Flow velocity profiles for canals with a depth of 3 m and flow velocities of 5–5.3 m/s.

Optimization Algorithms and Engineering: Recent Advances and Applications

Mahdi Feizbahr,1 Navid Tonekaboni,2Guang-Jun Jiang,3,4 and Hong-Xia Chen3,4Show moreAcademic Editor: Mohammad YazdiReceived08 Apr 2021Revised18 Jun 2021Accepted17 Jul 2021Published11 Aug 2021

Abstract

Vegetation along the river increases the roughness and reduces the average flow velocity, reduces flow energy, and changes the flow velocity profile in the cross section of the river. Many canals and rivers in nature are covered with vegetation during the floods. Canal’s roughness is strongly affected by plants and therefore it has a great effect on flow resistance during flood. Roughness resistance against the flow due to the plants depends on the flow conditions and plant, so the model should simulate the current velocity by considering the effects of velocity, depth of flow, and type of vegetation along the canal. Total of 48 models have been simulated to investigate the effect of roughness in the canal. The results indicated that, by enhancing the velocity, the effect of vegetation in decreasing the bed velocity is negligible, while when the current has lower speed, the effect of vegetation on decreasing the bed velocity is obviously considerable.


강의 식생은 거칠기를 증가시키고 평균 유속을 감소시키며, 유속 에너지를 감소시키고 강의 단면에서 유속 프로파일을 변경합니다. 자연의 많은 운하와 강은 홍수 동안 초목으로 덮여 있습니다. 운하의 조도는 식물의 영향을 많이 받으므로 홍수시 유동저항에 큰 영향을 미칩니다. 식물로 인한 흐름에 대한 거칠기 저항은 흐름 조건 및 식물에 따라 다르므로 모델은 유속, 흐름 깊이 및 운하를 따라 식생 유형의 영향을 고려하여 현재 속도를 시뮬레이션해야 합니다. 근관의 거칠기의 영향을 조사하기 위해 총 48개의 모델이 시뮬레이션되었습니다. 결과는 유속을 높임으로써 유속을 감소시키는 식생의 영향은 무시할 수 있는 반면, 해류가 더 낮은 유속일 때 유속을 감소시키는 식생의 영향은 분명히 상당함을 나타냈다.

1. Introduction

Considering the impact of each variable is a very popular field within the analytical and statistical methods and intelligent systems [114]. This can help research for better modeling considering the relation of variables or interaction of them toward reaching a better condition for the objective function in control and engineering [1527]. Consequently, it is necessary to study the effects of the passive factors on the active domain [2836]. Because of the effect of vegetation on reducing the discharge capacity of rivers [37], pruning plants was necessary to improve the condition of rivers. One of the important effects of vegetation in river protection is the action of roots, which cause soil consolidation and soil structure improvement and, by enhancing the shear strength of soil, increase the resistance of canal walls against the erosive force of water. The outer limbs of the plant increase the roughness of the canal walls and reduce the flow velocity and deplete the flow energy in vicinity of the walls. Vegetation by reducing the shear stress of the canal bed reduces flood discharge and sedimentation in the intervals between vegetation and increases the stability of the walls [3841].

One of the main factors influencing the speed, depth, and extent of flood in this method is Manning’s roughness coefficient. On the other hand, soil cover [42], especially vegetation, is one of the most determining factors in Manning’s roughness coefficient. Therefore, it is expected that those seasonal changes in the vegetation of the region will play an important role in the calculated value of Manning’s roughness coefficient and ultimately in predicting the flood wave behavior [4345]. The roughness caused by plants’ resistance to flood current depends on the flow and plant conditions. Flow conditions include depth and velocity of the plant, and plant conditions include plant type, hardness or flexibility, dimensions, density, and shape of the plant [46]. In general, the issue discussed in this research is the optimization of flood-induced flow in canals by considering the effect of vegetation-induced roughness. Therefore, the effect of plants on the roughness coefficient and canal transmission coefficient and in consequence the flow depth should be evaluated [4748].

Current resistance is generally known by its roughness coefficient. The equation that is mainly used in this field is Manning equation. The ratio of shear velocity to average current velocity  is another form of current resistance. The reason for using the  ratio is that it is dimensionless and has a strong theoretical basis. The reason for using Manning roughness coefficient is its pervasiveness. According to Freeman et al. [49], the Manning roughness coefficient for plants was calculated according to the Kouwen and Unny [50] method for incremental resistance. This method involves increasing the roughness for various surface and plant irregularities. Manning’s roughness coefficient has all the factors affecting the resistance of the canal. Therefore, the appropriate way to more accurately estimate this coefficient is to know the factors affecting this coefficient [51].

To calculate the flow rate, velocity, and depth of flow in canals as well as flood and sediment estimation, it is important to evaluate the flow resistance. To determine the flow resistance in open ducts, Manning, Chézy, and Darcy–Weisbach relations are used [52]. In these relations, there are parameters such as Manning’s roughness coefficient (n), Chézy roughness coefficient (C), and Darcy–Weisbach coefficient (f). All three of these coefficients are a kind of flow resistance coefficient that is widely used in the equations governing flow in rivers [53].

The three relations that express the relationship between the average flow velocity (V) and the resistance and geometric and hydraulic coefficients of the canal are as follows:where nf, and c are Manning, Darcy–Weisbach, and Chézy coefficients, respectively. V = average flow velocity, R = hydraulic radius, Sf = slope of energy line, which in uniform flow is equal to the slope of the canal bed,  = gravitational acceleration, and Kn is a coefficient whose value is equal to 1 in the SI system and 1.486 in the English system. The coefficients of resistance in equations (1) to (3) are related as follows:

Based on the boundary layer theory, the flow resistance for rough substrates is determined from the following general relation:where f = Darcy–Weisbach coefficient of friction, y = flow depth, Ks = bed roughness size, and A = constant coefficient.

On the other hand, the relationship between the Darcy–Weisbach coefficient of friction and the shear velocity of the flow is as follows:

By using equation (6), equation (5) is converted as follows:

Investigation on the effect of vegetation arrangement on shear velocity of flow in laboratory conditions showed that, with increasing the shear Reynolds number (), the numerical value of the  ratio also increases; in other words the amount of roughness coefficient increases with a slight difference in the cases without vegetation, checkered arrangement, and cross arrangement, respectively [54].

Roughness in river vegetation is simulated in mathematical models with a variable floor slope flume by different densities and discharges. The vegetation considered submerged in the bed of the flume. Results showed that, with increasing vegetation density, canal roughness and flow shear speed increase and with increasing flow rate and depth, Manning’s roughness coefficient decreases. Factors affecting the roughness caused by vegetation include the effect of plant density and arrangement on flow resistance, the effect of flow velocity on flow resistance, and the effect of depth [4555].

One of the works that has been done on the effect of vegetation on the roughness coefficient is Darby [56] study, which investigates a flood wave model that considers all the effects of vegetation on the roughness coefficient. There are currently two methods for estimating vegetation roughness. One method is to add the thrust force effect to Manning’s equation [475758] and the other method is to increase the canal bed roughness (Manning-Strickler coefficient) [455961]. These two methods provide acceptable results in models designed to simulate floodplain flow. Wang et al. [62] simulate the floodplain with submerged vegetation using these two methods and to increase the accuracy of the results, they suggested using the effective height of the plant under running water instead of using the actual height of the plant. Freeman et al. [49] provided equations for determining the coefficient of vegetation roughness under different conditions. Lee et al. [63] proposed a method for calculating the Manning coefficient using the flow velocity ratio at different depths. Much research has been done on the Manning roughness coefficient in rivers, and researchers [496366] sought to obtain a specific number for n to use in river engineering. However, since the depth and geometric conditions of rivers are completely variable in different places, the values of Manning roughness coefficient have changed subsequently, and it has not been possible to choose a fixed number. In river engineering software, the Manning roughness coefficient is determined only for specific and constant conditions or normal flow. Lee et al. [63] stated that seasonal conditions, density, and type of vegetation should also be considered. Hydraulic roughness and Manning roughness coefficient n of the plant were obtained by estimating the total Manning roughness coefficient from the matching of the measured water surface curve and water surface height. The following equation is used for the flow surface curve:where  is the depth of water change, S0 is the slope of the canal floor, Sf is the slope of the energy line, and Fr is the Froude number which is obtained from the following equation:where D is the characteristic length of the canal. Flood flow velocity is one of the important parameters of flood waves, which is very important in calculating the water level profile and energy consumption. In the cases where there are many limitations for researchers due to the wide range of experimental dimensions and the variety of design parameters, the use of numerical methods that are able to estimate the rest of the unknown results with acceptable accuracy is economically justified.

FLOW-3D software uses Finite Difference Method (FDM) for numerical solution of two-dimensional and three-dimensional flow. This software is dedicated to computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and is provided by Flow Science [67]. The flow is divided into networks with tubular cells. For each cell there are values of dependent variables and all variables are calculated in the center of the cell, except for the velocity, which is calculated at the center of the cell. In this software, two numerical techniques have been used for geometric simulation, FAVOR™ (Fractional-Area-Volume-Obstacle-Representation) and the VOF (Volume-of-Fluid) method. The equations used at this model for this research include the principle of mass survival and the magnitude of motion as follows. The fluid motion equations in three dimensions, including the Navier–Stokes equations with some additional terms, are as follows:where  are mass accelerations in the directions xyz and  are viscosity accelerations in the directions xyz and are obtained from the following equations:

Shear stresses  in equation (11) are obtained from the following equations:

The standard model is used for high Reynolds currents, but in this model, RNG theory allows the analytical differential formula to be used for the effective viscosity that occurs at low Reynolds numbers. Therefore, the RNG model can be used for low and high Reynolds currents.

Weather changes are high and this affects many factors continuously. The presence of vegetation in any area reduces the velocity of surface flows and prevents soil erosion, so vegetation will have a significant impact on reducing destructive floods. One of the methods of erosion protection in floodplain watersheds is the use of biological methods. The presence of vegetation in watersheds reduces the flow rate during floods and prevents soil erosion. The external organs of plants increase the roughness and decrease the velocity of water flow and thus reduce its shear stress energy. One of the important factors with which the hydraulic resistance of plants is expressed is the roughness coefficient. Measuring the roughness coefficient of plants and investigating their effect on reducing velocity and shear stress of flow is of special importance.

Roughness coefficients in canals are affected by two main factors, namely, flow conditions and vegetation characteristics [68]. So far, much research has been done on the effect of the roughness factor created by vegetation, but the issue of plant density has received less attention. For this purpose, this study was conducted to investigate the effect of vegetation density on flow velocity changes.

In a study conducted using a software model on three density modes in the submerged state effect on flow velocity changes in 48 different modes was investigated (Table 1).Table 1 The studied models.

The number of cells used in this simulation is equal to 1955888 cells. The boundary conditions were introduced to the model as a constant speed and depth (Figure 1). At the output boundary, due to the presence of supercritical current, no parameter for the current is considered. Absolute roughness for floors and walls was introduced to the model (Figure 1). In this case, the flow was assumed to be nonviscous and air entry into the flow was not considered. After  seconds, this model reached a convergence accuracy of .

Figure 1 The simulated model and its boundary conditions.

Due to the fact that it is not possible to model the vegetation in FLOW-3D software, in this research, the vegetation of small soft plants was studied so that Manning’s coefficients can be entered into the canal bed in the form of roughness coefficients obtained from the studies of Chow [69] in similar conditions. In practice, in such modeling, the effect of plant height is eliminated due to the small height of herbaceous plants, and modeling can provide relatively acceptable results in these conditions.

48 models with input velocities proportional to the height of the regular semihexagonal canal were considered to create supercritical conditions. Manning coefficients were applied based on Chow [69] studies in order to control the canal bed. Speed profiles were drawn and discussed.

Any control and simulation system has some inputs that we should determine to test any technology [7077]. Determination and true implementation of such parameters is one of the key steps of any simulation [237881] and computing procedure [8286]. The input current is created by applying the flow rate through the VFR (Volume Flow Rate) option and the output flow is considered Output and for other borders the Symmetry option is considered.

Simulation of the models and checking their action and responses and observing how a process behaves is one of the accepted methods in engineering and science [8788]. For verification of FLOW-3D software, the results of computer simulations are compared with laboratory measurements and according to the values of computational error, convergence error, and the time required for convergence, the most appropriate option for real-time simulation is selected (Figures 2 and 3 ).

Figure 2 Modeling the plant with cylindrical tubes at the bottom of the canal.

Figure 3 Velocity profiles in positions 2 and 5.

The canal is 7 meters long, 0.5 meters wide, and 0.8 meters deep. This test was used to validate the application of the software to predict the flow rate parameters. In this experiment, instead of using the plant, cylindrical pipes were used in the bottom of the canal.

The conditions of this modeling are similar to the laboratory conditions and the boundary conditions used in the laboratory were used for numerical modeling. The critical flow enters the simulation model from the upstream boundary, so in the upstream boundary conditions, critical velocity and depth are considered. The flow at the downstream boundary is supercritical, so no parameters are applied to the downstream boundary.

The software well predicts the process of changing the speed profile in the open canal along with the considered obstacles. The error in the calculated speed values can be due to the complexity of the flow and the interaction of the turbulence caused by the roughness of the floor with the turbulence caused by the three-dimensional cycles in the hydraulic jump. As a result, the software is able to predict the speed distribution in open canals.

2. Modeling Results

After analyzing the models, the results were shown in graphs (Figures 414 ). The total number of experiments in this study was 48 due to the limitations of modeling.(a)
(a)(b)
(b)(c)
(c)(d)
(d)(a)
(a)(b)
(b)(c)
(c)(d)
(d)Figure 4 Flow velocity profiles for canals with a depth of 1 m and flow velocities of 3–3.3 m/s. Canal with a depth of 1 meter and a flow velocity of (a) 3 meters per second, (b) 3.1 meters per second, (c) 3.2 meters per second, and (d) 3.3 meters per second.

Figure 5 Canal diagram with a depth of 1 meter and a flow rate of 3 meters per second.

Figure 6 Canal diagram with a depth of 1 meter and a flow rate of 3.1 meters per second.

Figure 7 Canal diagram with a depth of 1 meter and a flow rate of 3.2 meters per second.

Figure 8 Canal diagram with a depth of 1 meter and a flow rate of 3.3 meters per second.(a)
(a)(b)
(b)(c)
(c)(d)
(d)(a)
(a)(b)
(b)(c)
(c)(d)
(d)Figure 9 Flow velocity profiles for canals with a depth of 2 m and flow velocities of 4–4.3 m/s. Canal with a depth of 2 meters and a flow rate of (a) 4 meters per second, (b) 4.1 meters per second, (c) 4.2 meters per second, and (d) 4.3 meters per second.

Figure 10 Canal diagram with a depth of 2 meters and a flow rate of 4 meters per second.

Figure 11 Canal diagram with a depth of 2 meters and a flow rate of 4.1 meters per second.

Figure 12 Canal diagram with a depth of 2 meters and a flow rate of 4.2 meters per second.

Figure 13 Canal diagram with a depth of 2 meters and a flow rate of 4.3 meters per second.(a)
(a)(b)
(b)(c)
(c)(d)
(d)(a)
(a)(b)
(b)(c)
(c)(d)
(d)Figure 14 Flow velocity profiles for canals with a depth of 3 m and flow velocities of 5–5.3 m/s. Canal with a depth of 2 meters and a flow rate of (a) 4 meters per second, (b) 4.1 meters per second, (c) 4.2 meters per second, and (d) 4.3 meters per second.

To investigate the effects of roughness with flow velocity, the trend of flow velocity changes at different depths and with supercritical flow to a Froude number proportional to the depth of the section has been obtained.

According to the velocity profiles of Figure 5, it can be seen that, with the increasing of Manning’s coefficient, the canal bed speed decreases.

According to Figures 5 to 8, it can be found that, with increasing the Manning’s coefficient, the canal bed speed decreases. But this deceleration is more noticeable than the deceleration of the models 1 to 12, which can be justified by increasing the speed and of course increasing the Froude number.

According to Figure 10, we see that, with increasing Manning’s coefficient, the canal bed speed decreases.

According to Figure 11, we see that, with increasing Manning’s coefficient, the canal bed speed decreases. But this deceleration is more noticeable than the deceleration of Figures 510, which can be justified by increasing the speed and, of course, increasing the Froude number.

With increasing Manning’s coefficient, the canal bed speed decreases (Figure 12). But this deceleration is more noticeable than the deceleration of the higher models (Figures 58 and 1011), which can be justified by increasing the speed and, of course, increasing the Froude number.

According to Figure 13, with increasing Manning’s coefficient, the canal bed speed decreases. But this deceleration is more noticeable than the deceleration of Figures 5 to 12, which can be justified by increasing the speed and, of course, increasing the Froude number.

According to Figure 15, with increasing Manning’s coefficient, the canal bed speed decreases.

Figure 15 Canal diagram with a depth of 3 meters and a flow rate of 5 meters per second.

According to Figure 16, with increasing Manning’s coefficient, the canal bed speed decreases. But this deceleration is more noticeable than the deceleration of the higher model, which can be justified by increasing the speed and, of course, increasing the Froude number.

Figure 16 Canal diagram with a depth of 3 meters and a flow rate of 5.1 meters per second.

According to Figure 17, it is clear that, with increasing Manning’s coefficient, the canal bed speed decreases. But this deceleration is more noticeable than the deceleration of the higher models, which can be justified by increasing the speed and, of course, increasing the Froude number.

Figure 17 Canal diagram with a depth of 3 meters and a flow rate of 5.2 meters per second.

According to Figure 18, with increasing Manning’s coefficient, the canal bed speed decreases. But this deceleration is more noticeable than the deceleration of the higher models, which can be justified by increasing the speed and, of course, increasing the Froude number.

Figure 18 Canal diagram with a depth of 3 meters and a flow rate of 5.3 meters per second.

