion related to the overhang angle: (a) simulation-predicted, θ = 45°; (b) simulation-predicted, θ = 60°; (c, e) optical micrographs, θ = 45°; (d, f) optical micrographs, θ = 60°. (e) and (f) are partial enlargement of (c) and (d), respectively.
Figure 10. Two mechanisms of powder adhesion related to the overhang angle: (a) simulation-predicted, θ = 45°; (b) simulation-predicted, θ = 60°; (c, e) optical micrographs, θ = 45°; (d, f) optical micrographs, θ = 60°. (e) and (f) are partial enlargement of (c) and (d), respectively.
Figure 11. Simulation-predicted surface morphology in the overhang region at different overhang angle: (a) θ = 15°, (b) θ = 30°, (c) θ = 45°, (d) θ = 60° and (e) θ = 80° (Blue solid lines: simulation-predicted contour; red dashed lines: the planar profile of designed overhang region specified by the overhang angles).
Figure 11. Simulation-predicted surface morphology in the overhang region at different overhang angle: (a) θ = 15°, (b) θ = 30°, (c) θ = 45°, (d) θ = 60° and (e) θ = 80° (Blue solid lines: simulation-predicted contour; red dashed lines: the planar profile of designed overhang region specified by the overhang angles).
Figure 12. Effect of overhang angle on surface roughness Ra in overhang regions
Figure 12. Effect of overhang angle on surface roughness Ra in overhang regions
Figure 13. Surface morphology of L-PBF printed overhang regions with different overhang angle: (a) θ = 15°, (b) θ = 30°, (c) θ = 45° and (d) θ = 60° (overhang border parameters: P = 100 W, v = 1000 mm/s).
Figure 13. Surface morphology of L-PBF printed overhang regions with different overhang angle: (a) θ = 15°, (b) θ = 30°, (c) θ = 45° and (d) θ = 60° (overhang border parameters: P = 100 W, v = 1000 mm/s).
Figure 14. Effect of (a) laser power (scan speed = 1000 mm/s) and (b) scan speed (lase power = 100 W) on surface roughness Ra in overhang regions (θ = 45°, laser power and scan speed referred to overhang border parameters, and the other process parameters are listed in Table 2).
Figure 14. Effect of (a) laser power (scan speed = 1000 mm/s) and (b) scan speed (lase power = 100 W) on surface roughness Ra in overhang regions (θ = 45°, laser power and scan speed referred to overhang border parameters, and the other process parameters are listed in Table 2).

References

  • Cai, Chao, Chrupcala Radoslaw, Jinliang Zhang, Qian Yan, Shifeng Wen, Bo Song, and Yusheng Shi. 2019. “In-Situ Preparation and Formation of TiB/Ti-6Al-4V Nanocomposite via Laser Additive Manufacturing: Microstructure Evolution and Tribological Behavior.” Powder Technology 342: 73–84. doi:10.1016/j.powtec.2018.09.088. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Cai, Chao, Wei Shian Tey, Jiayao Chen, Wei Zhu, Xingjian Liu, Tong Liu, Lihua Zhao, and Kun Zhou. 2021. “Comparative Study on 3D Printing of Polyamide 12 by Selective Laser Sintering and Multi Jet Fusion.” Journal of Materials Processing Technology 288 (August 2020): 116882. doi:10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2020.116882. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Cai, Chao, Xu Wu, Wan Liu, Wei Zhu, Hui Chen, Jasper Dong Qiu Chua, Chen Nan Sun, Jie Liu, Qingsong Wei, and Yusheng Shi. 2020. “Selective Laser Melting of Near-α Titanium Alloy Ti-6Al-2Zr-1Mo-1V: Parameter Optimization, Heat Treatment and Mechanical Performance.” Journal of Materials Science and Technology 57: 51–64. doi:10.1016/j.jmst.2020.05.004. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Charles, Amal, Ahmed Elkaseer, Lore Thijs, and Steffen G. Scholz. 2020. “Dimensional Errors Due to Overhanging Features in Laser Powder Bed Fusion Parts Made of Ti-6Al-4V.” Applied Sciences 10 (7): 2416. doi:10.3390/app10072416. [Crossref], [Google Scholar]
  • Chatham, Camden A., Timothy E. Long, and Christopher B. Williams. 2019. “A Review of the Process Physics and Material Screening Methods for Polymer Powder Bed Fusion Additive Manufacturing.” Progress in Polymer Science 93: 68–95. doi:10.1016/j.progpolymsci.2019.03.003. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Du, Yang, Xinyu You, Fengbin Qiao, Lijie Guo, and Zhengwu Liu. 2019. “A Model for Predicting the Temperature Field during Selective Laser Melting.” Results in Physics 12 (November 2018): 52–60. doi:10.1016/j.rinp.2018.11.031. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Duval-Chaneac, M. S., S. Han, C. Claudin, F. Salvatore, J. Bajolet, and J. Rech. 2018. “Experimental Study on Finishing of Internal Laser Melting (SLM) Surface with Abrasive Flow Machining (AFM).” Precision Engineering 54 (July 2017): 1–6. doi:10.1016/j.precisioneng.2018.03.006. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Feng, Shaochuan, Shijie Chen, Amar M. Kamat, Ru Zhang, Mingji Huang, and Liangcai Hu. 2020. “Investigation on Shape Deviation of Horizontal Interior Circular Channels Fabricated by Laser Powder Bed Fusion.” Additive Manufacturing 36 (December): 101585. doi:10.1016/j.addma.2020.101585. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Feng, Shaochuan, Chuanzhen Huang, Jun Wang, Hongtao Zhu, Peng Yao, and Zhanqiang Liu. 2017. “An Analytical Model for the Prediction of Temperature Distribution and Evolution in Hybrid Laser-Waterjet Micro-Machining.” Precision Engineering 47: 33–45. doi:10.1016/j.precisioneng.2016.07.002. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Feng, Shaochuan, Amar M. Kamat, and Yutao Pei. 2021. “Design and Fabrication of Conformal Cooling Channels in Molds: Review and Progress Updates.” International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer. doi:10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2021.121082. [Crossref], [PubMed], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Flow-3D V11.2 Documentation. 2016. Flow Science, Inc. [Crossref], [Google Scholar]
  • Foroozmehr, Ali, Mohsen Badrossamay, Ehsan Foroozmehr, and Sa’id Golabi. 2016. “Finite Element Simulation of Selective Laser Melting Process Considering Optical Penetration Depth of Laser in Powder Bed.” Materials and Design 89: 255–263. doi:10.1016/j.matdes.2015.10.002. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • “Geometrical Product Specifications (GPS) — Surface Texture: Profile Method — Rules and Procedures for the Assessment of Surface Texture (ISO 4288).” 1996. International Organization for Standardization. https://www.iso.org/standard/2096.html. [Google Scholar]
  • Günther, Johannes, Stefan Leuders, Peter Koppa, Thomas Tröster, Sebastian Henkel, Horst Biermann, and Thomas Niendorf. 2018. “On the Effect of Internal Channels and Surface Roughness on the High-Cycle Fatigue Performance of Ti-6Al-4V Processed by SLM.” Materials & Design 143: 1–11. doi:10.1016/j.matdes.2018.01.042. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Hopkinson, Neil, and Phill Dickens. 2000. “Conformal Cooling and Heating Channels Using Laser Sintered Tools.” In Solid Freeform Fabrication Conference, 490–497. Texas. doi:10.26153/tsw/3075. [Crossref], [Google Scholar]
  • Hu, Zhiheng, Haihong Zhu, Changchun Zhang, Hu Zhang, Ting Qi, and Xiaoyan Zeng. 2018. “Contact Angle Evolution during Selective Laser Melting.” Materials and Design 139: 304–313. doi:10.1016/j.matdes.2017.11.002. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Hu, Cheng, Kejia Zhuang, Jian Weng, and Donglin Pu. 2019. “Three-Dimensional Analytical Modeling of Cutting Temperature for Round Insert Considering Semi-Infinite Boundary and Non-Uniform Heat Partition.” International Journal of Mechanical Sciences 155 (October 2018): 536–553. doi:10.1016/j.ijmecsci.2019.03.019. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Huang, Yuze, Mir Behrad Khamesee, and Ehsan Toyserkani. 2019. “A New Physics-Based Model for Laser Directed Energy Deposition (Powder-Fed Additive Manufacturing): From Single-Track to Multi-Track and Multi-Layer.” Optics & Laser Technology 109 (August 2018): 584–599. doi:10.1016/j.optlastec.2018.08.015. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Kadirgama, K., W. S. W. Harun, F. Tarlochan, M. Samykano, D. Ramasamy, Mohd Zaidi Azir, and H. Mehboob. 2018. “Statistical and Optimize of Lattice Structures with Selective Laser Melting (SLM) of Ti6AL4V Material.” International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology 97 (1–4): 495–510. doi:10.1007/s00170-018-1913-1. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Kamat, Amar M, and Yutao Pei. 2019. “An Analytical Method to Predict and Compensate for Residual Stress-Induced Deformation in Overhanging Regions of Internal Channels Fabricated Using Powder Bed Fusion.” Additive Manufacturing 29 (March): 100796. doi:10.1016/j.addma.2019.100796. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Kamath, Chandrika, Bassem El-Dasher, Gilbert F. Gallegos, Wayne E. King, and Aaron Sisto. 2014. “Density of Additively-Manufactured, 316L SS Parts Using Laser Powder-Bed Fusion at Powers up to 400 W.” International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology 74 (1–4): 65–78. doi:10.1007/s00170-014-5954-9. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Karimi, J., C. Suryanarayana, I. Okulov, and K. G. Prashanth. 2020. “Selective Laser Melting of Ti6Al4V: Effect of Laser Re-Melting.” Materials Science and Engineering A (July): 140558. doi:10.1016/j.msea.2020.140558. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Khairallah, Saad A., and Andy Anderson. 2014. “Mesoscopic Simulation Model of Selective Laser Melting of Stainless Steel Powder.” Journal of Materials Processing Technology 214 (11): 2627–2636. doi:10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2014.06.001. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Khairallah, Saad A., Andrew T. Anderson, Alexander Rubenchik, and Wayne E. King. 2016. “Laser Powder-Bed Fusion Additive Manufacturing: Physics of Complex Melt Flow and Formation Mechanisms of Pores, Spatter, and Denudation Zones.” Edited by Adedeji B. Badiru, Vhance V. Valencia, and David Liu. Acta Materialia 108 (April): 36–45. doi:10.1016/j.actamat.2016.02.014. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Kuo, C. N., C. K. Chua, P. C. Peng, Y. W. Chen, S. L. Sing, S. Huang, and Y. L. Su. 2020. “Microstructure Evolution and Mechanical Property Response via 3D Printing Parameter Development of Al–Sc Alloy.” Virtual and Physical Prototyping 15 (1): 120–129. doi:10.1080/17452759.2019.1698967. [Taylor & Francis Online], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Le, K. Q., C. H. Wong, K. H. G. Chua, C. Tang, and H. Du. 2020. “Discontinuity of Overhanging Melt Track in Selective Laser Melting Process.” International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer 162 (December): 120284. doi:10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2020.120284. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Lee, Y. S., and W. Zhang. 2016. “Modeling of Heat Transfer, Fluid Flow and Solidification Microstructure of Nickel-Base Superalloy Fabricated by Laser Powder Bed Fusion.” Additive Manufacturing 12: 178–188. doi:10.1016/j.addma.2016.05.003. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Leitz, K. H., P. Singer, A. Plankensteiner, B. Tabernig, H. Kestler, and L. S. Sigl. 2017. “Multi-Physical Simulation of Selective Laser Melting.” Metal Powder Report 72 (5): 331–338. doi:10.1016/j.mprp.2016.04.004. [Crossref], [Google Scholar]
  • Li, Jian, Jing Hu, Yi Zhu, Xiaowen Yu, Mengfei Yu, and Huayong Yang. 2020. “Surface Roughness Control of Root Analogue Dental Implants Fabricated Using Selective Laser Melting.” Additive Manufacturing 34 (September 2019): 101283. doi:10.1016/j.addma.2020.101283. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Li, Yingli, Kun Zhou, Pengfei Tan, Shu Beng Tor, Chee Kai Chua, and Kah Fai Leong. 2018. “Modeling Temperature and Residual Stress Fields in Selective Laser Melting.” International Journal of Mechanical Sciences 136 (February): 24–35. doi:10.1016/j.ijmecsci.2017.12.001. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Mazur, MacIej, Martin Leary, Matthew McMillan, Joe Elambasseril, and Milan Brandt. 2016. “SLM Additive Manufacture of H13 Tool Steel with Conformal Cooling and Structural Lattices.” Rapid Prototyping Journal 22 (3): 504–518. doi:10.1108/RPJ-06-2014-0075. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Mingear, Jacob, Bing Zhang, Darren Hartl, and Alaa Elwany. 2019. “Effect of Process Parameters and Electropolishing on the Surface Roughness of Interior Channels in Additively Manufactured Nickel-Titanium Shape Memory Alloy Actuators.” Additive Manufacturing 27 (October 2018): 565–575. doi:10.1016/j.addma.2019.03.027. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Pakkanen, Jukka, Flaviana Calignano, Francesco Trevisan, Massimo Lorusso, Elisa Paola Ambrosio, Diego Manfredi, and Paolo Fino. 2016. “Study of Internal Channel Surface Roughnesses Manufactured by Selective Laser Melting in Aluminum and Titanium Alloys.” Metallurgical and Materials Transactions A 47 (8): 3837–3844. doi:10.1007/s11661-016-3478-7. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Patterson, Albert E., Sherri L. Messimer, and Phillip A. Farrington. 2017. “Overhanging Features and the SLM/DMLS Residual Stresses Problem: Review and Future Research Need.” Technologies 5 (4): 15. doi:10.3390/technologies5020015. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Roberts, I. A., C. J. Wang, R. Esterlein, M. Stanford, and D. J. Mynors. 2009. “A Three-Dimensional Finite Element Analysis of the Temperature Field during Laser Melting of Metal Powders in Additive Layer Manufacturing.” International Journal of Machine Tools and Manufacture 49 (12–13): 916–923. doi:10.1016/j.ijmachtools.2009.07.004. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Shrestha, Subin, and Kevin Chou. 2018. “Computational Analysis of Thermo-Fluid Dynamics with Metallic Powder in SLM.” In CFD Modeling and Simulation in Materials Processing 2018, edited by Laurentiu Nastac, Koulis Pericleous, Adrian S. Sabau, Lifeng Zhang, and Brian G. Thomas, 85–95. Cham, Switzerland: Springer Nature. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-72059-3_9. [Crossref], [Google Scholar]
  • Sing, S. L., and W. Y. Yeong. 2020. “Laser Powder Bed Fusion for Metal Additive Manufacturing: Perspectives on Recent Developments.” Virtual and Physical Prototyping 15 (3): 359–370. doi:10.1080/17452759.2020.1779999. [Taylor & Francis Online], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Šmilauer, Václav, Emanuele Catalano, Bruno Chareyre, Sergei Dorofeenko, Jérôme Duriez, Nolan Dyck, Jan Eliáš, et al. 2015. Yade Documentation. 2nd ed. The Yade Project. doi:10.5281/zenodo.34073. [Crossref], [Google Scholar]
  • Tan, Pengfei, Fei Shen, Biao Li, and Kun Zhou. 2019. “A Thermo-Metallurgical-Mechanical Model for Selective Laser Melting of Ti6Al4V.” Materials & Design 168 (April): 107642. doi:10.1016/j.matdes.2019.107642. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Tan, Lisa Jiaying, Wei Zhu, and Kun Zhou. 2020. “Recent Progress on Polymer Materials for Additive Manufacturing.” Advanced Functional Materials 30 (43): 1–54. doi:10.1002/adfm.202003062. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Wang, Xiaoqing, and Kevin Chou. 2018. “Effect of Support Structures on Ti-6Al-4V Overhang Parts Fabricated by Powder Bed Fusion Electron Beam Additive Manufacturing.” Journal of Materials Processing Technology 257 (February): 65–78. doi:10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2018.02.038. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Wang, Di, Yongqiang Yang, Ziheng Yi, and Xubin Su. 2013. “Research on the Fabricating Quality Optimization of the Overhanging Surface in SLM Process.” International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology 65 (9–12): 1471–1484. doi:10.1007/s00170-012-4271-4. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Wen, Peng, Maximilian Voshage, Lucas Jauer, Yanzhe Chen, Yu Qin, Reinhart Poprawe, and Johannes Henrich Schleifenbaum. 2018. “Laser Additive Manufacturing of Zn Metal Parts for Biodegradable Applications: Processing, Formation Quality and Mechanical Properties.” Materials and Design 155: 36–45. doi:10.1016/j.matdes.2018.05.057. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Wu, Yu-che, Cheng-hung San, Chih-hsiang Chang, Huey-jiuan Lin, Raed Marwan, Shuhei Baba, and Weng-Sing Hwang. 2018. “Numerical Modeling of Melt-Pool Behavior in Selective Laser Melting with Random Powder Distribution and Experimental Validation.” Journal of Materials Processing Technology 254 (November 2017): 72–78. doi:10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2017.11.032. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Yadroitsev, I., P. Krakhmalev, I. Yadroitsava, S. Johansson, and I. Smurov. 2013. “Energy Input Effect on Morphology and Microstructure of Selective Laser Melting Single Track from Metallic Powder.” Journal of Materials Processing Technology 213 (4): 606–613. doi:10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2012.11.014. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Yu, Wenhui, Swee Leong Sing, Chee Kai Chua, and Xuelei Tian. 2019. “Influence of Re-Melting on Surface Roughness and Porosity of AlSi10Mg Parts Fabricated by Selective Laser Melting.” Journal of Alloys and Compounds 792: 574–581. doi:10.1016/j.jallcom.2019.04.017. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Zhang, Dongyun, Pudan Zhang, Zhen Liu, Zhe Feng, Chengjie Wang, and Yanwu Guo. 2018. “Thermofluid Field of Molten Pool and Its Effects during Selective Laser Melting (SLM) of Inconel 718 Alloy.” Additive Manufacturing 21 (100): 567–578. doi:10.1016/j.addma.2018.03.031. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
Figure 1. (a) Top view of the microfluidic-magnetophoretic device, (b) Schematic representation of the channel cross-sections studied in this work, and (c) the magnet position relative to the channel location (Sepy and Sepz are the magnet separation distances in y and z, respectively).

Continuous-Flow Separation of Magnetic Particles from Biofluids: How Does the Microdevice Geometry Determine the Separation Performance?

1Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, ETSIIT, University of Cantabria, Avda. Los Castros s/n, 39005 Santander, Spain
2William G. Lowrie Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The Ohio State University, 151 W. Woodruff Ave., Columbus, OH 43210, USA
*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sensors 202020(11), 3030; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20113030
Received: 16 April 2020 / Revised: 21 May 2020 / Accepted: 25 May 2020 / Published: 27 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lab-on-a-Chip and Microfluidic Sensors)

Abstract

The use of functionalized magnetic particles for the detection or separation of multiple chemicals and biomolecules from biofluids continues to attract significant attention. After their incubation with the targeted substances, the beads can be magnetically recovered to perform analysis or diagnostic tests. Particle recovery with permanent magnets in continuous-flow microdevices has gathered great attention in the last decade due to the multiple advantages of microfluidics. As such, great efforts have been made to determine the magnetic and fluidic conditions for achieving complete particle capture; however, less attention has been paid to the effect of the channel geometry on the system performance, although it is key for designing systems that simultaneously provide high particle recovery and flow rates. Herein, we address the optimization of Y-Y-shaped microchannels, where magnetic beads are separated from blood and collected into a buffer stream by applying an external magnetic field. The influence of several geometrical features (namely cross section shape, thickness, length, and volume) on both bead recovery and system throughput is studied. For that purpose, we employ an experimentally validated Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) numerical model that considers the dominant forces acting on the beads during separation. Our results indicate that rectangular, long devices display the best performance as they deliver high particle recovery and high throughput. Thus, this methodology could be applied to the rational design of lab-on-a-chip devices for any magnetically driven purification, enrichment or isolation.

Keywords: particle magnetophoresisCFDcross sectionchip fabrication

Korea Abstract

생체 유체에서 여러 화학 물질과 생체 분자의 검출 또는 분리를위한 기능화 된 자성 입자의 사용은 계속해서 상당한 관심을 받고 있습니다. 표적 물질과 함께 배양 한 후 비드를 자기 적으로 회수하여 분석 또는 진단 테스트를 수행 할 수 있습니다. 연속 흐름 마이크로 장치에서 영구 자석을 사용한 입자 회수는 마이크로 유체의 여러 장점으로 인해 지난 10 년 동안 큰 관심을 모았습니다. 

따라서 완전한 입자 포획을 달성하기 위한 자기 및 유체 조건을 결정하기 위해 많은 노력을 기울였습니다. 그러나 높은 입자 회수율과 유속을 동시에 제공하는 시스템을 설계하는 데있어 핵심이기는 하지만 시스템 성능에 대한 채널 형상의 영향에 대해서는 덜주의를 기울였습니다. 

여기에서 우리는 자기 비드가 혈액에서 분리되고 외부 자기장을 적용하여 버퍼 스트림으로 수집되는 YY 모양의 마이크로 채널의 최적화를 다룹니다. 비드 회수 및 시스템 처리량에 대한 여러 기하학적 특징 (즉, 단면 형상, 두께, 길이 및 부피)의 영향을 연구합니다. 

이를 위해 분리 중에 비드에 작용하는 지배적인 힘을 고려하는 실험적으로 검증 된 CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) 수치 모델을 사용합니다. 우리의 결과는 직사각형의 긴 장치가 높은 입자 회수율과 높은 처리량을 제공하기 때문에 최고의 성능을 보여줍니다. 

따라서 이 방법론은 자기 구동 정제, 농축 또는 분리를 위한 랩온어 칩 장치의 합리적인 설계에 적용될 수 있습니다.

Figure 1. (a) Top view of the microfluidic-magnetophoretic device, (b) Schematic representation of the channel cross-sections studied in this work, and (c) the magnet position relative to the channel location (Sepy and Sepz are the magnet separation distances in y and z, respectively).
Figure 1. (a) Top view of the microfluidic-magnetophoretic device, (b) Schematic representation of the channel cross-sections studied in this work, and (c) the magnet position relative to the channel location (Sepy and Sepz are the magnet separation distances in y and z, respectively).
Figure 2. (a) Channel-magnet configuration and (b–d) magnetic force distribution in the channel midplane for 2 mm, 5 mm and 10 mm long rectangular (left) and U-shaped (right) devices.
Figure 2. (a) Channel-magnet configuration and (b–d) magnetic force distribution in the channel midplane for 2 mm, 5 mm and 10 mm long rectangular (left) and U-shaped (right) devices.
Figure 3. (a) Velocity distribution in a section perpendicular to the flow for rectangular (left) and U-shaped (right) cross section channels, and (b) particle location in these cross sections.
Figure 3. (a) Velocity distribution in a section perpendicular to the flow for rectangular (left) and U-shaped (right) cross section channels, and (b) particle location in these cross sections.
Figure 4. Influence of fluid flow rate on particle recovery when the applied magnetic force is (a) different and (b) equal in U-shaped and rectangular cross section microdevices.
Figure 4. Influence of fluid flow rate on particle recovery when the applied magnetic force is (a) different and (b) equal in U-shaped and rectangular cross section microdevices.
Figure 5. Magnetic bead capture as a function of fluid flow rate for all of the studied geometries.
Figure 5. Magnetic bead capture as a function of fluid flow rate for all of the studied geometries.
Figure 6. Influence of (a) magnetic and fluidic forces (J parameter) and (b) channel geometry (θ parameter) on particle recovery. Note that U-2mm does not accurately fit a line.
Figure 6. Influence of (a) magnetic and fluidic forces (J parameter) and (b) channel geometry (θ parameter) on particle recovery. Note that U-2mm does not accurately fit a line.
Figure 7. Dependence of bead capture on the (a) functional channel volume and (b) particle residence time (tres). Note that in the curve fitting expressions V represents the functional channel volume and that U-2mm does not accurately fit a line.
Figure 7. Dependence of bead capture on the (a) functional channel volume and (b) particle residence time (tres). Note that in the curve fitting expressions V represents the functional channel volume and that U-2mm does not accurately fit a line.

References

  1. Gómez-Pastora, J.; Xue, X.; Karampelas, I.H.; Bringas, E.; Furlani, E.P.; Ortiz, I. Analysis of separators for magnetic beads recovery: From large systems to multifunctional microdevices. Sep. Purif. Technol. 2017172, 16–31. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  2. Wise, N.; Grob, T.; Morten, K.; Thompson, I.; Sheard, S. Magnetophoretic velocities of superparamagnetic particles, agglomerates and complexes. J. Magn. Magn. Mater. 2015384, 328–334. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  3. Khashan, S.A.; Elnajjar, E.; Haik, Y. CFD simulation of the magnetophoretic separation in a microchannel. J. Magn. Magn. Mater. 2011323, 2960–2967. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  4. Khashan, S.A.; Furlani, E.P. Scalability analysis of magnetic bead separation in a microchannel with an array of soft magnetic elements in a uniform magnetic field. Sep. Purif. Technol. 2014125, 311–318. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  5. Furlani, E.P. Magnetic biotransport: Analysis and applications. Materials 20103, 2412–2446. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  6. Gómez-Pastora, J.; Bringas, E.; Ortiz, I. Design of novel adsorption processes for the removal of arsenic from polluted groundwater employing functionalized magnetic nanoparticles. Chem. Eng. Trans. 201647, 241–246. [Google Scholar]
  7. Gómez-Pastora, J.; Bringas, E.; Lázaro-Díez, M.; Ramos-Vivas, J.; Ortiz, I. The reverse of controlled release: Controlled sequestration of species and biotoxins into nanoparticles (NPs). In Drug Delivery Systems; Stroeve, P., Mahmoudi, M., Eds.; World Scientific: Hackensack, NJ, USA, 2017; pp. 207–244. ISBN 9789813201057. [Google Scholar]
  8. Ruffert, C. Magnetic bead-magic bullet. Micromachines 20167, 21. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  9. Yáñez-Sedeño, P.; Campuzano, S.; Pingarrón, J.M. Magnetic particles coupled to disposable screen printed transducers for electrochemical biosensing. Sensors 201616, 1585. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  10. Schrittwieser, S.; Pelaz, B.; Parak, W.J.; Lentijo-Mozo, S.; Soulantica, K.; Dieckhoff, J.; Ludwig, F.; Guenther, A.; Tschöpe, A.; Schotter, J. Homogeneous biosensing based on magnetic particle labels. Sensors 201616, 828. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  11. He, J.; Huang, M.; Wang, D.; Zhang, Z.; Li, G. Magnetic separation techniques in sample preparation for biological analysis: A review. J. Pharm. Biomed. Anal. 2014101, 84–101. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  12. Ha, Y.; Ko, S.; Kim, I.; Huang, Y.; Mohanty, K.; Huh, C.; Maynard, J.A. Recent advances incorporating superparamagnetic nanoparticles into immunoassays. ACS Appl. Nano Mater. 20181, 512–521. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  13. Gómez-Pastora, J.; González-Fernández, C.; Fallanza, M.; Bringas, E.; Ortiz, I. Flow patterns and mass transfer performance of miscible liquid-liquid flows in various microchannels: Numerical and experimental studies. Chem. Eng. J. 2018344, 487–497. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  14. Gale, B.K.; Jafek, A.R.; Lambert, C.J.; Goenner, B.L.; Moghimifam, H.; Nze, U.C.; Kamarapu, S.K. A review of current methods in microfluidic device fabrication and future commercialization prospects. Inventions 20183, 60. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  15. Nanobiotechnology; Concepts, Applications and Perspectives; Niemeyer, C.M.; Mirkin, C.A. (Eds.) Wiley-VCH: Weinheim, Germany, 2004; ISBN 3527305068. [Google Scholar]
  16. Khashan, S.A.; Dagher, S.; Alazzam, A.; Mathew, B.; Hilal-Alnaqbi, A. Microdevice for continuous flow magnetic separation for bioengineering applications. J. Micromech. Microeng. 201727, 055016. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  17. Basauri, A.; Gomez-Pastora, J.; Fallanza, M.; Bringas, E.; Ortiz, I. Predictive model for the design of reactive micro-separations. Sep. Purif. Technol. 2019209, 900–907. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  18. Abdollahi, P.; Karimi-Sabet, J.; Moosavian, M.A.; Amini, Y. Microfluidic solvent extraction of calcium: Modeling and optimization of the process variables. Sep. Purif. Technol. 2020231, 115875. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  19. Khashan, S.A.; Alazzam, A.; Furlani, E. A novel design for a microfluidic magnetophoresis system: Computational study. In Proceedings of the 12th International Symposium on Fluid Control, Measurement and Visualization (FLUCOME2013), Nara, Japan, 18–23 November 2013. [Google Scholar]
  20. Pamme, N. Magnetism and microfluidics. Lab Chip 20066, 24–38. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  21. Gómez-Pastora, J.; Amiri Roodan, V.; Karampelas, I.H.; Alorabi, A.Q.; Tarn, M.D.; Iles, A.; Bringas, E.; Paunov, V.N.; Pamme, N.; Furlani, E.P.; et al. Two-step numerical approach to predict ferrofluid droplet generation and manipulation inside multilaminar flow chambers. J. Phys. Chem. C 2019123, 10065–10080. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  22. Gómez-Pastora, J.; Karampelas, I.H.; Bringas, E.; Furlani, E.P.; Ortiz, I. Numerical analysis of bead magnetophoresis from flowing blood in a continuous-flow microchannel: Implications to the bead-fluid interactions. Sci. Rep. 20199, 7265. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  23. Tarn, M.D.; Pamme, N. On-Chip Magnetic Particle-Based Immunoassays Using Multilaminar Flow for Clinical Diagnostics. In Microchip Diagnostics Methods and Protocols; Taly, V., Viovy, J.L., Descroix, S., Eds.; Humana Press: New York, NY, USA, 2017; pp. 69–83. [Google Scholar]
  24. Phurimsak, C.; Tarn, M.D.; Peyman, S.A.; Greenman, J.; Pamme, N. On-chip determination of c-reactive protein using magnetic particles in continuous flow. Anal. Chem. 201486, 10552–10559. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  25. Wu, X.; Wu, H.; Hu, Y. Enhancement of separation efficiency on continuous magnetophoresis by utilizing L/T-shaped microchannels. Microfluid. Nanofluid. 201111, 11–24. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  26. Vojtíšek, M.; Tarn, M.D.; Hirota, N.; Pamme, N. Microfluidic devices in superconducting magnets: On-chip free-flow diamagnetophoresis of polymer particles and bubbles. Microfluid. Nanofluid. 201213, 625–635. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  27. Gómez-Pastora, J.; González-Fernández, C.; Real, E.; Iles, A.; Bringas, E.; Furlani, E.P.; Ortiz, I. Computational modeling and fluorescence microscopy characterization of a two-phase magnetophoretic microsystem for continuous-flow blood detoxification. Lab Chip 201818, 1593–1606. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  28. Forbes, T.P.; Forry, S.P. Microfluidic magnetophoretic separations of immunomagnetically labeled rare mammalian cells. Lab Chip 201212, 1471–1479. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  29. Nandy, K.; Chaudhuri, S.; Ganguly, R.; Puri, I.K. Analytical model for the magnetophoretic capture of magnetic microspheres in microfluidic devices. J. Magn. Magn. Mater. 2008320, 1398–1405. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  30. Plouffe, B.D.; Lewis, L.H.; Murthy, S.K. Computational design optimization for microfluidic magnetophoresis. Biomicrofluidics 20115, 013413. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  31. Hale, C.; Darabi, J. Magnetophoretic-based microfluidic device for DNA isolation. Biomicrofluidics 20148, 044118. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  32. Becker, H.; Gärtner, C. Polymer microfabrication methods for microfluidic analytical applications. Electrophoresis 200021, 12–26. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  33. Pekas, N.; Zhang, Q.; Nannini, M.; Juncker, D. Wet-etching of structures with straight facets and adjustable taper into glass substrates. Lab Chip 201010, 494–498. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  34. Wang, T.; Chen, J.; Zhou, T.; Song, L. Fabricating microstructures on glass for microfluidic chips by glass molding process. Micromachines 20189, 269. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  35. Castaño-Álvarez, M.; Pozo Ayuso, D.F.; García Granda, M.; Fernández-Abedul, M.T.; Rodríguez García, J.; Costa-García, A. Critical points in the fabrication of microfluidic devices on glass substrates. Sens. Actuators B Chem. 2008130, 436–448. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  36. Prakash, S.; Kumar, S. Fabrication of microchannels: A review. Proc. Inst. Mech. Eng. Part B J. Eng. Manuf. 2015229, 1273–1288. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  37. Leester-Schädel, M.; Lorenz, T.; Jürgens, F.; Ritcher, C. Fabrication of Microfluidic Devices. In Microsystems for Pharmatechnology: Manipulation of Fluids, Particles, Droplets, and Cells; Dietzel, A., Ed.; Springer: Basel, Switzerland, 2016; pp. 23–57. ISBN 9783319269207. [Google Scholar]
  38. Bartlett, N.W.; Wood, R.J. Comparative analysis of fabrication methods for achieving rounded microchannels in PDMS. J. Micromech. Microeng. 201626, 115013. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  39. Ng, P.F.; Lee, K.I.; Yang, M.; Fei, B. Fabrication of 3D PDMS microchannels of adjustable cross-sections via versatile gel templates. Polymers 201911, 64. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  40. Furlani, E.P.; Sahoo, Y.; Ng, K.C.; Wortman, J.C.; Monk, T.E. A model for predicting magnetic particle capture in a microfluidic bioseparator. Biomed. Microdevices 20079, 451–463. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  41. Tarn, M.D.; Peyman, S.A.; Robert, D.; Iles, A.; Wilhelm, C.; Pamme, N. The importance of particle type selection and temperature control for on-chip free-flow magnetophoresis. J. Magn. Magn. Mater. 2009321, 4115–4122. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  42. Furlani, E.P. Permanent Magnet and Electromechanical Devices; Materials, Analysis and Applications; Academic Press: Waltham, MA, USA, 2001. [Google Scholar]
  43. White, F.M. Viscous Fluid Flow; McGraw-Hill: New York, NY, USA, 1974. [Google Scholar]
  44. Mathew, B.; Alazzam, A.; El-Khasawneh, B.; Maalouf, M.; Destgeer, G.; Sung, H.J. Model for tracing the path of microparticles in continuous flow microfluidic devices for 2D focusing via standing acoustic waves. Sep. Purif. Technol. 2015153, 99–107. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  45. Furlani, E.J.; Furlani, E.P. A model for predicting magnetic targeting of multifunctional particles in the microvasculature. J. Magn. Magn. Mater. 2007312, 187–193. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  46. Furlani, E.P.; Ng, K.C. Analytical model of magnetic nanoparticle transport and capture in the microvasculature. Phys. Rev. E 200673, 061919. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  47. Eibl, R.; Eibl, D.; Pörtner, R.; Catapano, G.; Czermak, P. Cell and Tissue Reaction Engineering; Springer: Berlin/Heidelberg, Germany, 2009. [Google Scholar]
  48. Pamme, N.; Eijkel, J.C.T.; Manz, A. On-chip free-flow magnetophoresis: Separation and detection of mixtures of magnetic particles in continuous flow. J. Magn. Magn. Mater. 2006307, 237–244. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  49. Alorabi, A.Q.; Tarn, M.D.; Gómez-Pastora, J.; Bringas, E.; Ortiz, I.; Paunov, V.N.; Pamme, N. On-chip polyelectrolyte coating onto magnetic droplets-Towards continuous flow assembly of drug delivery capsules. Lab Chip 201717, 3785–3795. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  50. Zhang, H.; Guo, H.; Chen, Z.; Zhang, G.; Li, Z. Application of PECVD SiC in glass micromachining. J. Micromech. Microeng. 200717, 775–780. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  51. Mourzina, Y.; Steffen, A.; Offenhäusser, A. The evaporated metal masks for chemical glass etching for BioMEMS. Microsyst. Technol. 200511, 135–140. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  52. Mata, A.; Fleischman, A.J.; Roy, S. Fabrication of multi-layer SU-8 microstructures. J. Micromech. Microeng. 200616, 276–284. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  53. Su, N. 8 2000 Negative Tone Photoresist Formulations 2002–2025; MicroChem Corporation: Newton, MA, USA, 2002. [Google Scholar]
  54. Su, N. 8 2000 Negative Tone Photoresist Formulations 2035–2100; MicroChem Corporation: Newton, MA, USA, 2002. [Google Scholar]
  55. Fu, C.; Hung, C.; Huang, H. A novel and simple fabrication method of embedded SU-8 micro channels by direct UV lithography. J. Phys. Conf. Ser. 200634, 330–335. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  56. Kazoe, Y.; Yamashiro, I.; Mawatari, K.; Kitamori, T. High-pressure acceleration of nanoliter droplets in the gas phase in a microchannel. Micromachines 20167, 142. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  57. Sharp, K.V.; Adrian, R.J.; Santiago, J.G.; Molho, J.I. Liquid flows in microchannels. In MEMS: Introduction and Fundamentals; Gad-el-Hak, M., Ed.; CRC Press: Boca Raton, FL, USA, 2006; pp. 10-1–10-46. ISBN 9781420036572. [Google Scholar]
  58. Oh, K.W.; Lee, K.; Ahn, B.; Furlani, E.P. Design of pressure-driven microfluidic networks using electric circuit analogy. Lab Chip 201212, 515–545. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  59. Bruus, H. Theoretical Microfluidics; Oxford University Press: New York, NY, USA, 2008; ISBN 9788578110796. [Google Scholar]
  60. Beebe, D.J.; Mensing, G.A.; Walker, G.M. Physics and applications of microfluidics in biology. Annu. Rev. Biomed. Eng. 20024, 261–286. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  61. Yalikun, Y.; Tanaka, Y. Large-scale integration of all-glass valves on a microfluidic device. Micromachines 20167, 83. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  62. Van Heeren, H.; Verhoeven, D.; Atkins, T.; Tzannis, A.; Becker, H.; Beusink, W.; Chen, P. Design Guideline for Microfluidic Device and Component Interfaces (Part 2), Version 3; Available online: http://www.makefluidics.com/en/design-guideline?id=7 (accessed on 9 March 2020).
  63. Scheuble, N.; Iles, A.; Wootton, R.C.R.; Windhab, E.J.; Fischer, P.; Elvira, K.S. Microfluidic technique for the simultaneous quantification of emulsion instabilities and lipid digestion kinetics. Anal. Chem. 201789, 9116–9123. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  64. Lynch, E.C. Red blood cell damage by shear stress. Biophys. J. 197212, 257–273. [Google Scholar]
  65. Paul, R.; Apel, J.; Klaus, S.; Schügner, F.; Schwindke, P.; Reul, H. Shear stress related blood damage in laminar Couette flow. Artif. Organs 200327, 517–529. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  66. Gómez-Pastora, J.; Karampelas, I.H.; Xue, X.; Bringas, E.; Furlani, E.P.; Ortiz, I. Magnetic bead separation from flowing blood in a two-phase continuous-flow magnetophoretic microdevice: Theoretical analysis through computational fluid dynamics simulation. J. Phys. Chem. C 2017121, 7466–7477. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  67. Lim, J.; Yeap, S.P.; Leow, C.H.; Toh, P.Y.; Low, S.C. Magnetophoresis of iron oxide nanoparticles at low field gradient: The role of shape anisotropy. J. Colloid Interface Sci. 2014421, 170–177. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  68. Culbertson, C.T.; Sibbitts, J.; Sellens, K.; Jia, S. Fabrication of Glass Microfluidic Devices. In Microfluidic Electrophoresis: Methods and Protocols; Dutta, D., Ed.; Humana Press: New York, NY, USA, 2019; pp. 1–12. ISBN 978-1-4939-8963-8. [Google Scholar]
Fluid velocity magnitude including velocity vectors and blood volumetric fraction contours for scenario 3: (a,b) Magnet distance d = 0; (c,d) Magnet distance d = 1 mm.

Numerical Analysis of Bead Magnetophoresis from Flowing Blood in a Continuous-Flow Microchannel: Implications to the Bead-Fluid Interactions

Scientific Reports volume 9, Article number: 7265 (2019) Cite this article

Abstract

이 연구에서는 비드 운동과 유체 흐름에 미치는 영향에 대한 자세한 분석을 제공하기 위해 연속 흐름 마이크로 채널 내부의 비드 자기 영동에 대한 수치 흐름 중심 연구를 보고합니다.

수치 모델은 Lagrangian 접근 방식을 포함하며 영구 자석에 의해 생성 된 자기장의 적용에 의해 혈액에서 비드 분리 및 유동 버퍼로의 수집을 예측합니다.

다음 시나리오가 모델링됩니다. (i) 운동량이 유체에서 점 입자로 처리되는 비드로 전달되는 단방향 커플 링, (ii) 비드가 점 입자로 처리되고 운동량이 다음으로부터 전달되는 양방향 결합 비드를 유체로 또는 그 반대로, (iii) 유체 변위에서 비드 체적의 영향을 고려한 양방향 커플 링.

결과는 세 가지 시나리오에서 비드 궤적에 약간의 차이가 있지만 특히 높은 자기력이 비드에 적용될 때 유동장에 상당한 변화가 있음을 나타냅니다.

따라서 높은 자기력을 사용할 때 비드 운동과 유동장의 체적 효과를 고려한 정확한 전체 유동 중심 모델을 해결해야 합니다. 그럼에도 불구하고 비드가 중간 또는 낮은 자기력을 받을 때 계산적으로 저렴한 모델을 안전하게 사용하여 자기 영동을 모델링 할 수 있습니다.

Sketch of the magnetophoresis process in the continuous-flow microdevice.
Sketch of the magnetophoresis process in the continuous-flow microdevice.
Schematic view of the microdevice showing the working conditions set in the simulations.
Schematic view of the microdevice showing the working conditions set in the simulations.
Bead trajectories for different magnetic field conditions, magnet placed at different distances “d” from the channel: (a) d = 0; (b) d = 1 mm; (c) d = 1.5 mm; (d) d = 2 mm
Bead trajectories for different magnetic field conditions, magnet placed at different distances “d” from the channel: (a) d = 0; (b) d = 1 mm; (c) d = 1.5 mm; (d) d = 2 mm
Separation efficacy as a function of the magnet distance. Comparison between one-way and two-way coupling.
Separation efficacy as a function of the magnet distance. Comparison between one-way and two-way coupling.
(a) Fluid velocity magnitude including velocity vectors and (b) blood volumetric fraction contours with magnet distance d = 0 mm for scenario 1 (t = 0.25 s).
(a) Fluid velocity magnitude including velocity vectors and (b) blood volumetric fraction contours with magnet distance d = 0 mm for scenario 1 (t = 0.25 s).
luid velocity magnitude including velocity vectors and blood volumetric fraction contours for scenario 2: (a,b) Magnet distance d = 0 mm at t = 0.4 s; (c,d) Magnet distance d = 1 mm at t = 0.4 s.
luid velocity magnitude including velocity vectors and blood volumetric fraction contours for scenario 2: (a,b) Magnet distance d = 0 mm at t = 0.4 s; (c,d) Magnet distance d = 1 mm at t = 0.4 s.
Fluid velocity magnitude including velocity vectors and blood volumetric fraction contours for scenario 3: (a,b) Magnet distance d = 0; (c,d) Magnet distance d = 1 mm.
Fluid velocity magnitude including velocity vectors and blood volumetric fraction contours for scenario 3: (a,b) Magnet distance d = 0; (c,d) Magnet distance d = 1 mm.
Blood volumetric fraction contours. Scenario 1: (a) Magnet distance d = 0 and (b) Magnet distance d = 1 mm; Scenario 2: (c) Magnet distance d = 0 and (d) Magnet distance d = 1 mm; and Scenario 3: (e) Magnet distance d = 0 and (f) Magnet distance d = 1 mm.
Blood volumetric fraction contours. Scenario 1: (a) Magnet distance d = 0 and (b) Magnet distance d = 1 mm; Scenario 2: (c) Magnet distance d = 0 and (d) Magnet distance d = 1 mm; and Scenario 3: (e) Magnet distance d = 0 and (f) Magnet distance d = 1 mm.

References

  1. 1.Keshipour, S. & Khalteh, N. K. Oxidation of ethylbenzene to styrene oxide in the presence of cellulose-supported Pd magnetic nanoparticles. Appl. Organometal. Chem. 30, 653–656 (2016).CAS Article Google Scholar 
  2. 2.Neamtu, M. et al. Functionalized magnetic nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, catalytic application and assessment of toxicity. Sci. Rep. 8(1), 6278 (2018).ADS MathSciNet Article Google Scholar 
  3. 3.Gómez-Pastora, J., Bringas, E. & Ortiz, I. Recent progress and future challenges on the use of high performance magnetic nano-adsorbents in environmental applications. Chem. Eng. J. 256, 187–204 (2014).Article Google Scholar 
  4. 4.Gómez-Pastora, J., Bringas, E. & Ortiz, I. Design of novel adsorption processes for the removal of arsenic from polluted groundwater employing functionalized magnetic nanoparticles. Chem. Eng. Trans. 47, 241–246 (2016).Google Scholar 
  5. 5.Bagbi, Y., Sarswat, A., Mohan, D., Pandey, A. & Solanki, P. R. Lead and chromium adsorption from water using L-Cysteine functionalized magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles. Sci. Rep. 7(1), 7672 (2017).ADS Article Google Scholar 
  6. 6.Gómez-Pastora, J. et al. Review and perspectives on the use of magnetic nanophotocatalysts (MNPCs) in water treatment. Chem. Eng. J. 310, 407–427 (2017).Article Google Scholar 
  7. 7.Lee, H. Y. et al. A selective fluoroionophore based on BODIPY-functionalized magnetic silica nanoparticles: removal of Pb2+ from human blood. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 48, 1239–1243 (2009).CAS Article Google Scholar 
  8. 8.Buzea, C., Pacheco, I. I. & Robbie, K. Nanomaterials and nanoparticles: sources and toxicity. Biointerphases 2, MR17–MR71 (2007).Article Google Scholar 
  9. 9.Roux, S. et al. Multifunctional nanoparticles: from the detection of biomolecules to the therapy. Int. J. Nanotechnol. 7, 781–801 (2010).ADS CAS Article Google Scholar 
  10. 10.Gómez-Pastora, J., Bringas, E., Lázaro-Díez, M., Ramos-Vivas, J. & Ortiz, I. In Drug Delivery Systems (Stroeve, P. & Mahmoudi, M. ed) 207–244 (World Scientific, 2017).
  11. 11.Selmi, M., Gazzah, M. H. & Belmabrouk, H. Optimization of microfluidic biosensor efficiency by means of fluid flow engineering. Sci. Rep. 7(1), 5721 (2017).ADS Article Google Scholar 
  12. 12.Gómez-Pastora, J., González-Fernández, C., Fallanza, M., Bringas, E. & Ortiz, I. Flow patterns and mass transfer performance of miscible liquid-liquid flows in various microchannels: Numerical and experimental studies. Chem. Eng. J. 344, 487–497 (2018).Article Google Scholar 
  13. 13.Pamme, N. Magnetism and microfluidics. Lab Chip 6, 24–38 (2006).CAS Article Google Scholar 
  14. 14.Alorabi, A. Q. et al. On-chip polyelectrolyte coating onto magnetic droplets – towards continuous flow assembly of drug delivery capsules. Lab Chip 17, 3785–3795 (2017).CAS Article Google Scholar 
  15. 15.Gómez-Pastora, J. et al. Analysis of separators for magnetic beads recovery: from large systems to multifunctional microdevices. Sep. Purif. Technol. 172, 16–31 (2017).Article Google Scholar 
  16. 16.Tarn, M. D. & Pamme, N. On-chip magnetic particle-based immunoassays using multilaminar flow for clinical diagnosis. Methods Mol. Biol. 1547, 69–83 (2017).CAS Article Google Scholar 
  17. 17.Lv, C. et al. Integrated optofluidic-microfluidic twin channels: toward diverse application of lab-on-a-chip systems. Sci. Rep. 6, 19801 (2016).ADS CAS Article Google Scholar 
  18. 18.Gómez-Pastora, J. et al. Magnetic bead separation from flowing blood in a two-phase continuous-flow magnetophoretic microdevice: theoretical analysis through computational fluid dynamics simulation. J. Phys. Chem. C 121, 7466–7477 (2017).Article Google Scholar 
  19. 19.Furlani, E. P. Magnetic biotransport: analysis and applications. Materials 3, 2412–2446 (2010).ADS CAS Article Google Scholar 
  20. 20.Khashan, S. A. & Furlani, E. P. Effects of particle–fluid coupling on particle transport and capture in a magnetophoretic microsystem. Microfluid. Nanofluid. 12, 565–580 (2012).Article Google Scholar 
  21. 21.Modak, N., Datta, A. & Ganguly, R. Cell separation in a microfluidic channel using magnetic microspheres. Microfluid. Nanofluid. 6, 647–660 (2009).CAS Article Google Scholar 
  22. 22.Furlani, E. P., Sahoo, Y., Ng, K. C., Wortman, J. C. & Monk, T. E. A model for predicting magnetic particle capture in a microfluidic bioseparator. Biomed. Microdevices 9, 451–463 (2007).CAS Article Google Scholar 
  23. 23.Furlani, E. P. & Sahoo, Y. Analytical model for the magnetic field and force in a magnetophoretic microsystem. J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 39, 1724–1732 (2006).ADS CAS Article Google Scholar 
  24. 24.Tarn, M. D. et al. The importance of particle type selection and temperature control for on-chip free-flow magnetophoresis. J. Magn. Magn. Mater. 321, 4115–4122 (2009).ADS CAS Article Google Scholar 
  25. 25.Fonnum, G., Johansson, C., Molteberg, A., Morup, S. & Aksnes, E. Characterisation of Dynabeads® by magnetization measurements and Mössbauer spectroscopy. J. Magn. Magn. Mater. 293, 41–47 (2005).ADS CAS Article Google Scholar 
  26. 26.Xue, W., Moore, L. R., Nakano, N., Chalmers, J. J. & Zborowski, M. Single cell magnetometry by magnetophoresis vs. bulk cell suspension magnetometry by SQUID-MPMS – A comparison. J. Magn. Magn. Mater. 474, 152–160 (2019).ADS CAS Article Google Scholar 
  27. 27.Moore, L. R. et al. Continuous, intrinsic magnetic depletion of erythrocytes from whole blood with a quadrupole magnet and annular flow channel; pilot scale study. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 115, 1521–1530 (2018).CAS Article Google Scholar 
  28. 28.Furlani, E. P. & Xue, X. Field, force and transport analysis for magnetic particle-based gene delivery. Microfluid Nanofluid. 13, 589–602 (2012).CAS Article Google Scholar 
  29. 29.Furlani, E. P. & Xue, X. A model for predicting field-directed particle transport in the magnetofection process. Pharm. Res. 29, 1366–1379 (2012).CAS Article Google Scholar 
  30. 30.Furlani, E. P. Permanent Magnet and Electromechanical Devices; MaterialsAnalysis and Applications, (Academic Press, 2001).
  31. 31.Balachandar, S. & Eaton, J. K. Turbulent dispersed multiphase flow. Annu. Rev. Fluid Mech. 42, 111–133 (2010).ADS Article Google Scholar 
  32. 32.Wakaba, L. & Balachandar, S. On the added mass force at finite Reynolds and acceleration number. Theor. Comput. Fluid. Dyn. 21, 147–153 (2007).Article Google Scholar 
  33. 33.White, F. M. Viscous Fluid Flow, (McGraw-Hill, 1974).
  34. 34.Rietema, K. & Van Den Akker, H. E. A. On the momentum equations in dispersed two-phase systems. Int. J. Multiphase Flow 9, 21–36 (1983).Article Google Scholar 
  35. 35.Furlani, E. P. & Ng, K. C. Analytical model of magnetic nanoparticle transport and capture in the microvasculature. Phys. Rev. E 73, 1–10 (2006).Article Google Scholar 
  36. 36.Eibl, R., Eibl, D., Pörtner, R., Catapano, G. & Czermak, P. Cell and Tissue Reaction Engineering, (Springer, 2009).
  37. 37.Gómez-Pastora, J. et al. Computational modeling and fluorescence microscopy characterization of a two-phase magnetophoretic microsystem for continuous-flow blood detoxification. Lab Chip 18, 1593–1606 (2018).Article Google Scholar 
  38. 38.Khashan, S. A. & Furlani, E. P. Scalability analysis of magnetic bead separation in a microchannel with an array of soft magnetic elements in a uniform magnetic field. Sep. Purif. Technol. 125, 311–318 (2014).CAS Article Google Scholar 
  39. 39.Hirt, C. W. & Sicilian, J. M. A porosity technique for the definition of obstacles in rectangular cell meshes. ProcFourth International ConfShip Hydro., National Academic of Science, Washington, DC., (1985).
  40. 40.Crank, J. Free and Moving Boundary Problems, (Oxford University Press, 1984).
  41. 41.Bruus, H. Theoretical Microfluidics, (Oxford University Press, 2008).
  42. 42.Liang, L. & Xuan, X. Diamagnetic particle focusing using ferromicrofluidics with a single magnet. Microfluid. Nanofluid. 13, 637–643 (2012).

Author information

  1. Edward P. Furlani is deceased.

Affiliations

  1. Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, ETSIIT, University of Cantabria, Avda. Los Castros s/n, 39005, Santander, SpainJenifer Gómez-Pastora, Eugenio Bringas & Inmaculada Ortiz
  2. Flow Science, Inc, Santa Fe, New Mexico, 87505, USAIoannis H. Karampelas
  3. Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University at Buffalo (SUNY), Buffalo, New York, 14260, USAEdward P. Furlani
  4. Department of Electrical Engineering, University at Buffalo (SUNY), Buffalo, New York, 14260, USAEdward P. Furlani
A new dynamic masking technique for time resolved PIV analysis

A new dynamic masking technique for time resolved PIV analysis

시간 분해 PIV 분석을위한 새로운 동적 마스킹 기술

물체 가시성을 허용하기 위해 형광 코팅과 결합 된 새로운 프리웨어 레이 캐스팅 도구

Journal of Visualization ( 2021 ) 이 기사 인용

Abstract

Time resolved PIV encompassing moving and/or deformable objects interfering with the light source requires the employment of dynamic masking (DM). A few DM techniques have been recently developed, mainly in microfluidics and multiphase flows fields. Most of them require ad-hoc design of the experimental setup, and may spoil the accuracy of the resulting PIV analysis. A new DM technique is here presented which envisages, along with a dedicated masking algorithm, the employment of fluorescent coating to allow for accurate tracking of the object. We show results from measurements obtained through a validated PIV setup demonstrating the need to include a DM step even for objects featuring limited displacements. We compare the proposed algorithm with both a no-masking and a static masking solution. In the framework of developing low cost, flexible and accurate PIV setups, the proposed algorithm is made available through a freeware application able to generate masks to be used by an existing, freeware PIV analysis package.

광원을 방해하는 이동 또는 변형 가능한 물체를 포함하는 시간 해결 PIV는 동적 마스킹 (DM)을 사용해야 합니다. 주로 미세 유체 및 다상 흐름 분야에서 몇 가지 DM 기술이 최근 개발되었습니다. 대부분은 실험 설정의 임시 설계가 필요하며 결과 PIV 분석의 정확도를 떨어 뜨릴 수 있습니다. 여기에는 전용 마스킹 알고리즘과 함께 형광 코팅을 사용하여 물체를 정확하게 추적 할 수있는 새로운 DM 기술이 제시되어 있습니다. 제한된 변위를 특징으로 하는 물체에 대해서도 DM 단계를 포함해야 하는 필요성을 보여주는 검증 된 PIV 설정을 통해 얻은 측정 결과를 보여줍니다. 제안 된 알고리즘을 no-masking 및 static masking 솔루션과 비교합니다. 저비용, 유연하고 정확한 PIV 설정 개발 프레임 워크에서 제안 된 알고리즘은 기존 프리웨어 PIV 분석 패키지에서 사용할 마스크를 생성 할 수 있는 프리웨어 애플리케이션을 통해 사용할 수 있습니다.

Keywords

  • Time resolved PIV, Dynamics masking, Image processing, Vibration inducers, Fluorescent coating

그래픽 개요

소개

PIV (입자 영상 속도계)의 사용은 70 년대 후반 (Archbold 및 Ennos 1972 )이 반점 계측의 확장 (Barker and Fourney 1977 ) 으로 도입된 이래 실험 유체 역학에서 중심적인 역할을 했습니다 . PIV 기술의 기본 아이디어는 유체에 주입된 입자의 속도를 측정하여 유동장을 재구성하는 것입니다. 입자의 크기와 밀도는 확실하게 선택되고 유동을 만족스럽게 따르게 됩니다.

흐름은 레이저 / LED 소스를 통해 조명되고 입자에 의해 산란 된 빛은 추적을 허용합니다. 독자는 리뷰 작품 Grant ( 1997 ), Westerweel et al. ( 2013 년)에 대한 자세한 설명을 참조하십시오. 기본 2D 기술은 고유한 설정으로 발전했으며, 가장 진보 된 것은 단일 / 다중 평면 입체 PIV (Prasad 2000 ) 및 체적 / 단층 PIV (Scarano 2013 )입니다. 광범위한 유동장의 비 침습적 측정이 필요한 산업 및 연구 응용 분야에서 광범위하게 사용되었습니다.

조사된 유동장이 단단한 서있는 경계의 영향을 받는 경우 정적 마스킹 (SM) 접근 방식을 사용하여 PIV 분석을 수행하는 영역에서 솔리드 객체와 그림자가 차지하는 영역을 빼기 위해 주의를 기울여야 합니다. 실제로 이러한 영역에서는 파종 입자를 식별 할 수 없으므로 유속 재구성을 수행 할 수 없습니다. 제대로 처리되지 않으면 이 마스킹 단계는 잘못된 예측으로 이어질 수 있으며, 불행히도 그림자 영역 경계의 근접성에 국한되지 않습니다.

PIV 기술은 획득 프레임 속도를 관심있는 시간 척도로 조정하여 정상 상태 또는 시간 변화 흐름에 적용 할 수 있습니다. 시간의 가변성이 고체 물체의 위치 / 모양과 관련된 경우 이미지를 동적으로 마스킹하기 위해 추가 노력이 필요합니다. 고체 물체뿐만 아니라 다른 유체 단계도 가려야한다는 점에 유의해야합니다 (Foeth et al. 2006). 

이 프로세스는 고체 물체의 움직임이 선험적으로 알려진 경우 비교적 쉬우므로 SM 알고리즘에 대한 최소한의 수정이 목적에 부합 할 수 있습니다. 그러나 고체 물체의 위치 및 / 또는 모양이 알려지지 않은 방식으로 시간에 따라 변할 경우 물체를 동적으로 추적 할 수 있는 마스킹 기술이 필요합니다. PIV 분석을위한 동적 마스킹 (DM) 접근 방식은 현재 상당한 주목을 받고 있습니다 (Sanchis and Jensen 2011 , Masullo 및 Theunissen 2017 , Anders et al. 2019 ) . 시간 분해 PIV 시스템의 확산 덕분에 고속 카메라의 가용성이 높아집니다. 

DM 기술의 주요 발전은 마이크로 PIV 분야에서 비롯됩니다 (Lindken et al. 2009) 마이크로 및 나노 스위 머 (Ergin et al. 2015 ) 및 다상 흐름 (Brücker 2000 , Khalitov 및 Longmire 2002 ) 주변의 유동장을 조사 하려면 정확하고 유연한 알고리즘이 필요합니다. DM 기술은 상용 PIV 분석 소프트웨어 패키지 (TSI Instruments 2014 , DantecDynamics 2018 )에 포함되어 있습니다. 최근 개발 (Vennemann 및 Rösgen 2020 )은 신경망 자동 마스킹 기술의 적용을 예상하지만, 네트워크를 훈련하려면 합성 데이터 세트를 생성해야합니다.

많은 알고리즘은 이미지 처리 기술을 사용하여 개체를 추적하며, 대부분 사용자는 획득 한 이미지에서 추적 할 개체를 강조 표시 할 수있는 임시 실험 설정을 개발해야합니다. 따라서 실험 설정의 설계는 알고리즘의 최종 정확도에 영향을줍니다.

몇 가지 해결책을 구상 할 수 있습니다. 다음에서는 간단한 2D PIV 설정을 참조하지만 대부분의 고려 사항은 더 복잡한 설정으로 확장 할 수 있습니다. PIV 설정에서 객체를 쉽고 정확하게 추적 할 수 있도록 렌더링하는 가장 간단한 방법은 일반적으로 PIV 레이저 시트에 대략 수직 인 카메라를 향한 반사를 최대화하는 방향을 가리키는 추가 광원을 사용하여 조명하는 것입니다. 이 순진한 솔루션과 관련된 주요 문제는 PIV의 ROI (관심 영역)를 비추 지 않고는 광원을 움직이는 물체에만 겨냥하는 것이 사실상 불가능하여 시딩에 의해 산란 된 레이저 광 사이의 명암비를 감소 시킨다는 것입니다. 입자와 어두운 배경.

카메라의 프레임 속도가 높을수록 센서에 닿는 빛의 양이 적다는 사실로 인해 상황이 가혹 해집니다. 고체 물체의 움직임과 유동 입자가 모두 사용 된 설정의 획득 속도에 비해 충분히 느리다면, 가능한 해결책은 레이저 펄스 쌍 사이에 단일 확산 광 샷을 삽입하는 것입니다 (반드시 대칭 삽입은 아님). 그리고 카메라 샷을 둘 모두에 동기화합니다. 각 레이저 커플에서 물체의 위치는 확산 광에 의해 생성 된 이전 샷과 다음 샷의 두 위치를 보간하여 결정될 수 있습니다. 이 접근 방식에는 레이저, 카메라 및 빛을 제어 할 수있는 동기화 장치가 필요합니다.

이 문제에 대한 해결책이 제안되었으며 유체 인터페이스 (Foeth et al. 2006 ; Dussol et al. 2016 ) 의 밝은 반사를 활용 하여 이미지에서 많은 양의 산란 레이저 광을 획득 할 수 있습니다. 고체 표면에는 효과를 높이기 위해 반사 코팅이 제공 될 수 있습니다. 그런 다음 물체는 비정상적으로 큰 입자로 식별되고 경계를 쉽게 추적 할 수 있습니다. 이 솔루션의 단점은 물체 표면에서 산란 된 빛이 레이저 시트에 있지 않은 많은 시딩 입자를 비추어 PIV 분석의 정확도를 점진적으로 저하 시킨다는 것입니다.

위의 접근 방식의 개선은 다른 파장 의 두 번째 동일 평면 레이저 시트 (Driscoll et al. 2003 )를 사용합니다. 첫 번째 레이저 파장을 중심으로 한 좁은 반사 대역. 전체 설정은 매우 비쌀 수 있습니다. 파장 방출의 차이를 이용하여 설정을 저렴하게 만들 수 있습니다. 서로 다른 필터가 장착 된 두 대의 카메라를 적용하면 인터페이스로부터의 반사와 독립적으로 형광 시드 입자를 식별 할 수 있습니다 (Pedocchi et al. 2008 ).

객체의 변위가 작을 때 기본 솔루션은 실제 시간에 따라 변하는 음영 영역에 가장 근접한 하나의 정적 마스크를 추출하는 것입니다. 일반적인 경험 법칙은 예상되는 음영 영역보다 약간 더 크게 마스크를 그려 분석에 포함 된 조명 영역의 양을 단순화하고 최소화하는 것 사이의 최상의 균형을 찾는 것입니다.

본 논문에서는 PIV 분석을위한 DM 문제에 대한 새로운 실험적 접근법을 제안합니다. 우리의 방법은 형광 페인팅을 사용하여 물체를 쉽게 추적 할 수 있도록 하는 기술과 시변 마스크를 생성 할 수있는 특정 오픈 소스 알고리즘을 포함합니다. 이 접근법은 레이저 광에 불투명 한 물체의 큰 변위를 허용함으로써 효과적인 것으로 입증되었습니다. 

우리의 방법인 NM (no-masking)과 SM (static masking) 접근 방식을 비교합니다. 우리의 접근 방식의 타당성을 입증하는 것 외에도 이 백서는 마스킹 단계가 정확한 결과를 얻기 위해 가장 중요하다는 것을 확인합니다. 실제로 물체의 변위가 무시할 수 없는 경우 DM에 대한 리조트는 필수이며 SM 접근 방식은 음영 처리 된 영역의 주변 환경에 국한되지 않는 부정확성을 유발합니다. 

논문의 구조는 다음과 같습니다. 먼저 형광 코팅 기술과 마스킹 소프트웨어를 설명하는 제안된 접근법의 근거를 소개합니다. 그런 다음 PIV 설정에 대한 설명 후 두 벤치 마크 사례를 통해 전체 PIV 체인 분석의 신뢰성을 평가합니다. 그런 다음 제안 된 DM 방법의 결과를 NM 및 SM 솔루션과 비교합니다. 마지막으로 몇 가지 결론이 도출됩니다.

행동 양식

제안 된 DM 기술은 PIV 분석을 위해 캡처 한 동일한 이미지에서 쉽고 정확한 추적 성을 허용하기 위해 움직이는 물체 표면의 형광 코팅을 구상합니다. 물체가 가시화되면 특정 알고리즘이 물체 추적을 수행하고 레이저 위치가 알려지면 (그림 1 참조  ) 음영 영역의 마스킹을 수행합니다.

형광 코팅

코팅은 구조적 매트릭스 에 시판되는 형광 분말 (fluorescein (Taniguchi and Lindsey 2018 ; Taniguchi et al. 2018 )) 의 분산액으로 구성됩니다 . 단단한 물체의 경우 매트릭스는 폴리 에스터 / 에폭시 (대상 재료와의 화학적 호환성에 따라) 투명 수지 일 수 있습니다. 변형 가능한 물체의 경우 매트릭스는 투명한 실리콘 고무로 만들 수 있습니다. 형광 코팅 된 물체는 실행 중에 지속적으로 빛을 방출하기 위해 실험 전에 충분히 오랫동안 조명을 비춰 야합니다. 우리는 4W LED 소스 (그림 2 에서 볼 수 있음)에 20 초 긴 노출이  실험 실행 (몇 초)의 짧은 기간 동안 일관된 형광 방출을 제공하기에 충분하다는 것을 발견했습니다.

우리 실험에서 물체와 입자 크기 사이의 상당한 차이를 감안할 때 전자를 식별하는 것은 간단합니다. 그림  3 은 씨 뿌리기 입자와 물체 모양이 서로 다른 세 번에 겹쳐진 모습을 보여줍니다 (색상은 다른 순간을 나타냄).

대신, 이러한 크기 기반 분류가 가능하지 않은 경우 입자와 물체의 파장을 분리해야합니다. 이러한 분리는 시드 입자에 의해 산란 된 빛과 현저하게 다른 파장에서 방출되는 형광 코팅을 선택하여 달성 할 수 있습니다. 또는 레이저에서 멀리 떨어진 대역에서 방출되는 형광 입자를 이용하는 것 (Pedocchi et al. 2008 ). 두 경우 모두 컬러 이미지 획득의 채널 분리 또는 멀티 카메라 설정의 애드혹 필터링은 물체 식별을 크게 촉진 할 수 있습니다. 우리의 경우에는 그러한 파장 분리를 달성 할 필요가 없습니다. 실제로 형광 코팅의 방출 스펙트럼의 피크는 540nm입니다 (Taniguchi and Lindsey 2018 ; Taniguchi et al. 2018), 사용 된 레이저의 532 nm에 매우 가깝습니다.

마스킹 소프트웨어

DM 용으로 개발 된 알고리즘 은 무료 PIV 분석 패키지 PIVlab (Thielicke 2020 , Thielicke 및 Stamhuis 2014 ) 과 함께 작동하도록 고안된 오픈 소스 프리웨어 GUI 기반 도구 (Prestininzi 및 Lombardi 2021 )입니다. 이것은 세 단계의 순차적 실행으로 구성됩니다 (그림 1 에서 a–b–c라고 함 ). 첫 번째 단계 (a)는 장면에서 레이저 위치를 찾는 데 사용됩니다 (즉, 소스의 좌표를 계산합니다. 장애물에 부딪히는 빛); 두 번째 항목 (b)은 개체 위치를 추적하고 각 프레임의 음영 영역을 계산합니다. 세 번째 항목 (c)은 추적 된 개체 영역과 음영 처리 된 개체 영역을 PIV 알고리즘을위한 단일 마스크로 병합합니다.

각 단계에 대한 자세한 내용은 다음과 같습니다.

  1. (ㅏ)레이저 위치는 프레임 (즉, 획득 한 프레임의 시야 (FOV)) 내에서 가시적 일 수도 있고 아닐 수도 있습니다. 전자의 경우 사용자는 GUI에서 레이저 소스를 클릭하여 찾기 만하면됩니다. 후자의 경우, 사용자는 음영 영역의 경계에 속하는 두 개의 세그먼트 (두 쌍의 점)를 그리도록 요청받습니다. 그러면 FOV 외부에있는 레이저 위치가 두 선의 교차점으로 계산됩니다. 세그먼트로 구성됩니다. 개체 그림자는 ROI 프레임 상자에 도달하는 것으로 간주됩니다.
  2. (비)레이저 위치가 알려지면 물체 추적은 다음과 같이 수행됩니다. 각 프레임의 하나의 채널 (이 경우 RGB 색상 공간이 사용되기 때문에 녹색 채널이지만 GUI는 선호하는 채널을 지정할 수 있음)은 다음과 같습니다. 로컬 적응 임계 값을 사용하여 이진화 됨 (Bradley and Roth 2007), 후자는 이웃 주변의 로컬 평균 강도를 사용하여 각 픽셀에 대해 계산됩니다. 그런 다음 입자와 물체로 구성된 이진 이미지가 영역으로 변환됩니다. 우리 실험에 존재하는 유일한 장애물은 모든 입자에 비해 더 큰 크기를 기준으로 식별됩니다. 다른 전략은 이전에 논의되었습니다. 그런 다음 장애물 영역의 경계 다각형은 사용자 정의 포인트 밀도로 결정됩니다. 여기에서는 그림자 결정을 위해 광선 투사 (RC) 접근 방식을 채택했습니다. RC는 컴퓨터 그래픽을 기반으로하는 “경 운송 모델링”의 틀에 속합니다. 수치 적으로 정확한 그림자를 제공하기 때문에 여기에서 선택됩니다. 정확도는 떨어지지 만 주로 RC의 계산 부하를 줄이는 것을 목표로하는 몇 가지 다른 방법이 개발되었습니다.2015 ), 여기서 간략히 회상합니다. 각 프레임 (명확성을 위해 여기에 색인화되지 않음)에 대해 광선아르 자형나는 j아르 자형나는제이레이저 위치 L 에서 i 번째 정점 으로 캐스트됩니다.피나는 j피나는제이의 J 오브젝트의 경계 다각형 일; 목표는피나는 j피나는제이 하위 집합에 속 ㅏ제이ㅏ제이 레이저에 의해 직접 조명되는 경계 정점의 피나는 j피나는제이 에 추가됩니다 ㅏ제이ㅏ제이 만약 아르 자형나는 j아르 자형나는제이 적어도 한쪽을 교차 에스k j에스케이제이( j 번째 개체 경계 다각형 의 모든면에 걸쳐있는 k )피나는 j피나는제이 (그것이 교차로 큐나는 j k큐나는제이케이 레이저 위치와 정점 사이에 있지 않습니다. 피나는 j피나는제이). 두 개의 광선, 즉ρ1ρ1 과 ρ2ρ2추가면을 가로 지르지 않는는 저장됩니다.
  3. (씨)일단 정점 세트, 즉 ㅏ제이ㅏ제이 레이저에 의해 직접 비춰지고 식별되었으며 ROI 프레임 상자의 음영 부분은 후자와 교차하여 결정됩니다. ρ1ρ1 과 ρ2ρ2. 두 교차점은 다음에 추가됩니다.ㅏ제이ㅏ제이. 점으로 둘러싸인 영역ㅏ제이ㅏ제이 마침내 마스크로 변환됩니다.

레이저 소스가 여러 개인 경우 각각에 RC 알고리즘을 적용해야하며 음영 영역의 결합이 수행됩니다. 레이 캐스팅 절차의 의사 코드는 Alg에보고됩니다. 1.

그림
그림 1
그림 1

DM 검증

이 섹션에서는 제안 된 DM으로 수행 된 PIV 측정과 두 가지 다른 접근 방식, 즉 no-masking (NM)과 static masking (SM) 간의 비교를 제시합니다.

그림 2
그림 2
그림 3
그림 3

실험 설정

진동 유도기 (VI)의 성능을 분석하기 위해 PIV 설정을 설계하고 현재 DM 기술을 개발했습니다 (Curatolo et al. 2019 , 2020 ). 후자는 비 맥동 ​​유체 흐름에서 역류에 배치 된 캔틸레버의 규칙적이고 넓은 진동을 유도 할 수있는 윙렛입니다. 이러한 VI는 캔틸레버의 끝에 장착되며 (그림 2 참조   ) 진동 운동의 어느 지점에서든 캔틸레버의 중립 구성을 향해 양력을 생성 할 수있는 두 개의 오목한 날개가 있습니다.

VI는 캔틸레버 표면에 장착 된 압전 패치를 사용하여 고정 유체 흐름에서 기계적 에너지 추출을 향상시킬 수 있습니다. 그림 2 에서 강조된 날개의 전체 측면 가장자리는  Sect에 설명 된 사양에 따라 형광 페인트로 코팅되어 있습니다. 2.1 . 실험은 Roma Tre University 공학부 수력 학 실험실의 자유 표면 채널에서 수행됩니다. 10.8cm 길이의 캔틸레버는 채널의 중심선에 배치되고 상류로 향하며 수직-세로 평면에서 진동합니다. 세라믹 페 로브 스카이 트 (PZT) 압전 패치 (7××캔틸레버의 윗면에는 Physik Instrumente (PI)에서 만든 3cm)가 부착되어 있습니다. 흐름 유도 진동 하에서 변형으로 인해 AC 전압 차이를 제공합니다. VI 왼쪽 날개의 수직 중앙면에있는 2D 속도 필드는 수제 수중 PIV 장비를 통해 얻었습니다.각주1 연속파, 저비용, 저전력 (150mW), 녹색 (532nm) 레이저 빔이 2mm 두께의 부채꼴 시트에 퍼집니다.120∘120∘그림 2 와 같이 VI의 한쪽 날개를 절반으로 교차 합니다. 물은 평균 직경이 100 인 폴리 아미드 입자로 시드됩니다.μμm 및 1016 Kg / m의 밀도삼삼. 레이저 소스는 VI의 15cm 위쪽 (자유 표면 아래 약 4cm)과 VI의 하류 5cm에 경사지게 배치됩니다.5∘5∘상류. 위의 설정은 주로 날개의 후류를 조사하기 위해 고안되었습니다. 날개의 상류면과 하류 부분의 일부는 레이저 시트에 직접 맞지 않습니다. 레이저 시트에 수직으로 촬영하는 고속 상용 카메라 (Sony RX100 M5)를 사용하여 동영상을 촬영합니다. 후자는 1920의 프레임 크기로 500fps의 높은 프레임 속도 모드로 기록됩니다.×× 1080px, 나중에 더 작은 655로 잘림 ××이미지 분석 중에 분석 할 850px ROI. 시간 해결, 프리웨어, 오픈 소스, MatLab 용 PIV 분석 도구가 사용됩니다 (Thielicke and Stamhuis 2014 ). 이 도구는 질의 영역 (IA) 변형 (우리의 경우 64×× 64, 32 ×× 32 및 26 ××26). 각 패스에서 각 IA의 경계와 모서리에서 추가 변위 정보를 얻기 위해 인접한 IA 사이에 50 %의 중첩이 허용됩니다. 첫 번째 통과 후, 입자 변위 정보가 보간되어 IA의 모든 픽셀의 변위를 도출하고 그에 따라 변형됩니다.

시딩 입자 수 밀도는 첫 번째 패스에서 IA 당 약 5입니다. Keane과 Adrian ( 1992 )에 따르면 이러한 밀도 값은 95 % 유효한 탐지 확률을 보장합니다. IA는 프레임 커플 내에서 입자의 충분한 영구성을 보장하기 위해 크기가 조정됩니다. 분석 된 유동 역학은 0.4 ~ 0.7m / s 범위의 유동 속도를 특징으로합니다. 따라서 입자는 권장 최소값 인 2 프레임 (Keane and Adrian 1992 ) 보다 큰 약 3-4 프레임의 세 번째 패스 IA에 나타납니다 .

PIV 체인 분석 평가

사용 된 PIV 알고리즘의 정확성은 이전에 문헌에서 광범위하게 평가되었습니다 (예 : Guérin et al. ( 2020 ), Vennemann and Rösgen ( 2020 ), Mohammadshahi et al. ( 2020 ), Narayan et al. ( 2020 )). 그러나 PIV 측정의 물리적 일관성을 보장하기 위해 두 가지 벤치 마크 사례가 여기에 나와 있습니다.

첫 번째는 Sect에 설명 된 동일한 PIV 설정을 통해 측정 된 세로 유속의 수직 프로파일을 비교합니다. 3.1 분석 기준 용액이있는 실험 채널에서. 후자는 플로팅 트레이서로 수행되는 PTV (입자 추적 속도계) 측정을 통해 보정되었습니다. 분석 속도 프로파일은 Eq. 1 (Keulegan 1938 ).u ( z) =유∗[5.75 로그(지δ) +8.5];유(지)=유∗[5.75로그⁡(지δ)+8.5];(1)

여기서 u 는 수평 유속 성분, z 는 수직 좌표,δδ 침대 거칠기 및 V∗V∗ 균일 한 흐름 공식에 의해 주어진 것으로 가정되는 마찰 속도, 즉 유∗= U/ C유∗=유/씨; U 는 깊이 평균 유속이고 C 는 다음 과 같이 주어진 마찰 계수입니다.씨= 5.75로그( 13.3에프R / δ)씨=5.75로그⁡(13.3에프아르 자형/δ), R = 0.2아르 자형=0.2 m은 유압 반경이고 에프= 0.92에프=0.92유한 폭 채널의 형상 계수. 그림  4 는 4 초의 시간 창에 걸쳐 순간 값을 평균화하여 얻은 분석 프로필과 PIV 측정 간의 비교를 보여줍니다. 국부적 인 변동은 대략 0.5 초의 시간 척도에서 진화하는 것으로 밝혀졌습니다. PTV 결과에 가장 적합하면 다음과 같은 값이 산출됩니다.δ= 1δ=1cm, 베드 거칠기의 경우 Eq. 1 , 실험 채널 침대 표면의 실제 조건과 호환됩니다. VI의 휴지 구성 위치에서 유속의 분석 값은 그림에서 검은 색 십자가로 표시됩니다. 비교는 놀라운 일치를 보여 주므로 실험 설정과 PIV 알고리즘의 조합이 분석 된 설정에 대해 신뢰할 수있는 것으로 간주 될 수 있음을 증명합니다.

두 번째 벤치 마크는 VI 뒷면에 재 부착 된 흐름의 양을 비교합니다. 실제로 이러한 장치의 높은 캠버를 고려할 때 흐름은 하류 표면에서 분리되어 결국 다시 연결됩니다. 첨부 흐름을 나타내는 표면의 양 (Curatolo 외. 발견 2020 ) 흥미로운 압전 패치 (즉, 효율이 큰 경우에 더 빠르게 진동이 유발되는 것이다)에서 VI의 효율과 상관된다. 여기에서는 PIV 분석을 통해 측정 된 진동의 상사 점에서 재 부착 된 흐름의 길이를 CFD (전산 유체 역학) 상용 코드 FLOW-3D® (Flow Science 2019 )로 예측 한 길이와 비교하여 RANS를 해결합니다. 결합 식 (비어 스톡스 레이놀즈 평균) 케이 -ϵϵ구조화 된 그리드의 난류 폐쇄 (시뮬레이션을 위해 1mm 간격이 선택됨). 다운 스트림 측면의 흐름은 이러한 높은 캠버 VI를 위해 여러 위치에서 분리 및 재 부착됩니다. 이 벤치 마크에서 비교 된 양은 VI의 앞쪽 가장자리와 가장 가까운 흐름 재 부착 위치 사이의 호 길이입니다. 그림 5를 참조  하면 CFD 모델에 의해 예측 된 호의 길이는 측정 된 호의 길이보다 10 % 더 큽니다. 이 작업에 제시된 DM 기술을 사용하는 PIV 분석은 물리적으로 건전한 측정을 제공하는 것으로 입증됩니다. 후류의 유체 역학에 대한 자세한 분석과 VI의 전반적인 효율성과의 상관 관계는 현재 진행 중이며 향후 작업의 대상이 될 것입니다.

그림 4
그림 4
그림 5
그림 5

결과

그림 6을 참조하여  순간 유속 장의 관점에서 세 가지 접근법의 결과를 비교합니다. 선택한 순간은 진동의 상사 점에 해당합니다.

제안 된 DM (그림 6 의 패널 a  )은 부드러운 유동장을 생성하여 후류에서 일관된 소용돌이 구조를 나타냅니다.

NM 접근법 (그림 6 의 패널 b1  )도 후류의 와류 구조를 정확하게 예측하지만 음영 영역에서 대부분 부정확 한 값을 산출합니다. 또한 비교에서 합리적인 기준을 추론 할 수 없기 때문에 획득 한 유동장 의 사후 필터링이 실현 가능하지 않다는 것이 분명합니다 . 실제로 유속은 그림 6 의 패널 c1에서 볼 수 있듯이 가장 큰 오류가 생성되는 위치에서도 “합리적인”크기를 갖습니다. , DM 및 NM 접근 방식으로 얻은 속도 필드 간의 차이가 표시됩니다. 더욱이 후류에서 발생하는 매우 불안정한 소용돌이 운동이 이러한 위치에 가깝게 이동하기 때문에 그럴듯한 흐름 방향을 가정하더라도 필터링 기준을 공식화 할 수 없습니다. 모델러가 그러한 부정확성을 알고 있었다하더라도 NM 접근법은 “합리적”이지만 여전히 날개의 내부 현과 그 바로 아래에있는 유동장의 대부분은 부정확합니다. 이러한 행동은 매우 오해의 소지가 있습니다.

그림 6 의 패널 b2는  SM 접근법으로 얻은 유속 장을 보여주고 패널 c2는 SM과 DM 접근법으로 얻은 결과 간의 차이를 보여줍니다. SM 접근법은 NM 대응 물에 비해 전반적으로 더 나은 정확도를 명확하게 보여 주지만, 이는 레이저 소스의 위치가 진동 중에 음영 영역이 많이 움직이지 않기 때문입니다 (그림 3 참조). 한 번의 진동 동안 VI가 경험 한 최대 변위를 육안으로 검사합니다. 즉, 분석 된 사례의 경우 정적 마스크를 그리기위한 중립 구성을 선택하면 NM 접근 방식보다 낮은 오류를 얻을 수 있습니다. 더 큰 물체 변위를 포함하는 실험 설정은 NM이 일관되게 더 정확해질 수 있기 때문에 NM보다 SM의 우월성은 일반화 될 수 없음을 강조하고 싶습니다.

그림  6 은 분석 된 접근법에 의해 생성 된 차이를 철저히 보여 주지만 결과에 대한보다 정량적 인 평가를 제공하기 위해 오류의 빈도 분포를 계산했습니다. 그림 7 에서 이러한 분포를  살펴보면 SM 접근법이 NM보다 전체적인 예측이 더 우수하고 SM 분포가 더 정점에 있음을 확인합니다. 그럼에도 불구하고 SM은 여전히 ​​비정상적인 강도의 스파이크를 생성합니다. 분포의 꼬리로 표시되는 이러한 값은 정적 마스크 범위의 과대 평가 (왼쪽 꼬리) 및 과소 평가 (오른쪽 꼬리)에 연결됩니다. 그러나 주파수의 크기는 고려되는 경우에 SM과 NM의 적용 가능성을 배제하여 DM에 대한 리조트를 의무적으로 만듭니다.

그림 6
그림 6
그림 7
그림 7

결론

이 작업에서는 PIV 분석 도구에 DM (Dynamic Masking) 모듈을 제공하기위한 새로운 실험 기법을 제시합니다. 동적 마스킹은 유체 흐름에 잠긴 불투명 이동 / 변형 가능한 물체를 포함하는 시간 해결 PIV 설정에서 필요한 단계입니다. 마스킹 알고리즘과 함께 형광 코팅을 사용하여 물체를 정확하게 추적 할 수 있습니다. 우리는 제안 된 DM과 두 가지 다른 접근 방식, 즉 no-masking (NM)과 static masking (SM)을 비교하여 자체적으로 설계된 저비용 PIV 설정을 통해 수행 된 측정을 제시합니다. 분석 된 유동 역학은 고체 물체의 제한된 변위를 포함하지만 정량적 비교는 DM 기술을 채택해야하는 필수 필요성을 보여줍니다. 여기에서 정확성이 입증 된 현재의 실험적 접근 방식은

메모

  1. 1.실험 데이터 세트는 PIV 분석의 복제를 허용하기 위해 요청시 제공됩니다.

참고 문헌

  1. Anders S, Noto D, Seilmayer M, Eckert S (2019) 스펙트럼 랜덤 마스킹 : 다상 흐름에서 piv를위한 새로운 동적 마스킹 기술. Experim 유체 60 (4) : 1–6 Google 학술 검색 
  2. Archbold E, Ennos A (1972) 이중 노출 레이저 사진에서 변위 측정. Optica Acta Int J Opt 19 (4) : 253–271 Google 학술 검색 
  3. Barker D, Fourney M (1977) 얼룩 패턴으로 유체 속도 측정. Opt Lett 1 (4) : 135–137 Google 학술 검색 
  4. Bradley D, Roth G (2007) 적분 이미지를 사용한 적응 형 임계 값. J 그래프 도구 12 (2) : 13–21 Google 학술 검색 
  5. Brücker C (2000) Piv의 다상 흐름. 입자 이미지 유속계 및 관련 기술, 강의 시리즈, p 1
  6. Case N (2015) 시력 및 조명. GitHub 저장소. https://github.com/ncase/sight-and-light
  7. Curatolo M, La Rosa M, Prestininzi P (2019) 바이 모르 프 압전 캔틸레버의 굽힘에서 평면 상태 가정의 타당성. J Intell Mater Syst Struct 30 (10) : 1508–1517 Google 학술 검색 
  8. Curatolo M, Lombardi V, Prestininzi P (2020) 얇은 압전 캔틸레버의 유동 유도 진동 향상 : 실험 분석. In : River Flow 2020— 유체 유압에 관한 국제 회의 절차
  9. DantecDynamics : DynamicStudio 6.4 (2018) https://www.dantecdynamics.com/dynamicstudio-6-4-release-with-new-dynamic-masking-add-on/
  10. Driscoll K, Sick V, Gray C (2003) 고밀도 연료 ​​스프레이에서 동시 공기 / 연료 위상 piv 측정. Experim 유체 35 (1) : 112–115 Google 학술 검색 
  11. Dussol D, Druault P, Mallat B, Delacroix S, Germain G (2016) 불안정한 인터페이스, 거품 및 움직이는 구조를 포함하는 piv 이미지에 대한 자동 동적 마스크 추출. Comptes Rendus Mécanique 344 (7) : 464–478 Google 학술 검색 
  12. Ergin F, Watz B, Wadhwa N (2015) 장거리 micropiv를 사용하여 작은 평영 수영 선수 주변의 픽셀 정확도 동적 마스킹 및 흐름 측정. 에서 : 입자 이미지 유속계 -PIV15에 관한 제 11 회 국제 심포지엄. 캘리포니아 주 산타 바바라, 9 월, 14 ~ 16 쪽
  13. Flow Science I (2019) FLOW-3D, 버전 12.0. 산타페, NM https://www.flow3d.com/
  14. Foeth EJ, Van Doorne C, Van Terwisga T, Wieneke B (2006) 시간은 3d 시트 캐비테이션의 piv 및 유동 시각화를 해결했습니다. Experim 유체 40 (4) : 503–513 Google 학술 검색 
  15. Grant I (1997) 입자 이미지 속도 측정 : 리뷰. Proc Inst Mech Eng CJ Mech Eng Sci 211 (1) : 55–76 Google 학술 검색 
  16. Guérin A, Derr J, Du Pont SC, Berhanu M (2020) 흐르는 물막에 의해 생성 된 Streamwise 용해 패턴. Phys Rev Lett 125 (19) : 194502 Google 학술 검색 
  17. Keane RD, Adrian RJ (1992) piv 이미지의 상호 상관 분석 이론. Appl Sci Res 49 (3) : 191–215 Google 학술 검색 
  18. Keulegan GH (1938) 열린 수로에서 난류의 법칙, vol. 21. 미국 표준 국 (National Bureau of Standards)
  19. Khalitov D, Longmire EK (2002) 2 개 매개 변수 위상 차별에 의한 동시 2 상 piv. Experim 유체 32 (2) : 252–268 Google 학술 검색 
  20. Lindken R, Rossi M, Große S, Westerweel J (2009) 미세 입자 영상 속도계 (piv) : 최근 개발, 응용 및 지침. 랩 칩 9 (17) : 2551–2567 Google 학술 검색 
  21. Masullo A, Theunissen R (2017) 픽셀 강도 통계를 기반으로 한 piv 이미지 분석을위한 자동화 된 마스크 생성. Experim 유체 58 (6) : 70 Google 학술 검색 
  22. Mohammadshahi S, Samsam-Khayani H, Cai T, Kim KC (2020) 수로에서 진동하는 제트의 흐름 특성과 열 전달에 대한 실험 및 수치 연구. Int J 열 유체 흐름 86 : 108701 Google 학술 검색 
  23. Narayan S, Moravec DB, Dallas AJ, Dutcher CS (2020) 4 채널 미세 유체 유체 역학 트랩에서 물방울 모양 이완. Phys Rev Fluids 5 (11) : 113603 Google 학술 검색 
  24. Pedocchi F, Martin JE, García MH (2008) 입자 이미지 속도계를 사용하는 대규모 실험을위한 저렴한 형광 입자. Experim 유체 45 (1) : 183–186 Google 학술 검색 
  25. Prasad AK (2000) 입체 입자 영상 유속계. Experim 유체 29 (2) : 103–116 Google 학술 검색 
  26. Prestininzi P, Lombardi V (2021) DM @ PIV. https://it.mathworks.com/matlabcentral/fileexchange/75398-dm-piv . MATLAB Central 파일 교환. 2021 년 5 월 6 일 확인
  27. Sanchis A, Jensen A (2011) 자유 표면 흐름에서 라돈 변환을 사용한 piv 이미지의 동적 마스킹. Experim 유체 51 (4) : 871–880 Google 학술 검색 
  28. Scarano F (2013) Tomographic piv : 원리와 실행. Meas Sci Technol 24 (1)
  29. Taniguchi M, Lindsey JS (2018) photochemcad에 사용하기위한> 300 개의 일반적인 화합물의 흡수 및 형광 스펙트럼 데이터베이스. Photochem Photobiol 94 (2) : 290–327 Google 학술 검색 
  30. Taniguchi M, Du H, Lindsey JS (2018) Photochemcad 3 : 다중 스펙트럼 데이터베이스를 사용한 광 물리 계산을위한 다양한 모듈. Photochem Photobiol 94 (2) : 277–289 Google 학술 검색 
  31. Thielicke W (2020) PIVlab (2020). https://www.mathworks.com/matlabcentral/fileexchange/27659-pivlab-particle-image-velocimetry-piv-tool . MATLAB Central 파일 교환. 5 월 8 일 확인
  32. Thielicke W, Stamhuis E (2014) PIVlab-matlab의 사용자 친화적이고 저렴하며 정확한 디지털 입자 이미지 속도계를 지향합니다. J Open Res Softw 2 (1)
  33. TSI Instruments (2014) PIV 이미지에 대한 동적 마스킹. TSI Incorporated 애플리케이션 노트 PIV-018
  34. Vennemann B, Rösgen T (2020) 컨볼 루션 오토 인코더를 사용하는 입자 이미지 속도 측정을위한 동적 마스킹 기술. Experim 유체 61 (7) : 1–11 Google 학술 검색 
  35. Westerweel J, Elsinga GE, Adrian RJ (2013) 복잡하고 난류 흐름에 대한 입자 이미지 유속계. Ann Rev Fluid Mech 45 (1) : 409–436. https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-fluid-120710-101204MathSciNet  수학 Google 학술 검색 

참조 다운로드

자금

CRUI-CARE 계약에 따라 Università degli Studi Roma Tre가 제공하는 오픈 액세스 자금.

작가 정보

제휴

  1. 이탈리아 Roma, Università Roma Tre 공학과Valentina Lombardi, Michele La Rocca, Pietro Prestininzi

교신 저자

Valentina Lombardi에 대한 서신 .

추가 정보

발행인의 메모

Springer Nature는 출판 된지도 및 기관 소속의 관할권 주장과 관련하여 중립을 유지합니다.

오픈 액세스이 기사는 크리에이티브 커먼즈 저작자 표시 4.0 국제 라이선스에 따라 사용이 허가되었습니다.이 라이선스는 귀하가 원저자와 출처에 대해 적절한 크레딧을 제공하는 한 모든 매체 또는 형식으로 사용, 공유, 개작, 배포 및 복제를 허용합니다. 크리에이티브 커먼즈 라이센스에 대한 링크를 제공하고 변경 사항이 있는지 표시합니다. 이 기사의 이미지 또는 기타 제 3 자 자료는 자료에 대한 크레딧 라인에 달리 명시되지 않는 한 기사의 크리에이티브 커먼즈 라이선스에 포함됩니다. 자료가 기사의 크리에이티브 커먼즈 라이센스에 포함되어 있지 않고 의도 된 사용이 법적 규정에 의해 허용되지 않거나 허용 된 사용을 초과하는 경우 저작권 보유자로부터 직접 허가를 받아야합니다. 이 라이센스의 사본을 보려면 다음을 방문하십시오.http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ .

재판 및 허가

이 기사에 대해

CrossMark를 통해 통화 및 진위 확인

이 기사 인용

Lombardi, V., Rocca, ML & Prestininzi, P. 시간 분해 PIV 분석을위한 새로운 동적 마스킹 기술. J Vis (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12650-021-00756-0

인용 다운로드

이 기사 공유

다음 링크를 공유하는 사람은 누구나이 콘텐츠를 읽을 수 있습니다.공유 가능한 링크 받기

Springer Nature SharedIt 콘텐츠 공유 이니셔티브 제공

키워드

  • 시간 해결 PIV
  • 역학 마스킹
  • 이미지 처리
  • 진동 유도제
  • 형광 코팅
The 3D computational domain model (50–18.6) slope change, and boundary condition for (50–30 slope change) model.

Numerical investigation of flow characteristics over stepped spillways

Güven, Aytaç
Mahmood, Ahmed Hussein
Water Supply (2021) 21 (3): 1344–1355.
https://doi.org/10.2166/ws.2020.283Article history

Abstract

Spillways are constructed to evacuate flood discharge safely so that a flood wave does not overtop the dam body. There are different types of spillways, with the ogee type being the conventional one. A stepped spillway is an example of a nonconventional spillway. The turbulent flow over a stepped spillway was studied numerically by using the Flow-3D package. Different fluid flow characteristics such as longitudinal flow velocity, temperature distribution, density and chemical concentration can be well simulated by Flow-3D. In this study, the influence of slope changes on flow characteristics such as air entrainment, velocity distribution and dynamic pressures distribution over a stepped spillway was modelled by Flow-3D. The results from the numerical model were compared with an experimental study done by others in the literature. Two models of a stepped spillway with different discharge for each model were simulated. The turbulent flow in the experimental model was simulated by the Renormalized Group (RNG) turbulence scheme in the numerical model. A good agreement was achieved between the numerical results and the observed ones, which are exhibited in terms of graphics and statistical tables.

배수로는 홍수가 댐 몸체 위로 넘치지 않도록 안전하게 홍수를 피할 수 있도록 건설되었습니다. 다른 유형의 배수로가 있으며, ogee 유형이 기존 유형입니다. 계단식 배수로는 비 전통적인 배수로의 예입니다. 계단식 배수로 위의 난류는 Flow-3D 패키지를 사용하여 수치적으로 연구되었습니다.

세로 유속, 온도 분포, 밀도 및 화학 농도와 같은 다양한 유체 흐름 특성은 Flow-3D로 잘 시뮬레이션 할 수 있습니다. 이 연구에서는 계단식 배수로에 대한 공기 혼입, 속도 분포 및 동적 압력 분포와 같은 유동 특성에 대한 경사 변화의 영향을 Flow-3D로 모델링 했습니다.

수치 모델의 결과는 문헌에서 다른 사람들이 수행한 실험 연구와 비교되었습니다. 각 모델에 대해 서로 다른 배출이 있는 계단식 배수로의 두 모델이 시뮬레이션되었습니다. 실험 모델의 난류 흐름은 수치 모델의 Renormalized Group (RNG) 난류 계획에 의해 시뮬레이션되었습니다. 수치 결과와 관찰 된 결과 사이에 좋은 일치가 이루어졌으며, 이는 그래픽 및 통계 테이블로 표시됩니다.

HIGHLIGHTS

ListenReadSpeaker webReader: Listen

  • A numerical model was developed for stepped spillways.
  • The turbulent flow was simulated by the Renormalized Group (RNG) model.
  • Both numerical and experimental results showed that flow characteristics are greatly affected by abrupt slope change on the steps.

Keyword

CFDnumerical modellingslope changestepped spillwayturbulent flow

INTRODUCTION

댐 구조는 물 보호가 생활의 핵심이기 때문에 물을 저장하거나 물을 운반하는 전 세계에서 가장 중요한 프로젝트입니다. 그리고 여수로는 댐의 가장 중요한 부분 중 하나로 분류됩니다. 홍수로 인한 파괴 나 피해로부터 댐을 보호하기 위해 여수로가 건설됩니다.

수력 발전, 항해, 레크리에이션 및 어업의 중요성을 감안할 때 댐 건설 및 홍수 통제는 전 세계적으로 매우 중요한 문제로 간주 될 수 있습니다. 많은 유형의 배수로가 있지만 가장 일반적인 유형은 다음과 같습니다 : ogee 배수로, 자유 낙하 배수로, 사이펀 배수로, 슈트 배수로, 측면 채널 배수로, 터널 배수로, 샤프트 배수로 및 계단식 배수로.

그리고 모든 여수로는 입구 채널, 제어 구조, 배출 캐리어 및 출구 채널의 네 가지 필수 구성 요소로 구성됩니다. 특히 롤러 압축 콘크리트 (RCC) 댐 건설 기술과 더 쉽고 빠르며 저렴한 건설 기술로 분류 된 계단식 배수로 건설과 관련하여 최근 수십 년 동안 많은 계단식 배수로가 건설되었습니다 (Chanson 2002; Felder & Chanson 2011).

계단식 배수로 구조는 캐비테이션 위험을 감소시키는 에너지 소산 속도를 증가시킵니다 (Boes & Hager 2003b). 계단식 배수로는 다양한 조건에서 더 매력적으로 만드는 장점이 있습니다.

계단식 배수로의 흐름 거동은 일반적으로 낮잠, 천이 및 스키밍 흐름 체제의 세 가지 다른 영역으로 분류됩니다 (Chanson 2002). 유속이 낮을 때 nappe 흐름 체제가 발생하고 자유 낙하하는 낮잠의 시퀀스로 특징 지워지는 반면, 스키밍 흐름 체제에서는 물이 외부 계단 가장자리 위의 유사 바닥에서 일관된 흐름으로 계단 위로 흐릅니다.

또한 주요 흐름에서 3 차원 재순환 소용돌이가 발생한다는 것도 분명합니다 (예 : Chanson 2002; Gonzalez & Chanson 2008). 계단 가장자리 근처의 의사 바닥에서 흐름의 방향은 가상 바닥과 가상으로 정렬됩니다. Takahashi & Ohtsu (2012)에 따르면, 스키밍 흐름 체제에서 주어진 유속에 대해 흐름은 계단 가장자리 근처의 수평 계단면에 영향을 미치고 슈트 경사가 감소하면 충돌 영역의 면적이 증가합니다. 전이 흐름 체제는 나페 흐름과 스키밍 흐름 체제 사이에서 발생합니다. 계단식 배수로를 설계 할 때 스키밍 흐름 체계를 고려해야합니다 (예 : Chanson 1994, Matos 2000, Chanson 2002, Boes & Hager 2003a).

CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics), 즉 수력 공학의 수치 모델은 일반적으로 물리적 모델에 소요되는 총 비용과 시간을 줄여줍니다. 따라서 수치 모델은 실험 모델보다 빠르고 저렴한 것으로 분류되며 동시에 하나 이상의 목적으로 사용될 수도 있습니다. 사용 가능한 많은 CFD 소프트웨어 패키지가 있지만 가장 널리 사용되는 것은 FLOW-3D입니다. 이 연구에서는 Flow 3D 소프트웨어를 사용하여 유량이 서로 다른 두 모델에 대해 계단식 배수로에서 공기 농도, 속도 분포 및 동적 압력 분포를 시뮬레이션합니다.

Roshan et al. (2010)은 서로 다른 수의 계단 및 배출을 가진 계단식 배수로의 두 가지 물리적 모델에 대한 흐름 체제 및 에너지 소산 조사를 연구했습니다. 실험 모델의 기울기는 각각 19.2 %, 12 단계와 23 단계의 수입니다. 결과는 23 단계 물리적 모델에서 관찰 된 흐름 영역이 12 단계 모델보다 더 수용 가능한 것으로 간주되었음을 보여줍니다. 그러나 12 단계 모델의 에너지 손실은 23 단계 모델보다 더 많았습니다. 그리고 실험은 스키밍 흐름 체제에서 23 단계 모델의 에너지 소산이 12 단계 모델보다 약 12 ​​% 더 적다는 것을 관찰했습니다.

Ghaderi et al. (2020a)는 계단 크기와 유속이 다른 정련 매개 변수의 영향을 조사하기 위해 계단식 배수로에 대한 실험 연구를 수행했습니다. 그 결과, 흐름 체계가 냅페 흐름 체계에서 발생하는 최소 scouring 깊이와 같은 scouring 구멍 치수에 영향을 미친다는 것을 보여주었습니다. 또한 테일 워터 깊이와 계단 크기는 최대 scouring깊이에 대한 실제 매개 변수입니다. 테일 워터의 깊이를 6.31cm에서 8.54 및 11.82cm로 늘림으로써 수세 깊이가 각각 18.56 % 및 11.42 % 증가했습니다. 또한 이 증가하는 테일 워터 깊이는 scouring 길이를 각각 31.43 % 및 16.55 % 감소 시킵니다. 또한 유속을 높이면 Froude 수가 증가하고 흐름의 운동량이 증가하면 scouring이 촉진됩니다. 또한 결과는 중간의 scouring이 횡단면의 측벽보다 적다는 것을 나타냅니다. 계단식 배수로 하류의 최대 scouring 깊이를 예측 한 후 실험 결과와 비교하기 위한 실험식이 제안 되었습니다. 그리고 비교 결과 제안 된 공식은 각각 3.86 %와 9.31 %의 상대 오차와 최대 오차 내에서 scouring 깊이를 예측할 수 있음을 보여주었습니다.

Ghaderi et al. (2020b)는 사다리꼴 미로 모양 (TLS) 단계의 수치 조사를 했습니다. 결과는 이러한 유형의 배수로가 확대 비율 LT / Wt (LT는 총 가장자리 길이, Wt는 배수로의 폭)를 증가시키기 때문에 더 나은 성능을 갖는 것으로 관찰되었습니다. 또한 사다리꼴 미로 모양의 계단식 배수로는 더 큰 마찰 계수와 더 낮은 잔류 수두를 가지고 있습니다. 마찰 계수는 다양한 배율에 대해 0.79에서 1.33까지 다르며 평평한 계단식 배수로의 경우 대략 0.66과 같습니다. 또한 TLS 계단식 배수로에서 잔류 수두의 비율 (Hres / dc)은 약 2.89이고 평평한 계단식 배수로의 경우 약 4.32와 같습니다.

Shahheydari et al. (2015)는 Flow-3D 소프트웨어, RNG k-ε 모델 및 VOF (Volume of Fluid) 방법을 사용하여 배출 계수 및 에너지 소산과 같은 자유 표면 흐름의 프로파일을 연구하여 스키밍 흐름 체제에서 계단식 배수로에 대한 흐름을 조사했습니다. 실험 결과와 비교했습니다. 결과는 에너지 소산 율과 방전 계수율의 관계가 역으로 실험 모델의 결과와 잘 일치 함을 보여 주었다.

Mohammad Rezapour Tabari & Tavakoli (2016)는 계단 높이 (h), 계단 길이 (L), 계단 수 (Ns) 및 단위 폭의 방전 (q)과 같은 다양한 매개 변수가 계단식 에너지 ​​소산에 미치는 영향을 조사했습니다. 방수로. 그들은 해석에 FLOW-3D 소프트웨어를 사용하여 계단식 배수로에서 에너지 손실과 임계 흐름 깊이 사이의 관계를 평가했습니다. 또한 유동 난류에 사용되는 방정식과 표준 k-ɛ 모델을 풀기 위해 유한 체적 방법을 적용했습니다. 결과에 따르면 스텝 수가 증가하고 유량 배출량이 증가하면 에너지 손실이 감소합니다. 얻은 결과를 다른 연구와 비교하고 경험적, 수학적 조사를 수행하여 결국 합격 가능한 결과를 얻었습니다.

METHODOLOGY

ListenReadSpeaker webReader: ListenFor all numerical models the basic principle is very similar: a set of partial differential equations (PDE) present the physical problems. The flow of fluids (gas and liquid) are governed by the conservation laws of mass, momentum and energy. For Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), the PDE system is substituted by a set of algebraic equations which can be worked out by using numerical methods (Versteeg & Malalasekera 2007). Flow-3D uses the finite volume approach to solve the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equation, by applying the technique of Fractional Area/Volume Obstacle Representation (FAVOR) to define an obstacle (Flow Science Inc. 2012). Equations (1) and (2) are RANS and continuity equations with FAVOR variables that are applied for incompressible flows.

formula

(1)

formula

(2)where  is the velocity in xi direction, t is the time,  is the fractional area open to flow in the subscript directions,  is the volume fraction of fluid in each cell, p is the hydrostatic pressure,  is the density, is the gravitational force in subscript directions and  is the Reynolds stresses.

Turbulence modelling is one of three key elements in CFD (Gunal 1996). There are many types of turbulence models, but the most common are Zero-equation models, One-equation models, Two-equation models, Reynolds Stress/Flux models and Algebraic Stress/Flux models. In FLOW-3D software, five turbulence models are available. The formulation used in the FLOW-3D software differs slightly from other formulations that includes the influence of the fractional areas/volumes of the FAVORTM method and generalizes the turbulence production (or decay) associated with buoyancy forces. The latter generalization, for example, includes buoyancy effects associated with non-inertial accelerations.

The available turbulence models in Flow-3D software are the Prandtl Mixing Length Model, the One-Equation Turbulent Energy Model, the Two-Equation Standard  Model, the Two-Equation Renormalization-Group (RNG) Model and large Eddy Simulation Model (Flow Science Inc. 2012).In this research the RNG model was selected because this model is more commonly used than other models in dealing with particles; moreover, it is more accurate to work with air entrainment and other particles. In general, the RNG model is classified as a more widely-used application than the standard k-ɛ model. And in particular, the RNG model is more accurate in flows that have strong shear regions than the standard k-ɛ model and it is defined to describe low intensity turbulent flows. For the turbulent dissipation  it solves an additional transport equation:

formula

(3)where CDIS1, CDIS2, and CDIS3 are dimensionless parameters and the user can modify them. The diffusion of dissipation, Diff ɛ, is

formula

(4)where uv and w are the x, y and z coordinates of the fluid velocity; ⁠, ⁠,  and ⁠, are FLOW-3D’s FAVORTM defined terms;  and  are turbulence due to shearing and buoyancy effects, respectively. R and  are related to the cylindrical coordinate system. The default values of RMTKE, CDIS1 and CNU differ, being 1.39, 1.42 and 0.085 respectively. And CDIS2 is calculated from turbulent production (⁠⁠) and turbulent kinetic energy (⁠⁠).The kinematic turbulent viscosity is the same in all turbulence transport models and is calculated from

formula

(5)where ⁠: is the turbulent kinematic viscosity.  is defined as the numerical challenge between the RNG and the two-equation k-ɛ models, found in the equation below. To avoid an unphysically large result for  in Equation (3), since this equation could produce a value for  very close to zero and also because the physical value of  may approach to zero in such cases, the value of  is calculated from the following equation:

formula

(6)where ⁠: the turbulent length scale.

VOF and FAVOR are classifications of volume-fraction methods. In these two methods, firstly the area should be subdivided into a control volume grid or a small element. Each flow parameter like velocity, temperature and pressure values within the element are computed for each element containing liquids. Generally, these values represent the volumetric average of values in the elements.Numerous methods have been used recently to solve free infinite boundaries in the various numerical simulations. VOF is an easy and powerful method created based on the concept of a fractional intensity of fluid. A significant number of studies have confirmed that this method is more flexible and efficient than others dealing with the configurations of a complex free boundary. By using VOF technology the Flow-3D free surface was modelled and first declared in Hirt & Nichols (1981). In the VOF method there are three ingredients: a planner to define the surface, an algorithm for tracking the surface as a net mediator moving over a computational grid, and application of the boundary conditions to the surface. Configurations of the fluids are defined in terms of VOF function, F (x, y, z, t) (Hirt & Nichols 1981). And this VOF function shows the volume of flow per unit volume

formula

(7)

formula

(8)

formula

(9)where  is the density of the fluid, is a turbulent diffusion term,  is a mass source,  is the fractional volume open to flow. The components of velocity (u, v, w) are in the direction of coordinates (x, y, z) or (r, ⁠).  in the x-direction is the fractional area open to flow,  and  are identical area fractions for flow in the y and z directions. The R coefficient is based on the selection of the coordinate system.

The FAVOR method is a different method and uses another volume fraction technique, which is only used to define the geometry, such as the volume of liquid in each cell used to determine the position of fluid surfaces. Another fractional volume can be used to define the solid surface. Then, this information is used to determine the boundary conditions of the wall that the flow should be adapted for.

Case study

ListenReadSpeaker webReader: Listen

In this study, the experimental results of Ostad Mirza (2016) was simulated. In a channel composed of two 4 m long modules, with a transparent sidewall of height 0.6 m and 0.5 m width. The upstream chute slope (i.e. pseudo-bottom angle) Ɵ1 = 50°, the downstream chute slope Ɵ2 = 30° or 18.6°, the step heights h = 0.06 m, the total number of steps along the 50° chute 41 steps, the total number of steps along the 30° chute 34 steps and the total number of steps along the 18.6° chute 20 steps.

The flume inflow tool contained a jetbox with a maximum opening set to 0.12 meters, designed for passing the maximum unit discharge of 0.48 m2/s. The measurements of the flow properties (i.e. air concentration and velocity) were computed perpendicular to the pseudo-bottom as shown in Figure 1 at the centre of twenty stream-wise cross-sections, along the stepped chute, (i.e. in five steps up on the slope change and fifteen steps down on the slope change, namely from step number −09 to +23 on 50°–30° slope change, or from −09 to +15 on 50°–18.6° slope change, respectively).

Sketch of the air concentration C and velocity V measured perpendicular to the pseudo-bottom used by Mirza (Ostad Mirza 2016).
Sketch of the air concentration C and velocity V measured perpendicular to the pseudo-bottom used by Mirza (Ostad Mirza 2016).

Sketch of the air concentration C and velocity V measured perpendicular to the pseudo-bottom used by Mirza (Ostad Mirza 2016).

Pressure sensors were arranged with the x/l values for different slope change as shown in Table 1, where x is the distance from the step edge, along the horizontal step face, and l is the length of the horizontal step face. The location of pressure sensors is shown in Table 1.Table 1

Location of pressure sensors on horizontal step faces

Θ(°)L(m)x/l (–)
50.0 0.050 0.35 0.64 – – – 
30.0 0.104 0.17 0.50 0.84 – – 
18.6 0.178 0.10 0.30 0.50 0.7 0.88 
Location of pressure sensors on horizontal step faces
Inlet boundary condition for Q = 0.235 m3/s and fluid elevation 4.21834 m.
Inlet boundary condition for Q = 0.235 m3/s and fluid elevation 4.21834 m.

Inlet boundary condition for Q = 0.235 m3/s and fluid elevation 4.21834 m.

Numerical model set-up

ListenReadSpeaker webReader: Listen

A 3D numerical model of hydraulic phenomena was simulated based on an experimental study by Ostad Mirza (2016). The water surcharge and flow pressure over the stepped spillway was computed for two models of a stepped spillway with different discharge for each model. In this study, the package was used to simulate the flow parameters such as air entrainment, velocity distribution and dynamic pressures. The solver uses the finite volume technique to discretize the computational domain. In every test run, one incompressible fluid flow with a free surface flow selected at 20̊ was used for this simulation model. Table 2 shows the variables used in test runs.Table 2

Variables used in test runs

Test no.Θ1 (°)Θ2 (°)h(m)d0q (m3s1)dc/h (–)
50 18.6 0.06 0.045 0.1 2.6 
50 18.6 0.06 0.082 0.235 4.6 
50 30.0 0.06 0.045 0.1 2.6 
50 30.0 0.06 0.082 0.235 4.6 
Table 2 Variables used in test runs

For stepped spillway simulation, several parameters should be specified to get accurate simulations, which is the scope of this research. Viscosity and turbulent, gravity and non-inertial reference frame, air entrainment, density evaluation and drift-flux should be activated for these simulations. There are five different choices in the ‘viscosity and turbulent’ option, in the viscosity flow and Renormalized Group (RNG) model. Then a dynamical model is selected as the second option, the ‘gravity and non-inertial reference frame’. Only the z-component was inputted as a negative 9.81 m/s2 and this value represents gravitational acceleration but in the same option the x and y components will be zero. Air entrainment is selected. Finally, in the drift-flux model, the density of phase one is input as (water) 1,000 kg/m3 and the density of phase two (air) as 1.225 kg/m3. Minimum volume fraction of phase one is input equal to 0.1 and maximum volume fraction of phase two to 1 to allow air concentration to reach 90%, then the option allowing gas to escape at free surface is selected, to obtain closer simulation.

The flow domain is divided into small regions relatively by the mesh in Flow-3D numerical model. Cells are the smallest part of the mesh, in which flow characteristics such as air concentration, velocity and dynamic pressure are calculated. The accuracy of the results and simulation time depends directly on the mesh block size so the cell size is very important. Orthogonal mesh was used in cartesian coordinate systems. A smaller cell size provides more accuracy for results, so we reduced the number of cells whilst including enough accuracy. In this study, the size of cells in x, y and z directions was selected as 0.015 m after several trials.

Figure 3 shows the 3D computational domain model 50–18.6 slope change, that is 6.0 m length, 0.50 m width and 4.23 m height. The 3D model of the computational domain model 50–30 slope changes this to 6.0 m length, 0.50 m width and 5.068 m height and the size of meshes in x, y, and z directions are 0.015 m. For the 50–18.6 slope change model: both total number of active and passive cells = 4,009,952, total number of active cells = 3,352,307, include real cells (used for solving the flow equations) = 3,316,269, open real cells = 3,316,269, fully blocked real cells equal to zero, external boundary cells were 36,038, inter-block boundary cells = 0 (Flow-3D report). For 50–30 slope change model: both total number of active and passive cells = 4,760,002, total number of active cells equal to 4,272,109, including real cells (used for solving the flow equations) were 3,990,878, open real cells = 3,990,878 fully blocked real cells = zero, external boundary cells were 281,231, inter-block boundary cells = 0 (Flow-3D report).

The 3D computational domain model (50–18.6) slope change, and boundary condition for (50–30 slope change) model.
Figure3 The 3D computational domain model (50–18.6) slope change, and boundary condition for (50–30 slope change) model.

Figure 3VIEW LARGEDOWNLOAD SLIDE

The 3D computational domain model (50–18.6) slope change, and boundary condition for (50–30 slope change) model.

When solving the Navier-Stokes equation and continuous equations, boundary conditions should be applied. The most important work of boundary conditions is to create flow conditions similar to physical status. The Flow-3D software has many types of boundary condition; each type can be used for the specific condition of the models. The boundary conditions in Flow-3D are symmetry, continuative, specific pressure, grid overlay, wave, wall, periodic, specific velocity, outflow, and volume flow rate.

There are two options to input finite flow rate in the Flow-3D software either for inlet discharge of the system or for the outlet discharge of the domain: specified velocity and volume flow rate. In this research, the X-minimum boundary condition, volume flow rate, has been chosen. For X-maximum boundary condition, outflow was selected because there is nothing to be calculated at the end of the flume. The volume flow rate and the elevation of surface water was set for Q = 0.1 and 0.235 m3/s respectively (Figure 2).

The bottom (Z-min) is prepared as a wall boundary condition and the top (Z-max) is computed as a pressure boundary condition, and for both (Y-min) and (Y-max) as symmetry.

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

ListenReadSpeaker webReader: Listen

The air concentration distribution profiles in two models of stepped spillway were obtained at an acquisition time equal to 25 seconds in skimming flow for both upstream and downstream of a slope change 50°–18.6° and 50°–30° for different discharge as in Table 2, and as shown in Figure 4 for 50°–18.6° slope change and Figure 5 for 50°–30° slope change configuration for dc/h = 4.6. The simulation results of the air concentration are very close to the experimental results in all curves and fairly close to that predicted by the advection-diffusion model for the air bubbles suggested by Chanson (1997) on a constant sloping chute.

Figure 4 Experimental and simulated air concentration distribution for steps number −5, +1, +5, +8, +11 and +15 along the 50°–18.6° slope change for dc/h = 4.6. VIEW LARGEDOWNLOAD SLIDE Experimental and simulated air concentration distribution for steps number −5, +1, +5, +8, +11 and +15 along the 50°–18.6° slope change for dc/h = 4.6.
Figure 4 Experimental and simulated air concentration distribution for steps number −5, +1, +5, +8, +11 and +15 along the 50°–18.6° slope change for dc/h = 4.6. VIEW LARGEDOWNLOAD SLIDE Experimental and simulated air concentration distribution for steps number −5, +1, +5, +8, +11 and +15 along the 50°–18.6° slope change for dc/h = 4.6.

Figure 4VIEW LARGEDOWNLOAD SLIDE

Experimental and simulated air concentration distribution for steps number −5, +1, +5, +8, +11 and +15 along the 50°–18.6° slope change for dc/h = 4.6.

Figure5 Experimental and simulated air concentration distribution for steps number −5, +1, +5, +11, +19 and +22 along the 50°–30° slope change, for dc/h = 4.6.
Figure5 Experimental and simulated air concentration distribution for steps number −5, +1, +5, +11, +19 and +22 along the 50°–30° slope change, for dc/h = 4.6.

Figure 5VIEW LARGEDOWNLOAD SLIDE

Experimental and simulated air concentration distribution for steps number −5, +1, +5, +11, +19 and +22 along the 50°–30° slope change, for dc/h = 4.6.

Figure 6VIEW LARGEDOWNLOAD SLIDE

Figure 6 Experimental and simulated dimensionless velocity distribution for steps number −5, −1, +1, +5, +8, +11 and +15 along the 50°–18.6° slope change for dc/h = 2.6.
Figure 6 Experimental and simulated dimensionless velocity distribution for steps number −5, −1, +1, +5, +8, +11 and +15 along the 50°–18.6° slope change for dc/h = 2.6.

Experimental and simulated dimensionless velocity distribution for steps number −5, −1, +1, +5, +8, +11 and +15 along the 50°–18.6° slope change for dc/h = 2.6.

Figure 7 Experimental and simulated dimensionless velocity distribution for steps number −5, −1, +1, +5. +11, +15 and +22 along the 50°–30° slope change for dc/h = 2.6.
Figure 7 Experimental and simulated dimensionless velocity distribution for steps number −5, −1, +1, +5. +11, +15 and +22 along the 50°–30° slope change for dc/h = 2.6.

Figure 7VIEW LARGEDOWNLOAD SLIDE

Experimental and simulated dimensionless velocity distribution for steps number −5, −1, +1, +5. +11, +15 and +22 along the 50°–30° slope change for dc/h = 2.6.

But as is shown in all above mentioned figures it is clear that at the pseudo-bottom the CFD results of air concentration are less than experimental ones until the depth of water reaches a quarter of the total depth of water. Also the direction of the curves are parallel to each other when going up towards the surface water and are incorporated approximately near the surface water. For all curves, the cross-section is separate between upstream and downstream steps. Therefore the (-) sign for steps represents a step upstream of the slope change cross-section and the (+) sign represents a step downstream of the slope change cross-section.

The dimensionless velocity distribution (V/V90) profile was acquired at an acquisition time equal to 25 seconds in skimming flow of the upstream and downstream slope change for both 50°–18.6° and 50°–30° slope change. The simulation results are compared with the experimental ones showing that for all curves there is close similarity for each point between the observed and experimental results. The curves increase parallel to each other and they merge near at the surface water as shown in Figure 6 for slope change 50°–18.6° configuration and Figure 7 for slope change 50°–30° configuration. However, at step numbers +1 and +5 in Figure 7 there are few differences between the simulated and observed results, namely the simulation curves ascend regularly meaning the velocity increases regularly from the pseudo-bottom up to the surface water.

Figure 8 (50°–18.6° slope change) and Figure 9 (50°–30° slope change) compare the simulation results and the experimental results for the presented dimensionless dynamic pressure distribution for different points on the stepped spillway. The results show a good agreement with the experimental and numerical simulations in all curves. For some points, few discrepancies can be noted in pressure magnitudes between the simulated and the observed ones, but they are in the acceptable range. Although the experimental data do not completely agree with the simulated results, there is an overall agreement.

Figure 8 Comparison between simulated and experimental results for the dimensionless pressure for steps number  −1, −2, −3 and +1, +2 +3 and +20 on the horizontal step faces of 50°–18.6° slope change configuration, for dc/h = 4.6, x is the distance from the step edge.
Figure 8 Comparison between simulated and experimental results for the dimensionless pressure for steps number −1, −2, −3 and +1, +2 +3 and +20 on the horizontal step faces of 50°–18.6° slope change configuration, for dc/h = 4.6, x is the distance from the step edge.

Figure 8VIEW LARGEDOWNLOAD SLIDE

Comparison between simulated and experimental results for the dimensionless pressure for steps number −1, −2, −3 and +1, +2 +3 and +20 on the horizontal step faces of 50°–18.6° slope change configuration, for dc/h = 4.6, x is the distance from the step edge.

Figure 9 Comparison between simulated and experimental results for the dimensionless pressure for steps number  −1, −2, −3 and +1, +2 and +30, +31 on the horizontal step face of 50°–30° slope change configuration, for dc/h = 4.6, x is the distance from the step edge.
Figure 9 Comparison between simulated and experimental results for the dimensionless pressure for steps number −1, −2, −3 and +1, +2 and +30, +31 on the horizontal step face of 50°–30° slope change configuration, for dc/h = 4.6, x is the distance from the step edge.

Figure 9VIEW LARGEDOWNLOAD SLIDE

Comparison between simulated and experimental results for the dimensionless pressure for steps number −1, −2, −3 and +1, +2 and +30, +31 on the horizontal step face of 50°–30° slope change configuration, for dc/h = 4.6, x is the distance from the step edge.

The pressure profiles were acquired at an acquisition time equal to 70 seconds in skimming flow on 50°–18.6°, where p is the measured dynamic pressure, h is step height and ϒ is water specific weight. A negative sign for steps represents a step upstream of the slope change cross-section and a positive sign represents a step downstream of the slope change cross-section.

Figure 10 shows the experimental streamwise development of dimensionless pressure on the 50°–18.6° slope change for dc/h = 4.6, x/l = 0.35 on 50° sloping chute and x/l = 0.3 on 18.6° sloping chute compared with the numerical simulation. It is obvious from Figure 10 that the streamwise development of dimensionless pressure before slope change (steps number −1, −2 and −3) both of the experimental and simulated results are close to each other. However, it is clear that there is a little difference between the results of the streamwise development of dimensionless pressure at step numbers +1, +2 and +3. Moreover, from step number +3 to the end, the curves get close to each other.

Figure 10 Comparison between experimental and simulated results for the streamwise development of the dimensionless pressure on the 50°–18.6° slope change, for dc/h = 4.6, and x/l = 0.35 on 50° sloping chute and x/l = 0.3 on 18.6° sloping chute.
Figure 10 Comparison between experimental and simulated results for the streamwise development of the dimensionless pressure on the 50°–18.6° slope change, for dc/h = 4.6, and x/l = 0.35 on 50° sloping chute and x/l = 0.3 on 18.6° sloping chute.

Figure 10VIEW LARGEDOWNLOAD SLIDE

Comparison between experimental and simulated results for the streamwise development of the dimensionless pressure on the 50°–18.6° slope change, for dc/h = 4.6, and x/l = 0.35 on 50° sloping chute and x/l = 0.3 on 18.6° sloping chute.

Figure 11 compares the experimental and the numerical results for the streamwise development of the dimensionless pressure on the 50°–30° slope change, for dc/h = 4.6, and x/l = 0.35 on 50° sloping chute and x/l = 0.17 on 30° sloping chute. It is apparent that the outcomes of the experimental work are close to the numerical results, however, the results of the simulation are above the experimental ones before the slope change, but the results of the simulation descend below the experimental ones after the slope change till the end.

Figure 11 Comparison between experimental and simulated results for the streamwise development of the dimensionless pressure on the 50°–30° slope change, for dc/h = 4.6, and x/l = 0.35 on 50° sloping chute and x/l = 0.17 on 30° sloping chute.
Figure 11 Comparison between experimental and simulated results for the streamwise development of the dimensionless pressure on the 50°–30° slope change, for dc/h = 4.6, and x/l = 0.35 on 50° sloping chute and x/l = 0.17 on 30° sloping chute.

Figure 11VIEW LARGEDOWNLOAD SLIDE

Comparison between experimental and simulated results for the streamwise development of the dimensionless pressure on the 50°–30° slope change, for dc/h = 4.6, and x/l = 0.35 on 50° sloping chute and x/l = 0.17 on 30° sloping chute.

CONCLUSION

ListenReadSpeaker webReader: Listen

In this research, numerical modelling was attempted to investigate the effect of abrupt slope change on the flow properties (air entrainment, velocity distribution and dynamic pressure) over a stepped spillway with two different models and various flow rates in a skimming flow regime by using the CFD technique. The numerical model was verified and compared with the experimental results of Ostad Mirza (2016). The same domain of the numerical model was inputted as in experimental models to reduce errors as much as possible.

Flow-3D is a well modelled tool that deals with particles. In this research, the model deals well with air entrainment particles by observing their results with experimental results. And the reason for the small difference between the numerical and the experimental results is that the program deals with particles more accurately than the laboratory. In general, both numerical and experimental results showed that near to the slope change the flow bulking, air entrainment, velocity distribution and dynamic pressure are greatly affected by abrupt slope change on the steps. Although the extent of the slope change was relatively small, the influence of the slope change was major on flow characteristics.

The Renormalized Group (RNG) model was selected as a turbulence solver. For 3D modelling, orthogonal mesh was used as a computational domain and the mesh grid size used for X, Y, and Z direction was equal to 0.015 m. In CFD modelling, air concentration and velocity distribution were recorded for a period of 25 seconds, but dynamic pressure was recorded for a period of 70 seconds. The results showed that there is a good agreement between the numerical and the physical models. So, it can be concluded that the proposed CFD model is very suitable for use in simulating and analysing the design of hydraulic structures.

이 연구에서 수치 모델링은 두 가지 다른 모델과 다양한 유속을 사용하여 스키밍 흐름 영역에서 계단식 배수로에 대한 유동 특성 (공기 혼입, 속도 분포 및 동적 압력)에 대한 급격한 경사 변화의 영향을 조사하기 위해 시도되었습니다. CFD 기술. 수치 모델을 검증하여 Ostad Mirza (2016)의 실험 결과와 비교 하였다. 오차를 최대한 줄이기 위해 실험 모형과 동일한 수치 모형을 입력 하였다.

Flow-3D는 파티클을 다루는 잘 모델링 된 도구입니다. 이 연구에서 모델은 실험 결과를 통해 결과를 관찰하여 공기 혼입 입자를 잘 처리합니다. 그리고 수치와 실험 결과의 차이가 작은 이유는 프로그램이 실험실보다 입자를 더 정확하게 다루기 때문입니다. 일반적으로 수치 및 실험 결과는 경사에 가까워지면 유동 벌킹, 공기 혼입, 속도 분포 및 동적 압력이 계단의 급격한 경사 변화에 크게 영향을받는 것으로 나타났습니다. 사면 변화의 정도는 상대적으로 작았지만 사면 변화의 영향은 유동 특성에 큰 영향을 미쳤다.

Renormalized Group (RNG) 모델이 난류 솔버로 선택되었습니다. 3D 모델링의 경우 계산 영역으로 직교 메쉬가 사용되었으며 X, Y, Z 방향에 사용 된 메쉬 그리드 크기는 0.015m입니다. CFD 모델링에서 공기 농도와 속도 분포는 25 초 동안 기록되었지만 동적 압력은 70 초 동안 기록되었습니다. 결과는 수치 모델과 물리적 모델간에 좋은 일치가 있음을 보여줍니다. 따라서 제안 된 CFD 모델은 수력 구조물의 설계 시뮬레이션 및 해석에 매우 적합하다는 결론을 내릴 수 있습니다.

DATA AVAILABILITY STATEMENT

ListenReadSpeaker webReader: Listen

All relevant data are included in the paper or its Supplementary Information.

REFERENCES

Boes R. M. Hager W. H. 2003a Hydraulic design of stepped spillways. Journal of Hydraulic Engineering 129 (9), 671–679.
Google Scholar
Boes R. M. Hager W. H. 2003b Two-Phase flow characteristics of stepped spillways. Journal of Hydraulic Engineering 129 (9), 661–670.
Google Scholar
Chanson H. 1994 Hydraulics of skimming flows over stepped channels and spillways. Journal of Hydraulic Research 32 (3), 445–460.
Google Scholar
Chanson H. 1997 Air Bubble Entrainment in Free Surface Turbulent Shear Flows. Academic Press, London.
Google Scholar
Chanson H. 2002 The Hydraulics of Stepped Chutes and Spillways. Balkema, Lisse, The Netherlands.
Google Scholar
Felder S. Chanson H. 2011 Energy dissipation down a stepped spillway with nonuniform step heights. Journal of Hydraulic Engineering 137 (11), 1543–1548.
Google Scholar
Flow Science, Inc. 2012 FLOW-3D v10-1 User Manual. Flow Science, Inc., Santa Fe, CA.
Ghaderi A. Daneshfaraz R. Torabi M. Abraham J. Azamathulla H. M. 2020a Experimental investigation on effective scouring parameters downstream from stepped spillways. Water Supply 20 (5), 1988–1998.
Google Scholar
Ghaderi A. Abbasi S. Abraham J. Azamathulla H. M. 2020b Efficiency of trapezoidal labyrinth shaped stepped spillways. Flow Measurement and Instrumentation 72, 101711.
Google Scholar
Gonzalez C. A. Chanson H. 2008 Turbulence and cavity recirculation in air-water skimming flows on a stepped spillway. Journal of Hydraulic Research 46 (1), 65–72.
Google Scholar
Gunal M. 1996 Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Hydraulic Jumps. PhD Thesis, University of Manchester, Institute of Science and Technology, Manchester, UK.
Hirt C. W. Nichols B. D. 1981 Volume of fluid (VOF) method for the dynamics of free boundaries. Journal of Computational Physics 39 (1), 201–225.
Google Scholar
Matos J. 2000 Hydraulic design of stepped spillways over RCC dams. In: Intl Workshop on Hydraulics of Stepped Spillways (H.-E. Minor & W. Hager, eds). Balkema Publ, Zurich, pp. 187–194.
Google Scholar
Mohammad Rezapour Tabari M. Tavakoli S. 2016 Effects of stepped spillway geometry on flow pattern and energy dissipation. Arabian Journal for Science & Engineering (Springer Science & Business Media BV) 41 (4), 1215–1224.
Google Scholar
Ostad Mirza M. J. 2016 Experimental Study on the Influence of Abrupt Slope Changes on Flow Characteristics Over Stepped Spillways. Communications du Laboratoire de Constructions Hydrauliques, No. 64 (A. J. Schleiss, ed.). Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne, Switzerland.
Roshan R. Azamathulla H. M. Marosi M. Sarkardeh H. Pahlavan H. Ab Ghani A. 2010 Hydraulics of stepped spillways with different numbers of steps. Dams and Reservoirs 20 (3), 131–136.
Google Scholar
Shahheydari H. Nodoshan E. J. Barati R. Moghadam M. A. 2015 Discharge coefficient and energy dissipation over stepped spillway under skimming flow regime. KSCE Journal of Civil Engineering 19 (4), 1174–1182.
Google Scholar
Takahashi M. Ohtsu I. 2012 Aerated flow characteristics of skimming flow over stepped chutes. Journal of Hydraulic Research 50 (4), 427–434.
Google Scholar
Versteeg H. K. Malalasekera W. 2007 An Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics: The Finite Volume Method. Pearson Education, Harlow.
Google Scholar
© 2021 The Authors
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Licence (CC BY 4.0), which permits copying, adaptation and redistribution, provided the original work is properly cited (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

Figure 4. Calculate and simulate the injection of water in a single-channel injection chamber with a nozzle diameter of 60 μm and a thickness of 50 μm, at an operating frequency of 5 KHz, in the X-Y two-dimensional cross-sectional view, at 10, 20, 30, 40 and 200 μs.

DNA Printing Integrated Multiplexer Driver Microelectronic Mechanical System Head (IDMH) and Microfluidic Flow Estimation

DNA 프린팅 통합 멀티플렉서 드라이버 Microelectronic Mechanical System Head (IDMH) 및 Microfluidic Flow Estimation

by Jian-Chiun Liou 1,*,Chih-Wei Peng 1,Philippe Basset 2 andZhen-Xi Chen 11School of Biomedical Engineering, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 11031, Taiwan2ESYCOM, Université Gustave Eiffel, CNRS, CNAM, ESIEE Paris, F-77454 Marne-la-Vallée, France*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.

Abstract

The system designed in this study involves a three-dimensional (3D) microelectronic mechanical system chip structure using DNA printing technology. We employed diverse diameters and cavity thickness for the heater. DNA beads were placed in this rapid array, and the spray flow rate was assessed. Because DNA cannot be obtained easily, rapidly deploying DNA while estimating the total amount of DNA being sprayed is imperative. DNA printings were collected in a multiplexer driver microelectronic mechanical system head, and microflow estimation was conducted. Flow-3D was used to simulate the internal flow field and flow distribution of the 3D spray room. The simulation was used to calculate the time and pressure required to generate heat bubbles as well as the corresponding mean outlet speed of the fluid. The “outlet speed status” function in Flow-3D was used as a power source for simulating the ejection of fluid by the chip nozzle. The actual chip generation process was measured, and the starting voltage curve was analyzed. Finally, experiments on flow rate were conducted, and the results were discussed. The density of the injection nozzle was 50, the size of the heater was 105 μm × 105 μm, and the size of the injection nozzle hole was 80 μm. The maximum flow rate was limited to approximately 3.5 cc. The maximum flow rate per minute required a power between 3.5 W and 4.5 W. The number of injection nozzles was multiplied by 100. On chips with enlarged injection nozzle density, experiments were conducted under a fixed driving voltage of 25 V. The flow curve obtained from various pulse widths and operating frequencies was observed. The operating frequency was 2 KHz, and the pulse width was 4 μs. At a pulse width of 5 μs and within the power range of 4.3–5.7 W, the monomer was injected at a flow rate of 5.5 cc/min. The results of this study may be applied to estimate the flow rate and the total amount of the ejection liquid of a DNA liquid.

이 연구에서 설계된 시스템은 DNA 프린팅 기술을 사용하는 3 차원 (3D) 마이크로 전자 기계 시스템 칩 구조를 포함합니다. 히터에는 다양한 직경과 캐비티 두께를 사용했습니다. DNA 비드를 빠른 어레이에 배치하고 스프레이 유속을 평가했습니다.

DNA를 쉽게 얻을 수 없기 때문에 DNA를 빠르게 배치하면서 스프레이 되는 총 DNA 양을 추정하는 것이 필수적입니다. DNA 프린팅은 멀티플렉서 드라이버 마이크로 전자 기계 시스템 헤드에 수집되었고 마이크로 플로우 추정이 수행되었습니다.

Flow-3D는 3D 스프레이 룸의 내부 유동장과 유동 분포를 시뮬레이션 하는데 사용되었습니다. 시뮬레이션은 열 거품을 생성하는데 필요한 시간과 압력뿐만 아니라 유체의 해당 평균 출구 속도를 계산하는데 사용되었습니다.

Flow-3D의 “출구 속도 상태”기능은 칩 노즐에 의한 유체 배출 시뮬레이션을 위한 전원으로 사용되었습니다. 실제 칩 생성 프로세스를 측정하고 시작 전압 곡선을 분석했습니다. 마지막으로 유속 실험을 하고 그 결과를 논의했습니다. 분사 노즐의 밀도는 50, 히터의 크기는 105μm × 105μm, 분사 노즐 구멍의 크기는 80μm였다. 최대 유량은 약 3.5cc로 제한되었습니다. 분당 최대 유량은 3.5W에서 4.5W 사이의 전력이 필요했습니다. 분사 노즐의 수에 100을 곱했습니다. 분사 노즐 밀도가 확대 된 칩에 대해 25V의 고정 구동 전압에서 실험을 수행했습니다. 얻은 유동 곡선 다양한 펄스 폭과 작동 주파수에서 관찰되었습니다. 작동 주파수는 2KHz이고 펄스 폭은 4μs입니다. 5μs의 펄스 폭과 4.3–5.7W의 전력 범위 내에서 단량체는 5.5cc / min의 유속으로 주입되었습니다. 이 연구의 결과는 DNA 액체의 토 출액의 유량과 총량을 추정하는 데 적용될 수 있습니다.

Keywords: DNA printingflow estimationMEMS

Introduction

잉크젯 프린트 헤드 기술은 매우 중요하며, 잉크젯 기술의 거대한 발전은 주로 잉크젯 프린트 헤드 기술의 원리 개발에서 시작되었습니다. 잉크젯 인쇄 연구를 위한 대규모 액적 생성기 포함 [ 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5 , 6 , 7 , 8]. 연속 식 잉크젯 시스템은 고주파 응답과 고속 인쇄의 장점이 있습니다. 그러나이 방법의 잉크젯 프린트 헤드의 구조는 더 복잡하고 양산이 어려운 가압 장치, 대전 전극, 편향 전계가 필요하다. 주문형 잉크젯 시스템의 잉크젯 프린트 헤드는 구조가 간단하고 잉크젯 헤드의 다중 노즐을 쉽게 구현할 수 있으며 디지털화 및 색상 지정이 쉽고 이미지 품질은 비교적 좋지만 일반적인 잉크 방울 토출 속도는 낮음 [ 9 , 10 , 11 ].

핫 버블 잉크젯 헤드의 총 노즐 수는 수백 또는 수천에 달할 수 있습니다. 노즐은 매우 미세하여 풍부한 조화 색상과 부드러운 메쉬 톤을 생성할 수 있습니다. 잉크 카트리지와 노즐이 일체형 구조를 이루고 있으며, 잉크 카트리지 교체시 잉크젯 헤드가 동시에 업데이트되므로 노즐 막힘에 대한 걱정은 없지만 소모품 낭비가 발생하고 상대적으로 높음 비용. 주문형 잉크젯 기술은 배출해야 하는 그래픽 및 텍스트 부분에만 잉크 방울을 배출하고 빈 영역에는 잉크 방울이 배출되지 않습니다. 이 분사 방법은 잉크 방울을 충전할 필요가 없으며 전극 및 편향 전기장을 충전할 필요도 없습니다. 노즐 구조가 간단하고 노즐의 멀티 노즐 구현이 용이하며, 출력 품질이 더욱 개선되었습니다. 펄스 제어를 통해 디지털화가 쉽습니다. 그러나 잉크 방울의 토출 속도는 일반적으로 낮습니다. 열 거품 잉크젯, 압전 잉크젯 및 정전기 잉크젯의 세 가지 일반적인 유형이 있습니다. 물론 다른 유형이 있습니다.