According to Figure 19, it can be seen that the vegetation placed in front of the flow input velocity has negligible effect on the reduction of velocity, which of course can be justified due to the flexibility of the vegetation. The only unusual thing is the unexpected decrease in floor speed of 3 m/s compared to higher speeds.(a)
(a)(b)
(b)(c)
(c)(a)
(a)(b)
(b)(c)
(c)Figure 19 Comparison of velocity profiles with the same plant densities (depth 1 m). Comparison of velocity profiles with (a) plant densities of 25%, depth 1 m; (b) plant densities of 50%, depth 1 m; and (c) plant densities of 75%, depth 1 m.

According to Figure 20, by increasing the speed of vegetation, the effect of vegetation on reducing the flow rate becomes more noticeable. And the role of input current does not have much effect in reducing speed.(a)
(a)(b)
(b)(c)
(c)(a)
(a)(b)
(b)(c)
(c)Figure 20 Comparison of velocity profiles with the same plant densities (depth 2 m). Comparison of velocity profiles with (a) plant densities of 25%, depth 2 m; (b) plant densities of 50%, depth 2 m; and (c) plant densities of 75%, depth 2 m.

According to Figure 21, it can be seen that, with increasing speed, the effect of vegetation on reducing the bed flow rate becomes more noticeable and the role of the input current does not have much effect. In general, it can be seen that, by increasing the speed of the input current, the slope of the profiles increases from the bed to the water surface and due to the fact that, in software, the roughness coefficient applies to the channel floor only in the boundary conditions, this can be perfectly justified. Of course, it can be noted that, due to the flexible conditions of the vegetation of the bed, this modeling can show acceptable results for such grasses in the canal floor. In the next directions, we may try application of swarm-based optimization methods for modeling and finding the most effective factors in this research [27815188994]. In future, we can also apply the simulation logic and software of this research for other domains such as power engineering [9599].(a)
(a)(b)
(b)(c)
(c)(a)
(a)(b)
(b)(c)
(c)Figure 21 Comparison of velocity profiles with the same plant densities (depth 3 m). Comparison of velocity profiles with (a) plant densities of 25%, depth 3 m; (b) plant densities of 50%, depth 3 m; and (c) plant densities of 75%, depth 3 m.

3. Conclusion

The effects of vegetation on the flood canal were investigated by numerical modeling with FLOW-3D software. After analyzing the results, the following conclusions were reached:(i)Increasing the density of vegetation reduces the velocity of the canal floor but has no effect on the velocity of the canal surface.(ii)Increasing the Froude number is directly related to increasing the speed of the canal floor.(iii)In the canal with a depth of one meter, a sudden increase in speed can be observed from the lowest speed and higher speed, which is justified by the sudden increase in Froude number.(iv)As the inlet flow rate increases, the slope of the profiles from the bed to the water surface increases.(v)By reducing the Froude number, the effect of vegetation on reducing the flow bed rate becomes more noticeable. And the input velocity in reducing the velocity of the canal floor does not have much effect.(vi)At a flow rate between 3 and 3.3 meters per second due to the shallow depth of the canal and the higher landing number a more critical area is observed in which the flow bed velocity in this area is between 2.86 and 3.1 m/s.(vii)Due to the critical flow velocity and the slight effect of the roughness of the horseshoe vortex floor, it is not visible and is only partially observed in models 1-2-3 and 21.(viii)As the flow rate increases, the effect of vegetation on the rate of bed reduction decreases.(ix)In conditions where less current intensity is passing, vegetation has a greater effect on reducing current intensity and energy consumption increases.(x)In the case of using the flow rate of 0.8 cubic meters per second, the velocity distribution and flow regime show about 20% more energy consumption than in the case of using the flow rate of 1.3 cubic meters per second.

Nomenclature

n:Manning’s roughness coefficient
C:Chézy roughness coefficient
f:Darcy–Weisbach coefficient
V:Flow velocity
R:Hydraulic radius
g:Gravitational acceleration
y:Flow depth
Ks:Bed roughness
A:Constant coefficient
:Reynolds number
y/∂x:Depth of water change
S0:Slope of the canal floor
Sf:Slope of energy line
Fr:Froude number
D:Characteristic length of the canal
G:Mass acceleration
:Shear stresses.

Data Availability

All data are included within the paper.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest.

Acknowledgments

This work was partially supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Contract no. 71761030 and Natural Science Foundation of Inner Mongolia under Contract no. 2019LH07003.

References

  1. H. Yu, L. Jie, W. Gui et al., “Dynamic Gaussian bare-bones fruit fly optimizers with abandonment mechanism: method and analysis,” Engineering with Computers, vol. 20, pp. 1–29, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  2. X. Zhao, D. Li, B. Yang, C. Ma, Y. Zhu, and H. Chen, “Feature selection based on improved ant colony optimization for online detection of foreign fiber in cotton,” Applied Soft Computing, vol. 24, pp. 585–596, 2014.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  3. J. Hu, H. Chen, A. A. Heidari et al., “Orthogonal learning covariance matrix for defects of grey wolf optimizer: insights, balance, diversity, and feature selection,” Knowledge-Based Systems, vol. 213, Article ID 106684, 2021.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  4. C. Yu, M. Chen, K. Chen et al., “SGOA: annealing-behaved grasshopper optimizer for global tasks,” Engineering with Computers, vol. 4, pp. 1–28, 2021.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  5. W. Shan, Z. Qiao, A. A. Heidari, H. Chen, H. Turabieh, and Y. Teng, “Double adaptive weights for stabilization of moth flame optimizer: balance analysis, engineering cases, and medical diagnosis,” Knowledge-Based Systems, vol. 8, Article ID 106728, 2020.View at: Google Scholar
  6. J. Tu, H. Chen, J. Liu et al., “Evolutionary biogeography-based whale optimization methods with communication structure: towards measuring the balance,” Knowledge-Based Systems, vol. 212, Article ID 106642, 2021.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  7. Y. Zhang, R. Liu, X. Wang et al., “Towards augmented kernel extreme learning models for bankruptcy prediction: algorithmic behavior and comprehensive analysis,” Neurocomputing, vol. 430, 2020.View at: Google Scholar
  8. H.-L. Chen, G. Wang, C. Ma, Z.-N. Cai, W.-B. Liu, and S.-J. Wang, “An efficient hybrid kernel extreme learning machine approach for early diagnosis of Parkinson׳s disease,” Neurocomputing, vol. 184, pp. 131–144, 2016.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  9. J. Xia, H. Chen, Q. Li et al., “Ultrasound-based differentiation of malignant and benign thyroid Nodules: an extreme learning machine approach,” Computer Methods and Programs in Biomedicine, vol. 147, pp. 37–49, 2017.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  10. C. Li, L. Hou, B. Y. Sharma et al., “Developing a new intelligent system for the diagnosis of tuberculous pleural effusion,” Computer Methods and Programs in Biomedicine, vol. 153, pp. 211–225, 2018.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  11. X. Xu and H.-L. Chen, “Adaptive computational chemotaxis based on field in bacterial foraging optimization,” Soft Computing, vol. 18, no. 4, pp. 797–807, 2014.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  12. M. Wang, H. Chen, B. Yang et al., “Toward an optimal kernel extreme learning machine using a chaotic moth-flame optimization strategy with applications in medical diagnoses,” Neurocomputing, vol. 267, pp. 69–84, 2017.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  13. L. Chao, K. Zhang, Z. Li, Y. Zhu, J. Wang, and Z. Yu, “Geographically weighted regression based methods for merging satellite and gauge precipitation,” Journal of Hydrology, vol. 558, pp. 275–289, 2018.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  14. F. J. Golrokh, G. Azeem, and A. Hasan, “Eco-efficiency evaluation in cement industries: DEA malmquist productivity index using optimization models,” ENG Transactions, vol. 1, 2020.View at: Google Scholar
  15. D. Zhao, L. Lei, F. Yu et al., “Chaotic random spare ant colony optimization for multi-threshold image segmentation of 2D Kapur entropy,” Knowledge-Based Systems, vol. 8, Article ID 106510, 2020.View at: Google Scholar
  16. Y. Zhang, R. Liu, X. Wang, H. Chen, and C. Li, “Boosted binary Harris hawks optimizer and feature selection,” Engineering with Computers, vol. 517, pp. 1–30, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  17. L. Hu, G. Hong, J. Ma, X. Wang, and H. Chen, “An efficient machine learning approach for diagnosis of paraquat-poisoned patients,” Computers in Biology and Medicine, vol. 59, pp. 116–124, 2015.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  18. L. Shen, H. Chen, Z. Yu et al., “Evolving support vector machines using fruit fly optimization for medical data classification,” Knowledge-Based Systems, vol. 96, pp. 61–75, 2016.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  19. X. Zhao, X. Zhang, Z. Cai et al., “Chaos enhanced grey wolf optimization wrapped ELM for diagnosis of paraquat-poisoned patients,” Computational Biology and Chemistry, vol. 78, pp. 481–490, 2019.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  20. Y. Xu, H. Chen, J. Luo, Q. Zhang, S. Jiao, and X. Zhang, “Enhanced Moth-flame optimizer with mutation strategy for global optimization,” Information Sciences, vol. 492, pp. 181–203, 2019.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  21. M. Wang and H. Chen, “Chaotic multi-swarm whale optimizer boosted support vector machine for medical diagnosis,” Applied Soft Computing Journal, vol. 88, Article ID 105946, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  22. Y. Chen, J. Li, H. Lu, and P. Yan, “Coupling system dynamics analysis and risk aversion programming for optimizing the mixed noise-driven shale gas-water supply chains,” Journal of Cleaner Production, vol. 278, Article ID 123209, 2020.View at: Google Scholar
  23. H. Tang, Y. Xu, A. Lin et al., “Predicting green consumption behaviors of students using efficient firefly grey wolf-assisted K-nearest neighbor classifiers,” IEEE Access, vol. 8, pp. 35546–35562, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  24. H.-J. Ma and G.-H. Yang, “Adaptive fault tolerant control of cooperative heterogeneous systems with actuator faults and unreliable interconnections,” IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, vol. 61, no. 11, pp. 3240–3255, 2015.View at: Google Scholar
  25. H.-J. Ma and L.-X. Xu, “Decentralized adaptive fault-tolerant control for a class of strong interconnected nonlinear systems via graph theory,” IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, vol. 66, 2020.View at: Google Scholar
  26. H. J. Ma, L. X. Xu, and G. H. Yang, “Multiple environment integral reinforcement learning-based fault-tolerant control for affine nonlinear systems,” IEEE Transactions on Cybernetics, vol. 51, pp. 1–16, 2019.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  27. J. Hu, M. Wang, C. Zhao, Q. Pan, and C. Du, “Formation control and collision avoidance for multi-UAV systems based on Voronoi partition,” Science China Technological Sciences, vol. 63, no. 1, pp. 65–72, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  28. C. Zhang, H. Li, Y. Qian, C. Chen, and X. Zhou, “Locality-constrained discriminative matrix regression for robust face identification,” IEEE Transactions on Neural Networks and Learning Systems, vol. 99, pp. 1–15, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  29. X. Zhang, D. Wang, Z. Zhou, and Y. Ma, “Robust low-rank tensor recovery with rectification and alignment,” IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence, vol. 43, no. 1, pp. 238–255, 2019.View at: Google Scholar
  30. X. Zhang, J. Wang, T. Wang, R. Jiang, J. Xu, and L. Zhao, “Robust feature learning for adversarial defense via hierarchical feature alignment,” Information Sciences, vol. 560, 2020.View at: Google Scholar
  31. X. Zhang, R. Jiang, T. Wang, and J. Wang, “Recursive neural network for video deblurring,” IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems for Video Technology, vol. 03, p. 1, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  32. X. Zhang, T. Wang, J. Wang, G. Tang, and L. Zhao, “Pyramid channel-based feature attention network for image dehazing,” Computer Vision and Image Understanding, vol. 197-198, Article ID 103003, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  33. X. Zhang, T. Wang, W. Luo, and P. Huang, “Multi-level fusion and attention-guided CNN for image dehazing,” IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems for Video Technology, vol. 3, p. 1, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  34. L. He, J. Shen, and Y. Zhang, “Ecological vulnerability assessment for ecological conservation and environmental management,” Journal of Environmental Management, vol. 206, pp. 1115–1125, 2018.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  35. Y. Chen, W. Zheng, W. Li, and Y. Huang, “Large group Activity security risk assessment and risk early warning based on random forest algorithm,” Pattern Recognition Letters, vol. 144, pp. 1–5, 2021.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  36. J. Hu, H. Zhang, Z. Li, C. Zhao, Z. Xu, and Q. Pan, “Object traversing by monocular UAV in outdoor environment,” Asian Journal of Control, vol. 25, 2020.View at: Google Scholar
  37. P. Tian, H. Lu, W. Feng, Y. Guan, and Y. Xue, “Large decrease in streamflow and sediment load of Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau driven by future climate change: a case study in Lhasa River Basin,” Catena, vol. 187, Article ID 104340, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  38. A. Stokes, C. Atger, A. G. Bengough, T. Fourcaud, and R. C. Sidle, “Desirable plant root traits for protecting natural and engineered slopes against landslides,” Plant and Soil, vol. 324, no. 1, pp. 1–30, 2009.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  39. T. B. Devi, A. Sharma, and B. Kumar, “Studies on emergent flow over vegetative channel bed with downward seepage,” Hydrological Sciences Journal, vol. 62, no. 3, pp. 408–420, 2017.View at: Google Scholar
  40. G. Ireland, M. Volpi, and G. Petropoulos, “Examining the capability of supervised machine learning classifiers in extracting flooded areas from Landsat TM imagery: a case study from a Mediterranean flood,” Remote Sensing, vol. 7, no. 3, pp. 3372–3399, 2015.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  41. L. Goodarzi and S. Javadi, “Assessment of aquifer vulnerability using the DRASTIC model; a case study of the Dezful-Andimeshk Aquifer,” Computational Research Progress in Applied Science & Engineering, vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 17–22, 2016.View at: Google Scholar
  42. K. Zhang, Q. Wang, L. Chao et al., “Ground observation-based analysis of soil moisture spatiotemporal variability across a humid to semi-humid transitional zone in China,” Journal of Hydrology, vol. 574, pp. 903–914, 2019.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  43. L. De Doncker, P. Troch, R. Verhoeven, K. Bal, P. Meire, and J. Quintelier, “Determination of the Manning roughness coefficient influenced by vegetation in the river Aa and Biebrza river,” Environmental Fluid Mechanics, vol. 9, no. 5, pp. 549–567, 2009.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  44. M. Fathi-Moghadam and K. Drikvandi, “Manning roughness coefficient for rivers and flood plains with non-submerged vegetation,” International Journal of Hydraulic Engineering, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 1–4, 2012.View at: Google Scholar
  45. F.-C. Wu, H. W. Shen, and Y.-J. Chou, “Variation of roughness coefficients for unsubmerged and submerged vegetation,” Journal of Hydraulic Engineering, vol. 125, no. 9, pp. 934–942, 1999.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  46. M. K. Wood, “Rangeland vegetation-hydrologic interactions,” in Vegetation Science Applications for Rangeland Analysis and Management, vol. 3, pp. 469–491, Springer, 1988.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  47. C. Wilson, O. Yagci, H.-P. Rauch, and N. Olsen, “3D numerical modelling of a willow vegetated river/floodplain system,” Journal of Hydrology, vol. 327, no. 1-2, pp. 13–21, 2006.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  48. R. Yazarloo, M. Khamehchian, and M. R. Nikoodel, “Observational-computational 3d engineering geological model and geotechnical characteristics of young sediments of golestan province,” Computational Research Progress in Applied Science & Engineering (CRPASE), vol. 03, 2017.View at: Google Scholar
  49. G. E. Freeman, W. H. Rahmeyer, and R. R. Copeland, “Determination of resistance due to shrubs and woody vegetation,” International Journal of River Basin Management, vol. 19, 2000.View at: Google Scholar
  50. N. Kouwen and T. E. Unny, “Flexible roughness in open channels,” Journal of the Hydraulics Division, vol. 99, no. 5, pp. 713–728, 1973.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  51. S. Hosseini and J. Abrishami, Open Channel Hydraulics, Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 2007.
  52. C. S. James, A. L. Birkhead, A. A. Jordanova, and J. J. O’Sullivan, “Flow resistance of emergent vegetation,” Journal of Hydraulic Research, vol. 42, no. 4, pp. 390–398, 2004.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  53. F. Huthoff and D. Augustijn, “Channel roughness in 1D steady uniform flow: Manning or Chézy?,,” NCR-days, vol. 102, 2004.View at: Google Scholar
  54. M. S. Sabegh, M. Saneie, M. Habibi, A. A. Abbasi, and M. Ghadimkhani, “Experimental investigation on the effect of river bank tree planting array, on shear velocity,” Journal of Watershed Engineering and Management, vol. 2, no. 4, 2011.View at: Google Scholar
  55. A. Errico, V. Pasquino, M. Maxwald, G. B. Chirico, L. Solari, and F. Preti, “The effect of flexible vegetation on flow in drainage channels: estimation of roughness coefficients at the real scale,” Ecological Engineering, vol. 120, pp. 411–421, 2018.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  56. S. E. Darby, “Effect of riparian vegetation on flow resistance and flood potential,” Journal of Hydraulic Engineering, vol. 125, no. 5, pp. 443–454, 1999.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  57. V. Kutija and H. Thi Minh Hong, “A numerical model for assessing the additional resistance to flow introduced by flexible vegetation,” Journal of Hydraulic Research, vol. 34, no. 1, pp. 99–114, 1996.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  58. T. Fischer-Antze, T. Stoesser, P. Bates, and N. R. B. Olsen, “3D numerical modelling of open-channel flow with submerged vegetation,” Journal of Hydraulic Research, vol. 39, no. 3, pp. 303–310, 2001.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  59. U. Stephan and D. Gutknecht, “Hydraulic resistance of submerged flexible vegetation,” Journal of Hydrology, vol. 269, no. 1-2, pp. 27–43, 2002.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  60. F. G. Carollo, V. Ferro, and D. Termini, “Flow resistance law in channels with flexible submerged vegetation,” Journal of Hydraulic Engineering, vol. 131, no. 7, pp. 554–564, 2005.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  61. W. Fu-sheng, “Flow resistance of flexible vegetation in open channel,” Journal of Hydraulic Engineering, vol. S1, 2007.View at: Google Scholar
  62. P.-f. Wang, C. Wang, and D. Z. Zhu, “Hydraulic resistance of submerged vegetation related to effective height,” Journal of Hydrodynamics, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 265–273, 2010.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  63. J. K. Lee, L. C. Roig, H. L. Jenter, and H. M. Visser, “Drag coefficients for modeling flow through emergent vegetation in the Florida Everglades,” Ecological Engineering, vol. 22, no. 4-5, pp. 237–248, 2004.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  64. G. J. Arcement and V. R. Schneider, Guide for Selecting Manning’s Roughness Coefficients for Natural Channels and Flood Plains, US Government Printing Office, Washington, DC, USA, 1989.
  65. Y. Ding and S. S. Y. Wang, “Identification of Manning’s roughness coefficients in channel network using adjoint analysis,” International Journal of Computational Fluid Dynamics, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 3–13, 2005.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  66. E. T. Engman, “Roughness coefficients for routing surface runoff,” Journal of Irrigation and Drainage Engineering, vol. 112, no. 1, pp. 39–53, 1986.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  67. M. Feizbahr, C. Kok Keong, F. Rostami, and M. Shahrokhi, “Wave energy dissipation using perforated and non perforated piles,” International Journal of Engineering, vol. 31, no. 2, pp. 212–219, 2018.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  68. M. Farzadkhoo, A. Keshavarzi, H. Hamidifar, and M. Javan, “Sudden pollutant discharge in vegetated compound meandering rivers,” Catena, vol. 182, Article ID 104155, 2019.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  69. V. T. Chow, Open-channel Hydraulics, Mcgraw-Hill Civil Engineering Series, Chennai, TN, India, 1959.
  70. X. Zhang, R. Jing, Z. Li, Z. Li, X. Chen, and C.-Y. Su, “Adaptive pseudo inverse control for a class of nonlinear asymmetric and saturated nonlinear hysteretic systems,” IEEE/CAA Journal of Automatica Sinica, vol. 8, no. 4, pp. 916–928, 2020.View at: Google Scholar
  71. C. Zuo, Q. Chen, L. Tian, L. Waller, and A. Asundi, “Transport of intensity phase retrieval and computational imaging for partially coherent fields: the phase space perspective,” Optics and Lasers in Engineering, vol. 71, pp. 20–32, 2015.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  72. C. Zuo, J. Sun, J. Li, J. Zhang, A. Asundi, and Q. Chen, “High-resolution transport-of-intensity quantitative phase microscopy with annular illumination,” Scientific Reports, vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 7654–7722, 2017.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  73. B.-H. Li, Y. Liu, A.-M. Zhang, W.-H. Wang, and S. Wan, “A survey on blocking technology of entity resolution,” Journal of Computer Science and Technology, vol. 35, no. 4, pp. 769–793, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  74. Y. Liu, B. Zhang, Y. Feng et al., “Development of 340-GHz transceiver front end based on GaAs monolithic integration technology for THz active imaging array,” Applied Sciences, vol. 10, no. 21, p. 7924, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  75. J. Hu, H. Zhang, L. Liu, X. Zhu, C. Zhao, and Q. Pan, “Convergent multiagent formation control with collision avoidance,” IEEE Transactions on Robotics, vol. 36, no. 6, pp. 1805–1818, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  76. M. B. Movahhed, J. Ayoubinejad, F. N. Asl, and M. Feizbahr, “The effect of rain on pedestrians crossing speed,” Computational Research Progress in Applied Science & Engineering (CRPASE), vol. 6, no. 3, 2020.View at: Google Scholar
  77. A. Li, D. Spano, J. Krivochiza et al., “A tutorial on interference exploitation via symbol-level precoding: overview, state-of-the-art and future directions,” IEEE Communications Surveys & Tutorials, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 796–839, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  78. W. Zhu, C. Ma, X. Zhao et al., “Evaluation of sino foreign cooperative education project using orthogonal sine cosine optimized kernel extreme learning machine,” IEEE Access, vol. 8, pp. 61107–61123, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  79. G. Liu, W. Jia, M. Wang et al., “Predicting cervical hyperextension injury: a covariance guided sine cosine support vector machine,” IEEE Access, vol. 8, pp. 46895–46908, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  80. Y. Wei, H. Lv, M. Chen et al., “Predicting entrepreneurial intention of students: an extreme learning machine with Gaussian barebone harris hawks optimizer,” IEEE Access, vol. 8, pp. 76841–76855, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  81. A. Lin, Q. Wu, A. A. Heidari et al., “Predicting intentions of students for master programs using a chaos-induced sine cosine-based fuzzy K-Nearest neighbor classifier,” Ieee Access, vol. 7, pp. 67235–67248, 2019.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  82. Y. Fan, P. Wang, A. A. Heidari et al., “Rationalized fruit fly optimization with sine cosine algorithm: a comprehensive analysis,” Expert Systems with Applications, vol. 157, Article ID 113486, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  83. E. Rodríguez-Esparza, L. A. Zanella-Calzada, D. Oliva et al., “An efficient Harris hawks-inspired image segmentation method,” Expert Systems with Applications, vol. 155, Article ID 113428, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  84. S. Jiao, G. Chong, C. Huang et al., “Orthogonally adapted Harris hawks optimization for parameter estimation of photovoltaic models,” Energy, vol. 203, Article ID 117804, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  85. Z. Xu, Z. Hu, A. A. Heidari et al., “Orthogonally-designed adapted grasshopper optimization: a comprehensive analysis,” Expert Systems with Applications, vol. 150, Article ID 113282, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  86. A. Abbassi, R. Abbassi, A. A. Heidari et al., “Parameters identification of photovoltaic cell models using enhanced exploratory salp chains-based approach,” Energy, vol. 198, Article ID 117333, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  87. M. Mahmoodi and K. K. Aminjan, “Numerical simulation of flow through sukhoi 24 air inlet,” Computational Research Progress in Applied Science & Engineering (CRPASE), vol. 03, 2017.View at: Google Scholar
  88. F. J. Golrokh and A. Hasan, “A comparison of machine learning clustering algorithms based on the DEA optimization approach for pharmaceutical companies in developing countries,” ENG Transactions, vol. 1, 2020.View at: Google Scholar
  89. H. Chen, A. A. Heidari, H. Chen, M. Wang, Z. Pan, and A. H. Gandomi, “Multi-population differential evolution-assisted Harris hawks optimization: framework and case studies,” Future Generation Computer Systems, vol. 111, pp. 175–198, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  90. J. Guo, H. Zheng, B. Li, and G.-Z. Fu, “Bayesian hierarchical model-based information fusion for degradation analysis considering non-competing relationship,” IEEE Access, vol. 7, pp. 175222–175227, 2019.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  91. J. Guo, H. Zheng, B. Li, and G.-Z. Fu, “A Bayesian approach for degradation analysis with individual differences,” IEEE Access, vol. 7, pp. 175033–175040, 2019.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  92. M. M. A. Malakoutian, Y. Malakoutian, P. Mostafapour, and S. Z. D. Abed, “Prediction for monthly rainfall of six meteorological regions and TRNC (case study: north Cyprus),” ENG Transactions, vol. 2, no. 2, 2021.View at: Google Scholar
  93. H. Arslan, M. Ranjbar, and Z. Mutlum, “Maximum sound transmission loss in multi-chamber reactive silencers: are two chambers enough?,,” ENG Transactions, vol. 2, no. 1, 2021.View at: Google Scholar
  94. N. Tonekaboni, M. Feizbahr, N. Tonekaboni, G.-J. Jiang, and H.-X. Chen, “Optimization of solar CCHP systems with collector enhanced by porous media and nanofluid,” Mathematical Problems in Engineering, vol. 2021, Article ID 9984840, 12 pages, 2021.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  95. Z. Niu, B. Zhang, J. Wang et al., “The research on 220GHz multicarrier high-speed communication system,” China Communications, vol. 17, no. 3, pp. 131–139, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  96. B. Zhang, Z. Niu, J. Wang et al., “Four‐hundred gigahertz broadband multi‐branch waveguide coupler,” IET Microwaves, Antennas & Propagation, vol. 14, no. 11, pp. 1175–1179, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  97. Z.-Q. Niu, L. Yang, B. Zhang et al., “A mechanical reliability study of 3dB waveguide hybrid couplers in the submillimeter and terahertz band,” Journal of Zhejiang University Science, vol. 1, no. 1, 1998.View at: Google Scholar
  98. B. Zhang, D. Ji, D. Fang, S. Liang, Y. Fan, and X. Chen, “A novel 220-GHz GaN diode on-chip tripler with high driven power,” IEEE Electron Device Letters, vol. 40, no. 5, pp. 780–783, 2019.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  99. M. Taleghani and A. Taleghani, “Identification and ranking of factors affecting the implementation of knowledge management engineering based on TOPSIS technique,” ENG Transactions, vol. 1, no. 1, 2020.View at: Google Scholar
Stability and deformations of deposited layers in material extrusion additive manufacturing