압전 잉크젯 기술의 실현 원리는 인쇄 헤드의 노즐 근처에 많은 소형 압전 세라믹을 배치하면 압전 크리스탈이 전기장의 작용으로 변형됩니다. 잉크 캐비티에서 돌출되어 노즐에서 분사되는 패턴 데이터 신호는 압전 크리스탈의 변형을 제어한 다음 잉크 분사량을 제어합니다. 압전 MEMS 프린트 헤드를 사용한 주문형 드롭 하이브리드 인쇄 [ 12]. 열 거품 잉크젯 기술의 실현 원리는 가열 펄스 (기록 신호)의 작용으로 노즐의 발열체 온도가 상승하여 근처의 잉크 용매가 증발하여 많은 수의 핵 형성 작은 거품을 생성하는 것입니다. 내부 거품의 부피는 계속 증가합니다. 일정 수준에 도달하면 생성된 압력으로 인해 잉크가 노즐에서 분사되고 최종적으로 기판 표면에 도달하여 패턴 정보가 재생됩니다 [ 13 , 14 , 15 , 16 , 17 , 18 ].

“3D 제품 프린팅”및 “증분 빠른 제조”의 의미는 진화했으며 모든 증분 제품 제조 기술을 나타냅니다. 이는 이전 제작과는 다른 의미를 가지고 있지만, 자동 제어 하에 소재를 쌓아 올리는 3D 작업 제작 과정의 공통적 인 특징을 여전히 반영하고 있습니다 [ 19 , 20 , 21 , 22 , 23 , 24 ].

이 개발 시스템은 열 거품 분사 기술입니다. 이 빠른 어레이에 DNA 비드를 배치하고 스프레이 유속을 평가하기 위해 다른 히터 직경과 캐비티 두께를 설계하는 것입니다. DNA 제트 칩의 부스트 회로 시스템은 큰 흐름을 구동하기위한 신호 소스입니다. 목적은 분사되는 DNA 용액의 양과 출력을 조정하는 것입니다. 입력 전압을 더 높은 출력 전압으로 변환해야 하는 경우 부스트 컨버터가 유일한 선택입니다. 부스트 컨버터는 내부 금속 산화물 반도체 전계 효과 트랜지스터 (MOSFET)를 통해 전압을 충전하여 부스트 출력의 목적을 달성하고, MOSFET이 꺼지면 인덕터는 부하 정류를 통해 방전됩니다.

인덕터의 충전과 방전 사이의 변환 프로세스는 인덕터를 통한 전압의 방향을 반대로 한 다음 점차적으로 입력 작동 전압보다 높은 전압을 증가시킵니다. MOSFET의 스위칭 듀티 사이클은 확실히 부스트 비율을 결정합니다. MOSFET의 정격 전류와 부스트 컨버터의 부스트 비율은 부스트 ​​컨버터의 부하 전류의 상한을 결정합니다. MOSFET의 정격 전압은 출력 전압의 상한을 결정합니다. 일부 부스트 컨버터는 정류기와 MOSFET을 통합하여 동기식 정류를 제공합니다. 통합 MOSFET은 정확한 제로 전류 턴 오프를 달성하여 부스트 변압기를 보다 효율적으로 만듭니다. 최대 전력 점 추적 장치를 통해 입력 전력을 실시간으로 모니터링합니다. 입력 전압이 최대 입력 전력 지점에 도달하면 부스트 컨버터가 작동하기 시작하여 부스트 컨버터가 최대 전력 출력 지점으로 유리 기판에 DNA 인쇄를 하는 데 적합합니다. 일정한 온 타임 생성 회로를 통해 온 타임이 온도 및 칩의 코너 각도에 영향을 받지 않아 시스템의 안정성이 향상됩니다.

잉크젯 프린트 헤드에 사용되는 기술은 매우 중요합니다. 잉크젯 기술의 엄청난 발전은 주로 잉크젯 프린팅에 사용되는 대형 액적 이젝터 [ 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5 , 6 , 7 , 8 ]를 포함하여 잉크젯 프린트 헤드 기술의 이론 개발에서 시작되었습니다 . 연속 잉크젯 시스템은 고주파 응답과 고속 인쇄의 장점을 가지고 있습니다. 잉크젯 헤드의 총 노즐 수는 수백 또는 수천에 달할 수 있으며 이러한 노즐은 매우 복잡합니다. 노즐은 풍부하고 조화로운 색상과 부드러운 메쉬 톤을 생성할 수 있습니다 [ 9 , 10 ,11 ]. 잉크젯은 열 거품 잉크젯, 압전 잉크젯 및 정전 식 잉크젯의 세 가지 주요 유형으로 분류할 수 있습니다. 다른 유형도 사용 중입니다. 압전 잉크젯의 기능은 다음과 같습니다. 많은 소형 압전 세라믹이 잉크젯 헤드 노즐 근처에 배치됩니다. 압전 결정은 전기장 아래에서 변형됩니다. 그 후, 잉크는 잉크 캐비티에서 압착되어 노즐에서 배출됩니다. 패턴의 데이터 신호는 압전 결정의 변형을 제어한 다음 분사되는 잉크의 양을 제어합니다. 압전 마이크로 전자 기계 시스템 (MEMS) 잉크젯 헤드는 하이브리드 인쇄에 사용됩니다. [ 12]. 열 버블 잉크젯 기술은 다음과 같이 작동합니다. 가열 펄스 (즉, 기록 신호) 하에서 노즐의 가열 구성 요소의 온도가 상승하여 근처의 잉크 용매를 증발시켜 많은 양의 작은 핵 기포를 생성합니다. 내부 기포의 부피가 지속적으로 증가합니다. 압력이 일정 수준에 도달하면 노즐에서 잉크가 분출되고 잉크가 기판 표면에 도달하여 패턴과 메시지가 표시됩니다 [ 13 , 14 , 15 , 16 , 17 , 18 ].

3 차원 (3D) 제품 프린팅 및 빠른 프로토 타입 기술의 발전에는 모든 빠른 프로토 타입의 생산 기술이 포함됩니다. 래피드 프로토 타입 기술은 기존 생산 방식과는 다르지만 3D 제품 프린팅 생산 과정의 일부 특성을 공유합니다. 구체적으로 자동 제어 [ 19 , 20 , 21 , 22 , 23 , 24 ] 하에서 자재를 쌓아 올립니다 .

이 연구에서 개발된 시스템은 열 기포 방출 기술을 사용했습니다. 이 빠른 어레이에 DNA 비드를 배치하기 위해 히터에 대해 다른 직경과 다른 공동 두께가 사용되었습니다. 그 후, 스프레이 유속을 평가했다. DNA 제트 칩의 부스트 회로 시스템은 큰 흐름을 구동하기위한 신호 소스입니다. 목표는 분사되는 DNA 액체의 양과 출력을 조정하는 것입니다. 입력 전압을 더 높은 출력 전압으로 수정해야하는 경우 승압 컨버터가 유일한 옵션입니다. 승압 컨버터는 내부 금속 산화물 반도체 전계 효과 트랜지스터 (MOSFET)를 충전하여 출력 전압을 증가시킵니다. MOSFET이 꺼지면 부하 정류를 통해 인덕턴스가 방전됩니다. 충전과 방전 사이에서 인덕터를 변경하는 과정은 인덕터를 통과하는 전압의 방향을 변경합니다. 전압은 입력 작동 전압을 초과하는 지점까지 점차적으로 증가합니다. MOSFET 스위치의 듀티 사이클은 부스트 ​​비율을 결정합니다. MOSFET의 승압 컨버터의 정격 전류와 부스트 비율은 승압 컨버터의 부하 전류의 상한을 결정합니다. MOSFET의 정격 전류는 출력 전압의 상한을 결정합니다. 일부 승압 컨버터는 정류기와 MOSFET을 통합하여 동기식 정류를 제공합니다. 통합 MOSFET은 정밀한 제로 전류 셧다운을 실현할 수 있으므로 셋업 컨버터의 효율성을 높일 수 있습니다. 최대 전력 점 추적 장치는 입력 전력을 실시간으로 모니터링하는 데 사용되었습니다. 입력 전압이 최대 입력 전력 지점에 도달하면 승압 컨버터가 작동을 시작합니다. 스텝 업 컨버터는 DNA 프린팅을 위한 최대 전력 출력 포인트가 있는 유리 기판에 사용됩니다.

MEMS Chip Design for Bubble Jet

이 연구는 히터 크기, 히터 번호 및 루프 저항과 같은 특정 매개 변수를 조작하여 5 가지 유형의 액체 배출 챔버 구조를 설계했습니다. 표 1 은 측정 결과를 나열합니다. 이 시스템은 다양한 히터의 루프 저항을 분석했습니다. 100 개 히터 설계를 완료하기 위해 2 세트의 히터를 사용하여 각 단일 회로 시리즈를 통과하기 때문에 100 개의 히터를 설계할 때 총 루프 저항은 히터 50 개의 총 루프 저항보다 하나 더 커야 합니다. 이 연구에서 MEMS 칩에서 기포를 배출하는 과정에서 저항 층의 면저항은 29 Ω / m 2입니다. 따라서 모델 A의 총 루프 저항이 가장 컸습니다. 일반 사이즈 모델 (모델 B1, C, D, E)의 두 배였습니다. 모델 B1, C, D 및 E의 총 루프 저항은 약 29 Ω / m 2 입니다. 표 1 에 따르면 오류 범위는 허용된 설계 값 이내였습니다. 따라서야 연구에서 설계된 각 유형의 단일 칩은 동일한 생산 절차 결과를 가지며 후속 유량 측정에 사용되었습니다.

Table 1. List of resistance measurement of single circuit resistance.
Table 1. List of resistance measurement of single circuit resistance.

DNA를 뿌린 칩의 파워가 정상으로 확인되면 히터 버블의 성장 특성을 테스트하고 검증했습니다. DNA 스프레이 칩의 필름 두께와 필름 품질은 히터의 작동 조건과 스프레이 품질에 영향을 줍니다. 따라서 기포 성장 현상과 그 성장 특성을 이해하면 본 연구에서 DNA 스프레이 칩의 특성과 작동 조건을 명확히 하는 데 도움이 됩니다.

설계된 시스템은 기포 성장 조건을 관찰하기 위해 개방형 액체 공급 방법을 채택했습니다. 이미지 관찰을 위해 발광 다이오드 (LED, Nichia NSPW500GS-K1, 3.1V 백색 LED 5mm)를 사용하는 동기식 플래시 방식을 사용하여 동기식 지연 광원을 생성했습니다. 이 시스템은 또한 전하 결합 장치 (CCD, Flir Grasshopper3 GigE GS3-PGE-50S5C-C)를 사용하여 이미지를 캡처했습니다. 그림 1핵 형성, 성장, 거품 생성에서 소산에 이르는 거품의 과정을 보여줍니다. 이 시스템은 기포의 성장 및 소산 과정을 확인하여 시작 전압을 관찰하는 데 사용할 수 있습니다. 마이크로 채널의 액체 공급 방법은 LED가 깜빡이는 시간을 가장 큰 기포 발생에 필요한 시간 (15μs)으로 설정했습니다. 이 디자인은 부적합한 깜박임 시간으로 인한 잘못된 판단과 거품 이미지 캡처 불가능을 방지합니다.

Figure 1. The system uses CCD to capture images.
Figure 1. The system uses CCD to capture images.

<내용 중략>…….

Table 2. Open pool test starting voltage results.
Table 2. Open pool test starting voltage results.
Figure 2. Serial input parallel output shift registers forms of connection.
Figure 2. Serial input parallel output shift registers forms of connection.
Figure 3. The geometry of the jet cavity. (a) The actual DNA liquid chamber, (b) the three-dimensional view of the microfluidic single channel. A single-channel jet cavity with 60 μm diameter and 50 μm thickness, with an operating frequency of 5 KHz, in (a) three-dimensional side view (b) X-Z two-dimensional cross-sectional view, at 10, 20, 30, 40 and 200 μs injection conditions.
Figure 3. The geometry of the jet cavity. (a) The actual DNA liquid chamber, (b) the three-dimensional view of the microfluidic single channel. A single-channel jet cavity with 60 μm diameter and 50 μm thickness, with an operating frequency of 5 KHz, in (a) three-dimensional side view (b) X-Z two-dimensional cross-sectional view, at 10, 20, 30, 40 and 200 μs injection conditions.
Figure 4. Calculate and simulate the injection of water in a single-channel injection chamber with a nozzle diameter of 60 μm and a thickness of 50 μm, at an operating frequency of 5 KHz, in the X-Y two-dimensional cross-sectional view, at 10, 20, 30, 40 and 200 μs.
Figure 4. Calculate and simulate the injection of water in a single-channel injection chamber with a nozzle diameter of 60 μm and a thickness of 50 μm, at an operating frequency of 5 KHz, in the X-Y two-dimensional cross-sectional view, at 10, 20, 30, 40 and 200 μs.
Figure 5 depicts the calculation results of the 2D X-Z cross section. At 100 μs and 200 μs, the fluid injection orifice did not completely fill the chamber. This may be because the size of the single-channel injection cavity was unsuitable for the highest operating frequency of 10 KHz. Thus, subsequent calculation simulations employed 5 KHz as the reference operating frequency. The calculation simulation results were calculated according to the operating frequency of the impact. Figure 6 illustrates the injection cavity height as 60 μm and 30 μm and reveals the 2D X-Y cross section. At 100 μs and 200 μs, the fluid injection orifice did not completely fill the chamber. In those stages, the fluid was still filling the chamber, and the flow field was not yet stable.
Figure 5 depicts the calculation results of the 2D X-Z cross section. At 100 μs and 200 μs, the fluid injection orifice did not completely fill the chamber. This may be because the size of the single-channel injection cavity was unsuitable for the highest operating frequency of 10 KHz. Thus, subsequent calculation simulations employed 5 KHz as the reference operating frequency. The calculation simulation results were calculated according to the operating frequency of the impact. Figure 6 illustrates the injection cavity height as 60 μm and 30 μm and reveals the 2D X-Y cross section. At 100 μs and 200 μs, the fluid injection orifice did not completely fill the chamber. In those stages, the fluid was still filling the chamber, and the flow field was not yet stable.
Figure 6. Calculate and simulate water in a single-channel spray chamber with a spray hole diameter of 60 μm and a thickness of 50 μm, with an operating frequency of 10 KHz, in an XY cross-sectional view, at 10, 20, 30, 40, 100, 110, 120, 130, 140 and 200 μs injection situation.
Figure 6. Calculate and simulate water in a single-channel spray chamber with a spray hole diameter of 60 μm and a thickness of 50 μm, with an operating frequency of 10 KHz, in an XY cross-sectional view, at 10, 20, 30, 40, 100, 110, 120, 130, 140 and 200 μs injection situation.
Figure 7. The DNA printing integrated multiplexer driver MEMS head (IDMH).
Figure 7. The DNA printing integrated multiplexer driver MEMS head (IDMH).
Figure 8. The initial voltage diagrams of chip number A,B,C,D,E type.
Figure 8. The initial voltage diagrams of chip number A,B,C,D,E type.
Figure 9. The initial energy diagrams of chip number A,B,C,D,E type.
Figure 9. The initial energy diagrams of chip number A,B,C,D,E type.
Figure 10. A Type-Sample01 flow test.
Figure 10. A Type-Sample01 flow test.
Figure 11. A Type-Sample01 drop volume.
Figure 11. A Type-Sample01 drop volume.
Figure 12. A Type-Sample01 flow rate.
Figure 12. A Type-Sample01 flow rate.
Figure 13. B1-00 flow test.
Figure 13. B1-00 flow test.
Figure 14. C Type-01 flow test.
Figure 14. C Type-01 flow test.
Figure 15. D Type-02 flow test.
Figure 15. D Type-02 flow test.
Figure 16. E1 type flow test.
Figure 16. E1 type flow test.
Figure 17. E1 type ejection rate relationship.
Figure 17. E1 type ejection rate relationship.

Conclusions

이 연구는 DNA 프린팅 IDMH를 제공하고 미세 유체 흐름 추정을 수행했습니다. 설계된 DNA 스프레이 캐비티와 20V의 구동 전압에서 다양한 펄스 폭의 유동 성능이 펄스 폭에 따라 증가하는 것으로 밝혀졌습니다.

E1 유형 유량 테스트는 해당 유량이 3.1cc / min으로 증가함에 따라 유량이 전력 변화에 영향을 받는 것으로 나타났습니다. 동력이 증가함에 따라 유량은 0.75cc / min에서 3.5cc / min으로 최대 6.5W까지 증가했습니다. 동력이 더 증가하면 유량은 에너지와 함께 증가하지 않습니다. 이것은 이 테이블 디자인이 가장 크다는 것을 보여줍니다. 유속은 3.5cc / 분이었다.
작동 주파수가 2KHz이고 펄스 폭이 4μs 및 5μs 인 특수 설계된 DNA 스프레이 룸 구조에서 다양한 전력 조건 하에서 유량 변화를 관찰했습니다. 4.3–5.87 W의 출력 범위 내에서 주입 된 모노머의 유속은 5.5cc / 분이었습니다. 이것은 힘이 증가해도 변하지 않았습니다. DNA는 귀중하고 쉽게 얻을 수 없습니다. 이 실험을 통해 우리는 DNA가 뿌려진 마이크로 어레이 바이오칩의 수천 개의 지점에 필요한 총 DNA 양을 정확하게 추정 할 수 있습니다.

<내용 중략>…….

References

  1. Pydar, O.; Paredes, C.; Hwang, Y.; Paz, J.; Shah, N.; Candler, R. Characterization of 3D-printed microfluidic chip interconnects with integrated O-rings. Sens. Actuators Phys. 2014205, 199–203. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  2. Ohtani, K.; Tsuchiya, M.; Sugiyama, H.; Katakura, T.; Hayakawa, M.; Kanai, T. Surface treatment of flow channels in microfluidic devices fabricated by stereolitography. J. Oleo Sci. 201463, 93–96. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  3. Castrejn-Pita, J.R.; Martin, G.D.; Hoath, S.D.; Hutchings, I.M. A simple large-scale droplet generator for studies of inkjet printing. Rev. Sci. Instrum. 200879, 075108. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  4. Asai, A. Application of the nucleation theory to the design of bubble jet printers. Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. Regul. Rap. Short Notes 198928, 909–915. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  5. Aoyama, R.; Seki, M.; Hong, J.W.; Fujii, T.; Endo, I. Novel Liquid Injection Method with Wedge-shaped Microchannel on a PDMS Microchip System for Diagnostic Analyses. In Transducers’ 01 Eurosensors XV; Springer: Berlin, Germany, 2001; pp. 1204–1207. [Google Scholar]
  6. Xu, B.; Zhang, Y.; Xia, H.; Dong, W.; Ding, H.; Sun, H. Fabrication and multifunction integration of microfluidic chips by femtosecond laser direct writing. Lab Chip 201313, 1677–1690. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  7. Nayve, R.; Fujii, M.; Fukugawa, A.; Takeuchi, T.; Murata, M.; Yamada, Y. High-Resolution long-array thermal ink jet printhead fabricated by anisotropic wet etching and deep Si RIE. J. Microelectromech. Syst. 200413, 814–821. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  8. O’Connor, J.; Punch, J.; Jeffers, N.; Stafford, J. A dimensional comparison between embedded 3D: Printed and silicon microchannesl. J. Phys. Conf. Ser. 2014525, 012009. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  9. Fang, Y.J.; Lee, J.I.; Wang, C.H.; Chung, C.K.; Ting, J. Modification of heater and bubble clamping behavior in off-shooting inkjet ejector. In Proceedings of the IEEE Sensors, Irvine, CA, USA, 30 October–3 November 2005; pp. 97–100. [Google Scholar]
  10. Lee, W.; Kwon, D.; Choi, W.; Jung, G.; Jeon, S. 3D-Printed microfluidic device for the detection of pathogenic bacteria using size-based separation in helical channel with trapezoid cross-section. Sci. Rep. 20155, 7717. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  11. Shin, D.Y.; Smith, P.J. Theoretical investigation of the influence of nozzle diameter variation on the fabrication of thin film transistor liquid crystal display color filters. J. Appl. Phys. 2008103, 114905-1–114905-11. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  12. Kim, Y.; Kim, S.; Hwang, J.; Kim, Y. Drop-on-Demand hybrid printing using piezoelectric MEMS printhead at various waveforms, high voltages and jetting frequencies. J. Micromech. Microeng. 201323, 8. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  13. Shin, S.J.; Kuka, K.; Shin, J.W.; Lee, C.S.; Oha, Y.S.; Park, S.O. Thermal design modifications to improve firing frequency of back shooting inkjet printhead. Sens. Actuators Phys. 2004114, 387–391. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  14. Rose, D. Microfluidic Technologies and Instrumentation for Printing DNA Microarrays. In Microarray Biochip Technology; Eaton Publishing: Norwalk, CT, USA, 2000; p. 35. [Google Scholar]
  15. Wu, D.; Wu, S.; Xu, J.; Niu, L.; Midorikawa, K.; Sugioka, K. Hybrid femtosecond laser microfabrication to achieve true 3D glass/polymer composite biochips with multiscale features and high performance: The concept of ship-in-abottle biochip. Laser Photon. Rev. 20148, 458–467. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  16. McIlroy, C.; Harlen, O.; Morrison, N. Modelling the jetting of dilute polymer solutions in drop-on-demand inkjet printing. J. Non Newton. Fluid Mech. 2013201, 17–28. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  17. Anderson, K.; Lockwood, S.; Martin, R.; Spence, D. A 3D printed fluidic device that enables integrated features. Anal. Chem. 201385, 5622–5626. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  18. Avedisian, C.T.; Osborne, W.S.; McLeod, F.D.; Curley, C.M. Measuring bubble nucleation temperature on the surface of a rapidly heated thermal ink-jet heater immersed in a pool of water. Proc. R. Soc. A Lond. Math. Phys. Sci. 1999455, 3875–3899. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  19. Lim, J.H.; Kuk, K.; Shin, S.J.; Baek, S.S.; Kim, Y.J.; Shin, J.W.; Oh, Y.S. Failure mechanisms in thermal inkjet printhead analyzed by experiments and numerical simulation. Microelectron. Reliab. 200545, 473–478. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  20. Shallan, A.; Semjkal, P.; Corban, M.; Gujit, R.; Breadmore, M. Cost-Effective 3D printing of visibly transparent microchips within minutes. Anal. Chem. 201486, 3124–3130. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  21. Cavicchi, R.E.; Avedisian, C.T. Bubble nucleation and growth anomaly for a hydrophilic microheater attributed to metastable nanobubbles. Phys. Rev. Lett. 200798, 124501. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  22. Kamei, K.; Mashimo, Y.; Koyama, Y.; Fockenberg, C.; Nakashima, M.; Nakajima, M.; Li, J.; Chen, Y. 3D printing of soft lithography mold for rapid production of polydimethylsiloxane-based microfluidic devices for cell stimulation with concentration gradients. Biomed. Microdevices 201517, 36. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  23. Shin, S.J.; Kuka, K.; Shin, J.W.; Lee, C.S.; Oha, Y.S.; Park, S.O. Firing frequency improvement of back shooting inkjet printhead by thermal management. In Proceedings of the TRANSDUCERS’03. 12th International Conference on Solid-State Sensors.Actuators and Microsystems. Digest of Technical Papers (Cat. No.03TH8664), Boston, MA, USA, 8–12 June 2003; Volume 1, pp. 380–383. [Google Scholar]
  24. Laio, X.; Song, J.; Li, E.; Luo, Y.; Shen, Y.; Chen, D.; Chen, Y.; Xu, Z.; Sugoioka, K.; Midorikawa, K. Rapid prototyping of 3D microfluidic mixers in glass by femtosecond laser direct writing. Lab Chip 201212, 746–749. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef] [PubMed]
Figure 4. Structure of artificial neural network [37]

Turbulent Flow Modeling at Tunnel Spillway Concave Bends and Prediction of Pressure using Artificial Neural Network

터널 배수로 오목 굴곡에서 난류 유동 모델링 인공 신경망을 이용한 압력 예측 및 예측

Zeinab Bashari Moghaddam 1
Hossein Mohammad Vali Samani2
Seyed Habib Mousavi Jahromi 3

Abstract

터널 배수로는 높은 자유 표면 유속이 설정되는 배수로 유형 중 하나입니다. 회전 가속과 난류 흐름의 불규칙성으로 인해 오목한 수직 굽힘에서 압력이 증가합니다. 물리적 모델은 이 현상을 분석하는 가장 좋은 도구입니다.

모든 실제 프로토 타입 상태 분석을 포괄하는 데 필요한 물리적 모델의 수가 너무 많아 배치 및 비용 측면에서 비실용적입니다. 따라서 FLOW-3D 소프트웨어는 가능한 모든 실제 대안을 포괄하는 오목한 굴곡 터널의 난류 흐름 데이터베이스를 분석하고 생성하기 위해 선택되었습니다.

이 소프트웨어는 방전과 형상이 다른 다양한 터널을 시뮬레이션했습니다. 수치 결과는 Alborz Dam 터널 배수로의 건설 된 물리적 모델의 실험 결과로 검증되었으며 만족스러운 동의를 얻었습니다. 차원 분석은 문제의 관련 변수를 차원 없는 매개 변수로 그룹화하는 데 사용됩니다.

이러한 매개 변수는 인공 신경망 시뮬레이션에 사용됩니다. 결과는 Flow-3D 소프트웨어로 얻은 무 차원 매개 변수와 신경망에 의해 예측된 변수 사이의 상관 계수 R2 = 0.95를 보여 주었으며, 이와 관련하여 난류 모델링을 통해 얻은 데이터베이스를 기반으로 한 인공 신경망이 결론을 내릴 수있었습니다. 압력 예측을 위한 강력한 도구입니다.

Keywords: Flow-3D, Tunnel spillway concave bend, Numerical simulation, Turbulent flow,
Artificial neural network

본문 내용 생략 : 본문 내용은 내용 하단부에 첨부된 본문 링크를 참조하시기 바랍니다.

Figure 1. Flow in a concave curvature
Figure 1. Flow in a concave curvature
Figure 2. Flow in the curvature of the flip bucket
Figure 2. Flow in the curvature of the flip bucket
Figure 3. The location of piezometers on the bed of the concave curvature of tunnel spillway in Alborz Dam
Figure 3. The location of piezometers on the bed of the concave curvature of tunnel spillway in Alborz Dam
Figure 4. Structure of artificial neural network [37]
Figure 4. Structure of artificial neural network [37]
Figure 5. Correlation coefficient of the Neural Network simulation and Flow-3D in the training
stage
Figure 6. Correlation coefficient of the Neural Network simulation and Flow-3D in the validation stage
Figure 6. Correlation coefficient of the Neural Network simulation and Flow-3D in the validation stage
Figure 7. Comparison 0f the Simulated Neural Network and Flow-3D Results of the validation stage
Figure 7. Comparison 0f the Simulated Neural Network and Flow-3D Results of the validation stage
Figure 8. Correlation coefficient of the Flow-3D numerical results and Equation (1)
Figure 8. Correlation coefficient of the Flow-3D numerical results and Equation (1)
Figure 9. Correlation coefficient of the Flow-3D numerical results and Equation (2)
Figure 9. Correlation coefficient of the Flow-3D numerical results and Equation (2)
Figure 10. Correlation coefficient of the Flow-3D numerical results and Equation (3)
Figure 10. Correlation coefficient of the Flow-3D numerical results and Equation (3)

현재 연구에서 FLOW-3D 소프트웨어는 처음에 다양한 크기와 배출의 터널 배수로에서 난류 흐름을 시뮬레이션하는데 사용되었습니다. 결과는 이란 에너지부 물 연구소에서 제공한 Alborz 저장 댐에서 얻은 실제 데이터와 비교하여 검증되었습니다.

시뮬레이션에는 다양한 난류 모델이 사용되었으며 RNG 방법이 관찰된 실제 결과와 가장 잘 일치하는 것으로 나타났습니다. 직경이 3 ~ 15m 인 다양한 터널 배수로, 곡률 반경 3 개, 거의 모든 실제 사례를 포괄하는 3개의 배출이 시뮬레이션에 사용되었습니다.

차원 분석을 사용하여 무 차원 매개 변수를 생성하고 문제의 변수 수를 줄였으며 마지막으로 두 개의 주요 무 차원 그룹이 결정되었습니다. 이러한 무 차원 변수 간의 관계를 얻기 위해 신경망을 사용하고 터널 배수로의 오목한 굴곡에서 압력 예측 단계에서 0.95의 상관 계수를 얻었습니다.

압력 계산 결과는 다른 일반적인 방법으로 얻은 결과와 비교되었습니다. 비교는 신경망 결과가 훨씬 더 정확하고 배수로 터널의 오목한 곡률에서 압력을 예측하는 강력한 도구로 간주 될 수 있음을 나타냅니다.

References

  1. Kim, D. G., & Park, J. H. (2005). Analysis of flow structure over ogee-spillway in
    consideration of scale and roughness effects by using CFD model. KSCE Journal of Civil
    Engineering, 9(2), 161-169.
  2. Sabbagh-Yazdi, S. R., Rostami, F., & Mastorakis, N. E. (2008, March). Simulation of selfaeration at steep chute spillway flow using VOF technique in a 3D finite volume software. In
    Am. Conf. on Appl. Maths. Harvard, Mass, 24-28.
  1. Nohani, E. (2015). Numerical simulation of the flow pattern on morning glory spillways.
    International Journal of Life Sciences, 9(4): 28-31.
  2. Parsaie, A., Dehdar-Behbahani, S., & Haghiabi, A. H. (2016). Numerical modeling of
    cavitation on spillway’s flip bucket. Frontiers of Structural and Civil Engineering, 10(4),
    438-444.
  3. Teuber, K., Broecker, T., Bay´on, A., N¨utzmann, G. and Hinkelmann, R. (2019) ‘CFDmodelling of free surface flows in closed conduits’, Progress in Computational Fluid
    Dynamics, 19(6), 368–380.
  4. Ghazanfari-Hashemi, R.S., Namin, M.M., Ghaeini-Hessaroeyeh, M. and Fadaei-Kermani,
    E., 2020. A Numerical Study on Three-Dimensionality and Turbulence in Supercritical Bend
    Flow. International Journal of Civil Engineering, 18(3), 381-391.
  5. Sha, H. F., Wu, S. Q., & Zhou, H. (2009). Flow characteristics in a circular-section bend of
    high head spillway tunnel. Advances in Water Science, (6), 14.
  6. Liu, Z., Zhang, D., Zhang, H., & Wu, Y. (2011). Hydraulic characteristics of converse
    curvature section and aerator in high-head and large discharge spillway tunnel. Science
    China Technological Sciences, 54(1), 33-39.
  7. Zheng, Q. W., Luo, S. J., & Zhang, F. X. (2012). The Effect of Concave Types on the
    Hydraulic Characteristics in Spillway Tunnels with High-Speed Velocity. China Rural
    Water and Hydropower, 4.
  8. Hongmin, G. U. O., Jiang, L. I., Shan, Q. I. N., & Yang, X. I. E. (2014). Three-Dimensional
    Numerical Simulation on Spillway Tunnel of Pankou Hydropower Station. Water Resources
    and Power, (4), 22.
  9. Wan, W., Liu, B., & Raza, A. (2018). Numerical Prediction and Risk Analysis of Hydraulic
    Cavitation Damage in a High-Speed-Flow Spillway. Shock and Vibration, 2018.
  10. Wei, W., Deng, J. and Xu, W. (2020). Numerical investigation of air demand by the free
    surface tunnel flows. Journal of Hydraulic Research, 1-8.
  11. Xu, W., Dang, Y., Li, G., Shao, J. and Chen, G. (2007) ‘Three-dimensional numerical
    simulation of the bi-tunnel spillway flow [J] ‘, Journal of Hydroelectric Engineering, 1, 56-
    60.
  12. Huang, H.Y., Gong, A.M., Qiu, Y. and Wangliang, Z.A. (2015) ‘ 3D Numerical Simulation
    and Experimental Analysis of Spillway Tunnel’ In Applied Mechanics and Materials. Trans
    Tech Publications Ltd. 723, 171-175.
  13. Li, S., Zhang, J. M., Xu, W. L., Chen, J. G., Peng, Y., Li, J. N., & He, X. L. (2016).
    Simulation and experiments of aerated flow in curve-connective tunnel with high head and
    large discharge. International Journal of Civil Engineering, 14(1), 23-33.
  14. Shilpakar, R., Hua, Z., Manandhar, B., Shrestha, N., Zafar, M. R., Iqbal, T., & Hussain, Z.
    (2017, August). Numerical simulation on tunnel spillway of Jingping-I hydropower project
    with four aerators. In IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science. 82, 012013.
  15. Song, C. C., & Zhou, F. (1999). Simulation of free surface flow over spillway. Journal of
    Hydraulic Engineering, 125(9), 959-967.
  16. Fais, L.M.C.F., Filho, J.G.D., Genovez, A.I.B. (2015). Geometry influence and discharge
    curve correction in morning glory spillways. Proceedings of the 36th IAHR World
    Congress.
  17. Falvey, H. T. (1990). Cavitation in chutes and spillways. Denver: US Department of the
    Interior, Bureau of Reclamation. 49-57.
  18. Chaudhry, M. H. (2007). Open-channel flow. Springer Science & Business Media.
  1. Novak, P., Moffat, A. I. B., Nalluri, C., & Narayanan, R. (2007). Hydraulic structures.
    Fourth Edition, Taylor & Francis, New York , 246–265.
  2. Jorabloo, M., Maghsoodi, R., Sarkardeh, H., & Branch, G. (2011). 3D simulation of flow
    over flip buckets at dams. Journal of American Science, 7(6), 931-936.
  3. Khani, S., Moghadam, M. A., & Nikookar, M. (2017). Pressure Fluctuations Investigation
    on the Curve of Flip Buckets Using Analytical and Numerical Methods. Vol. 03(04), 165-
    171.
  4. McCulloch, W. S., & Pitts, W. (1943). A logical calculus of the ideas immanent in nervous
    activity. The bulletin of mathematical biophysics, 5(4), 115-133.
  5. Hopfield, J. J. (1982). Neural networks and physical systems with emergent collective
    computational abilities. Proceedings of the national academy of sciences, 79(8), 2554-2558.
  6. Wu,C.L. Huang, B. Xie, C.B. (2008) . Comparison of calculation methods for irrigation
    district water inlet, China Rural Water and Hydropower ,5 (71) ,74–77.
  7. Qiu,J. Huang, B.S. . Lai, G.W. (2002). Research and application of discharge coefficient of
    wide crest weir, China Rural Water and Hydropower ,9 ,41–42.
  8. Xiang, H.Q .Ba,D.D. Liu, J.J. (2012) . Acquiring of curved practical weir flow coefficient by
    curve-fitting based on Matlab, Hydropower Energy Sci. 3 ,97–99.
  9. Ye,Y.T. He,J.J.(2013).Experimental study on hydraulic calculation of discharge under plane
    gate on broad-crested weir, J. Water Resour. Archit. Eng. 11 (2), 138–141.
  10. Salmasi, F., Yıldırım, G., Masoodi, A., & Parsamehr, P. (2013). Predicting discharge
    coefficient of compound broad-crested weir by using genetic programming (GP) and
    artificial neural network (ANN) techniques. Arabian Journal of Geosciences, 6(7), 2709-
    2717.
  11. Noori, R.; Hooshyaripor, F. (2014). Effective prediction of scour downstream of ski-jump
    buckets using artificial neural networks. Water Resour. 41, 8–18.
  12. Flow-Science. (2014). FLOW-3D user manual. version11. In: Flow Science Santa Fe, NM.
  13. Yakhot, V. S. A. S. T. B. C. G., Orszag, S. A., Thangam, S., Gatski, T. B., & Speziale, C. G.
    (1992). Development of turbulence models for shear flows by a double expansion technique.
    Physics of Fluids A: Fluid Dynamics, 4(7), 1510-1520.
  14. Report on the hydraulic model of Alborz dam reservoir. (2001). Iran Water Research
    Institute
  15. Lippman, R. (1987). An introduction to computing with neural nets. IEEE Assp magazine,
    4(2), pp.4-22.
  16. Baylar, A., Ozgur, K.I.S.I. and Emiroglu, M.E. (2009). Modeling air entrainment rate and
    aeration efficiency of weirs using ANN approach. Gazi University Journal of Science, 22(2),
    107-116.
  17. Maureen, C. and Caudill, M. (1989). Neural network primer: Part I. AI Expert, 2(12),
    p.1987.
Capsule-type Vane Tank

Numerical Simulation Analysis of Liquid Transportation in Capsule-type Vane Tank under Microgravity

Microgravity 하에서 캡슐형 베인 탱크의 액체 수송에 대한 수치 시뮬레이션 분석

Abstract

Li Yong-Qiang1,2 & Dong Jun-Yan1 & Rui Wei
1Received: 17 June 2019 /Accepted: 4 December 2019
#Springer Nature B.V. 2020

In order to research the influence of the guide vane on liquid transmission performance in a tank under microgravity, simulation analysis was carried out with FLOW-3D software. Firstly, it compared the working condition under the charging rate of 10% with the corresponding experiment results of the drop tower and validated the correctness of the simulation process. And then it changed the structure parameters of the guide vane, researched the influence of different quantity, gap and thickness on climbing rate of liquid, and analyzed the causing reasons of these effects in-depth. This paper provided a reference for the design of internal guiding vane of microgravity tank.

본 논문은 가이드 베인이 미세 중력 상태의 탱크에서 액체 전달 성능에 미치는 영향을 연구하기 위해 FLOW-3D 소프트웨어를 사용하여 시뮬레이션 분석을 수행했습니다. 첫째, 10 % 충전율 하에서 작업 조건을 드롭 타워의 해당 실험 결과와 비교하여 시뮬레이션 프로세스의 정확성을 검증했다. 그리고 가이드 베인의 구조 매개 변수를 변경하고, 액체의 상승 속도에 대한 양, 간격 및 두께의 영향을 연구하고 이러한 영향의 원인을 심도있게 분석했습니다. 이 논문은 미세 중력 탱크의 내부 안내 날개 설계에 대한 참고 자료를 제공했습니다.

Capsule-type Vane Tank
Capsule-type Vane Tank
The relationship curve between the square of climbing height and time with a = 6 mm
The relationship curve between the square of climbing height and time with a = 6 mm
The relationship curve between the vane’s liquid transportation and time under different width a
The relationship curve between the vane’s liquid transportation and time under different width a
Figure 1 (A) A schematic of ovarian cancer metastases involving tumor cells or clusters (yellow) shedding from a primary site and disseminating along ascitic currents of peritoneal fluid (green arrows) in the abdominal cavity. Ovarian cancer typically disseminates in four common abdomino-pelvic sites: (1) cul-de-sac (an extension of the peritoneal cavity between the rectum and back wall of the uterus); (2) right infracolic space (the apex formed by the termination of the small intestine of the small bowel mesentery at the ileocecal junction); (3) left infracolic space (superior site of the sigmoid colon); (4) Right paracolic gutter (communication between the upper and lower abdomen defined by the ascending colon and peritoneal wall). (B) The schematic of a perfusion model used to study the impact of sustained fluid flow on treatment resistance and molecular features of 3D ovarian cancer nodules (Top left). A side view of the perfusion model and growth of ovarian cancer nodules to a stromal bed (Top right). The photograph of a perfusion model used in the experiments (Bottom left) and depth-informed confocal imaging of ovarian cancer nodules in channels with and without carboplatin treatment (Bottom right). The perfusion model is 24 × 40 mm, with three channels that are 4 × 30 mm each and a height of 254 μm. The inlet and outlet ports of channels are 2.2 mm in diameter and positioned 5 mm from the edge of the chip. (C) A schematic of a 24-well plate model used to study the treatment resistance and molecular features of 3D ovarian cancer nodules under static conditions (without flow) (Top left). A side view of the static models and growth of ovarian cancer nodules on a stromal bed (Top right). Confocal imaging of 3D ovarian cancer nodules in a 24-well plate without and with carboplatin treatment (Bottom). Scale bars: 1 mm.

Flow-induced Shear Stress Confers Resistance to Carboplatin in an Adherent Three-Dimensional Model for Ovarian Cancer: A Role for EGFR-Targeted Photoimmunotherapy Informed by Physical Stress

난소암에 대한 일관된 3차원 모델에서 카보플라틴에 대한 유동에 의한 전단응력변화에 관한 연구

Abstract

A key reason for the persistently grim statistics associated with metastatic ovarian cancer is resistance to conventional agents, including platinum-based chemotherapies. A major source of treatment failure is the high degree of genetic and molecular heterogeneity, which results from significant underlying genomic instability, as well as stromal and physical cues in the microenvironment. Ovarian cancer commonly disseminates via transcoelomic routes to distant sites, which is associated with the frequent production of malignant ascites, as well as the poorest prognosis. In addition to providing a cell and protein-rich environment for cancer growth and progression, ascitic fluid also confers physical stress on tumors. An understudied area in ovarian cancer research is the impact of fluid shear stress on treatment failure. Here, we investigate the effect of fluid shear stress on response to platinum-based chemotherapy and the modulation of molecular pathways associated with aggressive disease in a perfusion model for adherent 3D ovarian cancer nodules. Resistance to carboplatin is observed under flow with a concomitant increase in the expression and activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) as well as downstream signaling members mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). The uptake of platinum by the 3D ovarian cancer nodules was significantly higher in flow cultures compared to static cultures. A downregulation of phospho-focal adhesion kinase (p-FAK), vinculin, and phospho-paxillin was observed following carboplatin treatment in both flow and static cultures. Interestingly, low-dose anti-EGFR photoimmunotherapy (PIT), a targeted photochemical modality, was found to be equally effective in ovarian tumors grown under flow and static conditions. These findings highlight the need to further develop PIT-based combinations that target the EGFR, and sensitize ovarian cancers to chemotherapy in the context of flow-induced shear stress.

전이성 난소 암과 관련된 지속적으로 암울한 통계의 주요 이유는 백금 기반 화학 요법을 포함한 기존 약제에 대한 내성 때문입니다. 치료 실패의 주요 원인은 높은 수준의 유전적 및 분자적 이질성이며, 이는 중요한 기본 게놈 불안정성과 미세 환경의 기질 및 물리적 단서로 인해 발생합니다.

난소 암은 흔히 transcoelomic 경로를 통해 먼 부위로 전파되며, 이는 악성 복수의 빈번한 생산과 가장 나쁜 예후와 관련이 있습니다. 암 성장 및 진행을위한 세포 및 단백질이 풍부한 환경을 제공하는 것 외에도 복수 액은 종양에 물리적 스트레스를 부여합니다. 난소 암 연구에서 잘 연구되지 않은 분야는 유체 전단 응력이 치료 실패에 미치는 영향입니다.

여기, 우리는 백금 기반 화학 요법에 대한 반응과 부착 3D 난소 암 결절에 대한 관류 모델에서 공격적인 질병과 관련된 분자 경로의 변조에 대한 유체 전단 응력의 효과를 조사합니다.

카르보플라틴에 대한 내성은 상피 성장 인자 수용체 (EGFR)의 발현 및 활성화의 수반되는 증가 뿐만 아니라 다운 스트림 신호 구성원인 미토겐 활성화 단백질 키나제/세포 외 신호 조절 키나제 (MEK) 및 세포 외 신호 조절과 함께 관찰됩니다. 키나아제 (ERK). 3D 난소 암 결절에 의한 백금 흡수는 정적 배양에 비해 유동 배양에서 상당히 높았습니다.

포스 포-포컬 접착 키나제 (p-FAK), 빈 쿨린 및 포스 포-팍 실린의 하향 조절은 유동 및 정적 배양 모두에서 카보 플 라틴 처리 후 관찰되었습니다. 흥미롭게도, 표적 광 화학적 양식 인 저용량 항 EGFR 광 면역 요법 (PIT)은 유동 및 정적 조건에서 성장한 난소 종양에서 똑같이 효과적인 것으로 밝혀졌습니다.

이러한 발견은 EGFR을 표적으로하는 PIT 기반 조합을 추가로 개발하고 흐름 유도 전단 응력의 맥락에서 화학 요법에 난소 암을 민감하게 할 필요성을 강조합니다.

Keywords: ovarian cancer, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), chemoresistance, fluid shear stress, ascites, perfusion model, photoimmunotherapy (PIT), photodynamic therapy (PDT), carboplatin

Figure 1 (A) A schematic of ovarian cancer metastases involving tumor cells or clusters (yellow) shedding from a primary site and disseminating along ascitic currents of peritoneal fluid (green arrows) in the abdominal cavity. Ovarian cancer typically disseminates in four common abdomino-pelvic sites: (1) cul-de-sac (an extension of the peritoneal cavity between the rectum and back wall of the uterus); (2) right infracolic space (the apex formed by the termination of the small intestine of the small bowel mesentery at the ileocecal junction); (3) left infracolic space (superior site of the sigmoid colon); (4) Right paracolic gutter (communication between the upper and lower abdomen defined by the ascending colon and peritoneal wall). (B) The schematic of a perfusion model used to study the impact of sustained fluid flow on treatment resistance and molecular features of 3D ovarian cancer nodules (Top left). A side view of the perfusion model and growth of ovarian cancer nodules to a stromal bed (Top right). The photograph of a perfusion model used in the experiments (Bottom left) and depth-informed confocal imaging of ovarian cancer nodules in channels with and without carboplatin treatment (Bottom right). The perfusion model is 24 × 40 mm, with three channels that are 4 × 30 mm each and a height of 254 μm. The inlet and outlet ports of channels are 2.2 mm in diameter and positioned 5 mm from the edge of the chip. (C) A schematic of a 24-well plate model used to study the treatment resistance and molecular features of 3D ovarian cancer nodules under static conditions (without flow) (Top left). A side view of the static models and growth of ovarian cancer nodules on a stromal bed (Top right). Confocal imaging of 3D ovarian cancer nodules in a 24-well plate without and with carboplatin treatment (Bottom). Scale bars: 1 mm.
Figure 1 (A) A schematic of ovarian cancer metastases involving tumor cells or clusters (yellow) shedding from a primary site and disseminating along ascitic currents of peritoneal fluid (green arrows) in the abdominal cavity. Ovarian cancer typically disseminates in four common abdomino-pelvic sites: (1) cul-de-sac (an extension of the peritoneal cavity between the rectum and back wall of the uterus); (2) right infracolic space (the apex formed by the termination of the small intestine of the small bowel mesentery at the ileocecal junction); (3) left infracolic space (superior site of the sigmoid colon); (4) Right paracolic gutter (communication between the upper and lower abdomen defined by the ascending colon and peritoneal wall). (B) The schematic of a perfusion model used to study the impact of sustained fluid flow on treatment resistance and molecular features of 3D ovarian cancer nodules (Top left). A side view of the perfusion model and growth of ovarian cancer nodules to a stromal bed (Top right). The photograph of a perfusion model used in the experiments (Bottom left) and depth-informed confocal imaging of ovarian cancer nodules in channels with and without carboplatin treatment (Bottom right). The perfusion model is 24 × 40 mm, with three channels that are 4 × 30 mm each and a height of 254 μm. The inlet and outlet ports of channels are 2.2 mm in diameter and positioned 5 mm from the edge of the chip. (C) A schematic of a 24-well plate model used to study the treatment resistance and molecular features of 3D ovarian cancer nodules under static conditions (without flow) (Top left). A side view of the static models and growth of ovarian cancer nodules on a stromal bed (Top right). Confocal imaging of 3D ovarian cancer nodules in a 24-well plate without and with carboplatin treatment (Bottom). Scale bars: 1 mm.
Figure 2 (A) Geometry of the micronodule located at the center of the microchannel. The flow velocity is in the X-direction. The nodule is modeled as an ellipse with a semi-minor axis of 40 μm in the Z-direction. The semi-major axis varies from 40-100 μm in the X-direction. The section over which the fluid dynamics are studied is the middle part of the channel with dimensions 4 mm along the Y-axis and 250 μm along the Z-axis. The nodule is located at (0, 20 μm). The black dotted line shows the centerline of the largest nodule. (B) Shear stress distribution over the surface of the solid micro-nodule on the XZ-plane. (C) Shear stress distribution over the surface of the porous micro-nodule on the XZ-plane. (D) Flow flux distribution over the centerline of the porous micro-nodule on the XZ-plane. The flux enters the surface at the left and leaves at the right.
Figure 2 (A) Geometry of the micronodule located at the center of the microchannel. The flow velocity is in the X-direction. The nodule is modeled as an ellipse with a semi-minor axis of 40 μm in the Z-direction. The semi-major axis varies from 40-100 μm in the X-direction. The section over which the fluid dynamics are studied is the middle part of the channel with dimensions 4 mm along the Y-axis and 250 μm along the Z-axis. The nodule is located at (0, 20 μm). The black dotted line shows the centerline of the largest nodule. (B) Shear stress distribution over the surface of the solid micro-nodule on the XZ-plane. (C) Shear stress distribution over the surface of the porous micro-nodule on the XZ-plane. (D) Flow flux distribution over the centerline of the porous micro-nodule on the XZ-plane. The flux enters the surface at the left and leaves at the right.
Figure 3 Cytotoxic response in carboplatin-treated 3D OVCAR-5 cultures under static conditions. (A) Representative confocal images of 3D tumors treated with carboplatin (0-500 μM) for 96 h showing a dose-dependent reduction in viable tumor (calcein signal). (B) Image-based quantification of normalized viable tumor area in 3D OVCAR-5 cultures following treatment with increasing doses of carboplatin. A minimum nodule size cut-off of 2000 µm2 (clusters of ~15–20 cells) was applied to the fluorescence images for quantitative analysis of the normalized viable tumor area. (One-way ANOVA with Dunnett’s post hoc test; n.s., not significant; * p < 0.05; *** p < 0.001; N = 9) (C) Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS)-based quantification of carboplatin uptake in static 3D OVCAR-5 tumors shows a dose-dependent increase in platinum levels, up to 9774 ± 3,052 ng/mg protein at an incubation concentration of 500 μM carboplatin. (One-way ANOVA with Dunn’s multiple comparisons test; n.s., not significant; * p < 0.05; ** p < 0.01; N = 3). Results are expressed as mean ± standard error of mean (SEM). Scale bars: 500 μm.
Figure 3 Cytotoxic response in carboplatin-treated 3D OVCAR-5 cultures under static conditions. (A) Representative confocal images of 3D tumors treated with carboplatin (0-500 μM) for 96 h showing a dose-dependent reduction in viable tumor (calcein signal). (B) Image-based quantification of normalized viable tumor area in 3D OVCAR-5 cultures following treatment with increasing doses of carboplatin. A minimum nodule size cut-off of 2000 µm2 (clusters of ~15–20 cells) was applied to the fluorescence images for quantitative analysis of the normalized viable tumor area. (One-way ANOVA with Dunnett’s post hoc test; n.s., not significant; * p < 0.05; *** p < 0.001; N = 9) (C) Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS)-based quantification of carboplatin uptake in static 3D OVCAR-5 tumors shows a dose-dependent increase in platinum levels, up to 9774 ± 3,052 ng/mg protein at an incubation concentration of 500 μM carboplatin. (One-way ANOVA with Dunn’s multiple comparisons test; n.s., not significant; * p < 0.05; ** p < 0.01; N = 3). Results are expressed as mean ± standard error of mean (SEM). Scale bars: 500 μm.
Figure 4 flow-induced chemo-resistance
Figure 4 flow-induced chemo-resistance
Figure 5 The effects of flow-induced shear stress on 3D ovarian cancer biology. (A) Western blot analysis of OVCAR-5 tumors was performed 7 days after culture under static or flow conditions. A flow-induced increase in EGFR and p-ERK, compared to static cultures, was observed. Conversely, a reduction in p-FAK, p-Paxillin, and Vinculin was observed under flow, relative to static conditions. (B) Western blot analysis of 3D OVCAR-5 tumors was performed 11 days after culture under static or flow conditions, including 4 days of treatment with 500 µM carboplatin, and respective controls. In both static and flow 3D cultures, carboplatin treatment resulted in downregulation of EGFR, FAK, p-Paxillin, Paxillin, and Vinculin. Upregulation of p-ERK was observed after carboplatin treatment in both static and flow 3D cultures. (C) Baseline levels of EGFR activity and expression are maintained by a complex array of factors, including recycling and degradation of the activated receptor complex. Flow-induced shear stress has been shown to cause a posttranslational up-regulation of EGFR expression and activation, likely resulting from increased receptor recycling and decreased EGFR degradation. Activation of EGFR results in ERK phosphorylation to induce gene expression, ultimately leading to cell proliferation, survival, and chemoresistance. FAK and other tyrosine kinases are activated by the engagement of integrins with the ECM. Subsequent phosphorylation of paxillin by FAK not only influences the remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton, but also modulates vinculin activation to regulate mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades, thereby stimulating pro-survival gene expression.
Figure 5 The effects of flow-induced shear stress on 3D ovarian cancer biology. (A) Western blot analysis of OVCAR-5 tumors was performed 7 days after culture under static or flow conditions. A flow-induced increase in EGFR and p-ERK, compared to static cultures, was observed. Conversely, a reduction in p-FAK, p-Paxillin, and Vinculin was observed under flow, relative to static conditions. (B) Western blot analysis of 3D OVCAR-5 tumors was performed 11 days after culture under static or flow conditions, including 4 days of treatment with 500 µM carboplatin, and respective controls. In both static and flow 3D cultures, carboplatin treatment resulted in downregulation of EGFR, FAK, p-Paxillin, Paxillin, and Vinculin. Upregulation of p-ERK was observed after carboplatin treatment in both static and flow 3D cultures. (C) Baseline levels of EGFR activity and expression are maintained by a complex array of factors, including recycling and degradation of the activated receptor complex. Flow-induced shear stress has been shown to cause a posttranslational up-regulation of EGFR expression and activation, likely resulting from increased receptor recycling and decreased EGFR degradation. Activation of EGFR results in ERK phosphorylation to induce gene expression, ultimately leading to cell proliferation, survival, and chemoresistance. FAK and other tyrosine kinases are activated by the engagement of integrins with the ECM. Subsequent phosphorylation of paxillin by FAK not only influences the remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton, but also modulates vinculin activation to regulate mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades, thereby stimulating pro-survival gene expression.
Figure 6 PIT efficacy in 3D tumors. (A) Dose-dependent change in normalized viable tumor area in static 3D cultures treated with PIC (1 μM BPD equivalent) and increasing energy densities (10–50 J/cm2 @ 50 mW/cm2). Significant tumoricidal efficacy is observed in a light-dose-dependent manner, starting at 15 J/cm2. (One-way ANOVA with Dunnett’s post hoc test; n.s., not significant; ** p < 0.01, *** p < 0.001, N = 9) (B) Comparison of cytotoxic response in PIT-treated 3D cultures under static and flow conditions. For quantitative analysis of fluorescence images, a minimum nodule size cut-off of 2000 µm2 (clusters of ~15–20 cells) was used to establish normalized viable tumor area. PIT is equally effective in 3D tumors grown in static cultures (green) and under flow-induced shear stress (blue) (in contrast to flow-induced chemo-resistance shown in Figure 4) (Two-tailed t test; n.s., not significant; N = 9).
Figure 6 PIT efficacy in 3D tumors. (A) Dose-dependent change in normalized viable tumor area in static 3D cultures treated with PIC (1 μM BPD equivalent) and increasing energy densities (10–50 J/cm2 @ 50 mW/cm2). Significant tumoricidal efficacy is observed in a light-dose-dependent manner, starting at 15 J/cm2. (One-way ANOVA with Dunnett’s post hoc test; n.s., not significant; ** p < 0.01, *** p < 0.001, N = 9) (B) Comparison of cytotoxic response in PIT-treated 3D cultures under static and flow conditions. For quantitative analysis of fluorescence images, a minimum nodule size cut-off of 2000 µm2 (clusters of ~15–20 cells) was used to establish normalized viable tumor area. PIT is equally effective in 3D tumors grown in static cultures (green) and under flow-induced shear stress (blue) (in contrast to flow-induced chemo-resistance shown in Figure 4) (Two-tailed t test; n.s., not significant; N = 9).

References

  1. Siegel R.L., Miller K.D., Jemal A. Cancer statistics, 2019. CA Cancer J. Clin. 2019;69:7–34. doi: 10.3322/caac.21551. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  2. Foley O.W., Rauh-Hain J.A., Del Carmen M.G. Recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer: An update on treatment. Oncology. 2013;27:288–294, 298. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  3. Kipps E., Tan D.S., Kaye S.B. Meeting the challenge of ascites in ovarian cancer: New avenues for therapy and research. Nat. Rev. Cancer. 2013;13:273–282. doi: 10.1038/nrc3432. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  4. Tan D.S., Agarwal R., Kaye S.B. Mechanisms of transcoelomic metastasis in ovarian cancer. Lancet Oncol. 2006;7:925–934. doi: 10.1016/S1470-2045(06)70939-1. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  5. Ahmed N., Stenvers K.L. Getting to know ovarian cancer ascites: Opportunities for targeted therapy-based translational research. Front. Oncol. 2013;3:256. doi: 10.3389/fonc.2013.00256. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  6. Shield K., Ackland M.L., Ahmed N., Rice G.E. Multicellular spheroids in ovarian cancer metastases: Biology and pathology. Gynecol. Oncol. 2009;113:143–148. doi: 10.1016/j.ygyno.2008.11.032. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  7. Naora H., Montell D.J. Ovarian cancer metastasis: Integrating insights from disparate model organisms. Nat. Rev. Cancer. 2005;5:355–366. doi: 10.1038/nrc1611. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  8. Lengyel E. Ovarian cancer development and metastasis. Am. J. Pathol. 2010;177:1053–1064. doi: 10.2353/ajpath.2010.100105. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  9. Javellana M., Hoppenot C., Lengyel E. The road to long-term survival: Surgical approach and longitudinal treatments of long-term survivors of advanced-stage serous ovarian cancer. Gynecol. Oncol. 2019;152:228–234. doi: 10.1016/j.ygyno.2018.11.007. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  10. Al Habyan S., Kalos C., Szymborski J., McCaffrey L. Multicellular detachment generates metastatic spheroids during intra-abdominal dissemination in epithelial ovarian cancer. Oncogene. 2018;37:5127–5135. doi: 10.1038/s41388-018-0317-x. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  11. Kim S., Kim B., Song Y.S. Ascites modulates cancer cell behavior, contributing to tumor heterogeneity in ovarian cancer. Cancer Sci. 2016;107:1173–1178. doi: 10.1111/cas.12987. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  12. Bowtell D.D., Bohm S., Ahmed A.A., Aspuria P.J., Bast R.C., Beral V., Berek J.S., Birrer M.J., Blagden S., Bookman M.A., et al. Rethinking ovarian cancer II: Reducing mortality from high-grade serous ovarian cancer. Nat. Rev. Cancer. 2015;15:668–679. doi: 10.1038/nrc4019. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  13. Hoppenot C., Eckert M.A., Tienda S.M., Lengyel E. Who are the long-term survivors of high grade serous ovarian cancer? Gynecol. Oncol. 2018;148:204–212. doi: 10.1016/j.ygyno.2017.10.032. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  14. Zhao Y., Cao J., Melamed A., Worley M., Gockley A., Jones D., Nia H.T., Zhang Y., Stylianopoulos T., Kumar A.S., et al. Losartan treatment enhances chemotherapy efficacy and reduces ascites in ovarian cancer models by normalizing the tumor stroma. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 2019;116:2210–2219. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1818357116. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  15. Ayantunde A.A., Parsons S.L. Pattern and prognostic factors in patients with malignant ascites: A retrospective study. Ann. Oncol. 2007;18:945–949. doi: 10.1093/annonc/mdl499. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  16. Latifi A., Luwor R.B., Bilandzic M., Nazaretian S., Stenvers K., Pyman J., Zhu H., Thompson E.W., Quinn M.A., Findlay J.K., et al. Isolation and characterization of tumor cells from the ascites of ovarian cancer patients: Molecular phenotype of chemoresistant ovarian tumors. PLoS ONE. 2012;7:e46858. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0046858. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  17. Ahmed N., Greening D., Samardzija C., Escalona R.M., Chen M., Findlay J.K., Kannourakis G. Unique proteome signature of post-chemotherapy ovarian cancer ascites-derived tumor cells. Sci. Rep. 2016;6:30061. doi: 10.1038/srep30061. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  18. Gjorevski N., Boghaert E., Nelson C.M. Regulation of Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition by Transmission of Mechanical Stress through Epithelial Tissues. Cancer Microenviron. 2012;5:29–38. doi: 10.1007/s12307-011-0076-5. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  19. Polacheck W.J., Charest J.L., Kamm R.D. Interstitial flow influences direction of tumor cell migration through competing mechanisms. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 2011;108:11115–11120. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1103581108. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  20. Polacheck W.J., German A.E., Mammoto A., Ingber D.E., Kamm R.D. Mechanotransduction of fluid stresses governs 3D cell migration. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 2014;111:2447–2452. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1316848111. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  21. Polacheck W.J., Zervantonakis I.K., Kamm R.D. Tumor cell migration in complex microenvironments. Cell Mol. Life Sci. 2013;70:1335–1356. doi: 10.1007/s00018-012-1115-1. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  22. Swartz M.A., Lund A.W. Lymphatic and interstitial flow in the tumour microenvironment: Linking mechanobiology with immunity. Nat. Rev. Cancer. 2012;12:210–219. doi: 10.1038/nrc3186. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  23. Pisano M., Triacca V., Barbee K.A., Swartz M.A. An in vitro model of the tumor-lymphatic microenvironment with simultaneous transendothelial and luminal flows reveals mechanisms of flow enhanced invasion. Integr. Biol. 2015;7:525–533. doi: 10.1039/C5IB00085H. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  24. Follain G., Herrmann D., Harlepp S., Hyenne V., Osmani N., Warren S.C., Timpson P., Goetz J.G. Fluids and their mechanics in tumour transit: Shaping metastasis. Nat. Rev. Cancer. 2020;20:107–124. doi: 10.1038/s41568-019-0221-x. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  25. Rizvi I., Gurkan U.A., Tasoglu S., Alagic N., Celli J.P., Mensah L.B., Mai Z., Demirci U., Hasan T. Flow induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition, cellular heterogeneity and biomarker modulation in 3D ovarian cancer nodules. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 2013;110:E1974–E1983. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1216989110. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  26. Novak C., Horst E., Mehta G. Mechanotransduction in ovarian cancer: Shearing into the unknown. APL Bioeng. 2018;2 doi: 10.1063/1.5024386. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  27. Carmignani C.P., Sugarbaker T.A., Bromley C.M., Sugarbaker P.H. Intraperitoneal cancer dissemination: Mechanisms of the patterns of spread. Cancer Metastasis Rev. 2003;22:465–472. doi: 10.1023/A:1023791229361. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  28. Sugarbaker P.H. Observations concerning cancer spread within the peritoneal cavity and concepts supporting an ordered pathophysiology. Cancer Treatment Res. 1996;82:79–100. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  29. Feki A., Berardi P., Bellingan G., Major A., Krause K.H., Petignat P., Zehra R., Pervaiz S., Irminger-Finger I. Dissemination of intraperitoneal ovarian cancer: Discussion of mechanisms and demonstration of lymphatic spreading in ovarian cancer model. Crit. Rev. Oncol./Hematol. 2009;72:1–9. doi: 10.1016/j.critrevonc.2008.12.003. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  30. Holm-Nielsen P. Pathogenesis of ascites in peritoneal carcinomatosis. Acta Pathol. Microbiol. Scand. 1953;33:10–21. doi: 10.1111/j.1699-0463.1953.tb04805.x. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  31. Ahmed N., Riley C., Oliva K., Rice G., Quinn M. Ascites induces modulation of alpha6beta1 integrin and urokinase plasminogen activator receptor expression and associated functions in ovarian carcinoma. Br. J. Cancer. 2005;92:1475–1485. doi: 10.1038/sj.bjc.6602495. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  32. Woodburn J.R. The epidermal growth factor receptor and its inhibition in cancer therapy. Pharmacol. Ther. 1999;82:241–250. doi: 10.1016/S0163-7258(98)00045-X. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  33. Servidei T., Riccardi A., Mozzetti S., Ferlini C., Riccardi R. Chemoresistant tumor cell lines display altered epidermal growth factor receptor and HER3 signaling and enhanced sensitivity to gefitinib. Int. J. Cancer J. Int. Cancer. 2008;123:2939–2949. doi: 10.1002/ijc.23902. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  34. Chen A.P., Zhang J., Liu H., Zhao S.P., Dai S.Z., Sun X.L. Association of EGFR expression with angiogenesis and chemoresistance in ovarian carcinoma. Zhonghua zhong liu za zhi [Chinese journal of oncology] 2009;31:48–52. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  35. Alper O., Bergmann-Leitner E.S., Bennett T.A., Hacker N.F., Stromberg K., Stetler-Stevenson W.G. Epidermal growth factor receptor signaling and the invasive phenotype of ovarian carcinoma cells. J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 2001;93:1375–1384. doi: 10.1093/jnci/93.18.1375. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  36. Zeineldin R., Muller C.Y., Stack M.S., Hudson L.G. Targeting the EGF receptor for ovarian cancer therapy. J. Oncol. 2010;2010:414676. doi: 10.1155/2010/414676. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  37. Alper O., De Santis M.L., Stromberg K., Hacker N.F., Cho-Chung Y.S., Salomon D.S. Anti-sense suppression of epidermal growth factor receptor expression alters cellular proliferation, cell-adhesion and tumorigenicity in ovarian cancer cells. Int. J. Cancer. 2000;88:566–574. doi: 10.1002/1097-0215(20001115)88:4<566::AID-IJC8>3.0.CO;2-D. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  38. Posadas E.M., Liel M.S., Kwitkowski V., Minasian L., Godwin A.K., Hussain M.M., Espina V., Wood B.J., Steinberg S.M., Kohn E.C. A phase II and pharmacodynamic study of gefitinib in patients with refractory or recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer. Cancer. 2007;109:1323–1330. doi: 10.1002/cncr.22545. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  39. Psyrri A., Kassar M., Yu Z., Bamias A., Weinberger P.M., Markakis S., Kowalski D., Camp R.L., Rimm D.L., Dimopoulos M.A. Effect of epidermal growth factor receptor expression level on survival in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer. Clin. Cancer Res. 2005;11:8637–8643. doi: 10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-05-1436. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  40. Dimou A., Agarwal S., Anagnostou V., Viray H., Christensen S., Gould Rothberg B., Zolota V., Syrigos K., Rimm D. Standardization of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) measurement by quantitative immunofluorescence and impact on antibody-based mutation detection in non-small cell lung cancer. Am. J. Pathol. 2011;179:580–589. doi: 10.1016/j.ajpath.2011.04.031. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  41. Anagnostou V.K., Welsh A.W., Giltnane J.M., Siddiqui S., Liceaga C., Gustavson M., Syrigos K.N., Reiter J.L., Rimm D.L. Analytic variability in immunohistochemistry biomarker studies. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2010;19:982–991. doi: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-10-0097. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  42. Del Carmen M.G., Rizvi I., Chang Y., Moor A.C., Oliva E., Sherwood M., Pogue B., Hasan T. Synergism of epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted immunotherapy with photodynamic treatment of ovarian cancer in vivo. J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 2005;97:1516–1524. doi: 10.1093/jnci/dji314. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  43. Armstrong D.K., Bundy B., Wenzel L., Huang H.Q., Baergen R., Lele S., Copeland L.J., Walker J.L., Burger R.A., Gynecologic Oncology G. Intraperitoneal cisplatin and paclitaxel in ovarian cancer. N. Engl. J. Med. 2006;354:34–43. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa052985. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  44. Verwaal V.J., Van Ruth S., De Bree E., Van Sloothen G.W., Van Tinteren H., Boot H., Zoetmulder F.A. Randomized trial of cytoreduction and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy versus systemic chemotherapy and palliative surgery in patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis of colorectal cancer. J. Clin. Oncol. 2003;21:3737–3743. doi: 10.1200/JCO.2003.04.187. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  45. Van Driel W.J., Koole S.N., Sikorska K., Schagen van Leeuwen J.H., Schreuder H.W.R., Hermans R.H.M., De Hingh I., Van der Velden J., Arts H.J., Massuger L., et al. Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy in Ovarian Cancer. N. Engl. J. Med. 2018;378:230–240. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1708618. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  46. Verwaal V.J., Bruin S., Boot H., Van Slooten G., Van Tinteren H. 8-year follow-up of randomized trial: Cytoreduction and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy versus systemic chemotherapy in patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis of colorectal cancer. Ann. Surg. Oncol. 2008;15:2426–2432. doi: 10.1245/s10434-008-9966-2. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  47. DeLaney T.F., Sindelar W.F., Tochner Z., Smith P.D., Friauf W.S., Thomas G., Dachowski L., Cole J.W., Steinberg S.M., Glatstein E. Phase I study of debulking surgery and photodynamic therapy for disseminated intraperitoneal tumors. Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 1993;25:445–457. doi: 10.1016/0360-3016(93)90066-5. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  48. Celli J.P., Spring B.Q., Rizvi I., Evans C.L., Samkoe K.S., Verma S., Pogue B.W., Hasan T. Imaging and photodynamic therapy: Mechanisms, monitoring, and optimization. Chem. Rev. 2010;110:2795–2838. doi: 10.1021/cr900300p. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  49. Spring B.Q., Rizvi I., Xu N., Hasan T. The role of photodynamic therapy in overcoming cancer drug resistance. Photochem. Photobiol. Sci. 2015;14:1476–1491. doi: 10.1039/C4PP00495G. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  50. Liang B.J., Pigula M., Baglo Y., Najafali D., Hasan T., Huang H.C. Breaking the Selectivity-Uptake Trade-Off of Photoimmunoconjugates with Nanoliposomal Irinotecan for Synergistic Multi-Tier Cancer Targeting. J. Nanobiotechnol. 2020;18:1. doi: 10.1186/s12951-019-0560-5. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  51. Huang H.C., Rizvi I., Liu J., Anbil S., Kalra A., Lee H., Baglo Y., Paz N., Hayden D., Pereira S., et al. Photodynamic Priming Mitigates Chemotherapeutic Selection Pressures and Improves Drug Delivery. Cancer Res. 2018;78:558–571. doi: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-17-1700. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  52. Huang H.C., Mallidi S., Liu J., Chiang C.T., Mai Z., Goldschmidt R., Ebrahim-Zadeh N., Rizvi I., Hasan T. Photodynamic Therapy Synergizes with Irinotecan to Overcome Compensatory Mechanisms and Improve Treatment Outcomes in Pancreatic Cancer. Cancer Res. 2016;76:1066–1077. doi: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-15-0391. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  53. Cengel K.A., Glatstein E., Hahn S.M. Intraperitoneal photodynamic therapy. Cancer Treat. Res. 2007;134:493–514. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  54. Obaid G., Broekgaarden M., Bulin A.-L., Huang H.-C., Kuriakose J., Liu J., Hasan T. Photonanomedicine: A convergence of photodynamic therapy and nanotechnology. Nanoscale. 2016;8:12471–12503. doi: 10.1039/C5NR08691D. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  55. Ogata F., Nagaya T., Nakamura Y., Sato K., Okuyama S., Maruoka Y., Choyke P.L., Kobayashi H. Near-infrared photoimmunotherapy: A comparison of light dosing schedules. Oncotarget. 2017;8:35069–35075. doi: 10.18632/oncotarget.17047. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  56. Mitsunaga M., Ogawa M., Kosaka N., Rosenblum L.T., Choyke P.L., Kobayashi H. Cancer cell-selective in vivo near infrared photoimmunotherapy targeting specific membrane molecules. Nat. Med. 2011;17:1685–1691. doi: 10.1038/nm.2554. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  57. Inglut C.T., Baglo Y., Liang B.J., Cheema Y., Stabile J., Woodworth G.F., Huang H.-C. Systematic Evaluation of Light-Activatable Biohybrids for Anti-Glioma Photodynamic Therapy. J. Clin. Med. 2019;8:1269. doi: 10.3390/jcm8091269. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  58. Huang H.C., Pigula M., Fang Y., Hasan T. Immobilization of Photo-Immunoconjugates on Nanoparticles Leads to Enhanced Light-Activated Biological Effects. Small. 2018:e1800236. doi: 10.1002/smll.201800236. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  59. Spring B.Q., Abu-Yousif A.O., Palanisami A., Rizvi I., Zheng X., Mai Z., Anbil S., Sears R.B., Mensah L.B., Goldschmidt R., et al. Selective treatment and monitoring of disseminated cancer micrometastases in vivo using dual-function, activatable immunoconjugates. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 2014;111:E933–E942. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1319493111. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  60. Abu-Yousif A.O., Moor A.C., Zheng X., Savellano M.D., Yu W., Selbo P.K., Hasan T. Epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted photosensitizer selectively inhibits EGFR signaling and induces targeted phototoxicity in ovarian cancer cells. Cancer Lett. 2012;321:120–127. doi: 10.1016/j.canlet.2012.01.014. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  61. Rizvi I., Dinh T.A., Yu W., Chang Y., Sherwood M.E., Hasan T. Photoimmunotherapy and irradiance modulation reduce chemotherapy cycles and toxicity in a murine model for ovarian carcinomatosis: Perspective and results. Israel J. Chem. 2012;52:776–787. doi: 10.1002/ijch.201200016. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  62. Quirk B.J., Brandal G., Donlon S., Vera J.C., Mang T.S., Foy A.B., Lew S.M., Girotti A.W., Jogal S., LaViolette P.S., et al. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) for malignant brain tumors–where do we stand? Photodiagnosis Photodyn. Ther. 2015;12:530–544. doi: 10.1016/j.pdpdt.2015.04.009. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  63. Eljamel M.S., Goodman C., Moseley H. ALA and Photofrin fluorescence-guided resection and repetitive PDT in glioblastoma multiforme: A single centre Phase III randomised controlled trial. Lasers Med. Sci. 2008;23:361–367. doi: 10.1007/s10103-007-0494-2. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  64. Varma A.K., Muller P.J. Cranial neuropathies after intracranial Photofrin-photodynamic therapy for malignant supratentorial gliomas-a report on 3 cases. Surg. Neurol. 2008;70:190–193. doi: 10.1016/j.surneu.2007.01.060. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  65. Akimoto J. Photodynamic Therapy for Malignant Brain Tumors. Neurol. Medico-Chirurgica. 2016;56:151–157. doi: 10.2176/nmc.ra.2015-0296. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  66. Kercher E.M., Nath S., Rizvi I., Spring B.Q. Cancer Cell-targeted and Activatable Photoimmunotherapy Spares T Cells in a 3D Coculture Model. Photochem. Photobiol. 2019 doi: 10.1111/php.13153. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  67. Savellano M.D., Hasan T. Targeting cells that overexpress the epidermal growth factor receptor with polyethylene glycolated BPD verteporfin photosensitizer immunoconjugates. Photochem. Photobiol. 2003;77:431–439. doi: 10.1562/0031-8655(2003)077<0431:TCTOTE>2.0.CO;2. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  68. Molpus K.L., Hamblin M.R., Rizvi I., Hasan T. Intraperitoneal photoimmunotherapy of ovarian carcinoma xenografts in nude mice using charged photoimmunoconjugates. Gynecol. Oncol. 2000;76:397–404. doi: 10.1006/gyno.1999.5705. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  69. Savellano M.D., Hasan T. Photochemical targeting of epidermal growth factor receptor: A mechanistic study. Clin. Cancer Res. 2005;11:1658–1668. doi: 10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-04-1902. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  70. Nath S., Saad M.A., Pigula M., Swain J.W.R., Hasan T. Photoimmunotherapy of Ovarian Cancer: A Unique Niche in the Management of Advanced Disease. Cancers. 2019;11:1887. doi: 10.3390/cancers11121887. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  71. Calibasi Kocal G., Guven S., Foygel K., Goldman A., Chen P., Sengupta S., Paulmurugan R., Baskin Y., Demirci U. Dynamic Microenvironment Induces Phenotypic Plasticity of Esophageal Cancer Cells Under Flow. Sci. Rep. 2016;6:38221. doi: 10.1038/srep38221. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  72. Tasoglu S., Gurkan U.A., Wang S., Demirci U. Manipulating biological agents and cells in micro-scale volumes for applications in medicine. Chem. Soc. Rev. 2013;42:5788–5808. doi: 10.1039/c3cs60042d. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  73. Moon S., Gurkan U.A., Blander J., Fawzi W.W., Aboud S., Mugusi F., Kuritzkes D.R., Demirci U. Enumeration of CD4+ T-cells using a portable microchip count platform in Tanzanian HIV-infected patients. PLoS ONE. 2011;6:e21409. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0021409. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  74. White F.M. Fluid Mechanics. McGraw-Hill; Boston, MA, USA: 2011. [Google Scholar]
  75. Luo Q., Kuang D., Zhang B., Song G. Cell stiffness determined by atomic force microscopy and its correlation with cell motility. Biochim Biophys Acta. 2016;1860:1953–1960. doi: 10.1016/j.bbagen.2016.06.010. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  76. Sarntinoranont M., Rooney F., Ferrari M. Interstitial Stress and Fluid Pressure Within a Growing Tumor. Ann. Biomed. Eng. 2003;31:327–335. doi: 10.1114/1.1554923. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  77. Baxter L.T., Jain R.K. Transport of fluid and macromolecules in tumors. I. Role of interstitial pressure and convection. Microvasc. Res. 1989;37:77–104. doi: 10.1016/0026-2862(89)90074-5. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  78. Malik R., Khan A.P., Asangani I.A., Cieślik M., Prensner J.R., Wang X., Iyer M.K., Jiang X., Borkin D., Escara-Wilke J., et al. Targeting the MLL complex in castration-resistant prostate cancer. Nat. Med. 2015;21:344. doi: 10.1038/nm.3830. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  79. Nath S., Christian L., Tan S.Y., Ki S., Ehrlich L.I., Poenie M. Dynein Separately Partners with NDE1 and Dynactin To Orchestrate T Cell Focused Secretion. J. Immunol. 2016;197:2090–2101. doi: 10.4049/jimmunol.1600180. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  80. Celli J.P., Rizvi I., Evans C.L., Abu-Yousif A.O., Hasan T. Quantitative imaging reveals heterogeneous growth dynamics and treatment-dependent residual tumor distributions in a three-dimensional ovarian cancer model. J. Biomed. Opt. 2010;15:051603. doi: 10.1117/1.3483903. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  81. Rizvi I., Celli J.P., Evans C.L., Abu-Yousif A.O., Muzikansky A., Pogue B.W., Finkelstein D., Hasan T. Synergistic Enhancement of Carboplatin Efficacy with Photodynamic Therapy in a Three-Dimensional Model for Micrometastatic Ovarian Cancer. Cancer Res. 2010;70:9319–9328. doi: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-10-1783. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  82. Glidden M.D., Celli J.P., Massodi I., Rizvi I., Pogue B.W., Hasan T. Image-Based Quantification of Benzoporphyrin Derivative Uptake, Localization, and Photobleaching in 3D Tumor Models, for Optimization of PDT Parameters. Theranostics. 2012;2:827–839. doi: 10.7150/thno.4334. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  83. Celli J.P., Rizvi I., Blanden A.R., Massodi I., Glidden M.D., Pogue B.W., Hasan T. An imaging-based platform for high-content, quantitative evaluation of therapeutic response in 3D tumour models. Sci. Rep. 2014;4:3751. doi: 10.1038/srep03751. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  84. Bulin A.L., Broekgaarden M., Hasan T. Comprehensive high-throughput image analysis for therapeutic efficacy of architecturally complex heterotypic organoids. Sci. Rep. 2017;7:16645. doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-16622-9. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  85. Rahmanzadeh R., Rai P., Celli J.P., Rizvi I., Baron-Luhr B., Gerdes J., Hasan T. Ki-67 as a molecular target for therapy in an in vitro three-dimensional model for ovarian cancer. Cancer Res. 2010;70:9234–9242. doi: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-10-1190. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  86. Anbil S., Rizvi I., Celli J.P., Alagic N., Pogue B.W., Hasan T. Impact of treatment response metrics on photodynamic therapy planning and outcomes in a three-dimensional model of ovarian cancer. J. Biomed. Opt. 2013;18:098004. doi: 10.1117/1.JBO.18.9.098004. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  87. Di Pasqua A.J., Goodisman J., Dabrowiak J.C. Understanding how the platinum anticancer drug carboplatin works: From the bottle to the cell. Inorg. Chim. Acta. 2012;389:29–35. doi: 10.1016/j.ica.2012.01.028. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  88. Rabik C.A., Dolan M.E. Molecular mechanisms of resistance and toxicity associated with platinating agents. Cancer Treat. Rev. 2007;33:9–23. doi: 10.1016/j.ctrv.2006.09.006. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  89. Ozols R.F. Carboplatin and paclitaxel in ovarian cancer. Semin. Oncol. 1995;22:78–83. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  90. Neijt J.P., Lund B. Paclitaxel with carboplatin for the treatment of ovarian cancer. Semin. Oncol. 1996;23:2–4. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  91. Subauste C.M., Pertz O., Adamson E.D., Turner C.E., Junger S., Hahn K.M. Vinculin modulation of paxillin–FAK interactions regulates ERK to control survival and motility. J. Cell Biol. 2004;165:371–381. doi: 10.1083/jcb.200308011. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  92. Eke I., Cordes N. Focal adhesion signaling and therapy resistance in cancer. Semin. Cancer Biol. 2015;31:65–75. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  93. McCubrey J.A., Steelman L.S., Chappell W.H., Abrams S.L., Wong E.W., Chang F., Lehmann B., Terrian D.M., Milella M., Tafuri A., et al. Roles of the Raf/MEK/ERK pathway in cell growth, malignant transformation and drug resistance. Biochim. Biophys. Acta. 2007;1773:1263–1284. doi: 10.1016/j.bbamcr.2006.10.001. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  94. Duska L.R., Hamblin M.R., Miller J.L., Hasan T. Combination photoimmunotherapy and cisplatin: Effects on human ovarian cancer ex vivo. J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 1999;91:1557–1563. doi: 10.1093/jnci/91.18.1557. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  95. Spring B., Mai Z., Rai P., Chang S., Hasan T. Theranostic nanocells for simultaneous imaging and photodynamic therapy of pancreatic cancer. Proc. SPIE. 2010;7551:755104. [Google Scholar]
  96. Kessel D., Oleinick N.L. Photodynamic therapy and cell death pathways. Methods Mol. Biol. 2010;635:35–46. doi: 10.1007/978-1-60761-697-9_3. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  97. Van Dongen G.A., Visser G.W., Vrouenraets M.B. Photosensitizer-antibody conjugates for detection and therapy of cancer. Adv. Drug Deliv. Rev. 2004;56:31–52. doi: 10.1016/j.addr.2003.09.003. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  98. Ayhan A., Gultekin M., Taskiran C., Dursun P., Firat P., Bozdag G., Celik N.Y., Yuce K. Ascites and epithelial ovarian cancers: A reappraisal with respect to different aspects. Int. J. Gynecol. Cancer. 2007;17:68–75. doi: 10.1111/j.1525-1438.2006.00777.x. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  99. Shen-Gunther J., Mannel R.S. Ascites as a predictor of ovarian malignancy. Gynecol. Oncol. 2002;87:77–83. doi: 10.1006/gyno.2002.6800. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  100. Pourgholami M.H., Ataie-Kachoie P., Badar S., Morris D.L. Minocycline inhibits malignant ascites of ovarian cancer through targeting multiple signaling pathways. Gynecol. Oncol. 2013;129:113–119. doi: 10.1016/j.ygyno.2012.12.031. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  101. Shender V., Arapidi G., Butenko I., Anikanov N., Ivanova O., Govorun V. Peptidome profiling dataset of ovarian cancer and non-cancer proximal fluids: Ascites and blood sera. Data Brief. 2019;22:557–562. doi: 10.1016/j.dib.2018.12.056. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  102. Parsons S.L., Watson S.A., Steele R.J.C. Malignant ascites. Br. J. Surg. 1996;83:6–14. doi: 10.1002/bjs.1800830104. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  103. Becker G., Galandi D., Blum H.E. Malignant ascites: Systematic review and guideline for treatment. Eur. J. Cancer. 2006;42:589–597. doi: 10.1016/j.ejca.2005.11.018. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  104. Huang H., Li Y.J., Lan C.Y., Huang Q.D., Feng Y.L., Huang Y.W., Liu J.H. Clinical significance of ascites in epithelial ovarian cancer. Neoplasma. 2013;60:546–552. doi: 10.4149/neo_2013_071. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  105. Blagden S.P. Harnessing Pandemonium: The Clinical Implications of Tumor Heterogeneity in Ovarian Cancer. Front. Oncol. 2015;5:149. doi: 10.3389/fonc.2015.00149. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  106. Ahmed N., Latifi A., Riley C.B., Findlay J.K., Quinn M.A. Neuronal transcription factor Brn-3a(l) is over expressed in high-grade ovarian carcinomas and tumor cells from ascites of patients with advanced-stage ovarian cancer. J. Ovarian Res. 2010;3:17. doi: 10.1186/1757-2215-3-17. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  107. Mahmood N., Mihalcioiu C., Rabbani S.A. Multifaceted Role of the Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator (uPA) and Its Receptor (uPAR): Diagnostic, Prognostic, and Therapeutic Applications. Front. Oncol. 2018;8:24. doi: 10.3389/fonc.2018.00024. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  108. Jeffrey B., Udaykumar H.S., Schulze K.S. Flow fields generated by peristaltic reflex in isolated guinea pig ileum: Impact of contraction depth and shoulders. Am. J. Physiol. Gastrointest. Liver Physiol. 2003;285:G907–G918. doi: 10.1152/ajpgi.00062.2003. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  109. Nagy J.A., Herzberg K.T., Dvorak J.M., Dvorak H.F. Pathogenesis of malignant ascites formation: Initiating events that lead to fluid accumulation. Cancer Res. 1993;53:2631–2643. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  110. Ahmed N., Abubaker K., Findlay J., Quinn M. Epithelial mesenchymal transition and cancer stem cell-like phenotypes facilitate chemoresistance in recurrent ovarian cancer. Curr. Cancer Drug Targets. 2010;10:268–278. doi: 10.2174/156800910791190175. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  111. Latifi A., Abubaker K., Castrechini N., Ward A.C., Liongue C., Dobill F., Kumar J., Thompson E.W., Quinn M.A., Findlay J.K., et al. Cisplatin treatment of primary and metastatic epithelial ovarian carcinomas generates residual cells with mesenchymal stem cell-like profile. J. Cell Biochem. 2011;112:2850–2864. doi: 10.1002/jcb.23199. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  112. Chan D.W., Hui W.W., Cai P.C., Liu M.X., Yung M.M., Mak C.S., Leung T.H., Chan K.K., Ngan H.Y. Targeting GRB7/ERK/FOXM1 signaling pathway impairs aggressiveness of ovarian cancer cells. PLoS ONE. 2012;7:e52578. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0052578. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  113. Mebratu Y., Tesfaigzi Y. How ERK1/2 activation controls cell proliferation and cell death: Is subcellular localization the answer? Cell Cycle. 2009;8:1168–1175. doi: 10.4161/cc.8.8.8147. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  114. Zebisch A., Czernilofsky A.P., Keri G., Smigelskaite J., Sill H., Troppmair J. Signaling through RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK: From basics to bedside. Curr. Med. Chem. 2007;14:601–623. doi: 10.2174/092986707780059670. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  115. Jo H., Sipos K., Go Y.M., Law R., Rong J., McDonald J.M. Differential effect of shear stress on extracellular signal-regulated kinase and N-terminal Jun kinase in endothelial cells. Gi2- and Gbeta/gamma-dependent signaling pathways. J. Biol. Chem. 1997;272:1395–1401. doi: 10.1074/jbc.272.2.1395. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  116. Surapisitchat J., Hoefen R.J., Pi X., Yoshizumi M., Yan C., Berk B.C. Fluid shear stress inhibits TNF-alpha activation of JNK but not ERK1/2 or p38 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells: Inhibitory crosstalk among MAPK family members. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 2001;98:6476–6481. doi: 10.1073/pnas.101134098. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  117. Kim C.H., Jeung E.B., Yoo Y.M. Combined Fluid Shear Stress and Melatonin Enhances the ERK/Akt/mTOR Signal in Cilia-Less MC3T3-E1 Preosteoblast Cells. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018;19:2929. doi: 10.3390/ijms19102929. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  118. Persons D.L., Yazlovitskaya E.M., Cui W., Pelling J.C. Cisplatin-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases in ovarian carcinoma cells: Inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase activity increases sensitivity to cisplatin. Clin. Cancer Res. 1999;5:1007–1014. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  119. Hayakawa J., Ohmichi M., Kurachi H., Ikegami H., Kimura A., Matsuoka T., Jikihara H., Mercola D., Murata Y. Inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase or c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase cascade, differentially activated by cisplatin, sensitizes human ovarian cancer cell line. J. Biol. Chem. 1999;274:31648–31654. doi: 10.1074/jbc.274.44.31648. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  120. Yeh P.Y., Chuang S.E., Yeh K.H., Song Y.C., Ea C.K., Cheng A.L. Increase of the resistance of human cervical carcinoma cells to cisplatin by inhibition of the MEK to ERK signaling pathway partly via enhancement of anticancer drug-induced NF kappa B activation. Biochem. Pharmacol. 2002;63:1423–1430. doi: 10.1016/S0006-2952(02)00908-5. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  121. Wang X., Martindale J.L., Holbrook N.J. Requirement for ERK activation in cisplatin-induced apoptosis. J. Biol. Chem. 2000;275:39435–39443. doi: 10.1074/jbc.M004583200. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  122. Qin X., Liu C., Zhou Y., Wang G. Cisplatin induces programmed death-1-ligand 1(PD-L1) over-expression in hepatoma H22 cells via Erk /MAPK signaling pathway. Cell Mol. Biol. 2010;56:OL1366-72. doi: 10.1170/156. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  123. Basu A., Tu H. Activation of ERK during DNA damage-induced apoptosis involves protein kinase Cdelta. Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 2005;334:1068–1073. doi: 10.1016/j.bbrc.2005.06.199. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  124. Nowak G. Protein kinase C-alpha and ERK1/2 mediate mitochondrial dysfunction, decreases in active Na+ transport, and cisplatin-induced apoptosis in renal cells. J. Biol. Chem. 2002;277:43377–43388. doi: 10.1074/jbc.M206373200. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  125. Chaudhury A., Tan B.J., Das S., Chiu G.N. Increased ERK activation and cellular drug accumulation in the enhanced cytotoxicity of folate receptor-targeted liposomal carboplatin. Int. J. Oncol. 2012;40:703–710. doi: 10.3892/ijo.2011.1262. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  126. Lok G.T., Chan D.W., Liu V.W., Hui W.W., Leung T.H., Yao K.M., Ngan H.Y. Aberrant activation of ERK/FOXM1 signaling cascade triggers the cell migration/invasion in ovarian cancer cells. PLoS ONE. 2011;6:e23790. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0023790. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  127. Lafky J.M., Wilken J.A., Baron A.T., Maihle N.J. Clinical implications of the ErbB/epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor family and its ligands in ovarian cancer. Biochim. Biophys. Acta. 2008;1785:232–265. doi: 10.1016/j.bbcan.2008.01.001. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  128. Secord A.A., Blessing J.A., Armstrong D.K., Rodgers W.H., Miner Z., Barnes M.N., Lewandowski G., Mannel R.S., Gynecologic Oncology G. Phase II trial of cetuximab and carboplatin in relapsed platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer and evaluation of epidermal growth factor receptor expression: A Gynecologic Oncology Group study. Gynecol. Oncol. 2008;108:493–499. doi: 10.1016/j.ygyno.2007.11.029. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  129. Bae G.-Y., Choi S.-J., Lee J.-S., Jo J., Lee J., Kim J., Cha H.-J. Loss of E-cadherin activates EGFR-MEK/ERK signaling, which promotes invasion via the ZEB1/MMP2 axis in non-small cell lung cancer. Oncotarget. 2013;4:2512. doi: 10.18632/oncotarget.1463. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  130. Pece S., Gutkind J.S. Signaling from E-cadherins to the MAPK pathway by the recruitment and activation of epidermal growth factor receptors upon cell-cell contact formation. J. Biol. Chem. 2000;275:41227–41233. doi: 10.1074/jbc.M006578200. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  131. Lifschitz-Mercer B., Czernobilsky B., Feldberg E., Geiger B. Expression of the adherens junction protein vinculin in human basal and squamous cell tumors: Relationship to invasiveness and metastatic potential. Hum. Pathol. 1997;28:1230–1236. doi: 10.1016/S0046-8177(97)90195-7. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  132. Raz A., Geiger B. Altered organization of cell-substrate contacts and membrane-associated cytoskeleton in tumor cell variants exhibiting different metastatic capabilities. Cancer Res. 1982;42:5183–5190. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  133. Fukada T., Sakajiri H., Kuroda M., Kioka N., Sugimoto K. Fluid shear stress applied by orbital shaking induces MG-63 osteosarcoma cells to activate ERK in two phases through distinct signaling pathways. Biochem. Biophys. Rep. 2017;9:257–265. doi: 10.1016/j.bbrep.2017.01.004. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  134. Wu D.W., Wu T.C., Wu J.Y., Cheng Y.W., Chen Y.C., Lee M.C., Chen C.Y., Lee H. Phosphorylation of paxillin confers cisplatin resistance in non-small cell lung cancer via activating ERK-mediated Bcl-2 expression. Oncogene. 2014;33:4385–4395. doi: 10.1038/onc.2013.389. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  135. Kessel D. Apoptosis and associated phenomena as a determinants of the efficacy of photodynamic therapy. Photochem. Photobiol. Sci. 2015;14:1397–1402. doi: 10.1039/C4PP00413B. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  136. Agostinis P., Berg K., Cengel K.A., Foster T.H., Girotti A.W., Gollnick S.O., Hahn S.M., Hamblin M.R., Juzeniene A., Kessel D., et al. Photodynamic therapy of cancer: An update. CA Cancer J. Clin. 2011;61:250–281. doi: 10.3322/caac.20114. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  137. Sorrin A.J., Ruhi M.K., Ferlic N.A., Karimnia V., Polacheck W.J., Celli J.P., Huang H.C., Rizvi I. Photodynamic Therapy and the Biophysics of the Tumor Microenvironment. Photochem. Photobiol. 2020 doi: 10.1111/php.13209. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  138. Niu C.J., Fisher C., Scheffler K., Wan R., Maleki H., Liu H., Sun Y., C A.S., Birngruber R., Lilge L. Polyacrylamide gel substrates that simulate the mechanical stiffness of normal and malignant neuronal tissues increase protoporphyin IX synthesis in glioma cells. J. Biomed. Opt. 2015;20:098002. doi: 10.1117/1.JBO.20.9.098002. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  139. Perentes J.Y., Wang Y., Wang X., Abdelnour E., Gonzalez M., Decosterd L., Wagnieres G., Van den Bergh H., Peters S., Ris H.B., et al. Low-Dose Vascular Photodynamic Therapy Decreases Tumor Interstitial Fluid Pressure, which Promotes Liposomal Doxorubicin Distribution in a Murine Sarcoma Metastasis Model. Transl. Oncol. 2014;7 doi: 10.1016/j.tranon.2014.04.010. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  140. Leunig M., Goetz A.E., Gamarra F., Zetterer G., Messmer K., Jain R.K. Photodynamic therapy-induced alterations in interstitial fluid pressure, volume and water content of an amelanotic melanoma in the hamster. Br. J. Cancer. 1994;69:101–103. doi: 10.1038/bjc.1994.15. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  141. Foster T.H., Murant R.S., Bryant R.G., Knox R.S., Gibson S.L., Hilf R. Oxygen consumption and diffusion effects in photodynamic therapy. Radiat Res. 1991;126:296–303. doi: 10.2307/3577919. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  142. Foster T.H., Hartley D.F., Nichols M.G., Hilf R. Fluence rate effects in photodynamic therapy of multicell tumor spheroids. Cancer Res. 1993;53:1249–1254. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  143. Nichols M.G., Foster T.H. Oxygen diffusion and reaction kinetics in the photodynamic therapy of multicell tumour spheroids. Phys. Med. Biol. 1994;39:2161–2181. doi: 10.1088/0031-9155/39/12/003. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  144. Cavin S., Wang X., Zellweger M., Gonzalez M., Bensimon M., Wagnieres G., Krueger T., Ris H.B., Gronchi F., Perentes J.Y. Interstitial fluid pressure: A novel biomarker to monitor photo-induced drug uptake in tumor and normal tissues. Lasers Surg. Med. 2017;49:773–780. doi: 10.1002/lsm.22687. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  145. Garcia Calavia P., Chambrier I., Cook M.J., Haines A.H., Field R.A., Russell D.A. Targeted photodynamic therapy of breast cancer cells using lactose-phthalocyanine functionalized gold nanoparticles. J. Colloid Interface Sci. 2018;512:249–259. doi: 10.1016/j.jcis.2017.10.030. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  146. Kato T., Jin C.S., Ujiie H., Lee D., Fujino K., Wada H., Hu H.P., Weersink R.A., Chen J., Kaji M., et al. Nanoparticle targeted folate receptor 1-enhanced photodynamic therapy for lung cancer. Lung Cancer. 2017;113:59–68. doi: 10.1016/j.lungcan.2017.09.002. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  147. Sebak A.A., Gomaa I.E.O., ElMeshad A.N., AbdelKader M.H. Targeted photodynamic-induced singlet oxygen production by peptide-conjugated biodegradable nanoparticles for treatment of skin melanoma. Photodiagnosis Photodyn. Ther. 2018;23:181–189. doi: 10.1016/j.pdpdt.2018.05.017. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  148. Fernandes S.R.G., Fernandes R., Sarmento B., Pereira P.M.R., Tome J.P.C. Photoimmunoconjugates: Novel synthetic strategies to target and treat cancer by photodynamic therapy. Org. Biomol. Chem. 2019;17:2579–2593. doi: 10.1039/C8OB02902D. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  149. Hamblin M.R., Miller J.L., Hasan T. Effect of charge on the interaction of site-specific photoimmunoconjugates with human ovarian cancer cells. Cancer Res. 1996;56:5205–5210. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  150. Flont M., Jastrzebska E., Brzozka Z. Synergistic effect of the combination therapy on ovarian cancer cells under microfluidic conditions. Anal. Chim. Acta. 2020;1100:138–148. doi: 10.1016/j.aca.2019.11.047. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
Figure 3. (a) Velocity distribution in a section perpendicular to the flow for rectangular (left) and Ushaped (right) cross section channels, and (b) particle location in these cross sections.