Conflict resolution in the multi-stakeholder stepped spillway design under uncertainty by machine learning techniques

Md TusherMollah, Raphaël Comminal, Marcin P.Serdeczny, David B.Pedersen, Jon Spangenberg
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark

Abstract

This paper presents computational fluid dynamics simulations of the deposition flow during printing of multiple layers in material extrusion additive manufacturing. The developed model predicts the morphology of the deposited layers and captures the layer deformations during the printing of viscoplastic materials. The physics is governed by the continuity and momentum equations with the Bingham constitutive model, formulated as a generalized Newtonian fluid. The cross-sectional shapes of the deposited layers are predicted, and the deformation of layers is studied for different constitutive parameters of the material. It is shown that the deformation of layers is due to the hydrostatic pressure of the printed material, as well as the extrusion pressure during the extrusion. The simulations show that a higher yield stress results in prints with less deformations, while a higher plastic viscosity leads to larger deformations in the deposited layers. Moreover, the influence of the printing speed, extrusion speed, layer height, and nozzle diameter on the deformation of the printed layers is investigated. Finally, the model provides a conservative estimate of the required increase in yield stress that a viscoplastic material demands after deposition in order to support the hydrostatic and extrusion pressure of the subsequently printed layers.

이 논문은 재료 압출 적층 제조에서 여러 레이어를 인쇄하는 동안 증착 흐름의 전산 유체 역학 시뮬레이션을 제공합니다. 개발된 모델은 증착된 레이어의 형태를 예측하고 점소성 재료를 인쇄하는 동안 레이어 변형을 캡처합니다.

물리학은 일반화된 뉴턴 유체로 공식화된 Bingham 구성 모델의 연속성 및 운동량 방정식에 의해 제어됩니다. 증착된 층의 단면 모양이 예측되고 재료의 다양한 구성 매개변수에 대해 층의 변형이 연구됩니다. 층의 변형은 인쇄물의 정수압과 압출시 압출압력으로 인한 것임을 알 수 있다.

시뮬레이션에 따르면 항복 응력이 높을수록 변형이 적은 인쇄물이 생성되는 반면 플라스틱 점도가 높을수록 증착된 레이어에서 변형이 커집니다. 또한 인쇄 속도, 압출 속도, 층 높이 및 노즐 직경이 인쇄된 층의 변형에 미치는 영향을 조사했습니다.

마지막으로, 이 모델은 후속 인쇄된 레이어의 정수압 및 압출 압력을 지원하기 위해 증착 후 점소성 재료가 요구하는 항복 응력의 필요한 증가에 대한 보수적인 추정치를 제공합니다.

Stability and deformations of deposited layers in material extrusion additive manufacturing
Stability and deformations of deposited layers in material extrusion additive manufacturing

Keywords

Viscoplastic MaterialsMaterial Extrusion Additive Manufacturing (MEX-AM)Multiple-Layers DepositionComputational Fluid Dynamics (CFD)Deformation Control

electromagnetic metal casting computation designs Fig1

A survey of electromagnetic metal casting computation designs, present approaches, future possibilities, and practical issues

The European Physical Journal Plus volume 136, Article number: 704 (2021) Cite this article

Abstract

Electromagnetic metal casting (EMC) is a casting technique that uses electromagnetic energy to heat metal powders. It is a faster, cleaner, and less time-consuming operation. Solid metals create issues in electromagnetics since they reflect the electromagnetic radiation rather than consume it—electromagnetic energy processing results in sounded pieces with higher-ranking material properties and a more excellent microstructure solution. For the physical production of the electromagnetic casting process, knowledge of electromagnetic material interaction is critical. Even where the heated material is an excellent electromagnetic absorber, the total heating quality is sometimes insufficient. Numerical modelling works on finding the proper coupled effects between properties to bring out the most effective operation. The main parameters influencing the quality of output of the EMC process are: power dissipated per unit volume into the material, penetration depth of electromagnetics, complex magnetic permeability and complex dielectric permittivity. The contact mechanism and interference pattern also, in turn, determines the quality of the process. Only a few parameters, such as the environment’s temperature, the interference pattern, and the rate of metal solidification, can be controlled by AI models. Neural networks are used to achieve exact outcomes by stimulating the neurons in the human brain. Additive manufacturing (AM) is used to design mold and cores for metal casting. The models outperformed the traditional DFA optimization approach, which is susceptible to local minima. The system works only offline, so real-time analysis and corrections are not yet possible.

Korea Abstract

전자기 금속 주조 (EMC)는 전자기 에너지를 사용하여 금속 분말을 가열하는 주조 기술입니다. 더 빠르고 깨끗하며 시간이 덜 소요되는 작업입니다.

고체 금속은 전자기 복사를 소비하는 대신 반사하기 때문에 전자기학에서 문제를 일으킵니다. 전자기 에너지 처리는 더 높은 등급의 재료 특성과 더 우수한 미세 구조 솔루션을 가진 사운드 조각을 만듭니다.

전자기 주조 공정의 물리적 생산을 위해서는 전자기 물질 상호 작용에 대한 지식이 중요합니다. 가열된 물질이 우수한 전자기 흡수재인 경우에도 전체 가열 품질이 때때로 불충분합니다. 수치 모델링은 가장 효과적인 작업을 이끌어 내기 위해 속성 간의 적절한 결합 효과를 찾는데 사용됩니다.

EMC 공정의 출력 품질에 영향을 미치는 주요 매개 변수는 단위 부피당 재료로 분산되는 전력, 전자기의 침투 깊이, 복합 자기 투과성 및 복합 유전율입니다. 접촉 메커니즘과 간섭 패턴 또한 공정의 품질을 결정합니다. 환경 온도, 간섭 패턴 및 금속 응고 속도와 같은 몇 가지 매개 변수 만 AI 모델로 제어 할 수 있습니다.

신경망은 인간 뇌의 뉴런을 자극하여 정확한 결과를 얻기 위해 사용됩니다. 적층 제조 (AM)는 금속 주조용 몰드 및 코어를 설계하는 데 사용됩니다. 모델은 로컬 최소값에 영향을 받기 쉬운 기존 DFA 최적화 접근 방식을 능가했습니다. 이 시스템은 오프라인에서만 작동하므로 실시간 분석 및 수정은 아직 불가능합니다.

electromagnetic metal casting computation designs Fig1
electromagnetic metal casting computation designs Fig1
electromagnetic metal casting computation designs Fig2
electromagnetic metal casting computation designs Fig2
electromagnetic metal casting computation designs Fig3
electromagnetic metal casting computation designs Fig3
electromagnetic metal casting computation designs Fig4
electromagnetic metal casting computation designs Fig4
electromagnetic metal casting computation designs Fig5
electromagnetic metal casting computation designs Fig5
electromagnetic metal casting computation designs Fig6
electromagnetic metal casting computation designs Fig6
electromagnetic metal casting computation designs Fig7
electromagnetic metal casting computation designs Fig7
electromagnetic metal casting computation designs Fig8
electromagnetic metal casting computation designs Fig8
electromagnetic metal casting computation designs Fig9
electromagnetic metal casting computation designs Fig9