Continuous-Flow Separation of Magnetic Particles from Biofluids: How Does the Microdevice Geometry Determine the Separation Performance?

Cristina González Fernández,1 Jenifer Gómez Pastora,2 Arantza Basauri,1 Marcos Fallanza,1 Eugenio Bringas,1 Jeffrey J. Chalmers,2 and Inmaculada Ortiz1,*
Author information Article notes Copyright and License information Disclaimer

생체 유체에서 자성 입자의 연속 흐름 분리 : 마이크로 장치 형상이 분리 성능을 어떻게 결정합니까?

Abstract

The use of functionalized magnetic particles for the detection or separation of multiple chemicals and biomolecules from biofluids continues to attract significant attention. After their incubation with the targeted substances, the beads can be magnetically recovered to perform analysis or diagnostic tests. Particle recovery with permanent magnets in continuous-flow microdevices has gathered great attention in the last decade due to the multiple advantages of microfluidics. As such, great efforts have been made to determine the magnetic and fluidic conditions for achieving complete particle capture; however, less attention has been paid to the effect of the channel geometry on the system performance, although it is key for designing systems that simultaneously provide high particle recovery and flow rates. Herein, we address the optimization of Y-Y-shaped microchannels, where magnetic beads are separated from blood and collected into a buffer stream by applying an external magnetic field. The influence of several geometrical features (namely cross section shape, thickness, length, and volume) on both bead recovery and system throughput is studied. For that purpose, we employ an experimentally validated Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) numerical model that considers the dominant forces acting on the beads during separation. Our results indicate that rectangular, long devices display the best performance as they deliver high particle recovery and high throughput. Thus, this methodology could be applied to the rational design of lab-on-a-chip devices for any magnetically driven purification, enrichment or isolation.

생체 유체에서 여러 화학 물질과 생체 분자의 검출 또는 분리를 위한 기능화된 자성 입자의 사용은 계속해서 상당한 관심을 받고 있습니다. 표적 물질과 함께 배양 한 후 비드는 자기적으로 회수되어 분석 또는 진단 테스트를 수행 할 수 있습니다.

연속 흐름 마이크로 장치에서 영구 자석을 사용한 입자 회수는 마이크로 유체의 여러 장점으로 인해 지난 10 년 동안 큰 관심을 모았습니다. 따라서 완전한 입자 포획을 달성하기 위한 자기 및 유체 조건을 결정하기 위해 많은 노력을 기울였습니다.

그러나 높은 입자 회수율과 유속을 동시에 제공하는 시스템을 설계하는데 있어 핵심이기는 하지만 시스템 성능에 대한 채널 형상의 영향에 대해서는 덜 주의를 기울였습니다.

여기에서 우리는 자기 비드가 혈액에서 분리되어 외부 자기장을 적용하여 버퍼 스트림으로 수집되는 Y-Y 모양의 마이크로 채널의 최적화를 다룹니다. 비드 회수 및 시스템 처리량에 대한 여러 기하학적 특징 (즉, 단면 형상, 두께, 길이 및 부피)의 영향을 연구합니다.

이를 위해 분리 중에 비드에 작용하는 지배적인 힘을 고려하는 실험적으로 검증된 CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) 수치 모델을 사용합니다.

우리의 결과는 직사각형의 긴 장치가 높은 입자 회수율과 높은 처리량을 제공하기 때문에 최고의 성능을 보여줍니다. 따라서 이 방법론은 자기 구동 정제, 농축 또는 분리를 위한 랩 온어 칩 장치의 합리적인 설계에 적용될 수 있습니다.

Keywords: particle magnetophoresis, CFD, cross section, chip fabrication

Figure 1 (a) Top view of the microfluidic-magnetophoretic device, (b) Schematic representation of the channel cross-sections studied in this work, and (c) the magnet position relative to the channel location (Sepy and Sepz are the magnet separation distances in y and z, respectively).
Figure 1 (a) Top view of the microfluidic-magnetophoretic device, (b) Schematic representation of the channel cross-sections studied in this work, and (c) the magnet position relative to the channel location (Sepy and Sepz are the magnet separation distances in y and z, respectively).
Figure 2. (a) Channel-magnet configuration and (b–d) magnetic force distribution in the channel midplane for 2 mm, 5 mm and 10 mm long rectangular (left) and U-shaped (right) devices.
Figure 2. (a) Channel-magnet configuration and (b–d) magnetic force distribution in the channel midplane for 2 mm, 5 mm and 10 mm long rectangular (left) and U-shaped (right) devices.
Figure 3. (a) Velocity distribution in a section perpendicular to the flow for rectangular (left) and Ushaped (right) cross section channels, and (b) particle location in these cross sections.
Figure 3. (a) Velocity distribution in a section perpendicular to the flow for rectangular (left) and Ushaped (right) cross section channels, and (b) particle location in these cross sections.
Figure 4. Influence of fluid flow rate on particle recovery when the applied magnetic force is (a) different and (b) equal in U-shaped and rectangular cross section microdevices.
Figure 4. Influence of fluid flow rate on particle recovery when the applied magnetic force is (a) different and (b) equal in U-shaped and rectangular cross section microdevices.
Figure 5. Magnetic bead capture as a function of fluid flow rate for all of the studied geometries.
Figure 5. Magnetic bead capture as a function of fluid flow rate for all of the studied geometries.
Figure 6. Influence of (a) magnetic and fluidic forces (J parameter) and (b) channel geometry (θ parameter) on particle recovery. Note that U-2mm does not accurately fit a line.
Figure 6. Influence of (a) magnetic and fluidic forces (J parameter) and (b) channel geometry (θ parameter) on particle recovery. Note that U-2mm does not accurately fit a line.
Figure 7. Dependence of bead capture on the (a) functional channel volume, and (b) particle residence time (tres). Note that in the curve fitting expressions V represents the functional channel volume and that U-2mm does not accurately fit a line.
Figure 7. Dependence of bead capture on the (a) functional channel volume, and (b) particle residence time (tres). Note that in the curve fitting expressions V represents the functional channel volume and that U-2mm does not accurately fit a line.

References

  1. Gómez-Pastora J., Xue X., Karampelas I.H., Bringas E., Furlani E.P., Ortiz I. Analysis of separators for magnetic beads recovery: From large systems to multifunctional microdevices. Sep. Purif. Technol. 2017;172:16–31. doi: 10.1016/j.seppur.2016.07.050. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  2. Wise N., Grob T., Morten K., Thompson I., Sheard S. Magnetophoretic velocities of superparamagnetic particles, agglomerates and complexes. J. Magn. Magn. Mater. 2015;384:328–334. doi: 10.1016/j.jmmm.2015.02.031. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  3. Khashan S.A., Elnajjar E., Haik Y. CFD simulation of the magnetophoretic separation in a microchannel. J. Magn. Magn. Mater. 2011;323:2960–2967. doi: 10.1016/j.jmmm.2011.06.001. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  4. Khashan S.A., Furlani E.P. Scalability analysis of magnetic bead separation in a microchannel with an array of soft magnetic elements in a uniform magnetic field. Sep. Purif. Technol. 2014;125:311–318. doi: 10.1016/j.seppur.2014.02.007. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  5. Furlani E.P. Magnetic biotransport: Analysis and applications. Materials. 2010;3:2412–2446. doi: 10.3390/ma3042412. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  6. Gómez-Pastora J., Bringas E., Ortiz I. Design of novel adsorption processes for the removal of arsenic from polluted groundwater employing functionalized magnetic nanoparticles. Chem. Eng. Trans. 2016;47:241–246. [Google Scholar]
  7. Gómez-Pastora J., Bringas E., Lázaro-Díez M., Ramos-Vivas J., Ortiz I. The reverse of controlled release: Controlled sequestration of species and biotoxins into nanoparticles (NPs) In: Stroeve P., Mahmoudi M., editors. Drug Delivery Systems. World Scientific; Hackensack, NJ, USA: 2017. pp. 207–244. [Google Scholar]
  8. Ruffert C. Magnetic bead-magic bullet. Micromachines. 2016;7:21. doi: 10.3390/mi7020021. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  9. Yáñez-Sedeño P., Campuzano S., Pingarrón J.M. Magnetic particles coupled to disposable screen printed transducers for electrochemical biosensing. Sensors. 2016;16:1585. doi: 10.3390/s16101585. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  10. Schrittwieser S., Pelaz B., Parak W.J., Lentijo-Mozo S., Soulantica K., Dieckhoff J., Ludwig F., Guenther A., Tschöpe A., Schotter J. Homogeneous biosensing based on magnetic particle labels. Sensors. 2016;16:828. doi: 10.3390/s16060828. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  11. He J., Huang M., Wang D., Zhang Z., Li G. Magnetic separation techniques in sample preparation for biological analysis: A review. J. Pharm. Biomed. Anal. 2014;101:84–101. doi: 10.1016/j.jpba.2014.04.017. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  12. Ha Y., Ko S., Kim I., Huang Y., Mohanty K., Huh C., Maynard J.A. Recent advances incorporating superparamagnetic nanoparticles into immunoassays. ACS Appl. Nano Mater. 2018;1:512–521. doi: 10.1021/acsanm.7b00025. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  13. Gómez-Pastora J., González-Fernández C., Fallanza M., Bringas E., Ortiz I. Flow patterns and mass transfer performance of miscible liquid-liquid flows in various microchannels: Numerical and experimental studies. Chem. Eng. J. 2018;344:487–497. doi: 10.1016/j.cej.2018.03.110. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  14. Gale B.K., Jafek A.R., Lambert C.J., Goenner B.L., Moghimifam H., Nze U.C., Kamarapu S.K. A review of current methods in microfluidic device fabrication and future commercialization prospects. Inventions. 2018;3:60. doi: 10.3390/inventions3030060. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  15. Niemeyer C.M., Mirkin C.A., editors. Nanobiotechnology; Concepts, Applications and Perspectives. Wiley-VCH; Weinheim, Germany: 2004. [Google Scholar]
  16. Khashan S.A., Dagher S., Alazzam A., Mathew B., Hilal-Alnaqbi A. Microdevice for continuous flow magnetic separation for bioengineering applications. J. Micromech. Microeng. 2017;27:055016. doi: 10.1088/1361-6439/aa666d. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  17. Basauri A., Gomez-Pastora J., Fallanza M., Bringas E., Ortiz I. Predictive model for the design of reactive micro-separations. Sep. Purif. Technol. 2019;209:900–907. doi: 10.1016/j.seppur.2018.09.028. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  18. Abdollahi P., Karimi-Sabet J., Moosavian M.A., Amini Y. Microfluidic solvent extraction of calcium: Modeling and optimization of the process variables. Sep. Purif. Technol. 2020;231:115875. doi: 10.1016/j.seppur.2019.115875. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  19. Khashan S.A., Alazzam A., Furlani E. A novel design for a microfluidic magnetophoresis system: Computational study; Proceedings of the 12th International Symposium on Fluid Control, Measurement and Visualization (FLUCOME2013); Nara, Japan. 18–23 November 2013. [Google Scholar]
  20. Pamme N. Magnetism and microfluidics. Lab Chip. 2006;6:24–38. doi: 10.1039/B513005K. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  21. Gómez-Pastora J., Amiri Roodan V., Karampelas I.H., Alorabi A.Q., Tarn M.D., Iles A., Bringas E., Paunov V.N., Pamme N., Furlani E.P., et al. Two-step numerical approach to predict ferrofluid droplet generation and manipulation inside multilaminar flow chambers. J. Phys. Chem. C. 2019;123:10065–10080. doi: 10.1021/acs.jpcc.9b01393. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  22. Gómez-Pastora J., Karampelas I.H., Bringas E., Furlani E.P., Ortiz I. Numerical analysis of bead magnetophoresis from flowing blood in a continuous-flow microchannel: Implications to the bead-fluid interactions. Sci. Rep. 2019;9:7265. doi: 10.1038/s41598-019-43827-x. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  23. Tarn M.D., Pamme N. On-Chip Magnetic Particle-Based Immunoassays Using Multilaminar Flow for Clinical Diagnostics. In: Taly V., Viovy J.L., Descroix S., editors. Microchip Diagnostics Methods and Protocols. Humana Press; New York, NY, USA: 2017. pp. 69–83. [Google Scholar]
  24. Phurimsak C., Tarn M.D., Peyman S.A., Greenman J., Pamme N. On-chip determination of c-reactive protein using magnetic particles in continuous flow. Anal. Chem. 2014;86:10552–10559. doi: 10.1021/ac5023265. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  25. Wu X., Wu H., Hu Y. Enhancement of separation efficiency on continuous magnetophoresis by utilizing L/T-shaped microchannels. Microfluid. Nanofluid. 2011;11:11–24. doi: 10.1007/s10404-011-0768-7. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  26. Vojtíšek M., Tarn M.D., Hirota N., Pamme N. Microfluidic devices in superconducting magnets: On-chip free-flow diamagnetophoresis of polymer particles and bubbles. Microfluid. Nanofluid. 2012;13:625–635. doi: 10.1007/s10404-012-0979-6. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  27. Gómez-Pastora J., González-Fernández C., Real E., Iles A., Bringas E., Furlani E.P., Ortiz I. Computational modeling and fluorescence microscopy characterization of a two-phase magnetophoretic microsystem for continuous-flow blood detoxification. Lab Chip. 2018;18:1593–1606. doi: 10.1039/C8LC00396C. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  28. Forbes T.P., Forry S.P. Microfluidic magnetophoretic separations of immunomagnetically labeled rare mammalian cells. Lab Chip. 2012;12:1471–1479. doi: 10.1039/c2lc40113d. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  29. Nandy K., Chaudhuri S., Ganguly R., Puri I.K. Analytical model for the magnetophoretic capture of magnetic microspheres in microfluidic devices. J. Magn. Magn. Mater. 2008;320:1398–1405. doi: 10.1016/j.jmmm.2007.11.024. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  30. Plouffe B.D., Lewis L.H., Murthy S.K. Computational design optimization for microfluidic magnetophoresis. Biomicrofluidics. 2011;5:013413. doi: 10.1063/1.3553239. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  31. Hale C., Darabi J. Magnetophoretic-based microfluidic device for DNA isolation. Biomicrofluidics. 2014;8:044118. doi: 10.1063/1.4893772. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  32. Becker H., Gärtner C. Polymer microfabrication methods for microfluidic analytical applications. Electrophoresis. 2000;21:12–26. doi: 10.1002/(SICI)1522-2683(20000101)21:1<12::AID-ELPS12>3.0.CO;2-7. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  33. Pekas N., Zhang Q., Nannini M., Juncker D. Wet-etching of structures with straight facets and adjustable taper into glass substrates. Lab Chip. 2010;10:494–498. doi: 10.1039/B912770D. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  34. Wang T., Chen J., Zhou T., Song L. Fabricating microstructures on glass for microfluidic chips by glass molding process. Micromachines. 2018;9:269. doi: 10.3390/mi9060269. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  35. Castaño-Álvarez M., Pozo Ayuso D.F., García Granda M., Fernández-Abedul M.T., Rodríguez García J., Costa-García A. Critical points in the fabrication of microfluidic devices on glass substrates. Sens. Actuators B Chem. 2008;130:436–448. doi: 10.1016/j.snb.2007.09.043. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  36. Prakash S., Kumar S. Fabrication of microchannels: A review. Proc. Inst. Mech. Eng. Part B J. Eng. Manuf. 2015;229:1273–1288. doi: 10.1177/0954405414535581. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  37. Leester-Schädel M., Lorenz T., Jürgens F., Ritcher C. Fabrication of Microfluidic Devices. In: Dietzel A., editor. Microsystems for Pharmatechnology: Manipulation of Fluids, Particles, Droplets, and Cells. Springer; Basel, Switzerland: 2016. pp. 23–57. [Google Scholar]
  38. Bartlett N.W., Wood R.J. Comparative analysis of fabrication methods for achieving rounded microchannels in PDMS. J. Micromech. Microeng. 2016;26:115013. doi: 10.1088/0960-1317/26/11/115013. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  39. Ng P.F., Lee K.I., Yang M., Fei B. Fabrication of 3D PDMS microchannels of adjustable cross-sections via versatile gel templates. Polymers. 2019;11:64. doi: 10.3390/polym11010064. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  40. Furlani E.P., Sahoo Y., Ng K.C., Wortman J.C., Monk T.E. A model for predicting magnetic particle capture in a microfluidic bioseparator. Biomed. Microdevices. 2007;9:451–463. doi: 10.1007/s10544-007-9050-x. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  41. Tarn M.D., Peyman S.A., Robert D., Iles A., Wilhelm C., Pamme N. The importance of particle type selection and temperature control for on-chip free-flow magnetophoresis. J. Magn. Magn. Mater. 2009;321:4115–4122. doi: 10.1016/j.jmmm.2009.08.016. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  42. Furlani E.P. Permanent Magnet and Electromechanical Devices; Materials, Analysis and Applications. Academic Press; Waltham, MA, USA: 2001. [Google Scholar]
  43. White F.M. Viscous Fluid Flow. McGraw-Hill; New York, NY, USA: 1974. [Google Scholar]
  44. Mathew B., Alazzam A., El-Khasawneh B., Maalouf M., Destgeer G., Sung H.J. Model for tracing the path of microparticles in continuous flow microfluidic devices for 2D focusing via standing acoustic waves. Sep. Purif. Technol. 2015;153:99–107. doi: 10.1016/j.seppur.2015.08.026. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  45. Furlani E.J., Furlani E.P. A model for predicting magnetic targeting of multifunctional particles in the microvasculature. J. Magn. Magn. Mater. 2007;312:187–193. doi: 10.1016/j.jmmm.2006.09.026. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  46. Furlani E.P., Ng K.C. Analytical model of magnetic nanoparticle transport and capture in the microvasculature. Phys. Rev. E. 2006;73:061919. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevE.73.061919. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  47. Eibl R., Eibl D., Pörtner R., Catapano G., Czermak P. Cell and Tissue Reaction Engineering. Springer; Berlin/Heidelberg, Germany: 2009. [Google Scholar]
  48. Pamme N., Eijkel J.C.T., Manz A. On-chip free-flow magnetophoresis: Separation and detection of mixtures of magnetic particles in continuous flow. J. Magn. Magn. Mater. 2006;307:237–244. doi: 10.1016/j.jmmm.2006.04.008. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  49. Alorabi A.Q., Tarn M.D., Gómez-Pastora J., Bringas E., Ortiz I., Paunov V.N., Pamme N. On-chip polyelectrolyte coating onto magnetic droplets-Towards continuous flow assembly of drug delivery capsules. Lab Chip. 2017;17:3785–3795. doi: 10.1039/C7LC00918F. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  50. Zhang H., Guo H., Chen Z., Zhang G., Li Z. Application of PECVD SiC in glass micromachining. J. Micromech. Microeng. 2007;17:775–780. doi: 10.1088/0960-1317/17/4/014. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  51. Mourzina Y., Steffen A., Offenhäusser A. The evaporated metal masks for chemical glass etching for BioMEMS. Microsyst. Technol. 2005;11:135–140. doi: 10.1007/s00542-004-0430-3. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  52. Mata A., Fleischman A.J., Roy S. Fabrication of multi-layer SU-8 microstructures. J. Micromech. Microeng. 2006;16:276–284. doi: 10.1088/0960-1317/16/2/012. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  53. Su N. 8 2000 Negative Tone Photoresist Formulations 2002–2025. MicroChem Corporation; Newton, MA, USA: 2002. [Google Scholar]
  54. Su N. 8 2000 Negative Tone Photoresist Formulations 2035–2100. MicroChem Corporation; Newton, MA, USA: 2002. [Google Scholar]
  55. Fu C., Hung C., Huang H. A novel and simple fabrication method of embedded SU-8 micro channels by direct UV lithography. J. Phys. Conf. Ser. 2006;34:330–335. doi: 10.1088/1742-6596/34/1/054. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  56. Kazoe Y., Yamashiro I., Mawatari K., Kitamori T. High-pressure acceleration of nanoliter droplets in the gas phase in a microchannel. Micromachines. 2016;7:142. doi: 10.3390/mi7080142. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  57. Sharp K.V., Adrian R.J., Santiago J.G., Molho J.I. Liquid flows in microchannels. In: Gad-el-Hak M., editor. MEMS: Introduction and Fundamentals. CRC Press; Boca Raton, FL, USA: 2006. pp. 10-1–10-46. [Google Scholar]
  58. Oh K.W., Lee K., Ahn B., Furlani E.P. Design of pressure-driven microfluidic networks using electric circuit analogy. Lab Chip. 2012;12:515–545. doi: 10.1039/C2LC20799K. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  59. Bruus H. Theoretical Microfluidics. Oxford University Press; New York, NY, USA: 2008. [Google Scholar]
  60. Beebe D.J., Mensing G.A., Walker G.M. Physics and applications of microfluidics in biology. Annu. Rev. Biomed. Eng. 2002;4:261–286. doi: 10.1146/annurev.bioeng.4.112601.125916. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  61. Yalikun Y., Tanaka Y. Large-scale integration of all-glass valves on a microfluidic device. Micromachines. 2016;7:83. doi: 10.3390/mi7050083. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  62. Van Heeren H., Verhoeven D., Atkins T., Tzannis A., Becker H., Beusink W., Chen P. [(accessed on 9 March 2020)];Design Guideline for Microfluidic Device and Component Interfaces (Part 2) Version 3. Available online: http://www.makefluidics.com/en/design-guideline?id=7.
  63. Scheuble N., Iles A., Wootton R.C.R., Windhab E.J., Fischer P., Elvira K.S. Microfluidic technique for the simultaneous quantification of emulsion instabilities and lipid digestion kinetics. Anal. Chem. 2017;89:9116–9123. doi: 10.1021/acs.analchem.7b01853. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  64. Lynch E.C. Red blood cell damage by shear stress. Biophys. J. 1972;12:257–273. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  65. Paul R., Apel J., Klaus S., Schügner F., Schwindke P., Reul H. Shear stress related blood damage in laminar Couette flow. Artif. Organs. 2003;27:517–529. doi: 10.1046/j.1525-1594.2003.07103.x. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  66. Gómez-Pastora J., Karampelas I.H., Xue X., Bringas E., Furlani E.P., Ortiz I. Magnetic bead separation from flowing blood in a two-phase continuous-flow magnetophoretic microdevice: Theoretical analysis through computational fluid dynamics simulation. J. Phys. Chem. C. 2017;121:7466–7477. doi: 10.1021/acs.jpcc.6b12835. [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  67. Lim J., Yeap S.P., Leow C.H., Toh P.Y., Low S.C. Magnetophoresis of iron oxide nanoparticles at low field gradient: The role of shape anisotropy. J. Colloid Interface Sci. 2014;421:170–177. doi: 10.1016/j.jcis.2014.01.044. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
  68. Culbertson C.T., Sibbitts J., Sellens K., Jia S. Fabrication of Glass Microfluidic Devices. In: Dutta D., editor. Microfluidic Electrophoresis: Methods and Protocols. Humana Press; New York, NY, USA: 2019. pp. 1–12. [Google Scholar]
Figure 1. Geometries and bed topography settings of the nine computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations with channel curvature (C) changed from 0.77 to 0

The Straightening of a River Meander Leads to Extensive Losses in Flow Complexity and Ecosystem Services

Abstract

하천 복원 노력을 지원하기 위해 우리는 하천 파괴 속도를 늦출 필요가 있습니다. 이 연구는 하천 곡률 보호를 위해 구불 구불 한 하천이 곧게 펴질 때 수리적 복잡성 손실에 대한 자세한 설명을 제공합니다.

전산 유체 역학 (CFD) 모델링을 사용하여 채널 곡률 (C)이 잘 확립된 사행 굽힘 (C = 0.77)에서 곡률이 없는 직선 채널 (C = 0)로 저하되는 9 개의 시뮬레이션에서 유동 역학의 차이를 문서화했습니다.

공변량을 제어하고 수리적 복잡성에 대한 손실률을 늦추기 위해 각 9 개 채널 구현은 동등한 베드 형태 지형을 가졌습니다. 분석된 수력학적 변수에는 흐름 표면 고도, 흐름 방향 및 횡단 단위 배출, 흐름 방향, 가로 방향 및 수직 방향의 유속, 베드 전단 응력, 흐름 함수 및 채널 베드에서의 수직 저 유량 유속 비율이 포함되었습니다.

수력 복잡성의 손실은 처음에 수로를 C = 0.77에서 C = 0.33 (즉, 수로의 반경이 수로 폭의 3 배임) 할 때 점차적으로 발생했으며, 추가 직선화는 수력 복잡성에 대한 급속한 손실을 초래했습니다.

다른 연구에서는 수리적 복잡성이 중요한 하천 서식지를 제공하고 생물 다양성과 양의 상관 관계가 있음을 보여주었습니다. 이 연구는 강을 풀 때 수력학적 복잡성이 점진적으로 사라졌다가 빠르게 사라지는 방법을 보여줍니다.

To assist river restoration efforts we need to slow the rate of river degradation. This study provides a detailed explanation of the hydraulic complexity loss when a meandering river is straightened in order to motivate the protection of river channel curvature. We used computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling to document the difference in flow dynamics in nine simulations with channel curvature (C) degrading from a well-established tight meander bend (C = 0.77) to a straight channel without curvature (C = 0). To control for covariates and slow the rate of loss to hydraulic complexity, each of the nine-channel realizations had equivalent bedform topography. The analyzed hydraulic variables included the flow surface elevation, streamwise and transverse unit discharge, flow velocity at streamwise, transverse, and vertical directions, bed shear stress, stream function, and the vertical hyporheic flux rates at the channel bed. The loss of hydraulic complexity occurred gradually when initially straightening the channel from C = 0.77 to C = 0.33 (i.e., the radius of the channel is three-times the channel width), and additional straightening incurred rapid losses to hydraulic complexity. Other studies have shown hydraulic complexity provides important riverine habitat and is positively correlated with biodiversity. This study demonstrates how hydraulic complexity can be gradually and then rapidly lost when unwinding a river, and hopefully will serve as a cautionary tale.

Figure 1. Geometries and bed topography settings of the nine computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations with channel curvature (C) changed from 0.77 to 0
Figure 1. Geometries and bed topography settings of the nine computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations with channel curvature (C) changed from 0.77 to 0
Figure 2. Flow surface elevation (h) normalized by H at C = 0.77, C = 0.33, and C = 0 conditions. n denotes the lateral coordination with n = 0 at channel center and B denotes the channel width.
Figure 2. Flow surface elevation (h) normalized by H at C = 0.77, C = 0.33, and C = 0 conditions. n denotes the lateral coordination with n = 0 at channel center and B denotes the channel width.
Figure 3. Normalized flow surface profiles for the nine simulations at the point bar apex 1.5 s/B. The insert plot shows the second order derivative of normalized flow surface elevation in the transverse direction, Fh00(n/B), which gives the convexity or concavity of the surface profile curves.
Figure 3. Normalized flow surface profiles for the nine simulations at the point bar apex 1.5 s/B. The insert plot shows the second order derivative of normalized flow surface elevation in the transverse direction, Fh00(n/B), which gives the convexity or concavity of the surface profile curves.
Figure 4. Streamwise unit discharge qs/UH for channel curvature C = 0.77, 0.33, and 0 conditions.
Figure 4. Streamwise unit discharge qs/UH for channel curvature C = 0.77, 0.33, and 0 conditions.
Figure 5. Transverse unit discharge qn/UH for channel curvature C = 0.77, 0.33, and 0 conditions.
Figure 5. Transverse unit discharge qn/UH for channel curvature C = 0.77, 0.33, and 0 conditions.

Reference : https://www.mdpi.com/2073-4441/12/6/1680

Figure 6. Transverse unit discharge averaged over the transverse direction. The inset shows the R2 of transverse unit discharge < qn/UH > between each curvature, C, and the straight channel condition (C = 0, R2 = 1); a lower R2 suggests greater hydraulic complexity for transverse unit discharge.
Figure 6. Transverse unit discharge averaged over the transverse direction. The inset shows the R2 of transverse unit discharge < qn/UH > between each curvature, C, and the straight channel condition (C = 0, R2 = 1); a lower R2 suggests greater hydraulic complexity for transverse unit discharge.
Figure 7. Normalized depth averaged streamwise velocity <vs>/U for channel curvature C = 0.77, 0.33, and 0 conditions.
Figure 7. Normalized depth averaged streamwise velocity /U for channel curvature C = 0.77, 0.33, and 0 conditions.
Figure 8. The first moment of normalized depth averaged streamwise velocity <vs>/U, which represents center of gravity of the streamwise flow distribution, along the channel. The inset shows the R2 of the first moment of <vs>/U between each curvature and the straight channel condition (C = 0, R2 = 1); a lower R2 suggests greater hydraulic complexity for the first moment of depth averaged streamwise velocity.
Figure 8. The first moment of normalized depth averaged streamwise velocity /U, which represents center of gravity of the streamwise flow distribution, along the channel. The inset shows the R2 of the first moment of /U between each curvature and the straight channel condition (C = 0, R2 = 1); a lower R2 suggests greater hydraulic complexity for the first moment of depth averaged streamwise velocity.
Figure 9. Distribution of river channel bed shear Cf for channel curvature C = 0.77, 0.33, and 0 conditions.
Figure 9. Distribution of river channel bed shear Cf for channel curvature C = 0.77, 0.33, and 0 conditions.
Figure 10. Normalized vertical hyporheic flux vzbed/U at 2 mm below sediment surface for channel curvature C = 0.77, 0.33, and 0 conditions. Positive indicates upwelling of groundwater into the river channel.
Figure 10. Normalized vertical hyporheic flux vzbed/U at 2 mm below sediment surface for channel curvature C = 0.77, 0.33, and 0 conditions. Positive indicates upwelling of groundwater into the river channel.
Figure 11. Normalized vertical velocity <vz>/U for channel curvature C = 0.77, 0.33, and 0 conditions, with positive values upward flows, negative values downward flows.
Figure 11. Normalized vertical velocity /U for channel curvature C = 0.77, 0.33, and 0 conditions, with positive values upward flows, negative values downward flows.
Figure 12. Transverse stream function distribution ψ/UBH reveals the secondary circulation of transverse flow cells rotating at the meander apex 1.5 s/B for channel curvature C = 0.77 (A), C = 0.33 (B), and C = 0 (C), with positive values representing clockwise rotation direction when facing upstream, and negative values representing counter-clockwise rotation when facing upstream.
Figure 12. Transverse stream function distribution ψ/UBH reveals the secondary circulation of transverse flow cells rotating at the meander apex 1.5 s/B for channel curvature C = 0.77 (A), C = 0.33 (B), and C = 0 (C), with positive values representing clockwise rotation direction when facing upstream, and negative values representing counter-clockwise rotation when facing upstream.

References

  1. Paper 422-H); U.S. Government Printing Office: Washington, DC, USA, 1966.
  2. Leopold, L.B.; Wolman, M.G. River meanders. Bull. Geol. Soc. Am. 196071, 769–793. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  3. Wohl, E. Rivers in the Landscape; John Wiley & Sons: Hoboken, NJ, USA, 2020. [Google Scholar]
  4. Dietrich, W.E.; Smith, J.D. Influence of the point bar on flow through curved channels. Water Resour. Res. 198319, 1173–1192. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  5. Harvey, J.W.; Bencala, K. The effects of streambed topography on surface-subsurface water exchange in mountains catchments. Water Resour. Res. 199329, 89–98. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  6. Bridge, J.S. Rivers and Floodplains: Forms, Processes, and Sedimentary Record; John Wiley & Sons: Hoboken, NJ, USA, 2009. [Google Scholar]
  7. Schumm, S.A. Patterns of alluvial rivers. Annu. Rev. Earth Planet. Sci. 198513, 5–27. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  8. Vermeulen, B.; Hoitink, A.J.F.; Labeur, R.J. Flow structure caused by a local cross-sectional area increase and curvature in a sharp river bend. J. Geophys. Res. Earth Surf. 2015120, 1771–1783. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  9. Konsoer, K.M.; Rhoads, B.L.; Best, J.L.; Langendoen, E.J.; Abad, J.D.; Parsons, D.R.; Garcia, M.H. Three-dimensional flow structure and bed morphology in large elongate meander loops with different outer bank roughness characteristics. Water Resour. Res. 201652, 9621–9641. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  10. Li, B.D.; Zhang, X.H.; Tang, H.S.; Tsubaki, R. Influence of deflection angles on flow behaviours in openchannel bends. J. Mt. Sci. 201815, 2292–2306. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  11. Gualtieri, C.; Abdi, R.; Ianniruberto, M.; Filizola, N.; Endreny, T.A. A 3D analysis of spatial habitat metrics about the confluence of Negro and Solimões rivers, Brazil. Ecohydrology 202013, e2166. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  12. Gualtieri, C.; Ianniruberto, M.; Filizola, N.; Santos, R.; Endreny, T. Hydraulic complexity at a large river confluence in the Amazon basin. Ecohydrology 201710, e1863. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  13. Kozarek, J.; Hession, W.; Dolloff, C.; Diplas, P. Hydraulic complexity metrics for evaluating in-stream brook trout habitat. J. Hydraul. Eng. 2010136, 1067–1076. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  14. McCoy, E.D.; Bell, S.S.; Mushinsky, H.R. Habitat structure: Synthesis and perspectives. In Habitat Structure; Springer: Berlin, Germany, 1991; pp. 427–430. [Google Scholar]
  15. Re-Engineering Britain’s Rivers. The Economist. 6 March 2020. Available online: https://www.latestnigeriannews.com/news/8279579/reengineering-britains-rivers.html (accessed on 12 April 2020).
  16. Palmer, M.A.; Bernhardt, E.; Allan, J.; Lake, P.S.; Alexander, G.; Brooks, S.; Carr, J.; Clayton, S.; Dahm, C.; Follstad Shah, J.; et al. Standards for ecologically successful river restoration. J. Appl. Ecol. 200542, 208–217. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  17. Abad, J.D.; Rhoads, B.L.; Güneralp, İ.; García, M.H. Flow structure at different stages in a meander-bend with bendway weirs. J. Hydraul. Eng. 2008134, 1052–1063. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  18. Blanckaert, K.; Schnauder, I.; Sukhodolov, A.; van Balen, W.; Uijttewaal, W. Meandering: Field Experiments, Laboratory Experiments and Numerical Modeling. Technical Report. 2009. Available online: https://infoscience.epfl.ch/record/146621/files/2009-695-Blanckaert_et_al-Meandering_field_experiments_laboratory_experiments_and_numerical.pdf (accessed on 12 April 2020).
  19. Constantinescu, G.; Koken, M.; Zeng, J. The structure of turbulent flow in an open channel bend of strong curvature with deformed bed: Insight provided by detached eddy simulation. Water Resour. Res. 201147. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  20. Sawyer, A.H.; Bayani Cardenas, M.; Buttles, J. Hyporheic exchange due to channel-spanning logs. Water Resour. Res. 201147. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  21. Zhou, T.; Endreny, T. Meander hydrodynamics initiated by river restoration deflectors. Hydrol. Process. 201226, 3378–3392. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  22. Hirt, C.W.; Nichols, B.D. Volume of fluid (VOF) method for the dynamics of free boundaries. J. Comput. Phys. 198139, 201–225. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  23. Van Balen, W.; Uijttewaal, W.; Blanckaert, K. Large-eddy simulation of a curved open-channel flow over topography. Phys. Fluids 201022, 075108. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  24. Blanckaert, K. Topographic steering, flow recirculation, velocity redistribution, and bed topography in sharp meander bends. Water Resour. Res. 201046. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  25. Zeng, J.; Constantinescu, G.; Blanckaert, K.; Weber, L. Flow and bathymetry in sharp open-channel bends: Experiments and predictions. Water Resour. Res. 200844. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  26. Elliott, A.H.; Brooks, N.H. Transfer of nonsorbing solutes to a streambed with bed forms: Laboratory experiments. Water Resour. Res. 199733, 137–151. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  27. Zhou, T.; Endreny, T.A. Reshaping of the hyporheic zone beneath river restoration structures: Flume and hydrodynamic experiments. Water Resour. Res. 201349, 5009–5020. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  28. Lane, S.; Bradbrook, K.; Richards, K.; Biron, P.; Roy, A. The application of computational fluid dynamics to natural river channels: Three-dimensional versus two-dimensional approaches. Geomorphology 199929, 1–20. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  29. Vardy, A. Fluid Principles; McGraw-Hill International Series in Civil Engineering; McGraw-Hill: London, UK, 1990. [Google Scholar]
  30. Rozovskii, I.L. Flow of Water in Bends of Open Channels; Academy of Sciences of the Ukrainian SSR: Kiev, Ukraine, 1957. [Google Scholar]
  31. Blanckaert, K.; De Vriend, H.J. Secondary flow in sharp open-channel bends. J. Fluid Mech. 2004498, 353–380. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  32. Johannesson, H.; Parker, G. Linear theory of river meanders. River Meand. 198912, 181–213. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  33. Camporeale, C.; Perona, P.; Porporato, A.; Ridolfi, L. Hierarchy of models for meandering rivers and related morphodynamic processes. Rev. Geophys. 200745. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  34. He, L. Distribution of primary and secondary currents in sine-generated bends. Water SA 201844, 118–129. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  35. Liao, J.C.; Beal, D.N.; Lauder, G.V.; Triantafyllou, M.S. Fish exploiting vortices decrease muscle activity. Science 2003302, 1566–1569. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  36. Crispell, J.K.; Endreny, T.A. Hyporheic exchange flow around constructed in-channel structures and implications for restoration design. Hydrol. Process. 20091168, 1158–1168. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  37. Hester, E.T.; Gooseff, M.N. Moving Beyond the Banks: Hyporheic Restoration Is Fundamental to Restoring Ecological Services and Functions of Streams. Environ. Sci. Technol. 201044, 1521–1525. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
Abb. 3 Detail des Rechens am Vorversuch zum Seilrechen – Blick in Fließrichtung

Implementation of an angled trash rack in the 3D-numerical simulation with FLOW-3D

Abstract

Sebastian Krzyzagorski · Roman Gabl · Jakob Seibl · Heidi Böttcher · Markus Aufleger
Online publiziert: 17. Februar 2016
© Die Autor(en) 2016. Dieser Artikel ist auf Springerlink.com mit Open Access verfügbar.

지난 몇 년 동안 과학자와 엔지니어는 기초 연구와 유압 구조 계획에 3D 수리적 흐름 시뮬레이션을 점점 더 많이 사용해 왔다. 그러나 수력발전소 취수장 앞의 쓰레기통은 수치 시뮬레이션에 있어 특별한 문제를 나타낸다. 그 이유는 다른 건축 요소들에 비해 trash rack bars들의 기하학적 구조가 특히 단편화되었기 때문이다. 폐기물 랙 손실을 FLOW-3D로 3D 수리적 시뮬레이션에 포함시키기 위한 대안적 접근법으로 배플을 사용할 수 있다. 월디 외 연구진(Exsterreichische Wasser- und Abfallwichtschaft 67:1–2, 2015)은 그러한 배플이 쓰레기 수거함의 손실을 모형화하는 유망한 방법임을 입증했다. 서로 다른 개념의 이러한 비교는 계산면을 따라 그리드 방향을 갖는 수직 쓰레기장으로 제한되었다. 실제 논문은 각이 진 쓰레기 보관대의 배플을 이용하여 쓰레기 보관대 손실을 모델링하는 것에 초점을 맞추고 있으며, 따라서 월디 외 연구소의 조사를 업그레이드한다

Over the last years, scientists and engineers have used more and more 3D-numerical flow simulations for basic research and the planning of hydraulic constructions. However, trash racks in front of the intakes of hydroelectric power plants represent a particular problem for numerical simulations. The reason for this is the especially fragmented geometry of the trash rack bars in comparison to other construction elements. As an alternative approach to include trash rack losses into a 3D-numerical simulation with FLOW-3D a baffle can be used. Waldy et al. (Österreichische Wasser- und Abfallwirtschaft 67:1–2, 2015) demonstrated that such a baffle is a promising method to model the losses at trash racks. These comparisons of different concepts were limited to a vertical trash rack, which had its grid orientation along the computational plane. The actual paper focuses on the modelling of the trash rack losses by means of a baffle at an angled trash rack and thus upgrades the survey of Waldy et al. (Österreichische Wasser- und Abfallwirtschaft 67:1–2, 2015).

Vertikal geneigte Rechenstäbe mit Winkel a nach Definition von  Meusburger (2002) und b Seilrechen mit  Winkel d
Vertikal geneigte Rechenstäbe mit Winkel a nach Definition von Meusburger (2002) und b Seilrechen mit Winkel d
Abb. 2 Modellgeometrie, Grundriss (GR) und Schnitte für den geraden Rechen und exemplarisch der GR für den 30° geneigten  Rechen – Einheiten in [m]
Abb. 2 Modellgeometrie, Grundriss (GR) und Schnitte für den geraden Rechen und exemplarisch der GR für den 30° geneigten Rechen – Einheiten in [m]
Abb. 3 Detail des Rechens am Vorversuch zum Seilrechen – Blick in Fließrichtung
Abb. 3 Detail des Rechens am Vorversuch zum Seilrechen – Blick in Fließrichtung
3D-Ansicht der Nullvariante, geneigter Rechen, d=30°, Netz N4
3D-Ansicht der Nullvariante, geneigter Rechen, d=30°, Netz N4
 Zellenweise Auswertung der Wasserspiegelhöhen ohne Interpolation mit  MATLAB für die Nullvariante, geneigter Rechen, d=30°, Netz N4
Zellenweise Auswertung der Wasserspiegelhöhen ohne Interpolation mit MATLAB für die Nullvariante, geneigter Rechen, d=30°, Netz N4
Auswertung Einfluss der Rechenneigung für Netz N4
Auswertung Einfluss der Rechenneigung für Netz N4
Grundriss mit tiefengemittelten Geschwindigkeiten und Geschwindigkeitsvektoren, geneigter Rechen, d=30°, Netz N
Grundriss mit tiefengemittelten Geschwindigkeiten und Geschwindigkeitsvektoren, geneigter Rechen, d=30°, Netz N
Figure 1. The bathymetry provided with the benchmark problem.

Performance Assessment of NAMI DANCE in Tsunami Evolution and Currents Using a Benchmark Problem

1Civil Engineering Department, Middle East Technical University, Ankara 06800, Turkey
2Ocean Engineering Department, University of Rhode Island, Narragansett, RI 02882, USA
3Civil Engineering Department, Middle East Technical University, Ankara 06800, Turkey
4Department of Applied Mathematics, Nizhny Novgorod State Technical University, Nizhny Novgorod 603950, Russia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Richard P. Signell
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 20164(3), 49; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse4030049
Received: 5 July 2016 / Revised: 2 August 2016 / Accepted: 12 August 2016 / Published: 18 August 2016

Abstract

쓰나미 진화, 전파 및 침수의 수치 모델링은 현상에 관련된 수많은 매개 변수로 인해 복잡합니다. 쓰나미 모션을 해결하는 숫자 코드의 성능과 흐름 및 속도 패턴을 평가하는 것이 중요합니다. NAMI DANCE는 긴 파도 모델링을 위해 개발된 계산 도구입니다.

쓰나미 생성, 전파 및 침수 메커니즘의 수치 모델링 및 효율적인 시각화를 제공하고 쓰나미 매개 변수를 계산합니다. 긴 파도 이론에서, 물 입자의 수직 움직임은 압력 분포에 영향을 미치지 않습니다.

이러한 근사치와 소홀히 하는 수직 가속을 기반으로 질량 보존 및 모멘텀 방정식은 2차원 깊이 평균 방정식으로 줄어듭니다. NAMI DANCE는 유한차 계산 방법을 사용하여 긴 파도 문제에서 선형 및 비선형 형태의 깊이 평균 얕은 수식을 해결합니다.

이 연구에서 NAMI DANCE는 미국 포틀랜드에서 열린 2015 년 국립 쓰나미 위험 완화 프로그램 (NTHMP) 연례 회의에서 논의된 벤치 마크 문제에 적용됩니다.

벤치마크 문제는 하나의 독방 파도가 해양 섬 특징이 있는 삼각형 모양의 선반을 전파하는 일련의 실험을 특징으로 합니다. 이 문제는 섬 부근에서 상세한 무료 표면 고도 및 속도 의 타임 시리즈를 제공합니다. 결과를 비교한 결과, NAMI DANCE는 긴 파도 진화, 전파, 증폭 및 쓰나미 전류를 만족스럽게 예측할 수 있음을 보여주었습니다.

키워드: 수치 모델링;쓰나미 전류;깊이 평균 방정식;벤치마크,numerical modelingtsunami currentsdepth-averaged equationbenchmark

쓰나미는 해저 지진, 수중 산사태, 화산 폭발 또는 큰 운석 파업으로 인한 해저의 갑작스런 움직임에 의해 생성되는 큰 파도입니다. 쓰나미 파도는이 현상의 가장 파괴적인 매개 변수로 받아 들여진다; 그러나 큰 파도 움직임에 의해 트리거되는 전류는 경우에 따라 매우 치명적일 수 있습니다.

분지 공명 및 기하학적 증폭은 폐쇄 된 분지에서 쓰나미 영향의 지역 배율에 대한 두 가지 합리적으로 잘 이해된 메커니즘이며, 일반적으로 항구 또는 항구에서 쓰나미 위험 잠재력을 추정 할 때 조사 되는 메커니즘입니다. 반면에 전류에 대한 이해력과 예측 능력은부족하다[1]. 

이 연구는 수치 도구를 사용하여 쓰나미 진화, 전파 및 증폭뿐만 아니라 쓰나미 전류의 추정에 2 차원 깊이 평균 얕은 물 방정식의 충분성을 조사하는 것을 목표로; 즉 나미 댄스. 1970 년대 이후, 독방 파도는 일반적으로 실험 및 수학 연구에서, 쓰나미를 모델링하는 데 사용되었습니다[2]. 

이러한 점에서 수치 코드는 복잡한 목욕을 통해 단일 독방 파도의 진화와 전파에 초점을 맞춘 벤치마크 문제에 적용됩니다. 이 문제는 선반의 근해에 위치한 섬 특징이 있는 삼각형 모양의 선반을 전파할 때 단일 고독한 파도의 변형을 분석하는 일련의 실험을 설명합니다. 섬 부근에 형성되는 해류도 실험에서 조사된다.

이 연구에 사용된 벤치마크 문제는 미국 포틀랜드에서 개최된 2015 년 국립 쓰나미 위험 완화 프로그램 (NTHMP) 워크샵의 벤치마크 문제 #5.3]. 벤치마크 데이터와 수치 결과를 비교하여 2차원 깊이 평균 얕은 수식은 쓰나미 파도 진화와 해류에 대해 만족스러운 결과를 제공하므로 쓰나미 완화 전략을 결정하는 동안 사용하기에 충분한 도구임을 관찰합니다.

Figure 1. The bathymetry provided with the benchmark problem.
Figure 1. The bathymetry provided with the benchmark problem.
Figure 2. Model parameters: (a) bathymetry of the numerical model, NAMI DANCE; (b) incoming wave.
Figure 2. Model parameters: (a) bathymetry of the numerical model, NAMI DANCE; (b) incoming wave.
Figure 3. Comparison of free surface elevation (FSE) results: (a) X = 7.5 m and Y = 0.0 m at Gage 1; (b) X = 13.0 m and Y = 0.0 m at Gage 2; (c) X = 21.0 m and Y = 0.0 m at Gage 3; (d) X = 7.5 m and Y = 5.0 m at Gage 4; (e) X = 13.0 m and Y = 5.0 m at Gage 5; (f) X = 21.0 m and Y = 5.0 m at Gage 6; (g) X = 25.0 m and Y = 0.0 m at Gage 7; (h) X = 25.0 m and Y = 5.0 m at Gage 8. Black line represents benchmark data, red line represents numerical results.
Figure 3. Comparison of free surface elevation (FSE) results: (a) X = 7.5 m and Y = 0.0 m at Gage 1; (b) X = 13.0 m and Y = 0.0 m at Gage 2; (c) X = 21.0 m and Y = 0.0 m at Gage 3; (d) X = 7.5 m and Y = 5.0 m at Gage 4; (e) X = 13.0 m and Y = 5.0 m at Gage 5; (f) X = 21.0 m and Y = 5.0 m at Gage 6; (g) X = 25.0 m and Y = 0.0 m at Gage 7; (h) X = 25.0 m and Y = 5.0 m at Gage 8. Black line represents benchmark data, red line represents numerical results.
Figure 4. Comparison of results: (a) horizontal velocity in x-direction, U, recorded at X = 13.0 m, Y = 0.0 m and Z = 0.75 m at Gage 2; (b) horizontal velocity in y-direction, V, recorded at X = 13.0 m, Y = 0.0 m and Z = 0.75 m at Gage 2; (c) horizontal velocity in x-direction, U, recorded at X = 21.0 m, Y = −5.0 m and Z = 0.77 m at Gage 9; (d) horizontal velocity in y-direction, V, recorded at X = 21.0 m, Y = −5.0 m and Z = 0.77 m at Gage 9. Black line represents benchmark data, red line represents numerical results.
Figure 4. Comparison of results: (a) horizontal velocity in x-direction, U, recorded at X = 13.0 m, Y = 0.0 m and Z = 0.75 m at Gage 2; (b) horizontal velocity in y-direction, V, recorded at X = 13.0 m, Y = 0.0 m and Z = 0.75 m at Gage 2; (c) horizontal velocity in x-direction, U, recorded at X = 21.0 m, Y = −5.0 m and Z = 0.77 m at Gage 9; (d) horizontal velocity in y-direction, V, recorded at X = 21.0 m, Y = −5.0 m and Z = 0.77 m at Gage 9. Black line represents benchmark data, red line represents numerical results.

References

  1. Lynett, P.J.; Borrero, J.C.; Weiss, R.; Son, S.; Greer, D.; Renteria, W. Observations and modeling of tsunami-induced currents in ports and harbors. EPSL 2012327, 68–74. [Google Scholar]
  2. Madsen, P.A.; Fuhrman, D.R.; Schaffer, H.A. On the solitary wave paradigm for tsunamis. J. Geophys. Res. 2008113. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  3. NTHMP Mapping & Modeling Benchmarking Workshop: Tsunami Currents. Benchmark #5. Available online: http://coastal.usc.edu/currents_workshop/problems/prob5.html (accessed on 2 August 2016).
  4. Onat, Y.; Yalciner, A.C. Initial stage of database development for tsunami warning system along Turkish coasts. Ocean Eng. 201374, 141–154. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  5. Kian, R.; Yalciner, A.C.; Aytore, B.; Zaytsev, A. Wave Amplification and Resonance in Enclosed Basins; A Case Study in Haydarpasa Port of Istanbul. In Proceedings of the 2015 IEEE/OES Eleventh Current, Waves and Turbulence Measurement, St. Petersburg, VA, USA, 2–6 March 2015; Volume 11, pp. 1–7.
  6. Patel, V.M.; Dholakia, M.B.; Singh, A.P. Emergency preparedness in the case of Makran tsunami: A case study on tsunami risk visualization for the western parts of Gujarat, India. Geomat. Nat. Hazards Risk 20167, 826–842. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  7. Yalciner, A.C.; Pelinovsky, E.; Zaytsev, A.; Kurkin, A.; Ozer, C.; Karakus, H.; Ozyurt, G. Modeling and visualization of tsunamis: Mediterranean examples. In Tsunami and Nonlinear Waves, 1st ed.; Kundu, A., Ed.; Springer: Berlin, Germany, 2007; pp. 273–283. [Google Scholar]
  8. Synolakis, C.E.; Bernard, E.N.; Titov, V.; Kanoglu, U.; Gonzalez, F. Validation and verification of tsunami numerical models. PAGEOPH 2008165, 2197–2228. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  9. Yalciner, A.C.; Zaytsev, A.; Kanoglu, U.; Velioglu, D.; Dogan, G.G.; Kian, R.; Sharghivand, N.; Aytore, B. NTHMP Mapping and Modeling Benchmarking Workshop: Tsunami Currents. Available online: http://coastal.usc.edu/currents_workshop/presentations/Yalciner.pdf (accessed on 2 August 2016).
  10. Ozer, C.; Yalciner, A.C. Sensitivity study of hydrodynamic parameters during numerical simulations of tsunami inundation. PAGEOPH 2011168, 2083–2095. [Google Scholar]
  11. Sozdinler, C.O.; Yalciner, A.C.; Zaytsev, A. Investigation of tsunami hydrodynamic parameters in inundation zones with different structural layouts. PAGEOPH 2014172, 931–952. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  12. Sozdinler, C.O.; Yalciner, A.C.; Zaytsev, A.; Suppasri, A.; Imamura, F. Investigation of hydrodynamic parameters and the effects of breakwaters during the 2011 Great East Japan Tsunami in Kamaishi Bay. PAGEOPH 2015172, 3473–3491. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  13. Velioglu, D.; Kian, R.; Yalciner, A.C.; Zaytsev, A. Validation and Performance Comparison of Numerical Codes for Tsunami Inundation. In Proceedings of the 2015 American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, San Francisco, CA, USA, 14–18 December 2015.
  14. Velioglu, D.; Kian, R.; Yalciner, A.C.; Zaytsev, A. Validation and Comparison of 2D and 3D Codes for Nearshore Motion of Long Waves Using Benchmark Problems. In Proceedings of the 2016 European Geosciences Union, Vienna, Austria, 17–22 April 2016.
  15. Dilmen, D.I.; Kemec, S.; Yalciner, A.C.; Düzgün, S.; Zaytsev, A. Development of a tsunami inundation map in detecting tsunami risk in Gulf of Fethiye, Turkey. PAGEOPH 2015172. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  16. Heidarzadeh, M.; Krastel, S.; Yalciner, A.C. The state-of-the-art numerical tools for modeling landslide tsunamis: A short review. In Submarine Mass Movements and Their Consequences, 6th ed.; Sebastian, K., Jan-Hinrich, B., David, V., Michael, S., Christian, B., Roger, U., Jason, C., Katrin, H., Michael, S., Carl, B.H., Eds.; Springer: Bern, Switzerland, 2013; Volume 37, pp. 483–495. [Google Scholar]
  17. Yalciner, A.C.; Gülkan, P.; Dilmen, D. I.; Aytore, B.; Ayca, A.; Insel, I.; Zaytsev, A. Evaluation of tsunami scenarios for western Peloponnese, Greece. Boll. Geofis. Teor. Appl. 201455, 485–500. [Google Scholar]
  18. Zahibo, N.; Pelinovsky, E.; Kurkin, A.; Kozelkov, A. Estimation of far-field tsunami potential for the Caribbean Coast based on numerical simulation. Sci. Tsunami Hazards 200321, 202–222. [Google Scholar]
  19. Swigler, D.T. Laboratory Study Investigating the Three-dimensıonal Turbulence and Kinematic Properties Associated with a Breaking Solitary Wave. Master’s Thesis, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA, August 2009. [Google Scholar]
  20. National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program. Proceedings and Results of the 2011 NTHMP Model Benchmarking Workshop. Available online: http://nws.weather.gov/nthmp/documents/nthmpWorkshopProcMerged.pdf (accessed on 21 July 2016).
Figure 10.—Temperature contour time sequence for an EDS scale propellant tank at a jet mixing velocity of 0.06 m/s.

Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Simulations of Jet Mixing in Tanks of Different Scales

NASA/TM—2010-216749

Kevin Breisacher and Jeffrey Moder
Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio

Prepared for the57th Joint Army-Navy-NASA-Air Force (JANNAF) Propulsion Meetingsponsored by the JANNAF Interagency Propulsion CommitteeColorado Springs, Colorado, May 3–7, 2010

Abstract

극저온 추진제의 장기 공간 저장을 위해 축류 제트 믹서는 탱크 압력을 제어하고 열 층화를 줄이기위한 하나의 개념입니다. 1960 년대부터 현재까지 10 피트 이하의 탱크 직경에 대한 광범위한 지상 테스트 데이터가 존재합니다.

Ares V EDS (Earth Departure Stage) LH2 탱크 용으로 계획된 것과 같이 직경이 30 피트 정도 인 탱크 용 축류 제트 믹서를 설계하려면 훨씬 더 작은 탱크에서 사용 가능한 실험 데이터를 확장하고 미세 중력을 설계해야 합니다.

이 연구는 10 배 차이가 나는 2 개의 탱크 크기에서 기존의 지상 기반 축류 제트 혼합 실험의 시뮬레이션을 수행하여 이러한 규모의 변화를 처리하는 전산 유체 역학 (CFD)의 능력을 평가합니다. 저궤도 (LEO) 해안 동안 Ares V 스케일 EDS LH2 탱크에 대한 여러 축 제트 구성의 시뮬레이션이 평가되고 선택된 결과도 제공됩니다.

두 가지 탱크 크기 (직경 1 및 10 피트)의 물을 사용하여 General Dynamics에서 1960 년대에 수행한 제트 혼합 실험 데이터를 사용하여 CFD 정확도를 평가합니다. 제트 노즐 직경은 직경 1 피트 탱크 실험의 경우 0.032 ~ 0.25 인치, 직경 10 피트 탱크 실험의 경우 0.625 ~ 0.875 인치였습니다.

제트 믹서를 켜기 전에 두 탱크에서 열 층화 층이 생성되었습니다. 제트 믹서 효율은 층화 층이 섞일 때까지 탱크의 열전대 레이크의 온도를 모니터링하여 결정되었습니다. 염료는 층화된 탱크에 자주 주입되었고 침투가 기록되었습니다. 실험 데이터에서 사용 가능한 속도나 난류량은 없었습니다.

제시된 시뮬레이션에는 자유 표면 추적 (Flow Science, Inc.의 FLOW-3D)이 포함된 시판되고 시간 정확도가 높은 다차원 CFD 코드가 사용됩니다. 서로 다른 시간에 탱크의 다양한 축 위치에서 계산 된 온도와 실험적으로 관찰된 온도를 비교합니다. 획득한 합의에 대한 다양한 모델링 매개 변수의 영향을 평가합니다.

Introduction

Constellation 프로그램의 일부인 Ares V는 우주 비행사를 달로 돌려 보내도록 설계된 무거운 리프트 발사기입니다. Ares V 스택의 일부인 EDS (Earth Departure Stage)는 지구의 중력에서 벗어나 승무원 차량과 달 착륙선을 달로 보내는데 필요합니다.

이러한 차량의 질량과 달로 보내는 데 필요한 에너지 때문에 EDS의 액체 수소(LH2)와 액체 산소(LO2) 추진제 탱크는 매우 클 것입니다(직경 10m). 탱크 내부로의 환경적 열 누출로 인해 혼합 장치를 포함한 열역학적 환기 시스템(TV)은 설계 한계 내에서 탱크 압력을 유지하고 엔진 시동에 필요한 한도 내에서 액체 온도를 유지하기 위해 며칠의 순서에 따라 공간 내 저장 기간 동안 필요할 수 있습니다.

이러한 혼합 장치 중 하나는 그림 1과 2와 같이 탱크 바닥 근처에 있는 (순가속과 관련하여) 탱크 축을 따라 중심에 있는 축 제트입니다. 축방향 제트 혼합기와 TVS에 통합된 것은 1960년대 중반부터 연구되어 왔으며(참조 1~5), 광범위한 축방향 제트 접지 테스트 데이터(비사이로젠(참조 1~9), 극저온(참조 10~16) 유체 사용), 에탄올을 사용한 일부 드롭 타워 테스트 데이터(참조 17 및 18)가 있습니다. 극저온 추진제를 사용하는 축방향 제트에 대한 기존 접지 테스트 데이터는 3m(10ft) 이하의 탱크 직경으로 제한됩니다.

저자가 알고 있는 바와 같이, 현재 임계 미달의 극저온 추진체를 사용하는 폐쇄형 탱크에 축방향 제트가 포함된 낙하탑, 항공기 또는 우주 비행 시험 데이터는 없습니다.

축방향 제트(Axial jet)는 지구 저궤도(LEO) 연안의 며칠 동안 EDS LH2 탱크에서 작동하는 혼합 장치의 후보 중 하나입니다. 제안된 EDS 탱크 척도의 극저온 저장 탱크에서 작동하는 축 제트 실험 데이터가 존재하지 않기 때문에, EDS 탱크를 위한 축 제트 TV의 초기 설계는 기존 데이터에 대해 고정된 상관 관계 및 CFD 분석에 의존할 필요가 있습니다.

이 연구는 두 개의 탱크 척도에서 크기 순서로 다른 축방향 제트 열분해 성능을 예측하기 위한 CFD 정확도 평가의 현재 진행 상황을 보고합니다. CFD 시뮬레이션은 물을 작동 유체로 사용하는 접지 테스트 축 제트 데이터(참조 1 – 4)와 비교됩니다. 이 평가를 위해 선택된 CFD 코드는 Flow Science(참조 21)의 상용 코드 FLOW-3D로, 극저온 저장 탱크 및 축방향 제트(참조 22~24)의 이전 분석에서 사용되었습니다.

LEO의 대표적인 EDS LH2 탱크에 대한 예비 축 제트 시뮬레이션도 여러 축 제트 구성에 대해 수행됩니다. 이러한 축방향 제트 구성의 열분해 성능을 평가하고 선택된 결과를 제시합니다.

이러한 예비 축방향 제트 EDS 시뮬레이션은 비교적 짧은 시간 동안 혼합기 성능만 평가합니다. 탱크 열 누출, 위상 변화 및 일반적인 자기 압력(제트 오프)/압력 붕괴(제트 온) 사이클을 포함한 보다 상세한 시뮬레이션이 향후 작업에서 추진될 수 있습니다.

Figure 1.—Schematic of the small water tank / Figure 2.—Schematic of the large water tank
Figure 1.—Schematic of the small water tank / Figure 2.—Schematic of the large water tank
Figure 5.—Temperature contours for large tank jet mixing simulation. (Temperature contour range 294 to 302 K)
Figure 5.—Temperature contours for large tank jet mixing simulation. (Temperature contour range 294 to 302 K)

상세 내용은 원문을 참조하시기 바랍니다.


Figure 9.—Schematic of a representative EDS scale propellant tank.
Figure 9.—Schematic of a representative EDS scale propellant tank.
Figure 10.—Temperature contour time sequence for an EDS scale propellant tank at a jet mixing velocity of 0.06 m/s.
Figure 10.—Temperature contour time sequence for an EDS scale propellant tank at a jet mixing velocity of 0.06 m/s.
Figure 14.—Temperature contour at t = 1000 s for the five jet mixer with a 0.06 m/s jet velocity
Figure 14.—Temperature contour at t = 1000 s for the five jet mixer with a 0.06 m/s jet velocity

Summary and Conclusions

사용 가능한 유사성 상관 관계를 사용하는 스케일링 전략은 EDS 클래스 제트 믹서에 대한 적절한 제트 크기 및 작동 조건을 결정하기 위해 개발되었습니다. 물 탱크 시뮬레이션에서 결정된 모델링 매개 변수를 사용하여 열 층화를 제어하기 위해 제트 믹서를 사용하여 EDS 등급 추진제 탱크의 혼합 이력에 대한 CFD 시뮬레이션을 수행했습니다.

시뮬레이션 결과는 다양한 믹싱 동작을 보여 주며 유사성 매개 변수의 사용에서 예상되는 것과 일치했습니다. 이러한 결과는 하위 규모 테스트 및 유사성 상관 관계와 함께 CFD 시뮬레이션이 EDS 등급 탱크를위한 효율적인 제트 믹서 설계를 허용 할 것이라는 확신을 제공합니다.

CFD 시뮬레이션은 다양한 크기의 직경과 제트를 가진 탱크의 제트 믹서에서 수행되었습니다. 1 피트 직경의 물 탱크에서 제트 혼합에 대해 사용 가능한 실험 데이터와 합리적으로 일치하는 모델링 매개 변수가 결정되었습니다. 동일한 모델링 매개 변수를 사용하여 대략 10 배 정도 떨어져있는 스케일로 워터 제트 혼합 실험에서 혼합을 시뮬레이션했습니다. 시뮬레이션 결과는 실험 온도 데이터와 잘 일치하는 것으로 나타났습니다.

References 1.Poth, L.J., Van Hook, J.R., Wheeler, D.M. and Kee, C.R., “A Study of Cryogenic Propellant Mixing Techniques. Volume 1 – Mixer design and experimental investigations,” NASA CR-73908, Nov 1968. 2.Poth, L.J., Van Hook, J.R., Wheeler, D.M. and Kee, C.R., “A Study of Cryogenic Propellant Mixing Techniques. Volume 2 – Experimental data Final report,” NASA CR-73909, Nov 1968. 3.Scale Experimental Mixing Investigations and Liquid-Oxygen Mixer Design,” NASA CR-113897, Sep 1970. 4.Van Hook, J.R. and Poth, L.J., “Study of Cryogenic Fluid Mixing Techniques. Volume 1 – Large-Van Hook, J.R., “Study of Cryogenic Fluid Mixing Techniques. Volume 2 – Large-Scale Mixing Data,” NASA CR-113914, Sep 1970. 5.Poth, L.J. and Van Hook, J.R., “Control of the Thermodynamic State of Space-Stored Cryogens by Jet Mixing,” J. Spacecraft, Vol. 9, No. 5, 1972. 6.Lovrich, T.N. and Schwartz, S.H., “Development of Thermal Stratification and Destratification Scaling Concepts – Volume II. Stratification Experimental Data,” NASA CR-143945, 1975. 7.Dominick, S.M., “Mixing Induced Condensation Inside Propellant Tanks,” AIAA–1984–0514. 8.Meserole, J.S., Jones, O.S., Brennan, S.M. and Fortini, A., “Mixing-Induced Ullage Condensation and Fluid Destratification,” AIAA–1987–2018. 9.Barsi, S., Kassemi, M., Panzarella, C.H. and Alexander, J.I., “A Tank Self-Pressurization Experiment Using a Model Fluid in Normal Gravity,” AIAA–2005–1143. 10.Stark, J.A. and Blatt, M.H., “Cryogenic Zero-Gravity Prototype Vent System,” NAS8-20146, Convair Report GDC-DDB67-006, Oct 1967. 11.Bullard, B.R., “Liquid Propellant Thermal Conditioning System Test Program,” NAS3-12033, Lockheed Missiles & Space Co., NASA CR-72971, July 1972. 12.Erickson, R.C., “Space LOX Vent System,” NAS8-26972, General Dynamics Convair Report CASD-NAS 75-021, April 1975.

13.Lin, C.S., Hasan, M.M. and Nyland, T.W., “Mixing and Transient Interface Condensation of a Liquid Hydrogen Tank,” NASA TM-106201 (or AIAA–1993–1968), 1993. 14.Lin, C.S., Hasan, M.M. and Van Dresar, N.T., “Experimental Investigation of Jet-Induced Mixing of a Large Liquid Hydrogen Storage Tank,” NASA TM-106629 (or AIAA–1994–2079), 1994. 15.Olsen, A.D., Cady, E.C., Jenkins, D.S. and Hastings, L., “Solar Thermal Upper Stage Cryogenic System Engineering Checkout Test,” AIAA–1999–2604. 16.Van Overbeke, T.J., “Thermodynamic Vent System Test in a Low Earth Orbit Simulation,” NASA/TM—2004-213193 (or AIAA–2004–3838), Oct 2004. 17.Aydelott, J.C., “Axial Jet Mixing of Ethanol in Cylindrical Containers During Weightlessness,” NASA-TP-1487, July 1979. 18.Aydelott, J.C., “Axial Modeling of Space Vehicle Propellant Mixing,” NASA-TP-2107, Jan 1983. 19.Bentz, M.D., “Tank Pressure Control in Low Gravity by Jet Mixing,” NASA CR–191012, Mar. 1993. 20.Hasan, M.M., Lin, C.S., Knoll, R.H. and Bentz, M.D., “Tank Pressure Control Experiment: Thermal Phenomena in Microgravity,” NASA-TP-3564, 1996. 21.FLOW-3D User’s Manual, version 9.4, Flow Science, Inc., Santa Fe, NM 2009. 22.Grayson, G.D., Lopez, A., Chandler, F.O., Hastings, L.J. and Tucker, S.P., “Cryogenic Tank Modeling for the Saturn AS-203 Experiment,” AIAA–2006–5258. 23.Lopez, A., Grayson, G.D., Chandler, F.O., Hastings, L.J., and Hedayat, A., “Cryogenic Pressure Control Modeling for Ellipsoidal Space Tanks,” AIAA–2007–5552. 24.Lopez, A., Grayson, G.D., Chandler, F.O., Hastings, L.J. and Hedayat, A., “Cryogenic Pressure Control Modeling for Ellipsoidal Space Tanks in Reduced Gravity,” AIAA–2008–5104. 25.Thomas, R.M., “Condensation of Steam on Water in Turbulent Motion,” Int. J. Multiphase Flow, Vol. 5, No. 1, pp. 1–15, 1979. 26.Zimmerli, G.A., Asipauskas, M., Chen, Y. and Weislogel, M.M., “A Study of Fluid Interface Configurations in Exploration Vehicle Propellant Tanks,” AIAA–2010–1294.

Figure 20. Top: image of electrospray, bottom: cone-jet profile using the CF emitter. Distance between the carbon fiber tip and the counter electrode is 4.0 mm, potential difference is 3500 V, flow rate is 300 nL min−1 .

Modeling and characterization of a carbon fiber emitter for electrospray ionization

A K Sen1, J Darabi1, D R Knapp2 and J Liu2
1 MEMS and Microsystems Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of South Carolina, 300 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29208, USA
2 Department of Pharmacology, Medical University of South Carolina, 173 Ashley Avenue,
Charleston, SC 29425, USA
E-mail: darabi@engr.sc.edu

뾰족한 탄소 섬유(CF)를 사용하는 새로운 마이크로 스케일 이미터는 질량 분석 (MS) 분석에서 전기 분무에 사용할 수 있습니다. 탄소 섬유는 360 µm OD 및 75 µm ID의 용융 실리카 모세관과 동축에 위치하며 날카로운 팁은 튜브 말단에서 30 µm 연장됩니다.

Abstract

전기 분무 이온화 (ESI) 프로세스는 전기 유체 역학을 해결하기 위한 Taylor–Melcher 누설 유전체 유체 모델 및 액체-가스 인터페이스 추적을 위한 유체 부피 (VOF) 접근 방식을 기반으로 하는 전산 유체 역학 (CFD) 코드를 사용하여 시뮬레이션 됩니다. CFD 코드는 먼저 기존 지오메트리에 대해 검증한 다음 CF 이미터 기반 ESI 모델을 시뮬레이션하는데 사용됩니다.

시뮬레이션된 전류 흐름 및 전류 전압 결과는 CF 이미터의 실험 결과와 잘 일치합니다. 이미터 형상, 전위차, 유속 및 액체의 물리적 특성이 CF 이미터의 전기 분무 거동에 미치는 영향을 철저히 조사합니다.

스프레이 전류와 제트 직경은 액체의 유속, 전위차 및 물리적 특성과 상관 관계가 있으며 상관 결과는 문헌에 보고된 결과와 정량적으로 비교됩니다. (이 기사의 일부 그림은 전자 버전에서만 색상입니다)

Introduction

1980 년대 후반부터 매트릭스 보조 레이저 탈착 이온화 (MALDI)와 전기 분무 이온화 (ESI)의 두 가지 이온화 기술을 구현하여 감도, 속도 및 구조 정보 수준 측면에서 MS 분석이 엄청나게 성장했습니다. 1980 년대 초까지 전자 충격 (EI) 또는 화학 이온화 (CI) 방법은 가스 크로마토 그래피에 적합한 작은 생체 분자를 이온화 하는 데 사용되었습니다.

그러나 크고 열에 민감한 비 휘발성 샘플은 적절한 사전 처리 없이 EI 또는 CI-MS 기술로 분석 할 수 없습니다 [1]. ESI 기술을 사용하면 액체상에서 직접 이러한 큰 분자를 분석 할 수 있습니다 [2]. Zeleny [3, 4]는 출구에 높은 전위를 적용하여 모세관에서 액체 용액을 분사 할 수 있음을 보여주었습니다.

Dole [5, 6] 및 Fenn [7]의 선구적인 연구는 ESI를 고분자 및 생체 분자와 같은 대형 화합물의 이온화 방법으로 표시했습니다. 이에 이어이 기술에 의한 기상 이온 발생에 관련된 과정과 메커니즘이 널리 조사되고 있습니다.

ESI 방법에서 기체 이온화 된 분자는 강한 전계가 있는 상태에서 미세한 물방울을 생성하여 액체 용액에서 생성됩니다. ESI 프로세스의 이러한 능력은 단백질 및 기타 생체 분자 연구에 자연적으로 적용됨을 발견했습니다. ESI 방법과 관련된 다양한 프로세스가 그림 1에 나와 있습니다.

Figure 1. Schematic of an ESI process.
Figure 1. Schematic of an ESI process.

ESI 전위는 일반적으로 전도성 물질로 코팅 된 이미 터 튜브를 통해 외부에서 샘플 액체에 적용되지만 액체 샘플 내부에 적용될 수도 있습니다. Herring과 Qin [8]은 이미 터 팁에 삽입된 팔라듐 와이어를 통해 전기 분무 전위가 적용되는 모세관 전기 영동 (CE)을위한 ESI 인터페이스를 보여주었습니다.

Chiou의 설계 [9]에서는 작은 PDMS 칩에 있는 샘플 저장소, 마이크로 채널 및 실리카 모세관 노즐과 통합 된 내장 전극을 통해 전기 분무를 위한 고전압이 적용되었습니다.

Cao and Moini [10]는 ESI 전압이 모세관 내부에 위치한 전극을 통해인가되고 전기적 접촉이 출구 근처 모세관 벽의 작은 구멍을 통해 유지되는 전기 분무 방출기를 설계했습니다. 작은 모세관 직경 (~ 10 µm)을 가진 이미 터를 사용하여 낮은 전압에서 전기 분무가 가능하지만, 더 작은 구멍은 과도한 배압으로 인해 쉽게 막힐 수 있습니다.

직경이 더 큰 (> 50µm) 이미 터를 처리하는 것이 더 쉽습니다. 그러나 그들은 더 작은 직경의 이미 터만큼 효율적이지 않습니다 [11]. 일반적으로 ESI 전압을 적용하기 위해 유리 또는 용융 실리카와 같은 절연 재료로 제작 된 저 유량 이미 터의 외주에 전도성 코팅이 적용됩니다.

용융 실리카 모세관의 끝 부분에있는 스퍼터 코팅 된 귀금속 층은 내구성에 빠르게 영향을 미치는 것으로 관찰되었습니다. 코팅의 빠른 열화는 방전, 전기 화학적 반응 및 층과 용융 실리카 표면 사이의 불량한 기계적 결합으로 인해 발생할 수 있습니다.

이러한 에미 터의 수명은 스퍼터 코팅 후에 금을 전기 도금하거나 [12] 스퍼터 코팅 된 금 위에 SiOx를 코팅하여 증가시킬 수 있습니다 [13]. 크롬 또는 니켈 합금의 접착층 위에 금으로 코팅 된 이미 터는 우수한 결합력을 제공 할 수 있으며 음극으로 작동 할 때 내구성이 있습니다.

그러나 양극으로 작동하는 동안 접착층은 금 막을 통해 화학적으로 용해됩니다. 이미 터의 안정성과 내구성을 향상시키기 위해 대체 전도성 코팅이 평가되었습니다.

안정적인 ESI 작동을 위해 콜로이드 흑연 코팅 이미 터가 사용되었으며 수명이 길었습니다 [14]. 폴리아닐린 (PANI) 코팅 이미 터는 두꺼운 코팅으로 인해 높은 내구성을 보여주고 방전에 강합니다. PANIcoated와 gold-coated nanospray emitter의 electrospray ionization 거동을 비교 한 결과 PANIcoated emitter는 goldcoated emitter와 비슷한 향상된 감도를 제공합니다 [15].

그라파이트-폴리이 미드 혼합물은 또한 무 접착 전기 분무 방출기의 경우 전도성 코팅으로 사용되었습니다. 전도성 코팅의 안정성은 산화 스트레스 동안 좋은 성능을 나타내는 전기 화학적 방법에 의해 조사되었습니다 [16].

탄소 코팅 이미 터의 기능은 마이크로 스프레이 및 시스리스 CE 및 ESI 응용 분야에서 입증되었습니다. 이 이미 터는 견고하지는 않지만 방수가 되지 않는 CE 또는 ESI 애플리케이션에 충분히 내구성이있었습니다 [17].

우리는 막힘 문제를 제거하고 시료 액체와 금층 사이의 접촉 문제를 피할 수있는 뾰족한 탄소 섬유 기반의 새로운 ESI 방출기를 도입하여 ESI 시스템의 적용 성, 신뢰성 및 내구성을 향상 시켰습니다 [18]. 이 작업에서 탄소 섬유 기반 ESI 이미 터는 전산 유체 역학 (CFD) 소프트웨어 패키지 FLOW-3D [19]를 사용하여 시뮬레이션됩니다.

실험은 새로운 CF 이미 터를 사용하여 수행됩니다. 모델 예측은 실험 결과와 비교됩니다. 새로운 이미 터의 ESI 성능은 이미 터의 기하학적 구조, 유속, 액체의 물리적 특성과 같은 다양한 매개 변수에 대한 반응을 연구하여 평가됩니다.

스프레이 전류 및 제트 직경은 유량 및 액체의 특성과 상관 관계가 있으며 상관 결과는 문헌에보고 된 결과와 정량적으로 비교됩니다. 다음 섹션에서 ESI 공정을 지배하는 전기 유체 역학 이론은 Taylor–Melcher 누설 유전체 모델 [20]을 참조하여 설명됩니다.

그런 다음 Hartman 등이 사용하는 ESI 구성을 고려하여 CFD 코드의 유효성을 확인합니다 [21]. 또한 CF 기반 ESI 모델에 대한 시뮬레이션 및 실험 결과가 제시되고 논의됩니다. 마지막으로 모수 연구 결과와 상관 관계를 제시하고 논의합니다.

Figure 2. Forces in the liquid cone.
Figure 2. Forces in the liquid cone.
Figure 3. Schematic of the ESI model studied by Hartman et al [21].
Figure 3. Schematic of the ESI model studied by Hartman et al [21].
Figure 6. Cone-Jet profile and the electric potential contours at 19 kV; cone length is 4.3 mm.
Figure 6. Cone-Jet profile and the electric potential contours at 19 kV; cone length is 4.3 mm.
Figure 7. A photograph of the experimental cone shape; cone length is 4.2 ± 0.2 mm [21].
Figure 7. A photograph of the experimental cone shape; cone length is 4.2 ± 0.2 mm [21].
Figure 15. Electric field contours at various time steps
Figure 15. Electric field contours at various time steps
Figure 20. Top: image of electrospray, bottom: cone-jet profile using the CF emitter. Distance between the carbon fiber tip and the counter electrode is 4.0 mm, potential difference is 3500 V, flow rate is 300 nL min−1 .
Figure 20. Top: image of electrospray, bottom: cone-jet profile using the CF emitter. Distance between the carbon fiber tip and the counter electrode is 4.0 mm, potential difference is 3500 V, flow rate is 300 nL min−1 .

References

[1] Siuzdak M 1996 Mass Spectrometry for Biotechnology (New York: Academic)
[2] Cole R B (ed) 1997 Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (New York: Wiley-Interscience)
[3] Zeleny J 1914 Phys. Rev. 3 69–91
[4] Zeleny J 1917 Phys. Rev. 10 1–6
[5] Dole M, Mack L L, Hines R L, Mobley R C, Ferguson L D and Alice M B 1968 Molecular beams of macroions
J. Chem. Phys. 49 2240–9
[6] Clegg G A and Dole M 1971 Molecular beams of macroions: III. Zein and polyvinylpyrrolidone Biopolymers
10 821–6
[7] Fenn J B, Mann M, Meng C K, Wong S F and Whitehouse C M 1989 Electrospray ionization for mass
spectrometry of large biomolecules Science 246 64–71
[8] Herring C J and Qin J 1999 An on-line preconcentrator and the evaluation of electrospray interfaces for the capillary
electrophoresis/mass spectrometry of peptides Rapid Commun. Mass Spectr. 13 1–7
[9] Chiou C H, Lee G B, Hsu H T, Chen P W and Liao P C B 2002 Microscale Tools for Sample Preparation, Separation
and Detection of Neuropeptides Sensors Actuators B 86 280–6
[10] Cao P and Moini M 1997 A novel sheathless interface for capillary electrophoresis/electrospray ionization mass
spectrometry using an in-capillary electrode J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom 8 561–4
[11] Janini G M, Conards T P, Wilkens K L, Issaq H J and Veenstra T D 2003 A sheathless nanoflow electrospray
interface for on-line capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry Anal. Chem 75 1615–9
[12] Barroso M B de Jong and Ad P 1999 Sheathless preconcentration-capillary zone electrophoresis-mass
spectrometry applied to peptide analysis J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom 10 1271–8
[13] Valaskovic G A and McLafferty F W 1996 Long-lived metallized tips for nanoliter electrospray mass spectrometry
J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom. 7 1270–2
[14] Zhu X, Thiam S, Valle B C and Warner I M 2002 A colloidal graphite coated emitter for seathless capillary
electrophoresis/nanoelectrospray ionization mass spectrometry Anal. Chem 74 5405–9
[15] Maziarz E P I II, Lorenz S A, White T P and Wood T D 2000 Polyaniline: a conductive polymer coating for durable
nanospray emitters J. Am. Soc. Mass. Spectrom 11 659–63
[16] Nilsson S, Wetterhall M, Bergquist J, Nyholm L and Markides K E 2001 A simple and robust conductive
graphite coating for sheathless electrospray emitters used in capillary electrophoresis/mass spectrometry Rapid
Commun. Mass Spectr. 15 1997–2000
[17] Chang Y Z and Her G R 2000 Sheathless capillary electrophoresis/electospray mass spectrometry using a
carbon-coated tapered fused silica capillary with a beveled edge Anal. Chem. 72 626–30
[18] Liu J, Ro K W, Busman M and Knapp D R 2004 Electrospray ionization with a pointed carbon fiber emitter Anal. Chem. 76 3599–606
[19] Hirt C W 2004 Electro-hydrodynamics of semi–conductive fluids: with application to electro–spraying Flow Science
Technical Note 70 FSI–04–TN70 1–7
[20] Saville D A 1997 Electrohydrodynamcis: the Taylor–Melcher leaky dielectric model Annu. Rev. Fluid Mech. 29 27–64
[21] Hartman R P A, Brunner D J, Camelot D M A, Marijnissen J C M and Scarlett B 1999
Electrohydrodynamic atomization in the cone-jet mode physical modeling of the liquid cone and jet J. Aerosol Sci.
30 823–49
[22] Castellanos A 1998 Basic Concepts and Equations in Electrohydrodynamics Electrohydrodynamics
ed A Castellanos (Berlin: Springer)
[23] Melcher J R 1981 Continuum Electromechanics (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press)
[24] Hirt C W and Nichols B D 1981 Volume of fluid (VOF) method for the dynamics of free boundaries J. Comp. Phys.
39 201–25
[25] De la Mora F J and Loscertales I G 1994 The current emitted by highly conducting Taylor cones J. Fluid Mech. 260
155–84
[26] Ganan-Calvo A M 1997 Cone–jet analytical extension of Taylor’s electrostatic solution and the asymptotic universal
scaling laws in electrospraying Phys. Rev. Lett. 79 217–20
[27] Higuera F J 2004 Current/flow–rate characteristic of an electrospray with a small meniscus J. Fluid Mech.
513 239–46
[28] Zeng J, Sobek D and Korsmeyer T Electro-hydrodynamic modeling of electrospray ionization: cad for a microfluidic
device-mass spectrometer interface Transducers ’03: 12th Int. Conf. on Solid State Sensors, Actuators and
Microsystems 2 1275–8
[29] Ganan–Calvo A M, Davila J and Barrero A 1997 Current and droplet size in the electrospraying of liquids. Scaling laws J. Aerosol Sci. 28 249–75
[30] Cloupeau M and Prunet-Foch B 1989 Electrostatic spraying of liquids in cone–jet mode J. Electrost. 22 135–59

컴팩트 디스크 ELISA 칩 [2]

컴팩트 디스크 미세 유체 장치: Optimizing Real Estate

Compact Disc Microfluidic Devices: Optimizing Real Estate

미세 유체 장치 사용자의 증가하는 기대를 충족하려면 작은 미세 유체 장치에서 제한된 공간을 최적화하는 것이 중요합니다. 사용자는 단일 미세 유체 장치에서 최대의 기능과 여러 병렬 작업을 기대합니다. 제한된 공간을 최적화하는 문제는 이러한 장치의 많은 물리적 이점에도 불구하고 회전하는 미세 유체 장치로 확장됩니다. 회전 에너지를 이용하여 미세 유체 작업을 수행하는 회전 장치를 컴팩트 디스크 (CD) 미세 유체 장치라고합니다.

컴팩트 디스크 ELISA 칩 [1]
컴팩트 디스크 ELISA 칩 [2]
컴팩트 디스크 ELISA 칩 [2]

10 년 넘게 CD는 혈액 진단을위한 신속한 면역 분석 및 임상 생화학에서 지속적으로 장점을 보여 왔습니다. 마이크로 토탈 분석 시스템 (μTAS)으로 사용되며, 여러 개별 분석이 내장되어 단일 칩에서 동시에 실행됩니다. 핸즈프리 제어를 위해 프로그래밍 된 간단하고 저렴한 모터에서 작동하며 자석이나 표면 처리와 같은 외부 액추에이터가 필요하지 않습니다. 기본적으로 CD는 훌륭합니다! 그러나 공짜 점심 같은 것은 없습니다. 단방향 (방사형) 원심력으로 인해 CD는 회전하지 않는 미세 유체 장치보다 빠르게 공간이 부족합니다. 유체는 방사형으로 바깥쪽으로 만 이동하므로 CD가 수행 할 수있는 분석 단계의 수가 제한됩니다.

그림 3. CD 채널 내부의 방사형 물 기둥에 적용되는 다양한 신체 힘을 강조하는 회로도. 방사상으로 바깥쪽으로 작용하는 원심력을 확인합니다.
그림 3. CD 채널 내부의 방사형 물 기둥에 적용되는 다양한 신체 힘을 강조하는 회로도. 방사상으로 바깥쪽으로 작용하는 원심력을 확인합니다.

CD의 단 방향성 극복

Gorkin    [3]에서는 CD의 단 방향성 제약을 극복하기 위해 공압 펌핑이 제안되었습니다. 아이디어는 원심 에너지를 압축 에너지로 저장하고 다시 풀어서 유체를 중심으로 발사하는 것입니다. 아래 이미지는 로딩 챔버, 흡입 하위 구획 및 압축 하위 구획의 세 개의 챔버가있는 비교적 간단한 미세 유체 칩을 보여줍니다.

그림 4. CD 사진
그림 4. CD 사진
그림 5. FLOW-3D에서 모방 된 CD 디자인
그림 5. FLOW-3D에서 모방 된 CD 디자인

공압 펌핑 프로세스

유체가 로딩 챔버로 들어간 다음, 흡입 하위 구획을 통해 공기가 갇힌 압축 하위 구획으로 이동합니다. 공기가 갇 히면 CD가 특정 각속도로 회전하여 갇힌 공기가 압축됩니다. 공기가 더 이상 압축 할 수없는 경우 (안정 상태에 도달했기 때문에), 회전 속도가 감소하거나 완전히 꺼져 (누군가이 작업을 수행하고 있습니까? 아니면 장치가 수행하고 있습니까?) 유체가 로딩 챔버로 다시 펌핑됩니다. 이 마지막 단계는 이완 단계입니다. 공압 펌핑 공정의 5 단계는 다음과 같습니다.

그림 6. CD의 5 단계 공압 펌핑 [3]
그림 6. CD의 5 단계 공압 펌핑 [3]

회전 속도의 영향

회전 속도가 다르면 압축 하위 구획에서 공기의 압축 수준이 다릅니다. 회전 속도가 높을수록 유체가 공기에 더 세게 밀려 공기가 더 많이 압축됩니다. 그러나 공기가 압축 될 수있는 양에는 한계가 있습니다. 사실, 공기의 압축은 특정 회전 속도 이상으로 점진적으로 증가합니다. 압축 하위 구획의 부피는 회전 속도가 증가함에 따라 감소합니다. 흡입구의 액체 위치는 디스크 중앙에서 흡입 하위 구획의 유체 수준까지의 거리입니다. 이 거리는 증가합니다. 즉, 회전 속도가 증가함에 따라 유체가 중심에서 멀어집니다.

그림 7. 회전 주파수가 증가하면 압축이 증가합니다. [3]
그림 7. 회전 주파수가 증가하면 압축이 증가합니다. [3]

CD 미세 유체 장치 모델링

실험은 미세 유체 장치 설계의 핵심입니다. 그러나 충분한 실험을 수행하고 각 실험에 대한 완벽한 제어 환경을 유지하는 것은 불가능할 수 있습니다. 복잡한 설계에는 복잡한 실험 설정 및 분석이 필요합니다. FLOW-3D 의 정확하고 포괄적 인 다중 물리  모델링 기능 은 미세 유체 설계에 대한 통찰력과이를 최적화하는 방법을 제공합니다. FLOW-3D가  위에서 논의한 CD 미세 유체 장치에 대한 실험적 및 이론적 결과와 어떻게 비교되는지 보여 드리겠습니다  .

CD 미세 유체 장치에 대한 실험적 및 이론적 결과와 비교
CD 미세 유체 장치에 대한 실험적 및 이론적 결과와 비교

이미지 시퀀스는 실험 및 FLOW-3D  시뮬레이션 결과 의 시각적 비교를 제공합니다  . 두 유체 (공기 및 물) 압축 가능 모델을 사용하여 서로 다른 회전 속도에 대해 챔버 내부의 유체 역학을 시뮬레이션했습니다. 회귀 분석을 사용하여 아래 플롯에서 이러한 시각적 비교를 정량화하면 FLOW-3D  와 실험 결과,  FLOW-3D  및 분석 결과 간에 탁월한 상관 관계 (R 2 > 0.99)가 제공  됩니다.