References

  1. 1.J. Sun, W. Wang, Q. Yue, Review on electromagnetic-matter interaction fundamentals and efficient electromagnetic-associated heating strategies. Materials 9(4), 231 (2016). https://doi.org/10.3390/ma9040231ADS Article Google Scholar 
  2. 2.E. Ghasali, A. Fazili, M. Alizadeh, K. Shirvanimoghaddam, T. Ebadzadeh, Evaluation of microstructure and mechanical properties of Al-TiC metal matrix composite prepared by conventional, electromagnetic and spark plasma sintering methods. Materials 10(11), 1255 (2017). https://doi.org/10.3390/ma10111255ADS Article Google Scholar 
  3. 3.D. Agrawal, Latest global developments in electromagnetic materials processing. Mater. Res. Innov. 14(1), 3–8 (2010). https://doi.org/10.1179/143307510×12599329342926Article Google Scholar 
  4. 4.S. Singh, P. Singh, D. Gupta, V. Jain, R. Kumar, S. Kaushal, Development and characterization of electromagnetic processed cast iron joint. Eng. Sci. Technol. Int. J. (2018). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jestch.2018.10.012Article Google Scholar 
  5. 5.S. Singh, D. Gupta, V. Jain, Electromagnetic melting and processing of metal–ceramic composite castings. Proc. Inst. Mech. Eng. Part B J. Eng. Manuf. 232(7), 1235–1243 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1177/0954405416666900Article Google Scholar 
  6. 6.S. Singh, D. Gupta, V. Jain, Novel electromagnetic composite casting process: theory, feasibility and characterization. Mater. Des. 111, 51–59 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.matdes.2016.08.071Article Google Scholar 
  7. 7.J. Lucas, J, What are electromagnetics? LiveScience. (2018). https://www.livescience.com/50259-Electromagnetics.html
  8. 8.R. Samyal, A.K. Bagha, R. Bedi, the casting of materials using electromagnetic energy: a review. Mater. Today Proc. (2020). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.matpr.2020.02.255Article Google Scholar 
  9. 9.S. Singh, D. Gupta, V. Jain, Processing of Ni-WC-8Co MMC casting through electromagnetic melting. Mater. Manuf. Process. (2017). https://doi.org/10.1080/10426914.2017.1291954Article Google Scholar 
  10. 10.R. Singh, S. Singh, V. Mahajan, Investigations for dimensional accuracy of investment casting process after cycle time reduction by advancements in shell moulding. Procedia Mater. Sci. 6, 859–865 (2014). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mspro.2014.07.103Article Google Scholar 
  11. 11.R.R. Mishra, A.K. Sharma, On melting characteristics of bulk Al-7039 alloy during in-situ electromagnetic casting. Appl. Therm. Eng. 111, 660–675 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.applthermaleng.2016.09.122Article Google Scholar 
  12. 12.S. Zhang, 10 Different types of casting process. (2021). MachineMfg.com, https://www.machinemfg.com/types-of-casting/
  13. 13.Envirocare, Foundry health risks. (2013). https://envirocare.org/foundry-health-risks/
  14. 14.S.S. Gajmal, D.N. Raut, A review of opportunities and challenges in electromagnetic assisted casting. Recent Trends Product. Eng. 2(1) (2019)
  15. 15.R.R. Mishra, A.K. Sharma, Electromagnetic-material interaction phenomena: heating mechanisms, challenges and opportunities in material processing. Compos. Part A (2015). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compositesa.2015.10.035Article Google Scholar 
  16. 16.S. Chandrasekaran, T. Basak, S. Ramanathan, Experimental and theoretical investigation on electromagnetic melting of metals. J. Mater. Process. Technol. 211(3), 482–487 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2010.11.001Article Google Scholar 
  17. 17.C.R. Bird, J.M. Mertz, U.S. Patent No. 4655276. (U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, Washington, DC, 1987)
  18. 18.R.R. Mishra, A.K. Sharma, Experimental investigation on in-situ electromagnetic casting of copper. IOP Conf. Ser. Mater. Sci. Eng. 346, 012052 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1088/1757-899x/346/1/012052Article Google Scholar 
  19. 19.V. Gangwar, S. Kumar, V. Singh, H. Singh, Effect of process parameters on hardness of AA-6063 in-situ electromagnetic casting by using taguchi method, in IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering, vol. 804(1) (IOP Publishing, 2020), p. 012019
  20. 20.X. Ye, S. Guo, L. Yang, J. Gao, J. Peng, T. Hu, L. Wang, M. Hou, Q. Luo, New utilization approach of electromagnetic thermal energy: preparation of metallic matrix diamond tool bit by electromagnetic hot-press sintering. J. Alloy. Compd. (2018). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jallcom.2018.03.183Article Google Scholar 
  21. 21.S. Das, A.K. Mukhopadhyay, S. Datta, D. Basu, Prospects of Electromagnetic processing: an overview. Bull. Mater. Sci. 32(1), 1–13 (2009). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12034-009-0001-4Article Google Scholar 
  22. 22.K.L. Glass, D.M. Ashby, U.S. Patent No. 9050656. (U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, Washington, DC, 2015)
  23. 23.S. Verma, P. Gupta, S. Srivastava, S. Kumar, A. Anand, An overview: casting/melting of non ferrous metallic materials using domestic electromagnetic oven. J. Mater. Sci. Mech. Eng. 4(4), (2017). p-ISSN: 2393-9095; e-ISSN: 2393-9109
  24. 24.S.S. Panda, V. Singh, A. Upadhyaya, D. Agrawal, Sintering response of austenitic (316L) and ferritic (434L) stainless steel consolidated in conventional and electromagnetic furnaces. Scripta Mater. 54(12), 2179–2183 (2006). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scriptamat.2006.02.034Article Google Scholar 
  25. 25.Y. Zhang, S. Yang, S. Wang, X. Liu, L. Li, Microwave/freeze casting assisted fabrication of carbon frameworks derived from embedded upholder in tremella for superior performance supercapacitors. Energy Storage Mater. (2018). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ensm.2018.08.006Article Google Scholar 
  26. 26.D. Thomas, P. Abhilash, M.T. Sebastian, Casting and characterization of LiMgPO4 glass free LTCC tape for electromagnetic applications. J. Eur. Ceram. Soc. 33(1), 87–93 (2013). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jeurceramsoc.2012.08.002Article Google Scholar 
  27. 27.M.H. Awida, N. Shah, B. Warren, E. Ripley, A.E. Fathy, Modeling of an industrial Electromagnetic furnace for metal casting applications. 2008 IEEE MTT-S Int. Electromagn. Symp. Digest. (2008). https://doi.org/10.1109/mwsym.2008.4633143Article Google Scholar 
  28. 28.P.K. Loharkar, A. Ingle, S. Jhavar, Parametric review of electromagnetic-based materials processing and its applications. J. Market. Res. 8(3), 3306–3326 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jmrt.2019.04.004Article Google Scholar 
  29. 29.E.B. Ripley, J.A. Oberhaus, WWWeb search power page-melting and heat treating metals using electromagnetic heating-the potential of electromagnetic metal processing techniques for a wide variety of metals and alloys is. Ind. Heat. 72(5), 65–70 (2005)Google Scholar 
  30. 30.J. Campbell, Complete Casting Handbook: Metal Casting Processes, Metallurgy, Techniques and Design (Butterworth-Heinemann, 2015)Google Scholar 
  31. 31.B. Ravi, Metal Casting: Computer-Aided Design and Analysis, 1st edn. (PHI Learning Ltd, 2005)Google Scholar 
  32. 32.D.E. Clark, W.H. Sutton, Electromagnetic processing of materials. Annu. Rev. Mater. Sci. 26(1), 299–331 (1996)ADS Article Google Scholar 
  33. 33.A.D. Abdullin, New capabilities of software package ProCAST 2011 for modeling foundry operations. Metallurgist 56(5–6), 323–328 (2012). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11015-012-9578-8Article Google Scholar 
  34. 34.J. Ha, P. Cleary, V. Alguine, T. Nguyen, Simulation of die filling in gravity die casting using SPH and MAGMAsoft, in Proceedings of 2nd International Conference on CFD in Minerals & Process Industries (1999) pp. 423–428
  35. 35.M. Sirviö, M. Woś, Casting directly from a computer model by using advanced simulation software FLOW-3D Cast Ž. Arch. Foundry Eng. 9(1), 79–82 (2009)Google Scholar 
  36. 36.NOVACAST Systems, Nova-Solid/Flow Brochure, NOVACAST, Ronneby (2015)
  37. 37.AutoCAST-X1 Brochure, 3D Foundry Tech, Mumbai
  38. 38.EKK, Inc. Metal Casting Simulation Software and Consulting Services, CAPCAST Brochure
  39. 39.P. Muenprasertdee, Solidification modeling of iron castings using SOLIDCast (2007)
  40. 40.CasCAE, CT-CasTest Inc. Oy, Kerava
  41. 41.E. Dominguez-Tortajada, J. Monzo-Cabrera, A. Diaz-Morcillo, Uniform electric field distribution in electromagnetic heating applicators by means of genetic algorithms optimization of dielectric multilayer structures. IEEE Trans. Electromagn. Theory Tech. 55(1), 85–91 (2007). https://doi.org/10.1109/tmtt.2006.886913ADS Article Google Scholar 
  42. 42.B. Warren, M.H. Awida, A.E. Fathy, Electromagnetic heating of metals. IET Electromagn. Antennas Propag. 6(2), 196–205 (2012)Article Google Scholar 
  43. 43.S. Ashouri, M. Nili-Ahmadabadi, M. Moradi, M. Iranpour, Semi-solid microstructure evolution during reheating of aluminum A356 alloy deformed severely by ECAP. J. Alloy. Compd. 466(1–2), 67–72 (2008). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jallcom.2007.11.010Article Google Scholar 
  44. 44.Penn State, Metal Parts Made In The Electromagnetic Oven. ScienceDaily. (1999) Retrieved May 8, 2021, from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/06/990622055733.htm
  45. 45.R.R. Mishra, A.K. Sharma, A review of research trends in electromagnetic processing of metal-based materials and opportunities in electromagnetic metal casting. Crit. Rev. Solid State Mater. Sci. 41(3), 217–255 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1080/10408436.2016.1142421ADS Article Google Scholar 
  46. 46.D.K. Ghodgaonkar, V.V. Varadan, V.K. Varadan, Free-space measurement of complex permittivity and complex permeability of magnetic materials at Electromagnetic frequencies. IEEE Trans. Instrum. Meas. 39(2), 387–394 (1990). https://doi.org/10.1109/19.52520Article Google Scholar 
  47. 47.J. Baker-Jarvis, E.J. Vanzura, W.A. Kissick, Improved technique for determining complex permittivity with the transmission/reflection method. Microw. Theory Tech. IEEE Trans. 38, 1096–1103 (1990)ADS Article Google Scholar 
  48. 48.M. Bologna, A. Petri, B. Tellini, C. Zappacosta, Effective magnetic permeability measurementin composite resonator structures. Instrum. Meas. IEEE Trans. 59, 1200–1206 (2010)Article Google Scholar 
  49. 49.B. Ravi, G.L. Datta, Metal casting–back to future, in 52nd Indian Foundry Congress, (2004)
  50. 50.D. El Khaled, N. Novas, J.A. Gazquez, F. Manzano-Agugliaro. Microwave dielectric heating: applications on metals processing. Renew. Sustain. Energy Rev. 82, 2880–2892 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2017.10.043Article Google Scholar 
  51. 51.H. Sekiguchi, Y. Mori, Steam plasma reforming using Electromagnetic discharge. Thin Solid Films 435, 44–48 (2003)ADS Article Google Scholar 
  52. 52.J. Sun, W. Wang, C. Zhao, Y. Zhang, C. Ma, Q. Yue, Study on the coupled effect of wave absorption and metal discharge generation under electromagnetic irradiation. Ind. Eng. Chem. Res. 53, 2042–2051 (2014)Article Google Scholar 
  53. 53.K.I. Rybakov, E.A. Olevsky, E.V. Krikun, Electromagnetic sintering: fundamentals and modeling. J. Am. Ceram. Soc. 96(4), 1003–1020 (2013). https://doi.org/10.1111/jace.12278Article Google Scholar 
  54. 54.A.K. Shukla, A. Mondal, A. Upadhyaya, Numerical modeling of electromagnetic heating. Sci. Sinter. 42(1), 99–124 (2010)Article Google Scholar 
  55. 55.M. Chiumenti, C. Agelet de Saracibar, M. Cervera, On the numerical modeling of the thermomechanical contact for metal casting analysis. J. Heat Transf. 130(6), (2008). https://doi.org/10.1115/1.2897923Article MATH Google Scholar 
  56. 56.B. Ravi, Metal Casting: Computer-Aided Design and Analysis. (PHI Learning Pvt. Ltd., 2005)
  57. 57.J.H. Lee, S.D. Noh, H.-J. Kim, Y.-S. Kang, Implementation of cyber-physical production systems for quality prediction and operation control in metal casting. Sensors 18, 1428 (2018). https://doi.org/10.3390/s18051428ADS Article Google Scholar 
  58. 58.B. Aksoy, M. Koru, Estimation of casting mold interfacial heat transfer coefficient in pressure die casting process by artificial intelligence methods. Arab. J. Sci. Eng. 45, 8969–8980 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s13369-020-04648-7Article Google Scholar 
  59. 59.S.S. Miriyala, V.R. Subramanian, K. Mitra, TRANSFORM-ANN for online optimization of complex industrial processes: casting process as case study. Eur. J. Oper. Res. 264(1), 294–309 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejor.2017.05.026MathSciNet Article MATH Google Scholar 
  60. 60.J.K. Kittu, G.C.M. Patel, M. Parappagoudar, Modeling of pressure die casting process: an artificial intelligence approach. Int. J. Metalcast. (2015). https://doi.org/10.1007/s40962-015-0001-7Article Google Scholar 
  61. 61.W. Chen, B. Gutmann, C.O. Kappe, Characterization of electromagnetic-induced electric discharge phenomena in metal-solvent mixtures. ChemistryOpen 1, 39–48 (2012)Article Google Scholar 
  62. 62.J. Walker, A. Prokop, C. Lynagh, B. Vuksanovich, B. Conner, K. Rogers, J. Thiel, E. MacDonald, Real-time process monitoring of core shifts during metal casting with wireless sensing and 3D sand printing. Addit. Manuf. (2019). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.addma.2019.02.018Article Google Scholar 
  63. 63.G.C. Manjunath Patel, A.K. Shettigar, M.B. Parappagoudar, A systematic approach to model and optimize wear behaviour of castings produced by squeeze casting process. J. Manuf. Process. 32, 199–212 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jmapro.2018.02.004Article Google Scholar 
  64. 64.G.C. Manjunath Patel, P. Krishna, M.B. Parappagoudar, An intelligent system for squeeze casting process—soft computing based approach. Int. J. Adv. Manuf. Technol. 86, 3051–3065 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00170-016-8416-8Article Google Scholar 
  65. 65.M. Ferguson, R. Ak, Y.T. Lee, K.H. Law, Automatic localization of casting defects with convolutional neural networks, in 2017 IEEE International Conference on Big Data (Big Data) (Boston, MA, USA, 2017), pp. 1726–1735. https://doi.org/10.1109/BigData.2017.8258115.
  66. 66.P.K.D.V. Yarlagadda, Prediction of die casting process parameters by using an artificial neural network model for zinc alloys. Int. J. Prod. Res. 38(1), 119–139 (2000). https://doi.org/10.1080/002075400189617Article MATH Google Scholar 
  67. 67.G.C. ManjunathPatel, A.K. Shettigar, P. Krishna, M.B. Parappagoudar, Back propagation genetic and recurrent neural network applications in modelling and analysis of squeeze casting process. Appl. Soft Comput. 59, 418–437 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.asoc.2017.06.018Article Google Scholar 
  68. 68.J. Zheng, Q. Wang, P. Zhao et al., Optimization of high-pressure die-casting process parameters using artificial neural network. Int. J. Adv. Manuf. Technol. 44, 667–674 (2009). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00170-008-1886-6Article Google Scholar 
  69. 69.E. Mares, J. Sokolowski, Artificial intelligence-based control system for the analysis of metal casting properties. J. Achiev. Mater. Manuf. Eng. 40, 149–154 (2010)Google Scholar 
  70. 70.K.S. Senthil, S. Muthukumaran, C. Chandrasekhar Reddy, Suitability of friction welding of tube to tube plate using an external tool process for different tube diameters—a study. Exp. Tech. 37(6), 8–14 (2013)Article Google Scholar 
  71. 71.N.K. Bhoi, H. Singh, S. Pratap, P.K. Jain, Electromagnetic material processing: a clean, green, and sustainable approach. Sustain. Eng. Prod. Manuf. Technol. (2019). https://doi.org/10.1016/b978-0-12-816564-5.00001-3Article Google Scholar 
  72. 72.K.S. Senthil, D.A. Daniel, An investigation of boiler grade tube and tube plate without block by using friction welding process. Mater. Today Proc. 5(2), 8567–8576 (2018)Article Google Scholar 
  73. 73.E. Hetmaniok, D. Słota, A. Zielonka, Restoration of the cooling conditions in a three-dimensional continuous casting process using artificial intelligence algorithms. Appl. Math. Modell. 39(16), 4797–4807 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apm.2015.03.056Article MATH Google Scholar 
  74. 74.C.V. Kumar, S. Muthukumaran, A. Pradeep, S.S. Kumaran, Optimizational study of friction welding of steel tube to aluminum tube plate using an external tool process. Int. J. Mech. Mater. Eng. 6(2), 300–306 (2011)Google Scholar 
  75. 75.T. Adithiyaa, D. Chandramohan, T. Sathish, Optimal prediction of process parameters by GWO-KNN in stirring-squeeze casting of AA2219 reinforced metal matrix composites. Mater. Today Proc. 150, 1598 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.matpr.2019.10.051Article Google Scholar 
  76. 76.B.P. Pehrson, A.F. Moore (2014). U.S. Patent No. 8708031 (U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, Washington, DC, 2014)
  77. 77.Liu, J., & Rynerson, M. L. (2008). U.S. Patent No. 7,461,684. Washington, DC: U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.
  78. 78.K. Salonitis, B. Zeng, H.A. Mehrabi, M. Jolly, The challenges for energy efficient casting processes. Procedia CIRP 40, 24–29 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.procir.2016.01.043Article Google Scholar 
  79. 79.R.R. Mishra, A.K. Sharma, Effect of solidification environment on microstructure and indentation hardness of Al–Zn–Mg alloy casts developed using electromagnetic heating. Int. J. Metal Cast. 10, 1–13 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s40962-017-0176-1Article Google Scholar 
  80. 80.R.R. Mishra, A.K. Sharma, Effect of susceptor and Mold material on microstructure of in-situ electromagnetic casts of Al–Zn–Mg alloy. Mater. Des. 131, 428–440 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.matdes.2017.06.038Article Google Scholar 
  81. 81.S. Kaushal, S. Bohra, D. Gupta, V. Jain, On processing and characterization of Cu–Mo-based castings through electromagnetic heating. Int. J. Metalcast. (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s40962-020-00481-8Article Google Scholar 
  82. 82.S. Nandwani, S. Vardhan, A.K. Bagha, A literature review on the exposure time of electromagnetic based welding of different materials. Mater. Today Proc. (2019). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.matpr.2019.10.056Article Google Scholar 
  83. 83.F.J.B. Brum, S.C. Amico, I. Vedana, J.A. Spim, Electromagnetic dewaxing applied to the investment casting process. J. Mater. Process. Technol. 209(7), 3166–3171 (2009). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2008.07.024Article Google Scholar 
  84. 84.M.P. Reddy, R.A. Shakoor, G. Parande, V. Manakari, F. Ubaid, A.M.A. Mohamed, M. Gupta, Enhanced performance of nano-sized SiC reinforced Al metal matrix nanocomposites synthesized through electromagnetic sintering and hot extrusion techniques. Prog. Nat. Sci. Mater. Int. 27(5), 606–614 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pnsc.2017.08.015Article Google Scholar 
  85. 85.V.R. Kalamkar, K. Monkova, (Eds.), Advances in Mechanical Engineering. Lecture Notes in Mechanical Engineering. (2021) https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3639-7
  86. 86.V. Bist, A.K. Sharma, P. Kumar, Development and microstructural characterisations of the lead casting using electromagnetic technology. Manager’s J. Mech. Eng. 4(4), 6 (2014). https://doi.org/10.26634/jme.4.4.2840Article Google Scholar 
  87. 87.A. Sharma, A. Chouhan, L. Pavithran, U. Chadha, S.K. Selvaraj, Implementation of LSS framework in automotive component manufacturing: a review, current scenario and future directions. Mater Today: Proc. (2021). https://doi.org/10.1016/J.MATPR.2021.02.374Article Google Scholar 
Figure 6. Evolution of melt pool in the overhang region (θ = 45°, P = 100 W, v = 1000 mm/s, the streamlines are shown by arrows).