그림 9. FLOW-3D 데이터와 실험 데이터의 비교. (Poly는 다항식 곡선 맞춤을 의미합니다.)
그림 9. FLOW-3D 데이터와 실험 데이터의 비교. (Poly는 다항식 곡선 맞춤을 의미합니다.)

시뮬레이션은 또한 다양한 회전 속도에 대한 정상 상태에 대한 접근 방식을 보여줍니다. 아래의 애니메이션은 CD의 운동 에너지 변동을 1000rpm nd 7000rpm에서 보여줍니다. 더 빠른 속도는 더 빠른 정상 상태를 강제하지만 정상 상태에 도달할 때까지 수위를 빠르게 변동시킵니다. 저속 시뮬레이션의 경우 그 반대입니다.

Mean kinetic energy fluctuations for the CD rotating at 1000 rpm
Mean kinetic energy fluctuations for the CD rotating at 1000 rpm
Mean kinetic energy fluctuations for the CD rotating at 7000 rpm
Mean kinetic energy fluctuations for the CD rotating at 7000 rpm

전반적으로  FLOW-3D  는 실험 결과를 정확하게 검증합니다. 사소한 오류는 부정확 한 지오메트리 (CAD) 생성 및 / 또는 물과 공기 사이의 인터페이스를 엄격하게 정의하기 때문일 수 있습니다. 이 사례 연구는 FLOW-3D  가 실험 결과를 검증하고 컴팩트 디스크 설계의 신뢰도를 높이는 데 효과적으로 사용될 수 있음을 보여줍니다  .

References

[1] He, Hongyan et al. “Design and Testing of a Microfluidic Biochip for Cytokine Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay”. Biomicrofluidics 3(2):22401 February 2009

[2] Roy, Emmanuel, et al. “From Cellular Lysis to Microarray Detection, an Integrated Thermoplastic Elastomer (TPE) Point of Care Lab on a Disc.” Lab on a Chip, vol. 15, no. 2

[3] Gorkin III, Robert et al. “Pneumatic pumping in centrifugal microfluidic platforms”. February 2010 Springerlink.com

FLOW-3D CAST Bibliography

FLOW-3D CAST bibliography

아래는 FSI의 금속 주조 참고 문헌에 수록된 기술 논문 모음입니다. 이 모든 논문에는 FLOW-3D CAST 해석 결과가 수록되어 있습니다. FLOW-3D CAST를 사용하여 금속 주조 산업의 응용 프로그램을 성공적으로 시뮬레이션하는 방법에 대해 자세히 알아보십시오.

Below is a collection of technical papers in our Metal Casting Bibliography. All of these papers feature FLOW-3D CAST results. Learn more about how FLOW-3D CAST can be used to successfully simulate applications for the Metal Casting Industry.

33-20     Eric Riedel, Martin Liepe Stefan Scharf, Simulation of ultrasonic induced cavitation and acoustic streaming in liquid and solidifying aluminum, Metals, 10.4; 476, 2020. doi.org/10.3390/met10040476

20-20   Wu Yue, Li Zhuo and Lu Rong, Simulation and visual tester verification of solid propellant slurry vacuum plate casting, Propellants, Explosives, Pyrotechnics, 2020. doi.org/10.1002/prep.201900411

17-20   C.A. Jones, M.R. Jolly, A.E.W. Jarfors and M. Irwin, An experimental characterization of thermophysical properties of a porous ceramic shell used in the investment casting process, Supplimental Proceedings, pp. 1095-1105, TMS 2020 149th Annual Meeting and Exhibition, San Diego, CA, February 23-27, 2020. doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-36296-6_102

12-20   Franz Josef Feikus, Paul Bernsteiner, Ricardo Fernández Gutiérrez and Michal Luszczak , Further development of electric motor housings, MTZ Worldwide, 81, pp. 38-43, 2020. doi.org/10.1007/s38313-019-0176-z

09-20   Mingfan Qi, Yonglin Kang, Yuzhao Xu, Zhumabieke Wulabieke and Jingyuan Li, A novel rheological high pressure die-casting process for preparing large thin-walled Al–Si–Fe–Mg–Sr alloy with high heat conductivity, high plasticity and medium strength, Materials Science and Engineering: A, 776, art. no. 139040, 2020. doi.org/10.1016/j.msea.2020.139040

07-20   Stefan Heugenhauser, Erhard Kaschnitz and Peter Schumacher, Development of an aluminum compound casting process – Experiments and numerical simulations, Journal of Materials Processing Technology, 279, art. no. 116578, 2020. doi.org/10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2019.116578

05-20   Michail Papanikolaou, Emanuele Pagone, Mark Jolly and Konstantinos Salonitis, Numerical simulation and evaluation of Campbell running and gating systems, Metals, 10.1, art. no. 68, 2020. doi.org/10.3390/met10010068

102-19   Ferencz Peti and Gabriela Strnad, The effect of squeeze pin dimension and operational parameters on material homogeneity of aluminium high pressure die cast parts, Acta Marisiensis. Seria Technologica, 16.2, 2019. doi.org/0.2478/amset-2019-0010

94-19   E. Riedel, I. Horn, N. Stein, H. Stein, R. Bahr, and S. Scharf, Ultrasonic treatment: a clean technology that supports sustainability incasting processes, Procedia, 26th CIRP Life Cycle Engineering (LCE) Conference, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA, May 7-9, 2019. 

93-19   Adrian V. Catalina, Liping Xue, Charles A. Monroe, Robin D. Foley, and John A. Griffin, Modeling and Simulation of Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of AlSi- and AlCu-based Alloys, Transactions, 123rd Metalcasting Congress, Atlanta, GA, USA, April 27-30, 2019. 

84-19   Arun Prabhakar, Michail Papanikolaou, Konstantinos Salonitis, and Mark Jolly, Sand casting of sheet lead: numerical simulation of metal flow and solidification, The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, pp. 1-13, 2019. doi.org/10.1007/s00170-019-04522-3

72-19   Santosh Reddy Sama, Eric Macdonald, Robert Voigt, and Guha Manogharan, Measurement of metal velocity in sand casting during mold filling, Metals, 9:1079, 2019. doi.org/10.3390/met9101079

71-19   Sebastian Findeisen, Robin Van Der Auwera, Michael Heuser, and Franz-Josef Wöstmann, Gießtechnische Fertigung von E-Motorengehäusen mit interner Kühling (Casting production of electric motor housings with internal cooling), Geisserei, 106, pp. 72-78, 2019 (in German).

58-19     Von Malte Leonhard, Matthias Todte, and Jörg Schäffer, Realistic simulation of the combustion of exothermic feeders, Casting, No. 2, pp. 28-32, 2019. In English and German.

52-19     S. Lakkum and P. Kowitwarangkul, Numerical investigations on the effect of gas flow rate in the gas stirred ladle with dual plugs, International Conference on Materials Research and Innovation (ICMARI), Bangkok, Thailand, December 17-21, 2018. IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering, Vol. 526, 2019. doi.org/10.1088/1757-899X/526/1/012028

47-19     Bing Zhou, Shuai Lu, Kaile Xu, Chun Xu, and Zhanyong Wang, Microstructure and simulation of semisolid aluminum alloy castings in the process of stirring integrated transfer-heat (SIT) with water cooling, International Journal of Metalcasting, Online edition, pp. 1-13, 2019. doi.org/10.1007/s40962-019-00357-6

31-19     Zihao Yuan, Zhipeng Guo, and S.M. Xiong, Skin layer of A380 aluminium alloy die castings and its blistering during solution treatment, Journal of Materials Science & Technology, Vol. 35, No. 9, pp. 1906-1916, 2019. doi.org/10.1016/j.jmst.2019.05.011

25-19     Stefano Mascetti, Raul Pirovano, and Giulio Timelli, Interazione metallo liquido/stampo: Il fenomeno della metallizzazione, La Metallurgia Italiana, No. 4, pp. 44-50, 2019. In Italian.

20-19     Fu-Yuan Hsu, Campbellology for runner system design, Shape Casting: The Minerals, Metals & Materials Series, pp. 187-199, 2019. doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-06034-3_19

19-19     Chengcheng Lyu, Michail Papanikolaou, and Mark Jolly, Numerical process modelling and simulation of Campbell running systems designs, Shape Casting: The Minerals, Metals & Materials Series, pp. 53-64, 2019. doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-06034-3_5

18-19     Adrian V. Catalina, Liping Xue, and Charles Monroe, A solidification model with application to AlSi-based alloys, Shape Casting: The Minerals, Metals & Materials Series, pp. 201-213, 2019. doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-06034-3_20

17-19     Fu-Yuan Hsu and Yu-Hung Chen, The validation of feeder modeling for ductile iron castings, Shape Casting: The Minerals, Metals & Materials Series, pp. 227-238, 2019. doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-06034-3_22

04-19   Santosh Reddy Sama, Tony Badamo, Paul Lynch and Guha Manogharan, Novel sprue designs in metal casting via 3D sand-printing, Additive Manufacturing, Vol. 25, pp. 563-578, 2019. doi.org/10.1016/j.addma.2018.12.009

02-19   Jingying Sun, Qichi Le, Li Fu, Jing Bai, Johannes Tretter, Klaus Herbold and Hongwei Huo, Gas entrainment behavior of aluminum alloy engine crankcases during the low-pressure-die-casting-process, Journal of Materials Processing Technology, Vol. 266, pp. 274-282, 2019. doi.org/10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2018.11.016

92-18   Fast, Flexible… More Versatile, Foundry Management Technology, March, 2018. 

82-18   Xu Zhao, Ping Wang, Tao Li, Bo-yu Zhang, Peng Wang, Guan-zhou Wang and Shi-qi Lu, Gating system optimization of high pressure die casting thin-wall AlSi10MnMg longitudinal loadbearing beam based on numerical simulation, China Foundry, Vol. 15, no. 6, pp. 436-442, 2018. doi: 10.1007/s41230-018-8052-z

80-18   Michail Papanikolaou, Emanuele Pagone, Konstantinos Salonitis, Mark Jolly and Charalampos Makatsoris, A computational framework towards energy efficient casting processes, Sustainable Design and Manufacturing 2018: Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Sustainable Design and Manufacturing (KES-SDM-18), Gold Coast, Australia, June 24-26 2018, SIST 130, pp. 263-276, 2019. doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-04290-5_27

64-18   Vasilios Fourlakidis, Ilia Belov and Attila Diószegi, Strength prediction for pearlitic lamellar graphite iron: Model validation, Metals, Vol. 8, No. 9, 2018. doi.org/10.3390/met8090684

51-18   Xue-feng Zhu, Bao-yi Yu, Li Zheng, Bo-ning Yu, Qiang Li, Shu-ning Lü and Hao Zhang, Influence of pouring methods on filling process, microstructure and mechanical properties of AZ91 Mg alloy pipe by horizontal centrifugal casting, China Foundry, vol. 15, no. 3, pp.196-202, 2018. doi.org/10.1007/s41230-018-7256-6

47-18   Santosh Reddy Sama, Jiayi Wang and Guha Manogharan, Non-conventional mold design for metal casting using 3D sand-printing, Journal of Manufacturing Processes, vol. 34-B, pp. 765-775, 2018. doi.org/10.1016/j.jmapro.2018.03.049

42-18   M. Koru and O. Serçe, The Effects of Thermal and Dynamical Parameters and Vacuum Application on Porosity in High-Pressure Die Casting of A383 Al-Alloy, International Journal of Metalcasting, pp. 1-17, 2018. doi.org/10.1007/s40962-018-0214-7

41-18   Abhilash Viswanath, S. Savithri, U.T.S. Pillai, Similitude analysis on flow characteristics of water, A356 and AM50 alloys during LPC process, Journal of Materials Processing Technology, vol. 257, pp. 270-277, 2018. doi.org/10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2018.02.031

29-18   Seyboldt, Christoph and Liewald, Mathias, Investigation on thixojoining to produce hybrid components with intermetallic phase, AIP Conference Proceedings, vol. 1960, no. 1, 2018. doi.org/10.1063/1.5034992

28-18   Laura Schomer, Mathias Liewald and Kim Rouven Riedmüller, Simulation of the infiltration process of a ceramic open-pore body with a metal alloy in semi-solid state to design the manufacturing of interpenetrating phase composites, AIP Conference Proceedings, vol. 1960, no. 1, 2018. doi.org/10.1063/1.5034991

41-17   Y. N. Wu et al., Numerical Simulation on Filling Optimization of Copper Rotor for High Efficient Electric Motors in Die Casting Process, Materials Science Forum, Vol. 898, pp. 1163-1170, 2017.

12-17   A.M.  Zarubin and O.A. Zarubina, Controlling the flow rate of melt in gravity die casting of aluminum alloys, Liteynoe Proizvodstvo (Casting Manufacturing), pp 16-20, 6, 2017. In Russian.

10-17   A.Y. Korotchenko, Y.V. Golenkov, M.V. Tverskoy and D.E. Khilkov, Simulation of the Flow of Metal Mixtures in the Mold, Liteynoe Proizvodstvo (Casting Manufacturing), pp 18-22, 5, 2017. In Russian.

08-17   Morteza Morakabian Esfahani, Esmaeil Hajjari, Ali Farzadi and Seyed Reza Alavi Zaree, Prediction of the contact time through modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow in compound casting process of Al/Mg light metals, Journal of Materials Research, © Materials Research Society 2017

04-17   Huihui Liu, Xiongwei He and Peng Guo, Numerical simulation on semi-solid die-casting of magnesium matrix composite based on orthogonal experiment, AIP Conference Proceedings 1829, 020037 (2017); doi.org/10.1063/1.4979769.

100-16  Robert Watson, New numerical techniques to quantify and predict the effect of entrainment defects, applied to high pressure die casting, PhD Thesis: University of Birmingham, 2016.

88-16   M.C. Carter, T. Kauffung, L. Weyenberg and C. Peters, Low Pressure Die Casting Simulation Discovery through Short Shot, Cast Expo & Metal Casting Congress, April 16-19, 2016, Minneapolis, MN, Copyright 2016 American Foundry Society.

61-16   M. Koru and O. Serçe, Experimental and numerical determination of casting mold interfacial heat transfer coefficient in the high pressure die casting of a 360 aluminum alloy, ACTA PHYSICA POLONICA A, Vol. 129 (2016)

59-16   R. Pirovano and S. Mascetti, Tracking of collapsed bubbles during a filling simulation, La Metallurgia Italiana – n. 6 2016

43-16   Kevin Lee, Understanding shell cracking during de-wax process in investment casting, Ph.D Thesis: University of Birmingham, School of Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, 2016.

35-16   Konstantinos Salonitis, Mark Jolly, Binxu Zeng, and Hamid Mehrabi, Improvements in energy consumption and environmental impact by novel single shot melting process for casting, Journal of Cleaner Production, doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2016.06.165, Open Access funded by Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, June 29, 2016

20-16   Fu-Yuan Hsu, Bifilm Defect Formation in Hydraulic Jump of Liquid Aluminum, Metallurgical and Materials Transactions B, 2016, Band: 47, Heft 3, 1634-1648.

15-16   Mingfan Qia, Yonglin Kanga, Bing Zhoua, Wanneng Liaoa, Guoming Zhua, Yangde Lib,and Weirong Li, A forced convection stirring process for Rheo-HPDC aluminum and magnesium alloys, Journal of Materials Processing Technology 234 (2016) 353–367

112-15   José Miguel Gonçalves Ledo Belo da Costa, Optimization of filling systems for low pressure by FLOW-3D, Dissertação de mestrado integrado em Engenharia Mecânica, 2015.

89-15   B.W. Zhu, L.X. Li, X. Liu, L.Q. Zhang and R. Xu, Effect of Viscosity Measurement Method to Simulate High Pressure Die Casting of Thin-Wall AlSi10MnMg Alloy Castings, Journal of Materials Engineering and Performance, Published online, November 2015, doi.org/10.1007/s11665-015-1783-8, © ASM International.

88-15   Peng Zhang, Zhenming Li, Baoliang Liu, Wenjiang Ding and Liming Peng, Improved tensile properties of a new aluminum alloy for high pressure die casting, Materials Science & Engineering A651(2016)376–390, Available online, November 2015.

83-15   Zu-Qi Hu, Xin-Jian Zhang and Shu-Sen Wu, Microstructure, Mechanical Properties and Die-Filling Behavior of High-Performance Die-Cast Al–Mg–Si–Mn Alloy, Acta Metall. Sin. (Engl. Lett.), doi.org/10.1007/s40195-015-0332-7, © The Chinese Society for Metals and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015.

82-15   J. Müller, L. Xue, M.C. Carter, C. Thoma, M. Fehlbier and M. Todte, A Die Spray Cooling Model for Thermal Die Cycling Simulations, 2015 Die Casting Congress & Exposition, Indianapolis, IN, October 2015

81-15   M. T. Murray, L.F. Hansen, L. Chilcott, E. Li and A.M. Murray, Case Studies in the Use of Simulation- Improved Yield and Reduced Time to Market, 2015 Die Casting Congress & Exposition, Indianapolis, IN, October 2015

80-15   R. Bhola, S. Chandra and D. Souders, Predicting Castability of Thin-Walled Parts for the HPDC Process Using Simulations, 2015 Die Casting Congress & Exposition, Indianapolis, IN, October 2015

76-15   Prosenjit Das, Sudip K. Samanta, Shashank Tiwari and Pradip Dutta, Die Filling Behaviour of Semi Solid A356 Al Alloy Slurry During Rheo Pressure Die Casting, Transactions of the Indian Institute of Metals, pp 1-6, October 2015

74-15   Murat KORU and Orhan SERÇE, Yüksek Basınçlı Döküm Prosesinde Enjeksiyon Parametrelerine Bağlı Olarak Döküm Simülasyon, Cumhuriyet University Faculty of Science, Science Journal (CSJ), Vol. 36, No: 5 (2015) ISSN: 1300-1949, May 2015

69-15   A. Viswanath, S. Sivaraman, U. T. S. Pillai, Computer Simulation of Low Pressure Casting Process Using FLOW-3D, Materials Science Forum, Vols. 830-831, pp. 45-48, September 2015

68-15   J. Aneesh Kumar, K. Krishnakumar and S. Savithri, Computer Simulation of Centrifugal Casting Process Using FLOW-3D, Materials Science Forum, Vols. 830-831, pp. 53-56, September 2015

59-15   F. Hosseini Yekta and S. A. Sadough Vanini, Simulation of the flow of semi-solid steel alloy using an enhanced model, Metals and Materials International, August 2015.

44-15   Ulrich E. Klotz, Tiziana Heiss and Dario Tiberto, Platinum investment casting material properties, casting simulation and optimum process parameters, Jewelry Technology Forum 2015

41-15   M. Barkhudarov and R. Pirovano, Minimizing Air Entrainment in High Pressure Die Casting Shot Sleeves, GIFA 2015, Düsseldorf, Germany

40-15   M. Todte, A. Fent, and H. Lang, Simulation in support of the development of innovative processes in the casting industry, GIFA 2015, Düsseldorf, Germany

19-15   Bruce Morey, Virtual casting improves powertrain design, Automotive Engineering, SAE International, March 2015.

15-15   K.S. Oh, J.D. Lee, S.J. Kim and J.Y. Choi, Development of a large ingot continuous caster, Metall. Res. Technol. 112, 203 (2015) © EDP Sciences, 2015, doi.org/10.1051/metal/2015006, www.metallurgical-research.org

14-15   Tiziana Heiss, Ulrich E. Klotz and Dario Tiberto, Platinum Investment Casting, Part I: Simulation and Experimental Study of the Casting Process, Johnson Matthey Technol. Rev., 2015, 59, (2), 95, doi.org/10.1595/205651315×687399

138-14 Christopher Thoma, Wolfram Volk, Ruben Heid, Klaus Dilger, Gregor Banner and Harald Eibisch, Simulation-based prediction of the fracture elongation as a failure criterion for thin-walled high-pressure die casting components, International Journal of Metalcasting, Vol. 8, No. 4, pp. 47-54, 2014. doi.org/10.1007/BF03355594

107-14  Mehran Seyed Ahmadi, Dissolution of Si in Molten Al with Gas Injection, ProQuest Dissertations And Theses; Thesis (Ph.D.), University of Toronto (Canada), 2014; Publication Number: AAT 3637106; ISBN: 9781321195231; Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 76-02(E), Section: B.; 191 p.

99-14   R. Bhola and S. Chandra, Predicting Castability for Thin-Walled HPDC Parts, Foundry Management Technology, December 2014

92-14   Warren Bishenden and Changhua Huang, Venting design and process optimization of die casting process for structural components; Part II: Venting design and process optimization, Die Casting Engineer, November 2014

90-14   Ken’ichi Kanazawa, Ken’ichi Yano, Jun’ichi Ogura, and Yasunori Nemoto, Optimum Runner Design for Die-Casting using CFD Simulations and Verification with Water-Model Experiments, Proceedings of the ASME 2014 International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE2014, November 14-20, 2014, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, IMECE2014-37419

89-14   P. Kapranos, C. Carney, A. Pola, and M. Jolly, Advanced Casting Methodologies: Investment Casting, Centrifugal Casting, Squeeze Casting, Metal Spinning, and Batch Casting, In Comprehensive Materials Processing; McGeough, J., Ed.; 2014, Elsevier Ltd., 2014; Vol. 5, pp 39–67.

77-14   Andrei Y. Korotchenko, Development of Scientific and Technological Approaches to Casting Net-Shaped Castings in Sand Molds Free of Shrinkage Defects and Hot Tears, Post-doctoral thesis: Russian State Technological University, 2014. In Russian.

69-14   L. Xue, M.C. Carter, A.V. Catalina, Z. Lin, C. Li, and C. Qiu, Predicting, Preventing Core Gas Defects in Steel Castings, Modern Casting, September 2014

68-14   L. Xue, M.C. Carter, A.V. Catalina, Z. Lin, C. Li, and C. Qiu, Numerical Simulation of Core Gas Defects in Steel Castings, Copyright 2014 American Foundry Society, 118th Metalcasting Congress, April 8 – 11, 2014, Schaumburg, IL

51-14   Jesus M. Blanco, Primitivo Carranza, Rafael Pintos, Pedro Arriaga, and Lakhdar Remaki, Identification of Defects Originated during the Filling of Cast Pieces through Particles Modelling, 11th World Congress on Computational Mechanics (WCCM XI), 5th European Conference on Computational Mechanics (ECCM V), 6th European Conference on Computational Fluid Dynamics (ECFD VI), E. Oñate, J. Oliver and A. Huerta (Eds)

47-14   B. Vijaya Ramnatha, C.Elanchezhiana, Vishal Chandrasekhar, A. Arun Kumarb, S. Mohamed Asif, G. Riyaz Mohamed, D. Vinodh Raj , C .Suresh Kumar, Analysis and Optimization of Gating System for Commutator End Bracket, Procedia Materials Science 6 ( 2014 ) 1312 – 1328, 3rd International Conference on Materials Processing and Characterisation (ICMPC 2014)

42-14  Bing Zhou, Yong-lin Kang, Guo-ming Zhu, Jun-zhen Gao, Ming-fan Qi, and Huan-huan Zhang, Forced convection rheoforming process for preparation of 7075 aluminum alloy semisolid slurry and its numerical simulation, Trans. Nonferrous Met. Soc. China 24(2014) 1109−1116

37-14    A. Karwinski, W. Lesniewski, P. Wieliczko, and M. Malysza, Casting of Titanium Alloys in Centrifugal Induction Furnaces, Archives of Metallurgy and Materials, Volume 59, Issue 1, doi.org/10.2478/amm-2014-0068, 2014.

26-14    Bing Zhou, Yonglin Kang, Mingfan Qi, Huanhuan Zhang and Guoming ZhuR-HPDC Process with Forced Convection Mixing Device for Automotive Part of A380 Aluminum Alloy, Materials 2014, 7, 3084-3105; doi.org/10.3390/ma7043084

20-14  Johannes Hartmann, Tobias Fiegl, Carolin Körner, Aluminum integral foams with tailored density profile by adapted blowing agents, Applied Physics A, doi.org/10.1007/s00339-014-8377-4, March 2014.

19-14    A.Y. Korotchenko, N.A. Nikiforova, E.D. Demjanov, N.C. Larichev, The Influence of the Filling Conditions on the Service Properties of the Part Side Frame, Russian Foundryman, 1 (January), pp 40-43, 2014. In Russian.

11-14 B. Fuchs and C. Körner, Mesh resolution consideration for the viability prediction of lost salt cores in the high pressure die casting process, Progress in Computational Fluid Dynamics, Vol. 14, No. 1, 2014, Copyright © 2014 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.

08-14 FY Hsu, SW Wang, and HJ Lin, The External and Internal Shrinkages in Aluminum Gravity Castings, Shape Casting: 5th International Symposium 2014. Available online at Google Books

103-13  B. Fuchs, H. Eibisch and C. Körner, Core Viability Simulation for Salt Core Technology in High-Pressure Die Casting, International Journal of Metalcasting, July 2013, Volume 7, Issue 3, pp 39–45

94-13    Randall S. Fielding, J. Crapps, C. Unal, and J.R.Kennedy, Metallic Fuel Casting Development and Parameter Optimization Simulations, International Conference on Fast reators and Related Fuel Cycles (FR13), 4-7 March 2013, Paris France

90-13  A. Karwińskia, M. Małyszaa, A. Tchórza, A. Gila, B. Lipowska, Integration of Computer Tomography and Simulation Analysis in Evaluation of Quality of Ceramic-Carbon Bonded Foam Filter, Archives of Foundry Engineering, doi.org/10.2478/afe-2013-0084, Published quarterly as the organ of the Foundry Commission of the Polish Academy of Sciences, ISSN, (2299-2944), Volume 13, Issue 4/2013

88-13  Litie and Metallurgia (Casting and Metallurgy), 3 (72), 2013, N.V.Sletova, I.N.Volnov, S.P.Zadrutsky, V.A.Chaikin, Modeling of the Process of Removing Non-metallic Inclusions in Aluminum Alloys Using the FLOW-3D program, pp 138-140. In Russian.

85-13    Michał Szucki,Tomasz Goraj, Janusz Lelito, Józef S. Suchy, Numerical Analysis of Solid Particles Flow in Liquid Metal, XXXVII International Scientific Conference Foundryman’ Day 2013, Krakow, 28-29 November 2013

84-13  Körner, C., Schwankl, M., Himmler, D., Aluminum-Aluminum compound castings by electroless deposited zinc layers, Journal of Materials Processing Technology (2014), doi.org/10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2013.12.01483-13.

77-13  Antonio Armillotta & Raffaello Baraggi & Simone Fasoli, SLM tooling for die casting with conformal cooling channels, The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, doi.org/10.1007/s00170-013-5523-7, December 2013.

64-13   Johannes Hartmann, Christina Blümel, Stefan Ernst, Tobias Fiegl, Karl-Ernst Wirth, Carolin Körner, Aluminum integral foam castings with microcellular cores by nano-functionalization, J Mater Sci, doi.org/10.1007/s10853-013-7668-z, September 2013.

46-13  Nicholas P. Orenstein, 3D Flow and Temperature Analysis of Filling a Plutonium Mold, LA-UR-13-25537, Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Los Alamos Annual Student Symposium 2013, 2013-07-24 (Rev.1)

42-13   Yang Yue, William D. Griffiths, and Nick R. Green, Modelling of the Effects of Entrainment Defects on Mechanical Properties in a Cast Al-Si-Mg Alloy, Materials Science Forum, 765, 225, 2013.

39-13  J. Crapps, D.S. DeCroix, J.D Galloway, D.A. Korzekwa, R. Aikin, R. Fielding, R. Kennedy, C. Unal, Separate effects identification via casting process modeling for experimental measurement of U-Pu-Zr alloys, Journal of Nuclear Materials, 15 July 2013.

35-13   A. Pari, Real Life Problem Solving through Simulations in the Die Casting Industry – Case Studies, © Die Casting Engineer, July 2013.

34-13  Martin Lagler, Use of Simulation to Predict the Viability of Salt Cores in the HPDC Process – Shot Curve as a Decisive Criterion, © Die Casting Engineer, July 2013.

24-13    I.N.Volnov, Optimizatsia Liteynoi Tekhnologii, (Casting Technology Optimization), Liteyshik Rossii (Russian Foundryman), 3, 2013, 27-29. In Russian

23-13  M.R. Barkhudarov, I.N. Volnov, Minimizatsia Zakhvata Vozdukha v Kamere Pressovania pri Litie pod Davleniem, (Minimization of Air Entrainment in the Shot Sleeve During High Pressure Die Casting), Liteyshik Rossii (Russian Foundryman), 3, 2013, 30-34. In Russian

09-13  M.C. Carter and L. Xue, Simulating the Parameters that Affect Core Gas Defects in Metal Castings, Copyright 2012 American Foundry Society, Presented at the 2013 CastExpo, St. Louis, Missouri, April 2013

08-13  C. Reilly, N.R. Green, M.R. Jolly, J.-C. Gebelin, The Modelling Of Oxide Film Entrainment In Casting Systems Using Computational Modelling, Applied Mathematical Modelling, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apm.2013.03.061, April 2013.

03-13  Alexandre Reikher and Krishna M. Pillai, A fast simulation of transient metal flow and solidification in a narrow channel. Part II. Model validation and parametric study, Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer (2013), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2012.12.061.

02-13  Alexandre Reikher and Krishna M. Pillai, A fast simulation of transient metal flow and solidification in a narrow channel. Part I: Model development using lubrication approximation, Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer (2013), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2012.12.060.

116-12  Jufu Jianga, Ying Wang, Gang Chena, Jun Liua, Yuanfa Li and Shoujing Luo, “Comparison of mechanical properties and microstructure of AZ91D alloy motorcycle wheels formed by die casting and double control forming, Materials & Design, Volume 40, September 2012, Pages 541-549.

107-12  F.K. Arslan, A.H. Hatman, S.Ö. Ertürk, E. Güner, B. Güner, An Evaluation for Fundamentals of Die Casting Materials Selection and Design, IMMC’16 International Metallurgy & Materials Congress, Istanbul, Turkey, 2012.

103-12 WU Shu-sen, ZHONG Gu, AN Ping, WAN Li, H. NAKAE, Microstructural characteristics of Al−20Si−2Cu−0.4Mg−1Ni alloy formed by rheo-squeeze casting after ultrasonic vibration treatment, Transactions of Nonferrous Metals Society of China, 22 (2012) 2863-2870, November 2012. Full paper available online.

109-12 Alexandre Reikher, Numerical Analysis of Die-Casting Process in Thin Cavities Using Lubrication Approximation, Ph.D. Thesis: The University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, Engineering Department (2012) Theses and Dissertations. Paper 65.

97-12 Hong Zhou and Li Heng Luo, Filling Pattern of Step Gating System in Lost Foam Casting Process and its Application, Advanced Materials Research, Volumes 602-604, Progress in Materials and Processes, 1916-1921, December 2012.

93-12  Liangchi Zhang, Chunliang Zhang, Jeng-Haur Horng and Zichen Chen, Functions of Step Gating System in the Lost Foam Casting Process, Advanced Materials Research, 591-593, 940, DOI: 10.4028/www.scientific.net/AMR.591-593.940, November 2012.

91-12  Hong Yan, Jian Bin Zhu, Ping Shan, Numerical Simulation on Rheo-Diecasting of Magnesium Matrix Composites, 10.4028/www.scientific.net/SSP.192-193.287, Solid State Phenomena, 192-193, 287.

89-12  Alexandre Reikher and Krishna M. Pillai, A Fast Numerical Simulation for Modeling Simultaneous Metal Flow and Solidification in Thin Cavities Using the Lubrication Approximation, Numerical Heat Transfer, Part A: Applications: An International Journal of Computation and Methodology, 63:2, 75-100, November 2012.

82-12  Jufu Jiang, Gang Chen, Ying Wang, Zhiming Du, Weiwei Shan, and Yuanfa Li, Microstructure and mechanical properties of thin-wall and high-rib parts of AM60B Mg alloy formed by double control forming and die casting under the optimal conditions, Journal of Alloys and Compounds, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jallcom.2012.10.086, October 2012.

78-12   A. Pari, Real Life Problem Solving through Simulations in the Die Casting Industry – Case Studies, 2012 Die Casting Congress & Exposition, © NADCA, October 8-10, 2012, Indianapolis, IN.

77-12  Y. Wang, K. Kabiri-Bamoradian and R.A. Miller, Rheological behavior models of metal matrix alloys in semi-solid casting process, 2012 Die Casting Congress & Exposition, © NADCA, October 8-10, 2012, Indianapolis, IN.

76-12  A. Reikher and H. Gerber, Analysis of Solidification Parameters During the Die Cast Process, 2012 Die Casting Congress & Exposition, © NADCA, October 8-10, 2012, Indianapolis, IN.

75-12 R.A. Miller, Y. Wang and K. Kabiri-Bamoradian, Estimating Cavity Fill Time, 2012 Die Casting Congress & Exposition, © NADCA, October 8-10, 2012Indianapolis, IN.

65-12  X.H. Yang, T.J. Lu, T. Kim, Influence of non-conducting pore inclusions on phase change behavior of porous media with constant heat flux boundaryInternational Journal of Thermal Sciences, Available online 10 October 2012. Available online at SciVerse.

55-12  Hejun Li, Pengyun Wang, Lehua Qi, Hansong Zuo, Songyi Zhong, Xianghui Hou, 3D numerical simulation of successive deposition of uniform molten Al droplets on a moving substrate and experimental validation, Computational Materials Science, Volume 65, December 2012, Pages 291–301.

52-12 Hongbing Ji, Yixin Chen and Shengzhou Chen, Numerical Simulation of Inner-Outer Couple Cooling Slab Continuous Casting in the Filling Process, Advanced Materials Research (Volumes 557-559), Advanced Materials and Processes II, pp. 2257-2260, July 2012.

47-12    Petri Väyrynen, Lauri Holappa, and Seppo Louhenkilpi, Simulation of Melting of Alloying Materials in Steel Ladle, SCANMET IV – 4th International Conference on Process Development in Iron and Steelmaking, Lulea, Sweden, June 10-13, 2012.

46-12  Bin Zhang and Dave Salee, Metal Flow and Heat Transfer in Billet DC Casting Using Wagstaff® Optifill™ Metal Distribution Systems, 5th International Metal Quality Workshop, United Arab Emirates Dubai, March 18-22, 2012.

45-12 D.R. Gunasegaram, M. Givord, R.G. O’Donnell and B.R. Finnin, Improvements engineered in UTS and elongation of aluminum alloy high pressure die castings through the alteration of runner geometry and plunger velocity, Materials Science & Engineering.

44-12    Antoni Drys and Stefano Mascetti, Aluminum Casting Simulations, Desktop Engineering, September 2012

42-12   Huizhen Duan, Jiangnan Shen and Yanping Li, Comparative analysis of HPDC process of an auto part with ProCAST and FLOW-3D, Applied Mechanics and Materials Vols. 184-185 (2012) pp 90-94, Online available since 2012/Jun/14 at www.scientific.net, © (2012) Trans Tech Publications, Switzerland, doi:10.4028/www.scientific.net/AMM.184-185.90.

41-12    Deniece R. Korzekwa, Cameron M. Knapp, David A. Korzekwa, and John W. Gibbs, Co-Design – Fabrication of Unalloyed Plutonium, LA-UR-12-23441, MDI Summer Research Group Workshop Advanced Manufacturing, 2012-07-25/2012-07-26 (Los Alamos, New Mexico, United States)

29-12  Dario Tiberto and Ulrich E. Klotz, Computer simulation applied to jewellery casting: challenges, results and future possibilities, IOP Conf. Ser.: Mater. Sci. Eng.33 012008. Full paper available at IOP.

28-12  Y Yue and N R Green, Modelling of different entrainment mechanisms and their influences on the mechanical reliability of Al-Si castings, 2012 IOP Conf. Ser.: Mater. Sci. Eng. 33,012072.Full paper available at IOP.

27-12  E Kaschnitz, Numerical simulation of centrifugal casting of pipes, 2012 IOP Conf. Ser.: Mater. Sci. Eng. 33 012031, Issue 1. Full paper available at IOP.

15-12  C. Reilly, N.R Green, M.R. Jolly, The Present State Of Modeling Entrainment Defects In The Shape Casting Process, Applied Mathematical Modelling, Available online 27 April 2012, ISSN 0307-904X, 10.1016/j.apm.2012.04.032.

12-12   Andrei Starobin, Tony Hirt, Hubert Lang, and Matthias Todte, Core drying simulation and validation, International Foundry Research, GIESSEREIFORSCHUNG 64 (2012) No. 1, ISSN 0046-5933, pp 2-5

10-12  H. Vladimir Martínez and Marco F. Valencia (2012). Semisolid Processing of Al/β-SiC Composites by Mechanical Stirring Casting and High Pressure Die Casting, Recent Researches in Metallurgical Engineering – From Extraction to Forming, Dr Mohammad Nusheh (Ed.), ISBN: 978-953-51-0356-1, InTech

07-12     Amir H. G. Isfahani and James M. Brethour, Simulating Thermal Stresses and Cooling Deformations, Die Casting Engineer, March 2012

06-12   Shuisheng Xie, Youfeng He and Xujun Mi, Study on Semi-solid Magnesium Alloys Slurry Preparation and Continuous Roll-casting Process, Magnesium Alloys – Design, Processing and Properties, ISBN: 978-953-307-520-4, InTech.

04-12 J. Spangenberg, N. Roussel, J.H. Hattel, H. Stang, J. Skocek, M.R. Geiker, Flow induced particle migration in fresh concrete: Theoretical frame, numerical simulations and experimental results on model fluids, Cement and Concrete Research, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cemconres.2012.01.007, February 2012.

01-12   Lee, B., Baek, U., and Han, J., Optimization of Gating System Design for Die Casting of Thin Magnesium Alloy-Based Multi-Cavity LCD Housings, Journal of Materials Engineering and Performance, Springer New York, Issn: 1059-9495, 10.1007/s11665-011-0111-1, Volume 1 / 1992 – Volume 21 / 2012. Available online at Springer Link.

104-11  Fu-Yuan Hsu and Huey Jiuan Lin, Foam Filters Used in Gravity Casting, Metall and Materi Trans B (2011) 42: 1110. doi:10.1007/s11663-011-9548-8.

99-11    Eduardo Trejo, Centrifugal Casting of an Aluminium Alloy, thesis: Doctor of Philosophy, Metallurgy and Materials School of Engineering University of Birmingham, October 2011. Full paper available upon request.

93-11  Olga Kononova, Andrejs Krasnikovs ,Videvuds Lapsa,Jurijs Kalinka and Angelina Galushchak, Internal Structure Formation in High Strength Fiber Concrete during Casting, World Academy of Science, Engineering and Technology 59 2011

76-11  J. Hartmann, A. Trepper, and C. Körner, Aluminum Integral Foams with Near-Microcellular Structure, Advanced Engineering Materials 2011, Volume 13 (2011) No. 11, © Wiley-VCH

71-11  Fu-Yuan Hsu and Yao-Ming Yang Confluence Weld in an Aluminum Gravity Casting, Journal of Materials Processing Technology, Available online 23 November 2011, ISSN 0924-0136, 10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2011.11.006.

65-11     V.A. Chaikin, A.V. Chaikin, I.N.Volnov, A Study of the Process of Late Modification Using Simulation, in Zagotovitelnye Proizvodstva v Mashinostroenii, 10, 2011, 8-12. In Russian.

54-11  Ngadia Taha Niane and Jean-Pierre Michalet, Validation of Foundry Process for Aluminum Parts with FLOW-3D Software, Proceedings of the 2011 International Symposium on Liquid Metal Processing and Casting, 2011.

51-11    A. Reikher and H. Gerber, Calculation of the Die Cast parameters of the Thin Wall Aluminum Cast Part, 2011 Die Casting Congress & Tabletop, Columbus, OH, September 19-21, 2011

50-11   Y. Wang, K. Kabiri-Bamoradian, and R.A. Miller, Runner design optimization based on CFD simulation for a die with multiple cavities, 2011 Die Casting Congress & Tabletop, Columbus, OH, September 19-21, 2011

48-11 A. Karwiński, W. Leśniewski, S. Pysz, P. Wieliczko, The technology of precision casting of titanium alloys by centrifugal process, Archives of Foundry Engineering, ISSN: 1897-3310), Volume 11, Issue 3/2011, 73-80, 2011.

46-11  Daniel Einsiedler, Entwicklung einer Simulationsmethodik zur Simulation von Strömungs- und Trocknungsvorgängen bei Kernfertigungsprozessen mittels CFD (Development of a simulation methodology for simulating flow and drying operations in core production processes using CFD), MSc thesis at Technical University of Aalen in Germany (Hochschule Aalen), 2011.

44-11  Bin Zhang and Craig Shaber, Aluminum Ingot Thermal Stress Development Modeling of the Wagstaff® EpsilonTM Rolling Ingot DC Casting System during the Start-up Phase, Materials Science Forum Vol. 693 (2011) pp 196-207, © 2011 Trans Tech Publications, July, 2011.

43-11 Vu Nguyen, Patrick Rohan, John Grandfield, Alex Levin, Kevin Naidoo, Kurt Oswald, Guillaume Girard, Ben Harker, and Joe Rea, Implementation of CASTfill low-dross pouring system for ingot casting, Materials Science Forum Vol. 693 (2011) pp 227-234, © 2011 Trans Tech Publications, July, 2011.

40-11  A. Starobin, D. Goettsch, M. Walker, D. Burch, Gas Pressure in Aluminum Block Water Jacket Cores, © 2011 American Foundry Society, International Journal of Metalcasting/Summer 2011

37-11 Ferencz Peti, Lucian Grama, Analyze of the Possible Causes of Porosity Type Defects in Aluminum High Pressure Diecast Parts, Scientific Bulletin of the Petru Maior University of Targu Mures, Vol. 8 (XXV) no. 1, 2011, ISSN 1841-9267

31-11  Johannes Hartmann, André Trepper, Carolin Körner, Aluminum Integral Foams with Near-Microcellular Structure, Advanced Engineering Materials, 13: n/a. doi: 10.1002/adem.201100035, June 2011.

27-11  A. Pari, Optimization of HPDC Process using Flow Simulation Case Studies, Die Casting Engineer, July 2011

26-11    A. Reikher, H. Gerber, Calculation of the Die Cast Parameters of the Thin Wall Aluminum Die Casting Part, Die Casting Engineer, July 2011

21-11 Thang Nguyen, Vu Nguyen, Morris Murray, Gary Savage, John Carrig, Modelling Die Filling in Ultra-Thin Aluminium Castings, Materials Science Forum (Volume 690), Light Metals Technology V, pp 107-111, 10.4028/www.scientific.net/MSF.690.107, June 2011.

19-11 Jon Spangenberg, Cem Celal Tutum, Jesper Henri Hattel, Nicolas Roussel, Metter Rica Geiker, Optimization of Casting Process Parameters for Homogeneous Aggregate Distribution in Self-Compacting Concrete: A Feasibility Study, © IEEE Congress on Evolutionary Computation, 2011, New Orleans, USA

16-11  A. Starobin, C.W. Hirt, H. Lang, and M. Todte, Core Drying Simulation and Validations, AFS Proceedings 2011, © American Foundry Society, Presented at the 115th Metalcasting Congress, Schaumburg, Illinois, April 2011.

15-11  J. J. Hernández-Ortega, R. Zamora, J. López, and F. Faura, Numerical Analysis of Air Pressure Effects on the Flow Pattern during the Filling of a Vertical Die Cavity, AIP Conf. Proc., Volume 1353, pp. 1238-1243, The 14th International Esaform Conference on Material Forming: Esaform 2011; doi:10.1063/1.3589686, May 2011. Available online.

10-11 Abbas A. Khalaf and Sumanth Shankar, Favorable Environment for Nondentric Morphology in Controlled Diffusion Solidification, DOI: 10.1007/s11661-011-0641-z, © The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society and ASM International 2011, Metallurgical and Materials Transactions A, March 11, 2011.

08-11 Hai Peng Li, Chun Yong Liang, Li Hui Wang, Hong Shui Wang, Numerical Simulation of Casting Process for Gray Iron Butterfly Valve, Advanced Materials Research, 189-193, 260, February 2011.

04-11  C.W. Hirt, Predicting Core Shooting, Drying and Defect Development, Foundry Management & Technology, January 2011.

76-10  Zhizhong Sun, Henry Hu, Alfred Yu, Numerical Simulation and Experimental Study of Squeeze Casting Magnesium Alloy AM50, Magnesium Technology 2010, 2010 TMS Annual Meeting & ExhibitionFebruary 14-18, 2010, Seattle, WA.

68-10  A. Reikher, H. Gerber, K.M. Pillai, T.-C. Jen, Natural Convection—An Overlooked Phenomenon of the Solidification Process, Die Casting Engineer, January 2010

54-10    Andrea Bernardoni, Andrea Borsi, Stefano Mascetti, Alessandro Incognito and Matteo Corrado, Fonderia Leonardo aveva ragione! L’enorme cavallo dedicato a Francesco Sforza era materialmente realizzabile, A&C – Analisis e Calcolo, Giugno 2010. In  Italian.

48-10  J. J. Hernández-Ortega, R. Zamora, J. Palacios, J. López and F. Faura, An Experimental and Numerical Study of Flow Patterns and Air Entrapment Phenomena During the Filling of a Vertical Die Cavity, J. Manuf. Sci. Eng., October 2010, Volume 132, Issue 5, 05101, doi:10.1115/1.4002535.

47-10  A.V. Chaikin, I.N. Volnov, and V.A. Chaikin, Development of Dispersible Mixed Inoculant Compositions Using the FLOW-3D Program, Liteinoe Proizvodstvo, October, 2010, in Russian.

42-10  H. Lakshmi, M.C. Vinay Kumar, Raghunath, P. Kumar, V. Ramanarayanan, K.S.S. Murthy, P. Dutta, Induction reheating of A356.2 aluminum alloy and thixocasting as automobile component, Transactions of Nonferrous Metals Society of China 20(20101) s961-s967.

41-10  Pamela J. Waterman, Understanding Core-Gas Defects, Desktop Engineering, October 2010. Available online at Desktop Engineering. Also published in the Foundry Trade Journal, November 2010.

39-10  Liu Zheng, Jia Yingying, Mao Pingli, Li Yang, Wang Feng, Wang Hong, Zhou Le, Visualization of Die Casting Magnesium Alloy Steering Bracket, Special Casting & Nonferrous Alloys, ISSN: 1001-2249, CN: 42-1148/TG, 2010-04. In Chinese.

37-10  Morris Murray, Lars Feldager Hansen, and Carl Reinhardt, I Have Defects – Now What, Die Casting Engineer, September 2010

36-10  Stefano Mascetti, Using Flow Analysis Software to Optimize Piston Velocity for an HPDC Process, Die Casting Engineer, S