Experimental and numerical investigation of the origin of surface roughness in laser powder bed fused overhang regions

레이저 파우더 베드 융합 오버행 영역에서 표면 거칠기의 원인에 대한 실험 및 수치 조사

Shaochuan Feng,Amar M. Kamat,Soheil Sabooni &Yutao PeiPages S66-S84 | Received 18 Jan 2021, Accepted 25 Feb 2021, Published online: 10 Mar 2021

ABSTRACT

Surface roughness of laser powder bed fusion (L-PBF) printed overhang regions is a major contributor to deteriorated shape accuracy/surface quality. This study investigates the mechanisms behind the evolution of surface roughness (Ra) in overhang regions. The evolution of surface morphology is the result of a combination of border track contour, powder adhesion, warp deformation, and dross formation, which is strongly related to the overhang angle (θ). When 0° ≤ θ ≤ 15°, the overhang angle does not affect Ra significantly since only a small area of the melt pool boundaries contacts the powder bed resulting in slight powder adhesion. When 15° < θ ≤ 50°, powder adhesion is enhanced by the melt pool sinking and the increased contact area between the melt pool boundary and powder bed. When θ > 50°, large waviness of the overhang contour, adhesion of powder clusters, severe warp deformation and dross formation increase Ra sharply.

레이저 파우더 베드 퓨전 (L-PBF) 프린팅 오버행 영역의 표면 거칠기는 형상 정확도 / 표면 품질 저하의 주요 원인입니다. 이 연구 는 오버행 영역에서 표면 거칠기 (Ra ) 의 진화 뒤에 있는 메커니즘을 조사합니다 . 표면 형태의 진화는 오버행 각도 ( θ ) 와 밀접한 관련이있는 경계 트랙 윤곽, 분말 접착, 뒤틀림 변형 및 드로스 형성의 조합의 결과입니다 . 0° ≤  θ  ≤ 15° 인 경우 , 용융풀 경계의 작은 영역 만 분말 베드와 접촉하여 약간의 분말 접착이 발생하기 때문에 오버행 각도가 R a에 큰 영향을 주지 않습니다 . 15° < θ 일 때  ≤ 50°, 용융 풀 싱킹 및 용융 풀 경계와 분말 베드 사이의 증가된 접촉 면적으로 분말 접착력이 향상됩니다. θ  > 50° 일 때 오버행 윤곽의 큰 파형, 분말 클러스터의 접착, 심한 휨 변형 및 드 로스 형성이 Ra 급격히 증가 합니다.

KEYWORDS: Laser powder bed fusion (L-PBF), melt pool dynamics, overhang region, shape deviation, surface roughness

1. Introduction

레이저 분말 베드 융합 (L-PBF)은 첨단 적층 제조 (AM) 기술로, 집중된 레이저 빔을 사용하여 금속 분말을 선택적으로 융합하여 슬라이스 된 3D 컴퓨터 지원에 따라 층별로 3 차원 (3D) 금속 부품을 구축합니다. 설계 (CAD) 모델 (Chatham, Long 및 Williams 2019 ; Tan, Zhu 및 Zhou 2020 ). 재료가 인쇄 층 아래에 ​​존재하는지 여부에 따라 인쇄 영역은 각각 솔리드 영역 또는 돌출 영역으로 분류 될 수 있습니다. 따라서 오버행 영역은 고체 기판이 아니라 분말 베드 바로 위에 건설되는 특수 구조입니다 (Patterson, Messimer 및 Farrington 2017). 오버행 영역은지지 구조를 포함하거나 포함하지 않고 구축 할 수 있으며, 지지대가있는 돌출 영역의 L-PBF는 지지체가 더 낮은 밀도로 구축된다는 점을 제외 하고 (Wang and Chou 2018 ) 고체 기판의 공정과 유사합니다 (따라서 기계적 강도가 낮기 때문에 L-PBF 공정 후 기계적으로 쉽게 제거 할 수 있습니다. 따라서지지 구조로 인쇄 된 오버행 영역은 L-PBF 공정 후 지지물 제거, 연삭 및 연마와 같은 추가 후 처리 단계가 필요합니다.

수평 내부 채널의 제작과 같은 일부 특정 경우에는 공정 후 지지대를 제거하기가 어려우므로 채널 상단 절반의 돌출부 영역을 지지대없이 건설해야합니다 (Hopkinson and Dickens 2000 ). 수평 내부 채널에 사용할 수없는지지 구조 외에도 내부 표면, 특히 등각 냉각 채널 (Feng, Kamat 및 Pei 2021 ) 에서 발생하는 복잡한 3D 채널 네트워크의 경우 표면 마감 프로세스를 구현하는 것도 어렵습니다 . 결과적으로 오버행 영역은 (i) 잔류 응력에 의한 변형, (ii) 계단 효과 (Kuo et al. 2020 ; Li et al. 2020 )로 인해 설계된 모양에서 벗어날 수 있습니다 .) 및 (iii) 원하지 않는 분말 소결로 인한 향상된 표면 거칠기; 여기서, 앞의 두 요소는 일반적으로 mm 길이 스케일에서 ‘매크로’편차로 분류되고 후자는 일반적으로 µm 길이 스케일에서 ‘마이크로’편차로 인식됩니다.

열 응력에 의한 변형은 오버행 영역에서 발생하는 중요한 문제입니다 (Patterson, Messimer 및 Farrington 2017 ). 국부적 인 용융 / 냉각은 용융 풀 내부 및 주변에서 큰 온도 구배를 유도하여 응고 된 층에 집중적 인 열 응력을 유발합니다. 열 응력에 의한 뒤틀림은 고체 영역을 현저하게 변형하지 않습니다. 이러한 영역은 아래의 여러 레이어에 의해 제한되기 때문입니다. 반면에 오버행 영역은 구속되지 않고 공정 중 응력 완화로 인해 상당한 변형이 발생합니다 (Kamat 및 Pei 2019 ). 더욱이 용융 깊이는 레이어 두께보다 큽니다 (이전 레이어도 재용 해되어 빌드 된 레이어간에 충분한 결합을 보장하기 때문입니다 [Yadroitsev et al. 2013 ; Kamath et al.2014 ]),응고 된 두께가 설계된 두께보다 크기 때문에형태 편차 (예 : 드 로스 [Charles et al. 2020 ; Feng et al. 2020 ])가 발생합니다. 마이크로 스케일에서 인쇄 된 표면 (R a 및 S a ∼ 10 μm)은 기계적으로 가공 된 표면보다 거칠다 (Duval-Chaneac et al. 2018 ; Wen et al. 2018 ). 이 문제는고형화 된 용융 풀의 가장자리에 부착 된 용융되지 않은 분말의 결과로 표면 거칠기 (R a )가 일반적으로 약 20 μm인 오버행 영역에서 특히 심각합니다 (Mazur et al. 2016 ; Pakkanen et al. 2016 ).

오버행 각도 ( θ , 빌드 방향과 관련하여 측정)는 오버행 영역의 뒤틀림 편향과 표면 거칠기에 영향을 미치는 중요한 매개 변수입니다 (Kamat and Pei 2019 ; Mingear et al. 2019 ). θ ∼ 45 ° 의 오버행 각도 는 일반적으로지지 구조없이 오버행 영역을 인쇄 할 수있는 임계 값으로 합의됩니다 (Pakkanen et al. 2016 ; Kadirgama et al. 2018 ). θ 일 때이 임계 값보다 크면 오버행 영역을 허용 가능한 표면 품질로 인쇄 할 수 없습니다. 오버행 각도 외에도 레이저 매개 변수 (레이저 에너지 밀도와 관련된)는 용융 풀의 모양 / 크기 및 용융 풀 역학에 영향을줌으로써 오버행 영역의 표면 거칠기에 영향을줍니다 (Wang et al. 2013 ; Mingear et al . 2019 ).

용융 풀 역학은 고체 (Shrestha 및 Chou 2018 ) 및 오버행 (Le et al. 2020 ) 영역 모두에서 수행되는 L-PBF 공정을 포함한 레이저 재료 가공의 일반적인 물리적 현상입니다 . 용융 풀 모양, 크기 및 냉각 속도는 잔류 응력으로 인한 변형과 ​​표면 거칠기에 모두 영향을 미치므로 처리 매개 변수와 표면 형태 / 품질 사이의 다리 역할을하며 용융 풀을 이해하기 위해 수치 시뮬레이션을 사용하여 추가 조사를 수행 할 수 있습니다. 거동과 표면 거칠기에 미치는 영향. 현재까지 고체 영역의 L-PBF 동안 용융 풀 동작을 시뮬레이션하기 위해 여러 연구가 수행되었습니다. 유한 요소 방법 (FEM)과 같은 시뮬레이션 기술 (Roberts et al. 2009 ; Du et al.2019 ), 유한 차분 법 (FDM) (Wu et al. 2018 ), 전산 유체 역학 (CFD) (Lee and Zhang 2016 ), 임의의 Lagrangian-Eulerian 방법 (ALE) (Khairallah and Anderson 2014 )을 사용하여 증발 반동 압력 (Hu et al. 2018 ) 및 Marangoni 대류 (Zhang et al. 2018 ) 현상을포함하는 열 전달 (온도 장) 및 물질 전달 (용융 흐름) 프로세스. 또한 이산 요소법 (DEM)을 사용하여 무작위 분산 분말 베드를 생성했습니다 (Lee and Zhang 2016 ; Wu et al. 2018 ). 이 모델은 분말 규모의 L-PBF 공정을 시뮬레이션했습니다 (Khairallah et al. 2016) 메조 스케일 (Khairallah 및 Anderson 2014 ), 단일 트랙 (Leitz et al. 2017 )에서 다중 트랙 (Foroozmehr et al. 2016 ) 및 다중 레이어 (Huang, Khamesee 및 Toyserkani 2019 )로.

그러나 결과적인 표면 거칠기를 결정하는 오버행 영역의 용융 풀 역학은 문헌에서 거의 관심을받지 못했습니다. 솔리드 영역의 L-PBF에 대한 기존 시뮬레이션 모델이 어느 정도 참조가 될 수 있지만 오버행 영역과 솔리드 영역 간의 용융 풀 역학에는 상당한 차이가 있습니다. 오버행 영역에서 용융 금속은 분말 입자 사이의 틈새로 아래로 흘러 용융 풀이 다공성 분말 베드가 제공하는 약한 지지체 아래로 가라 앉습니다. 이것은 중력과 표면 장력의 영향이 용융 풀의 결과적인 모양 / 크기를 결정하는 데 중요하며, 결과적으로 오버행 영역의 마이크로 스케일 형태의 진화에 중요합니다. 또한 분말 입자 사이의 공극, 열 조건 (예 : 에너지 흡수,2019 ; Karimi et al. 2020 ; 노래와 영 2020 ). 표면 거칠기는 (마이크로) 형상 편차를 증가시킬뿐만 아니라 주기적 하중 동안 미세 균열의 시작 지점 역할을함으로써 기계적 강도를 저하시킵니다 (Günther et al. 2018 ). 오버행 영역의 높은 표면 거칠기는 (마이크로) 정확도 / 품질에 대한 엄격한 요구 사항이있는 부품 제조에서 L-PBF의 적용을 제한합니다.

본 연구는 실험 및 시뮬레이션 연구를 사용하여 오버행 영역 (지지물없이 제작)의 미세 형상 편차 형성 메커니즘과 표면 거칠기의 기원을 체계적이고 포괄적으로 조사합니다. 결합 된 DEM-CFD 시뮬레이션 모델은 경계 트랙 윤곽, 분말 접착 및 뒤틀림 변형의 효과를 고려하여 오버행 영역의 용융 풀 역학과 표면 형태의 형성 메커니즘을 나타 내기 위해 개발되었습니다. 표면 거칠기 R의 시뮬레이션 및 단일 요인 L-PBF 인쇄 실험을 사용하여 오버행 각도의 함수로 연구됩니다. 용융 풀의 침몰과 관련된 오버행 영역에서 분말 접착의 세 가지 메커니즘이 식별되고 자세히 설명됩니다. 마지막으로, 인쇄 된 오버행 영역에서 높은 표면 거칠기 문제를 완화 할 수 있는 잠재적 솔루션에 대해 간략하게 설명합니다.

The shape and size of the L-PBF printed samples are illustrated in Figure 1
The shape and size of the L-PBF printed samples are illustrated in Figure 1
Figure 2. Borders in the overhang region depending on the overhang angle θ
Figure 2. Borders in the overhang region depending on the overhang angle θ
Figure 3. (a) Profile of the volumetric heat source, (b) the model geometry of single-track printing on a solid substrate (unit: µm), and (c) the comparison of melt pool dimensions obtained from the experiment (right half) and simulation (left half) for a calibrated optical penetration depth of 110 µm (laser power 200 W and scan speed 800 mm/s, solidified layer thickness 30 µm, powder size 10–45 µm).
Figure 3. (a) Profile of the volumetric heat source, (b) the model geometry of single-track printing on a solid substrate (unit: µm), and (c) the comparison of melt pool dimensions obtained from the experiment (right half) and simulation (left half) for a calibrated optical penetration depth of 110 µm (laser power 200 W and scan speed 800 mm/s, solidified layer thickness 30 µm, powder size 10–45 µm).
Figure 4. The model geometry of an overhang being L-PBF processed: (a) 3D view and (b) right view.
Figure 4. The model geometry of an overhang being L-PBF processed: (a) 3D view and (b) right view.
Figure 5. The cross-sectional contour of border tracks in a 45° overhang region.
Figure 5. The cross-sectional contour of border tracks in a 45° overhang region.
Figure 6. Evolution of melt pool in the overhang region (θ = 45°, P = 100 W, v = 1000 mm/s, the streamlines are shown by arrows).
Figure 6. Evolution of melt pool in the overhang region (θ = 45°, P = 100 W, v = 1000 mm/s, the streamlines are shown by arrows).
Figure 7. The overhang contour is contributed by (a) only outer borders when θ ≤ 60° (b) both inner borders and outer borders when θ > 60°.
Figure 7. The overhang contour is contributed by (a) only outer borders when θ ≤ 60° (b) both inner borders and outer borders when θ > 60°.
Figure 8. Schematic of powder adhesion on a 45° overhang region.
Figure 8. Schematic of powder adhesion on a 45° overhang region.
Figure 9. The L-PBF printed samples with various overhang angle (a) θ = 0° (cube), (b) θ = 30°, (c) θ = 45°, (d) θ = 55° and (e) θ = 60°.
Figure 9. The L-PBF printed samples with various overhang angle (a) θ = 0° (cube), (b) θ = 30°, (c) θ = 45°, (d) θ = 55° and (e) θ = 60°.
Figure 10. Two mechanisms of powder adhesion related to the overhang angle: (a) simulation-predicted, θ = 45°; (b) simulation-predicted, θ = 60°; (c, e) optical micrographs, θ = 45°; (d, f) optical micrographs, θ = 60°. (e) and (f) are partial enlargement of (c) and (d), respectively.
Figure 10. Two mechanisms of powder adhesion related to the overhang angle: (a) simulation-predicted, θ = 45°; (b) simulation-predicted, θ = 60°; (c, e) optical micrographs, θ = 45°; (d, f) optical micrographs, θ = 60°. (e) and (f) are partial enlargement of (c) and (d), respectively.
Figure 11. Simulation-predicted surface morphology in the overhang region at different overhang angle: (a) θ = 15°, (b) θ = 30°, (c) θ = 45°, (d) θ = 60° and (e) θ = 80° (Blue solid lines: simulation-predicted contour; red dashed lines: the planar profile of designed overhang region specified by the overhang angles).
Figure 11. Simulation-predicted surface morphology in the overhang region at different overhang angle: (a) θ = 15°, (b) θ = 30°, (c) θ = 45°, (d) θ = 60° and (e) θ = 80° (Blue solid lines: simulation-predicted contour; red dashed lines: the planar profile of designed overhang region specified by the overhang angles).
Figure 12. Effect of overhang angle on surface roughness Ra in overhang regions
Figure 12. Effect of overhang angle on surface roughness Ra in overhang regions
Figure 13. Surface morphology of L-PBF printed overhang regions with different overhang angle: (a) θ = 15°, (b) θ = 30°, (c) θ = 45° and (d) θ = 60° (overhang border parameters: P = 100 W, v = 1000 mm/s).
Figure 13. Surface morphology of L-PBF printed overhang regions with different overhang angle: (a) θ = 15°, (b) θ = 30°, (c) θ = 45° and (d) θ = 60° (overhang border parameters: P = 100 W, v = 1000 mm/s).
Figure 14. Effect of (a) laser power (scan speed = 1000 mm/s) and (b) scan speed (lase power = 100 W) on surface roughness Ra in overhang regions (θ = 45°, laser power and scan speed referred to overhang border parameters, and the other process parameters are listed in Table 2).
Figure 14. Effect of (a) laser power (scan speed = 1000 mm/s) and (b) scan speed (lase power = 100 W) on surface roughness Ra in overhang regions (θ = 45°, laser power and scan speed referred to overhang border parameters, and the other process parameters are listed in Table 2).

References

  • Cai, Chao, Chrupcala Radoslaw, Jinliang Zhang, Qian Yan, Shifeng Wen, Bo Song, and Yusheng Shi. 2019. “In-Situ Preparation and Formation of TiB/Ti-6Al-4V Nanocomposite via Laser Additive Manufacturing: Microstructure Evolution and Tribological Behavior.” Powder Technology 342: 73–84. doi:10.1016/j.powtec.2018.09.088. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Cai, Chao, Wei Shian Tey, Jiayao Chen, Wei Zhu, Xingjian Liu, Tong Liu, Lihua Zhao, and Kun Zhou. 2021. “Comparative Study on 3D Printing of Polyamide 12 by Selective Laser Sintering and Multi Jet Fusion.” Journal of Materials Processing Technology 288 (August 2020): 116882. doi:10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2020.116882. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Cai, Chao, Xu Wu, Wan Liu, Wei Zhu, Hui Chen, Jasper Dong Qiu Chua, Chen Nan Sun, Jie Liu, Qingsong Wei, and Yusheng Shi. 2020. “Selective Laser Melting of Near-α Titanium Alloy Ti-6Al-2Zr-1Mo-1V: Parameter Optimization, Heat Treatment and Mechanical Performance.” Journal of Materials Science and Technology 57: 51–64. doi:10.1016/j.jmst.2020.05.004. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Charles, Amal, Ahmed Elkaseer, Lore Thijs, and Steffen G. Scholz. 2020. “Dimensional Errors Due to Overhanging Features in Laser Powder Bed Fusion Parts Made of Ti-6Al-4V.” Applied Sciences 10 (7): 2416. doi:10.3390/app10072416. [Crossref], [Google Scholar]
  • Chatham, Camden A., Timothy E. Long, and Christopher B. Williams. 2019. “A Review of the Process Physics and Material Screening Methods for Polymer Powder Bed Fusion Additive Manufacturing.” Progress in Polymer Science 93: 68–95. doi:10.1016/j.progpolymsci.2019.03.003. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Du, Yang, Xinyu You, Fengbin Qiao, Lijie Guo, and Zhengwu Liu. 2019. “A Model for Predicting the Temperature Field during Selective Laser Melting.” Results in Physics 12 (November 2018): 52–60. doi:10.1016/j.rinp.2018.11.031. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Duval-Chaneac, M. S., S. Han, C. Claudin, F. Salvatore, J. Bajolet, and J. Rech. 2018. “Experimental Study on Finishing of Internal Laser Melting (SLM) Surface with Abrasive Flow Machining (AFM).” Precision Engineering 54 (July 2017): 1–6. doi:10.1016/j.precisioneng.2018.03.006. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Feng, Shaochuan, Shijie Chen, Amar M. Kamat, Ru Zhang, Mingji Huang, and Liangcai Hu. 2020. “Investigation on Shape Deviation of Horizontal Interior Circular Channels Fabricated by Laser Powder Bed Fusion.” Additive Manufacturing 36 (December): 101585. doi:10.1016/j.addma.2020.101585. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Feng, Shaochuan, Chuanzhen Huang, Jun Wang, Hongtao Zhu, Peng Yao, and Zhanqiang Liu. 2017. “An Analytical Model for the Prediction of Temperature Distribution and Evolution in Hybrid Laser-Waterjet Micro-Machining.” Precision Engineering 47: 33–45. doi:10.1016/j.precisioneng.2016.07.002. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Feng, Shaochuan, Amar M. Kamat, and Yutao Pei. 2021. “Design and Fabrication of Conformal Cooling Channels in Molds: Review and Progress Updates.” International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer. doi:10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2021.121082. [Crossref], [PubMed], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Flow-3D V11.2 Documentation. 2016. Flow Science, Inc. [Crossref], [Google Scholar]
  • Foroozmehr, Ali, Mohsen Badrossamay, Ehsan Foroozmehr, and Sa’id Golabi. 2016. “Finite Element Simulation of Selective Laser Melting Process Considering Optical Penetration Depth of Laser in Powder Bed.” Materials and Design 89: 255–263. doi:10.1016/j.matdes.2015.10.002. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • “Geometrical Product Specifications (GPS) — Surface Texture: Profile Method — Rules and Procedures for the Assessment of Surface Texture (ISO 4288).” 1996. International Organization for Standardization. https://www.iso.org/standard/2096.html. [Google Scholar]
  • Günther, Johannes, Stefan Leuders, Peter Koppa, Thomas Tröster, Sebastian Henkel, Horst Biermann, and Thomas Niendorf. 2018. “On the Effect of Internal Channels and Surface Roughness on the High-Cycle Fatigue Performance of Ti-6Al-4V Processed by SLM.” Materials & Design 143: 1–11. doi:10.1016/j.matdes.2018.01.042. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Hopkinson, Neil, and Phill Dickens. 2000. “Conformal Cooling and Heating Channels Using Laser Sintered Tools.” In Solid Freeform Fabrication Conference, 490–497. Texas. doi:10.26153/tsw/3075. [Crossref], [Google Scholar]
  • Hu, Zhiheng, Haihong Zhu, Changchun Zhang, Hu Zhang, Ting Qi, and Xiaoyan Zeng. 2018. “Contact Angle Evolution during Selective Laser Melting.” Materials and Design 139: 304–313. doi:10.1016/j.matdes.2017.11.002. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Hu, Cheng, Kejia Zhuang, Jian Weng, and Donglin Pu. 2019. “Three-Dimensional Analytical Modeling of Cutting Temperature for Round Insert Considering Semi-Infinite Boundary and Non-Uniform Heat Partition.” International Journal of Mechanical Sciences 155 (October 2018): 536–553. doi:10.1016/j.ijmecsci.2019.03.019. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Huang, Yuze, Mir Behrad Khamesee, and Ehsan Toyserkani. 2019. “A New Physics-Based Model for Laser Directed Energy Deposition (Powder-Fed Additive Manufacturing): From Single-Track to Multi-Track and Multi-Layer.” Optics & Laser Technology 109 (August 2018): 584–599. doi:10.1016/j.optlastec.2018.08.015. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Kadirgama, K., W. S. W. Harun, F. Tarlochan, M. Samykano, D. Ramasamy, Mohd Zaidi Azir, and H. Mehboob. 2018. “Statistical and Optimize of Lattice Structures with Selective Laser Melting (SLM) of Ti6AL4V Material.” International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology 97 (1–4): 495–510. doi:10.1007/s00170-018-1913-1. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Kamat, Amar M, and Yutao Pei. 2019. “An Analytical Method to Predict and Compensate for Residual Stress-Induced Deformation in Overhanging Regions of Internal Channels Fabricated Using Powder Bed Fusion.” Additive Manufacturing 29 (March): 100796. doi:10.1016/j.addma.2019.100796. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Kamath, Chandrika, Bassem El-Dasher, Gilbert F. Gallegos, Wayne E. King, and Aaron Sisto. 2014. “Density of Additively-Manufactured, 316L SS Parts Using Laser Powder-Bed Fusion at Powers up to 400 W.” International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology 74 (1–4): 65–78. doi:10.1007/s00170-014-5954-9. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Karimi, J., C. Suryanarayana, I. Okulov, and K. G. Prashanth. 2020. “Selective Laser Melting of Ti6Al4V: Effect of Laser Re-Melting.” Materials Science and Engineering A (July): 140558. doi:10.1016/j.msea.2020.140558. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Khairallah, Saad A., and Andy Anderson. 2014. “Mesoscopic Simulation Model of Selective Laser Melting of Stainless Steel Powder.” Journal of Materials Processing Technology 214 (11): 2627–2636. doi:10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2014.06.001. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Khairallah, Saad A., Andrew T. Anderson, Alexander Rubenchik, and Wayne E. King. 2016. “Laser Powder-Bed Fusion Additive Manufacturing: Physics of Complex Melt Flow and Formation Mechanisms of Pores, Spatter, and Denudation Zones.” Edited by Adedeji B. Badiru, Vhance V. Valencia, and David Liu. Acta Materialia 108 (April): 36–45. doi:10.1016/j.actamat.2016.02.014. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Kuo, C. N., C. K. Chua, P. C. Peng, Y. W. Chen, S. L. Sing, S. Huang, and Y. L. Su. 2020. “Microstructure Evolution and Mechanical Property Response via 3D Printing Parameter Development of Al–Sc Alloy.” Virtual and Physical Prototyping 15 (1): 120–129. doi:10.1080/17452759.2019.1698967. [Taylor & Francis Online], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Le, K. Q., C. H. Wong, K. H. G. Chua, C. Tang, and H. Du. 2020. “Discontinuity of Overhanging Melt Track in Selective Laser Melting Process.” International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer 162 (December): 120284. doi:10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2020.120284. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Lee, Y. S., and W. Zhang. 2016. “Modeling of Heat Transfer, Fluid Flow and Solidification Microstructure of Nickel-Base Superalloy Fabricated by Laser Powder Bed Fusion.” Additive Manufacturing 12: 178–188. doi:10.1016/j.addma.2016.05.003. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Leitz, K. H., P. Singer, A. Plankensteiner, B. Tabernig, H. Kestler, and L. S. Sigl. 2017. “Multi-Physical Simulation of Selective Laser Melting.” Metal Powder Report 72 (5): 331–338. doi:10.1016/j.mprp.2016.04.004. [Crossref], [Google Scholar]
  • Li, Jian, Jing Hu, Yi Zhu, Xiaowen Yu, Mengfei Yu, and Huayong Yang. 2020. “Surface Roughness Control of Root Analogue Dental Implants Fabricated Using Selective Laser Melting.” Additive Manufacturing 34 (September 2019): 101283. doi:10.1016/j.addma.2020.101283. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Li, Yingli, Kun Zhou, Pengfei Tan, Shu Beng Tor, Chee Kai Chua, and Kah Fai Leong. 2018. “Modeling Temperature and Residual Stress Fields in Selective Laser Melting.” International Journal of Mechanical Sciences 136 (February): 24–35. doi:10.1016/j.ijmecsci.2017.12.001. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Mazur, MacIej, Martin Leary, Matthew McMillan, Joe Elambasseril, and Milan Brandt. 2016. “SLM Additive Manufacture of H13 Tool Steel with Conformal Cooling and Structural Lattices.” Rapid Prototyping Journal 22 (3): 504–518. doi:10.1108/RPJ-06-2014-0075. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Mingear, Jacob, Bing Zhang, Darren Hartl, and Alaa Elwany. 2019. “Effect of Process Parameters and Electropolishing on the Surface Roughness of Interior Channels in Additively Manufactured Nickel-Titanium Shape Memory Alloy Actuators.” Additive Manufacturing 27 (October 2018): 565–575. doi:10.1016/j.addma.2019.03.027. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Pakkanen, Jukka, Flaviana Calignano, Francesco Trevisan, Massimo Lorusso, Elisa Paola Ambrosio, Diego Manfredi, and Paolo Fino. 2016. “Study of Internal Channel Surface Roughnesses Manufactured by Selective Laser Melting in Aluminum and Titanium Alloys.” Metallurgical and Materials Transactions A 47 (8): 3837–3844. doi:10.1007/s11661-016-3478-7. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Patterson, Albert E., Sherri L. Messimer, and Phillip A. Farrington. 2017. “Overhanging Features and the SLM/DMLS Residual Stresses Problem: Review and Future Research Need.” Technologies 5 (4): 15. doi:10.3390/technologies5020015. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Roberts, I. A., C. J. Wang, R. Esterlein, M. Stanford, and D. J. Mynors. 2009. “A Three-Dimensional Finite Element Analysis of the Temperature Field during Laser Melting of Metal Powders in Additive Layer Manufacturing.” International Journal of Machine Tools and Manufacture 49 (12–13): 916–923. doi:10.1016/j.ijmachtools.2009.07.004. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Shrestha, Subin, and Kevin Chou. 2018. “Computational Analysis of Thermo-Fluid Dynamics with Metallic Powder in SLM.” In CFD Modeling and Simulation in Materials Processing 2018, edited by Laurentiu Nastac, Koulis Pericleous, Adrian S. Sabau, Lifeng Zhang, and Brian G. Thomas, 85–95. Cham, Switzerland: Springer Nature. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-72059-3_9. [Crossref], [Google Scholar]
  • Sing, S. L., and W. Y. Yeong. 2020. “Laser Powder Bed Fusion for Metal Additive Manufacturing: Perspectives on Recent Developments.” Virtual and Physical Prototyping 15 (3): 359–370. doi:10.1080/17452759.2020.1779999. [Taylor & Francis Online], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Šmilauer, Václav, Emanuele Catalano, Bruno Chareyre, Sergei Dorofeenko, Jérôme Duriez, Nolan Dyck, Jan Eliáš, et al. 2015. Yade Documentation. 2nd ed. The Yade Project. doi:10.5281/zenodo.34073. [Crossref], [Google Scholar]
  • Tan, Pengfei, Fei Shen, Biao Li, and Kun Zhou. 2019. “A Thermo-Metallurgical-Mechanical Model for Selective Laser Melting of Ti6Al4V.” Materials & Design 168 (April): 107642. doi:10.1016/j.matdes.2019.107642. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Tan, Lisa Jiaying, Wei Zhu, and Kun Zhou. 2020. “Recent Progress on Polymer Materials for Additive Manufacturing.” Advanced Functional Materials 30 (43): 1–54. doi:10.1002/adfm.202003062. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Wang, Xiaoqing, and Kevin Chou. 2018. “Effect of Support Structures on Ti-6Al-4V Overhang Parts Fabricated by Powder Bed Fusion Electron Beam Additive Manufacturing.” Journal of Materials Processing Technology 257 (February): 65–78. doi:10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2018.02.038. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Wang, Di, Yongqiang Yang, Ziheng Yi, and Xubin Su. 2013. “Research on the Fabricating Quality Optimization of the Overhanging Surface in SLM Process.” International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology 65 (9–12): 1471–1484. doi:10.1007/s00170-012-4271-4. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Wen, Peng, Maximilian Voshage, Lucas Jauer, Yanzhe Chen, Yu Qin, Reinhart Poprawe, and Johannes Henrich Schleifenbaum. 2018. “Laser Additive Manufacturing of Zn Metal Parts for Biodegradable Applications: Processing, Formation Quality and Mechanical Properties.” Materials and Design 155: 36–45. doi:10.1016/j.matdes.2018.05.057. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Wu, Yu-che, Cheng-hung San, Chih-hsiang Chang, Huey-jiuan Lin, Raed Marwan, Shuhei Baba, and Weng-Sing Hwang. 2018. “Numerical Modeling of Melt-Pool Behavior in Selective Laser Melting with Random Powder Distribution and Experimental Validation.” Journal of Materials Processing Technology 254 (November 2017): 72–78. doi:10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2017.11.032. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Yadroitsev, I., P. Krakhmalev, I. Yadroitsava, S. Johansson, and I. Smurov. 2013. “Energy Input Effect on Morphology and Microstructure of Selective Laser Melting Single Track from Metallic Powder.” Journal of Materials Processing Technology 213 (4): 606–613. doi:10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2012.11.014. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Yu, Wenhui, Swee Leong Sing, Chee Kai Chua, and Xuelei Tian. 2019. “Influence of Re-Melting on Surface Roughness and Porosity of AlSi10Mg Parts Fabricated by Selective Laser Melting.” Journal of Alloys and Compounds 792: 574–581. doi:10.1016/j.jallcom.2019.04.017. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
  • Zhang, Dongyun, Pudan Zhang, Zhen Liu, Zhe Feng, Chengjie Wang, and Yanwu Guo. 2018. “Thermofluid Field of Molten Pool and Its Effects during Selective Laser Melting (SLM) of Inconel 718 Alloy.” Additive Manufacturing 21 (100): 567–578. doi:10.1016/j.addma.2018.03.031. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]
Fig. 1. Schematic description of the laser welding process considered in this study.

Analysis of molten pool dynamics in laser welding with beam oscillation and filler wire feeding

Won-Ik Cho, Peer Woizeschke
Bremer Institut für angewandte Strahltechnik GmbH, Klagenfurter Straße 5, Bremen 28359, Germany

Received 30 July 2020, Revised 3 October 2020, Accepted 18 October 2020, Available online 1 November 2020.

Abstract

Molten pool flow and heat transfer in a laser welding process using beam oscillation and filler wire feeding were calculated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). There are various indirect methods used to analyze the molten pool dynamics in fusion welding. In this work, based on the simulation results, the surface fluctuation was directly measured to enable a more intuitive analysis, and then the signal was analyzed using the Fourier transform and wavelet transform in terms of the beam oscillation frequency and buttonhole formation. The 1st frequency (2 x beam oscillation frequency, the so-called chopping frequency), 2nd frequency (4 x beam oscillation frequency), and beam oscillation frequency components were the main components found. The 1st and 2nd frequency components were caused by the effect of the chopping process and lumped line energy. The beam oscillation frequency component was related to rapid, unstable molten pool behavior. The wavelet transform effectively analyzed the rapid behaviors based on the change of the frequency components over time.

Korea Abstract

빔 진동 및 필러 와이어 공급을 사용하는 레이저 용접 공정에서 용융 풀 흐름 및 열 전달은 CFD (전산 유체 역학)를 사용하여 계산되었습니다. 용융 용접에서 용융 풀 역학을 분석하는 데 사용되는 다양한 간접 방법이 있습니다.

본 연구에서는 시뮬레이션 결과를 바탕으로 보다 직관적 인 분석이 가능하도록 표면 변동을 직접 측정 한 후 빔 발진 주파수 및 버튼 홀 형성 측면에서 푸리에 변환 및 웨이블릿 변환을 사용하여 신호를 분석했습니다.

1 차 주파수 (2 x 빔 발진 주파수, 이른바 초핑 주파수), 2 차 주파수 (4 x 빔 발진 주파수) 및 빔 발진 주파수 성분이 발견 된 주요 구성 요소였습니다. 1 차 및 2 차 주파수 성분은 쵸핑 공정과 집중 라인 에너지의 영향으로 인해 발생했습니다.

빔 진동 주파수 성분은 빠르고 불안정한 용융 풀 동작과 관련이 있습니다. 웨이블릿 변환은 시간 경과에 따른 주파수 구성 요소의 변화를 기반으로 빠른 동작을 효과적으로 분석했습니다.

1 . 소개

융합 용접에서 용융 풀 역학은 용접 결함과 시각적 이음새 품질에 직접적인 영향을 미칩니다. 이러한 역학을 연구하기 위해 고속 카메라를 사용하는 직접 방법과 광학 또는 음향 신호를 사용하는 간접 방법과 같은 다양한 측정 방법을 사용하여 여러 실험 방법을 고려했습니다. 시간 도메인의 원래 신호는 특별히 주파수 도메인에서 변환 된 신호로 변환되어 용융 풀 동작에 영향을 미치는 주파수 성분을 분석합니다. Kotecki et al. (1972)는 고속 카메라를 사용하여 가스 텅스텐 아크 용접에서 용융 풀을 관찰했습니다. [1]. 그들은 120Hz 리플 DC 출력을 가진 용접 전원을 사용할 때 용융 풀 진동 주파수가 120Hz임을 보여주었습니다. 전원을 끈 후 진동 주파수는 용융 풀의 고유 주파수를 나타내는 용융 풀 크기와 관련이 있습니다. 진동은 응고 중에 용접 표면 스케일링을 생성했습니다. Zacksenhouse and Hardt (1983)는 레이저 섀도 잉 동작 측정 기술을 사용하여 가스 텅스텐 아크 용접에서 완전히 관통 된 용융 풀의 동작을 측정했습니다 [2] . 그들은 2.5mm 두께의 강판에서 6mm 풀 반경 (고정 용접)에 대해 용융 풀의 고유 주파수가 18.9Hz라는 것을 발견했습니다. Semak et al. (1995) 고속 카메라를 사용하여 레이저 스폿 용접에서 용융 풀 및 키홀 역학 조사 [3]. 그들은 깊이가 약 3mm이고 반경이 약 3mm 인 용융 풀에서 200Hz의 낮은 체적 진동 주파수를 관찰했습니다. 0.45mm Aendenroomer와 den Ouden (1998)은 강철의 펄스 가스 텅스텐 아크 용접에서 용융 풀 진동을보고했습니다 [4] . 그들은 침투 깊이에 따라 진동 모드 변화를 보였고 주파수는 50Hz에서 150Hz 사이에서 변화했습니다. 주파수는 완전히 침투 된 용융 풀에서 더 낮았습니다. Hermans와 den Ouden (1999)은 단락 가스 금속 아크 용접에서 용융 풀 진동을 분석했습니다. [5]. 그들은 용융 풀의 단락 주파수와 고유 주파수가 같을 때 부분적으로 침투 된 용융 풀의 경우 공정 안정성이 향상되었음을 보여주었습니다. Yudodibroto et al. (2004)는 가스 텅스텐 아크 용접에서 용융 풀 진동에 대한 필러 와이어의 영향을 조사했습니다 [6] . 그들은 금속 전달이 특히 부분적으로 침투 된 용융 풀에서 진동 거동을 방해한다는 것을 보여주었습니다. Geiger et al. (2009) 레이저 키홀 용접에서 발광 분석 [7]. 신호의 주파수 분석을 사용하여 용융 풀 (1.5kHz 미만)과 키홀 (약 3kHz)에 해당하는 진동 주파수 범위를 찾았습니다. Kägeler와 Schmidt (2010)는 레이저 용접에서 용융 풀 크기의 변화를 관찰하기 위해 고속 카메라를 사용했습니다 [8] . 그들은 용융 풀에서 지배적 인 저주파 진동 성분 (100Hz 미만)을 발견했습니다. Shi et al. (2015) 고속 카메라를 사용하여 펄스 가스 텅스텐 아크 용접에서 용융 풀 진동 주파수 분석 [9]. 그들은 용접 침투 깊이가 작을수록 용융 풀의 진동 빈도가 더 높다는 것을 보여주었습니다. 추출 된 진동 주파수는 완전 용입 용접의 경우 85Hz 미만 이었지만 부분 용입 용접의 경우 110Hz에서 125Hz 사이였습니다. Volpp와 Vollertsen (2016)은 레이저 키홀 역학을 분석하기 위해 광학 신호를 사용했습니다 [10] . 그들은 공간 레이저 강도 분포로 인해 0.8에서 154 kHz 사이의 고주파 범위에서 피크를 발견했습니다. 위에서 언급 한 실험적 접근법은 공정 조건, 측정 방법 및 측정 된 위치에 따라 수십 Hz에서 수십 kHz까지 광범위한 용융 풀 역학에 대한 결과를 보여 주었다는 점에 유의해야합니다.

융합 용접에서 용융 풀 역학을 연구하기 위해 분석 접근 방식도 사용되었습니다. Zacksenhouse와 Hardt (1983)는 2.5mm 두께의 강판에서 대칭형 완전 관통 용융 풀의 고유 진동수를 계산했습니다 [2] . 매스 스프링 해석 모델을 사용하여 용융 풀 반경 6mm (고정 용접)에 대해 20.4Hz (실험에서 18.9Hz)의 고유 진동수와 3mm 풀 반경 (연속 용접)에 대해 40Hz의 고유 진동수를 예측했습니다. ). Postacioglu et al. (1989)는 원통형 용융 풀과 키홀을 가정하여 레이저 용접의 용융 풀에서 키홀 진동의 고유 진동수를 계산했습니다 .. 특정 열쇠 구멍 모양의 경우 약 900Hz의 기본 주파수가 계산되었습니다. Postacioglu et al. (1991)은 또한 레이저 용접에서 용접 속도를 고려하기 위해 타원형 용융 풀의 고유 진동수를 계산했습니다 [12] . 그들은 타원형 용융 풀의 모양이 고유 진동수에 영향을 미친다는 것을 보여주었습니다. 고유 진동수는 축의 길이 비율이 낮았으며, 즉 타원의 반장 축과 반 단축의 비율이 낮았습니다. Kroos et al. (1993)은 축 대칭 용융 풀과 키홀을 가정하여 레이저 키홀 용접의 동적 거동에 대한 이론적 모델을 개발했습니다 .. 키홀 폐쇄 시간은 0.1ms였으며 안정성 분석은 약 500Hz의 주파수에서 공진과 같은 진동을 예측했습니다. Maruo와 Hirata (1993)는 완전 관통 아크 용접에서 용융 풀을 모델링했습니다 [14] . 그들은 녹은 웅덩이가 정적 타원 모양을 가지고 있다고 가정했습니다. 그들은 고유 진동수와 진동 모드 사이의 관계를 조사하고 용융 풀 크기가 감소함에 따라 고유 진동수가 증가한다는 것을 보여주었습니다. Klein et al. (1994)는 원통형 키홀 모양을 사용하여 완전 침투 레이저 용접에서 키홀 진동을 연구했습니다 [15] . 그들은 점성 감쇠로 인해 키홀 진동이 낮은 kHz 범위로 제한된다는 것을 보여주었습니다. Klein et al. (1996)은 또한 레이저 출력의 작은 변동이 강한 키홀 진동으로 이어질 수 있음을 보여주었습니다[16] . 그들은 키홀 진동의 주요 공진 주파수 범위가 500 ~ 3500Hz라는 것을 발견했습니다. Andersen et al. (1997)은 고정 가스 텅스텐 아크 용접 [17] 에서 고정 된 원통형 모양을 가정하여 용융 풀의 고유 진동수를 예측 했으며 완전 용입 용접에서 용융 풀 폭이 증가함에 따라 감소하는 것으로 나타났습니다. 3.175mm 두께의 강판의 경우 주파수는 20Hz ~ 100Hz 범위였습니다. 위에 표시된 분석 방법은 일반적으로 단순한 용융 풀 모양을 가정하고 고유 진동수를 계산했습니다. 이것은 단순한 용융 풀 모양으로 고정 용접 공정을 분석하는 데 충분하지만 대부분의 용접 사례를 설명하는 과도 용접 공정에서 용융 풀 역학 분석에는 적합하지 않습니다.

반면에 수치 접근 방식은 고온 및 강한 빛과 같은 실험적 제한없이 자세한 정보를 제공하기 때문에 용융 풀 역학을 분석하는 이점이 있습니다. 전산 유체 역학 (CFD)의 수치 시뮬레이션 기술이 발전함에 따라 용융 풀 역학 분석에 대한 많은 연구가 수행되었습니다. 실제 용융 표면 변화는 VOF (체적 부피) 방법을 사용하여 계산할 수 있습니다. Cho et al. (2010) CO 2 레이저-아크 하이브리드 용접 공정을 위한 수학적 모델 개발 [18], 구형 방울이 생성 된 금속 와이어의 용융 과정이 와이어 공급 속도와 일치한다고 가정합니다. 그들은 필러 와이어가 희석되는 용융 풀 동작을 보여주었습니다. Cho et al. (2012)는 높은 빔 품질과 높은 금속 흡수율로 인해 업계에서 널리 사용되는 디스크 레이저 키홀 용접으로 수학적 모델을 확장했습니다 [19] . 그들은 열쇠 구멍에서 레이저 광선 번들의 다중 반사를 고려하고 용융 풀에서 keyholing과 같은 빠른 표면 변화를 자세히보고했습니다. 최근 CFD 시뮬레이션은 험핑 (Otto et al., 2016 [20] ) 및 기공 (Lin et al., 2017 [21] )과 같은보다 구체적인 현상을 분석하는데도 사용되었습니다 .) 레이저 용접에서. 그러나 용융 풀 역학과 관련된 연구는 거의 수행되지 않았습니다. Ko et al. (2000)은 수치 시뮬레이션을 사용하여 가스 텅스텐 아크 용접 풀의 동적 거동을 조사했습니다 [22] . 그들은 완전히 침투 된 용융 풀이 부분적으로 침투 된 풀보다 낮은 주파수에서 진동한다는 것을 보여주었습니다. 진동은 수십 분의 1 초 내에 무시할 수있는 크기로 감쇠되었습니다. Geiger et al. (2009)는 또한 수치 시뮬레이션을 사용하여 레이저 용접에서 용융 풀 거동을 보여주었습니다 [7]. 그들은 계산 된 증발 속도를 주파수 분석에 사용하여 공정에서 나오는 빛의 실험 결과와 비교했습니다. 판금 레이저 용접에서 중요한 공간 빔 진동 및 추가 필러 재료가있는 공정에 대한 용융 풀 역학에 대한 연구도 불충분합니다. Hu et al. (2018)은 금속 전달 메커니즘을 밝히기 위해 전자빔 3D 프린팅에서 와이어 공급 모델링을 수행했습니다. 그들은 주로 열 입력에 의해 결정되는 액체 브리지 전이, 액적 전이 및 중간 전이의 세 가지 유형의 금속 전달 모드를 보여주었습니다 .. Meng et al. (2020)은 레이저 빔 용접에서 용융 풀에 필러 와이어에 의해 추가 된 추가 요소의 전자기 교반 효과를 모델링했습니다. 용가재의 연속적인 액체 브릿지 이동이 가정되었고, 그 결과 전자기 교반의 영향이 키홀 깊이에 미미한 반면 필러 와이어 혼합을 향상 시켰습니다 [24] . Cho et al. (2017) 용접 방향에 수직 인 1 차원 빔 진동과 용접 라인을 따라 공급되는 필러 와이어를 사용하여 레이저 용접을위한 시뮬레이션 모델 개발 [25]. 그들은 시뮬레이션을 사용하여 특정 용접 현상, 즉 용융 풀의 단추 구멍 형성을 보여주었습니다. Cho et al. (2018)은 다중 반사 수와 전력 흡수량의 푸리에 변환을 사용하여 주파수 영역에서 소위 쵸핑 주파수 (2 x 빔 발진 주파수) 성분을 발견했습니다 [26] . 그러나 그들은 용융 풀 역학을 분석하기 위해 간접 신호를 사용했습니다. 따라서보다 직관적 인 분석을 위해서는 표면의 변동을 직접 측정해야합니다.

이 연구는 이전 연구에서 개발 된 레이저 용접 모델을 사용하여 3 차원 과도 CFD 시뮬레이션을 수행하여 빔 진동 및 필러 와이어 공급을 포함한 레이저 용접 공정에서 용융 풀 역학을 조사합니다. 용융 된 풀 표면의 시간적 변화는 시뮬레이션 결과에서 추출되었습니다. 추출 된 데이터는 주파수 영역뿐만 아니라 시간-주파수 영역에서도 분석되었습니다. 신호 처리를 통해 도출 된 결과는 특징적인 용융 풀 역학을 나타내며 빔 진동 주파수 및 단추 구멍 형성 측면에서 레이저 용접의 역학을 줄일 수있는 잠재력을 제공합니다.

2 . 방법론

그림 1도 1은 용접 방향에 수직 인 1 차원 빔 진동과 용접 라인을 따라 공급되는 필러 와이어를 사용하는 레이저 용접 프로세스의 개략적 설명을 보여줍니다. 1mm 두께의 알루미늄 합금 (AlSi1MgMn) 시트는 시트 표면에 초점을 맞춘 멀티 kW 파이버 레이저 (YLR-8000S, IPG Photonics, USA)를 사용하여 용접되었습니다. 시트는 에어 갭이있는 맞대기 이음으로 정렬되었습니다. 1 차원 스캐너 (ILV DC-Scanner, Ingenieurbüro für Lasertechnik + Verschleiss-Schutz (ILV), 독일)를 사용하여 레이저 빔의 1 차원 정현파 진동을 실현했습니다. 이 스캔 시스템에서 최대 진동 폭은 250Hz의 진동 주파수에서 1.4mm입니다. 오정렬에 대한 공차를 개선하기 위해 동일한 최대 너비 값이 사용되었습니다. 와이어 공급 시스템은 1을 공급했습니다. 2mm 직경의 알루미늄 합금 (AlSi5) 필러 와이어를 일정한 공급 속도로 에어 갭을 채 웁니다. 1mm 에어 갭의 경우 와이어 이송 속도는 용접 속도의 1.5 배 값으로 설정되었으며 참조 실험 조건은 문헌에서 얻었습니다 (Schultz, 2015 참조).[27] ).

그림 1

CFD 시뮬레이션은 레이저 용접에서 열 전달 및 용융 풀 동작을 계산하기 위해 수행되었습니다. 그림 2 는 CFD 시뮬레이션을위한 계산 영역을 보여줍니다. 실온에서 1.2mm 직경의 필러 와이어가 공급되고 레이저 빔이 진동했습니다. 1mm 두께의 공작물이 용접 속도로 왼쪽에서 오른쪽으로 이동했습니다. 0.1mm의 최소 메쉬 크기가 도메인에서 생성되었습니다. 침투 깊이가 더 깊은 이전 연구의 메쉬 테스트 결과는 0.2mm 이하의 메쉬 크기로 시뮬레이션 정확도가 확보 된 것으로 나타 났으므로 [28] 본 연구에서 사용 된 메쉬 크기가 적절할 수 있습니다. 도메인을 구성하는 세포의 수는 약 120 만 개였습니다. 1 번 테이블사용 된 레이저 용접 매개 변수를 보여줍니다. 용융 풀 역학 측면에서 다양한 진동 주파수와 에어 갭 크기가 고려되었으며 12 개의 용접 사례가 표 2 에 나와 있습니다. 표 3 은 시뮬레이션에 사용 된 알루미늄 합금과 순수 알루미늄 (Cho et al., 2018 [26] )의 표면 장력 계수를 제외하고 온도와 무관 한 열-물리적 재료 특성을 보여줍니다 . 여기서 표면 장력 계수는 액체 온도에서 온도와 표면 장력 계수 사이의 선형 관계를 가진 유일한 온도 의존적 ​​특성이었습니다.

그림 2

표 1 . . 레이저 용접 매개 변수.

레이저 용접 매개 변수
레이저 빔 파워3.0kW
빔 허리 반경50µm *
용접 속도6.0m / 분
와이어 공급 속도9.0m / 분
빔 진동 폭1.4mm
빔 진동 주파수100Hz, 150Hz, 200Hz, 250Hz
에어 갭 크기0.8mm, 0.9mm, 1.0mm, 1.1mm

반경은 1.07μm의 파장, 4.2mm • mrad의 빔 품질, 시준 초점 거리 및 초점 렌즈 200mm, 광섬유 직경 100μm의 원형 빔을 가정하여 계산되었습니다.

표 2 . 이 연구에서 고려한 용접 사례.

에어 갭 크기 [mm]진동 주파수 [Hz]
100150200250
0.9사례 1엑스엑스엑스
1.0사례 2사례 4사례 7사례 10
1.1사례 3사례 5사례 8사례 11
1.2엑스사례 6사례 912면

표 3 . 시뮬레이션에 사용 된 열 물리적 재료 특성 (Cho et al., 2018 [26] ).

특성상징
밀도ρ2700kg / m3
열 전도성케이1.7×102Wm K
점도ν1.15×10−삼kg / ms
표면 장력 계수 티엘*γ엘0.871 J / m2
표면 장력 온도 구배 *−1.55×10−4J / m 2 K
표면 장력 계수γγ엘−ㅏ(티−티엘)
비열8.5×102J / kg K
융합 잠열h에스엘3.36×105J / kg
기화 잠열 *hV1.05×107J / kg
Solidus 온도티에스847K
Liquidus 온도티엘905K
끓는점 *티비2743K

순수한 알루미늄.

시뮬레이션을 위해 단상 뉴턴 유체와 비압축성 층류가 가정되었습니다. 질량, 운동량 및 에너지 보존의 지배 방정식을 해결하여 계산 영역에서 속도, 압력 및 온도 분포를 얻었습니다. VOF 방법은 자유 표면 경계를 찾는 데 사용되었습니다. 스칼라 보존 방정식을 추가로 도입하여 용융 풀에서 충전재의 부피 분율을 계산했습니다. 시뮬레이션에 사용 된 레이저 용접의 수학적 모델은 다음과 같습니다. 레이저 빔은 가우스와 같은 전력 밀도 분포를 기반으로 697 개의 광선 에너지 번들로 나뉩니다. 광선 추적 방법을 사용하여 다중 반사를 고려했습니다. 재료에 대한 레이저 빔의 반사 (또는 흡수) 에너지는 프레 넬 반사 모델을 사용하여 계산되었습니다. 온도에 따른 흡수율의 변화를 고려 하였다. 혼합물의 흡수율은베이스 및 충전제 물질 분획의 가중 평균을 사용하여 계산되었습니다. 반동 압력과 부력도 고려되었습니다. 경계 조건으로 에너지와 압력의 균형은 VOF 방법으로 계산 된 자유 표면에서 고려되었습니다. 레이저 용접 모델과 지배 방정식은 FLOW-3D v.11.2 (2017), Flow Science, Inc.에서 유한 차분 방법과 유한 체적 방법을 사용하여 이산화되고 해결되었습니다. 경계 조건으로 에너지와 압력의 균형은 VOF 방법으로 계산 된 자유 표면에서 고려되었습니다. 레이저 용접 모델과 지배 방정식은 FLOW-3D v.11.2 (2017), Flow Science, Inc.에서 유한 차분 방법과 유한 체적 방법을 사용하여 이산화되고 해결되었습니다. 경계 조건으로 에너지와 압력의 균형은 VOF 방법으로 계산 된 자유 표면에서 고려되었습니다. 레이저 용접 모델과 지배 방정식은 FLOW-3D v.11.2 (2017), Flow Science, Inc.에서 유한 차분 방법과 유한 체적 방법을 사용하여 이산화되고 해결되었습니다.[29] . 계산에는 48GB RAM이 장착 된 Intel® Xeon® 프로세서 E5649로 구성된 워크 스테이션이 사용되었습니다. 계산 시스템을 사용하여 0.2 초 레이저 용접을 시뮬레이션하는 데 약 18 시간이 걸렸습니다. 지배 방정식 (Cho and Woizeschke, 2020 [30] ) 및 레이저 용접 모델 (Cho et al., 2018 [26] )에 대한 자세한 설명은 부록 A 에서 확인할 수 있습니다 .

그림 3 은 용융 풀 변동의 직접 측정에 대한 개략적 설명을 보여줍니다. 용융 풀의 역학을 분석하기 위해 시뮬레이션 중에 용융 풀 표면의 시간적 변동 운동을 측정했습니다. 상단 및 하단 표면 모두에서 10kHz의 샘플링 주파수로 변동을 측정 한 반면, 측정 위치는 X 축의 레이저 빔 위치에서 2mm 떨어진 용접 중심선에있었습니다. 그림 4시간 신호를 분석하는 데 사용되는 푸리에 변환 및 웨이블릿 변환의 개략적 설명을 보여줍니다. 측정 된 시간 신호는 고속 푸리에 변환 (FFT) 방법을 사용하여 주파수 영역으로 변환되었습니다. 결과는 측정 기간 동안 평균화 된 주파수 성분의 크기를 보여줍니다. 웨이블릿 변환 방법은 시간-주파수 영역에서 국부적 인 특성을 찾는 데 사용되었습니다. 결과는 주파수 구성 요소의 크기뿐만 아니라 시간 변화도 보여줍니다.

그림 3
그림 4

3 . 결과

이 연구 에서는 표 2에 표시된 12 가지 용접 사례 를 시뮬레이션했습니다. 그림 5 는 3 차원 시뮬레이션 결과를 평면도 와 바닥면으로 보여줍니다. 결과는 용융 된 풀의 거동에 따라 분류 할 수 있습니다 : 단추 구멍 형성 없음 (녹색), 안정 또는 불안정 단추 구멍 있음 (파란색), 불안정한 단추 구멍으로 인한 구멍 결함 (빨간색). 일반적인 열쇠 구멍보다 훨씬 큰 직경을 가진 단추 구멍은 레이저 용접의 특정 진동 조건에서 나타날 수 있습니다 (Vollertsen, 2016 [31]). 진동 주파수가 증가함에 따라 용접 이음 부 코스 및 스케일링 측면에서 시각적 이음새 품질이 향상되었습니다. 고주파에서 스케일링은 무시할 수있을 정도 였고 코스는 균질했습니다. 언더컷 결함의 발생도 감소했습니다. 그러나 관통 결함 부족 (case 7, case 10)이 나타났다. 에어 갭은 단추 구멍 형성에 중요했습니다. 에어 갭 크기가 증가함에 따라 단추 구멍이 더 쉽게 형성되었지만 구멍 결함으로 더 쉽게 남아 있습니다. 안정적인 단추 구멍 형성은 고려 된 공극 조건의 좁은 영역에서만 나타납니다.

그림 5

그림 6 은 시뮬레이션과 실험에서 융합 영역의 모양을 보여줍니다. 버튼 홀이없는 경우 1, 불안정한 버튼 홀 형성이있는 경우 8, 안정적인 버튼 홀 형성이있는 경우 11의 3 가지 경우에 대해 시뮬레이션 결과와 실험 결과를 비교하여 유사성을 나타냈다. 본 연구에서 고려한 용접 조건의 경우 표면 품질 결과는 Fig. 5 와 같이 큰 차이를 보였으 나 단면 융착 영역 [26] 과 형상은 큰 차이를 보이지 않았다.

그림 6

무화과. 7 과 8 은 각각 100Hz와 250Hz의 진동 주파수에서 시뮬레이션 결과를 기반으로 분석 된 용융 풀 역학과 시뮬레이션 및 실험 결과를 보여줍니다. 이전 연구에서 볼 수 있듯이 레이저 빔의 진동 주파수는 단추 구멍 형성과 밀접한 관련이 있습니다 (Cho et al., 2018 [26] 참조 ). 그림 7 (a) 및 (b)는 각각 시뮬레이션 및 실험을 기반으로 한 진동 주파수 100Hz에서 대표적인 용융 풀 동작을 보여줍니다. 완전히 관통 된 키홀 및 버튼 홀 형성은 관찰되지 않았으며 응고 후 거친 비드 표면이 남았습니다. 그림 7(c)와 (d)는 각각 윗면과 바닥면의 표면 변동에 대한 시뮬레이션 결과를 기반으로 한 용융 풀 역학 분석을 보여줍니다. 샘플링 데이터는 상단 표면이 공작물의 상단 표면 위치에서 평균적으로 변동하는 반면 하단 표면은 공작물의 하단 표면 위치에서 평균적으로 변동하는 것으로 나타났습니다. 표면 변동의 푸리에 변환 및 웨이블릿 변환 결과는 명확한 1  주파수 (2 x 빔 발진 주파수, 이른바 초핑 주파수, Cho et al., 2018 [26] 참조 ) 및 2  주파수 (4 x 빔 발진)를 보여줍니다. 주파수) 두 표면의 구성 요소, 그러나 바닥 표면과 첫 번째에 대한 결과주파수 성분이 더 강합니다. 반면 그림 8 (a)와 (b)에서 보는 바와 같이 250Hz의 진동 주파수에서 시뮬레이션과 실험 결과는 안정된 버튼 홀 형성과 응고 후 매끄러운 비드 표면을 나타냈다. 그림 8 의 샘플링 신호의 진폭은 그림 7 의 진폭 보다 작으며 푸리에 변환 및 웨이블릿 변환의 결과에서 중요한 주파수 성분이 발견되지 않았습니다.

Fi 7
그림 8

Fig. 9 는 진동 주파수 200Hz에서 시뮬레이션 결과를 바탕으로 분석 된 용융 풀 역학과 시뮬레이션 및 실험 결과를 보여준다. 이 주파수에서 Fig. 9 (a)와 (b) 에서 보는 바와 같이 , 시뮬레이션과 실험 모두에서 불안정한 buttonhole 거동이 관찰되었다. 바닥면에서 샘플링 데이터의 푸리에 변환 및 웨이블릿 변환의 결과 빔 발진 주파수 성분이 발견되었습니다.

그림 9

4 . 토론

시뮬레이션 및 실험 결과는 비드 표면 품질이 향상되고 빔 진동 주파수가 증가함에 따라 버튼 홀이 형성되는 것으로 나타났습니다. 표면의 변동 데이터에 대한 푸리에 변환 및 웨이블릿 변환의 결과에 따라 다음과 같은 주요 주파수 구성 요소가 발견되었습니다. 1  및 2 버튼 홀 형성이없는 주파수, 불안정한 용융 풀 거동이있는 빔 진동 주파수, 안정적인 버튼 홀 형성이있는 중요한 주파수 성분이 없습니다. 이들 중 불안정한 용융 풀 동작과 관련된 빔 진동 주파수 성분은 완전히 관통 된 키홀과 반복적으로 생성 및 붕괴되는 불안정한 버튼 홀의 특성으로 인해 웨이블릿 변환 결과에서 명확한 실선 형태로 나타나지 않았습니다. 분석 결과는 윗면보다 바닥면에서 더 분명했습니다. 이는 필러 와이어 공급 및 키홀 링 공정에서 강한 하향 흐름으로 인해 용융 풀 역학이 바닥 표면 영역에서 더 강했기 때문입니다. 진동 주파수가 증가함에 따라 용융 풀 역학과 상단 표면과 하단 표면 간의 차이가 감소했습니다.

첫 번째 주파수 (2 x 빔 진동 주파수)는이 연구에서 관찰 된 가장 분명한 구성 요소였습니다. Schultz et al. (2018)은 또한 실험을 통해 동일한 성분을 발견했습니다 [32] , 용융 풀 표면 운동에 대한 푸리에 분석을 수행했습니다. 첫 번째 주파수 성분은 빔 발진주기 당 두 개의 주요 이벤트가 있음을 의미합니다. 이것은 레이저 빔이 빔 진동주기 당 두 번 와이어를 절단하거나 절단하는 프로세스와 일치합니다. 용융 된 와이어 팁은 낮은 진동 주파수에서 고르지 않고 날카로운 모서리를 갖는 것으로 나타났습니다 (Cho et al., 2018 [26] ). 이것은 첫 번째 원인이 될 수 있습니다.용융 된 풀에서 지배적이되는 주파수 성분. 진동 주파수가 증가하면 용융 된 와이어 팁이 더 균일 해 지므로 효과가 감소합니다. 용접 방향으로의 정현파 횡 방향 빔 진동을 통한 에너지 집중도 빔 진동주기 당 두 번 발생합니다. 그림 10 은 발진 주파수에 따른 레이저 빔의 라인 에너지 (단위 길이 당 에너지)의 변화를 보여줍니다. 그림 10 b) 의 라인 에너지 는 레이저 출력을 공정 속도로 나누어 계산했습니다. 여기서 처리 속도는(w이자형엘디나는엔지에스피이자형이자형디)2+(디(에스나는엔유에스영형나는디ㅏ엘wㅏV이자형나는엔에프나는지.10ㅏ))디티)2. 낮은 발진 주파수에서 라인 에너지는 발진 폭의 양쪽 끝에 과도하게 집중됩니다. 이러한 집중된 에너지는 과도한 키홀 링 프로세스를 초래하므로 언더컷 결함이 나타날 수있는 높은 흐름 역학이 발생합니다. 진동 주파수가 증가함에 따라 집중 에너지는 더 작은 조각으로 나뉩니다. 따라서 높은 진동 주파수에서 과도한 키홀 링 및 수반되는 언더컷 결함의 발생이 감소되었습니다. 위에서 언급 한 두 가지 현상 (불균일 한 와이어 팁과 집중된 라인 에너지)은 빔 발진주기 당 두 번 발생하며 발진 주파수가 증가하면 그 효과가 감소합니다. 따라서 저주파 에서 2  주파수 성분 (4 x 빔 발진 주파수)이 나타나는 것은이 두 현상의 동시 작용입니다.

그림 10

두 가지 현상 중 첫 번째 주파수 에 대한 주된 효과 는 집중된 라인 에너지입니다. Cho et al. (2018)은 전력 흡수 데이터를 푸리에 변환을 사용하여 분석했을 때 1  주파수 성분이 더 우세 해졌고, 2  주파수 성분은 발진 주파수가 증가함에 따라 상대적으로 약화 되었음을 보여주었습니다 [26] . 용융 된 와이어 팁은 또한 빈도가 증가함에 따라 더욱 균일 해졌습니다. 결과는 진동 주파수의 증가가 용융 풀에 대한 와이어의 영향을 제거하는 것으로 나타났습니다. 따라서 발진 주파수가 증가함에 따라 라인 에너지 집중의 영향 만 남을 수 있습니다. 그림 10 과 같이, 집중 선 에너지가 작은 조각으로 분할되기 때문에 효과도 감소하지만 최대 값이 변경되지 않았기 때문에 여전히 효과적입니다.

빔 진동 주파수 성분은 불안정한 단추 구멍 및 열쇠 구멍 붕괴를 수반하는 불안정한 용융 풀 동작과 관련이 있습니다. 언더컷 결함이있는 케이스 8 (발진 주파수 200Hz)에서 발진 주파수 성분이 관찰되었습니다. 이것은 특히 완전히 관통 된 열쇠 구멍과 불안정한 단추 구멍에서 불안정한 용융 풀 동작을 보여주었습니다. 경우 10 (진동 주파수 250Hz)의 경우 상대적으로 건강한 비드가 형성 되었으나, 도 11 (a) 와 같이 웨이블릿 변환 결과에서 t1의 시간 간격으로 진동 주파수 성분이 관찰되었다 . 이 시간 간격 t1의 용융 풀 거동은 그림 11에 나와 있습니다.(비). 완전히 관통 된 열쇠 구멍이 즉시 무너지는 것이 분명하게 관찰되었습니다. 이것은 진동 주파수 성분이 불안정한 용융 풀 거동과 밀접한 관련이 있음을 보여줍니다. 발견 된 주파수 성분으로부터 완전히 관통 된 열쇠 구멍과 같은 불안정한 용융 풀 거동을 예측할 수 있습니다. 완전히 관통 된 키홀이 반복적으로 붕괴되기 때문에 빔 진동 주파수 성분은 그림 9 (d) 와 같이 웨이블릿 변환 결과에서 명확한 실선 형태로 보이지 않습니다 .

그림 11

Cho and Woizeschke (2020)에 따르면 단추 구멍 형성은 자체 지속 가능한 카테 노이드처럼 작용하기 때문에 용융 풀 역학을 감소시킬 수 있습니다 [30] . 그림 12 는 버튼 홀 형성 측면에서 t2의 시간 간격에서 용융 풀 거동의 변화를 보여줍니다. 단추 구멍은 t2의 간헐적 인 부분에만 형성되었습니다. 1st 이후이 시간 동안 웨이블릿 변환의 결과로 주파수 성분이 사라졌고, 버튼 홀 형성은 용융 풀 역학을 줄이는 데 효과적이었습니다. 따라서, 웨이블릿 변환의 결과로 주파수 성분이 지워지는 것을 관찰함으로써 버튼 홀 형성을 예측할 수있다. 이와 관련하여 웨이블릿 변환 기술은 시간에 따른 용융 풀 변화를 나타낼 수 있습니다. 이 기술은 향후 용융 풀 동작을 모니터링하는 데 사용될 수 있습니다.

그림 12

5 . 결론

CFD 시뮬레이션 결과를 사용하여 빔 진동 및 필러 와이어 공급을 통한 레이저 용접에서 용융 풀 역학을 분석 할 수있었습니다. 용융 풀 표면의 변동 데이터의 푸리에 변환 및 웨이블릿 변환은 여기서 용융 풀 역학을 분석하는 데 사용되었습니다. 결과는 다음과 같은 결론으로 ​​이어집니다.1.

 주파수 (2 x 빔 발진 주파수, 이른바 초핑 주파수), 2  주파수 (4 x 빔 발진 주파수) 및 빔 발진 주파수 성분은 푸리에 변환 및 웨이블릿 변환 분석에서 발견 된 주요 성분이었습니다.2.

 주파수와 2  주파수 성분 의 출현은 두 가지 사건, 즉 레이저 빔에 의한 필러 와이어의 절단 공정과 집중된 레이저 라인 에너지의 효과의 결과였습니다. 이는 빔 진동주기 당 두 번 발생했습니다. 따라서 두 번째 주파수 성분은 동시 작용으로 인해 발생했습니다. 빔 진동 주파수 성분은 불안정한 용융 풀 동작과 관련이 있습니다. 구성 요소는 열쇠 구멍과 단추 구멍의 붕괴와 함께 나타났습니다.삼.

낮은 발진 주파수에서는 1  주파수와 2  주파수 성분이 함께 나타 났지만 발진 주파수가 증가함에 따라 그 크기가 함께 감소했습니다. 집중 선 에너지는 주파수가 증가함에 따라 최대 값이 변하지 않는 반면, 잘게 잘린 선단이 평평 해져 그 효과가 사라졌기 때문에 쵸핑 프로세스보다 더 큰 영향을 미쳤습니다.4.

용융 풀 거동의 빠른 시간적 변화는 웨이블릿 변환 방법을 사용하여 분석되었습니다. 따라서이 방법은 열쇠 구멍 및 단추 구멍의 형성 및 붕괴와 같은 일시적인 용융 풀 변화를 해석하는 데 사용할 수 있습니다.

CRediT 저자 기여 성명

조원익 : 개념화, 방법론, 소프트웨어, 검증, 형식 분석, 조사, 데이터 큐 레이션, 글쓰기-원고, 글쓰기-검토 및 편집. Peer Woizeschke : 감독, 프로젝트 관리, 작문-검토 및 편집.

경쟁 관심의 선언

저자는이 논문에보고 된 작업에 영향을 미칠 수있는 경쟁적인 재정적 이해 관계 나 개인적 관계가 없다고 선언합니다.

감사의 말

이 작업은 알루미늄 합금 용접 역량 센터 (Centr-Al)에서 수행되었습니다. Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, 프로젝트 번호 290705638 , “용접 풀 캐비티를 생성하여 레이저 깊은 용입 용접에서 매끄러운 이음매 표면”) 의 자금은 감사하게도 인정됩니다.

부록 A . 사용 된 지배 방정식 및 레이저 용접 모델

1 . 지배 방정식 (Cho 및 Woizeschke [ 30 ])

-대량 보존 방정식,(A1)∇·V→=미디엄˙에스ρ어디, V→속도 벡터입니다. ρ밀도이고 미디엄˙에스필러 와이어를 공급하여 질량 소스의 비율입니다. 단위미디엄에스단위 부피당 질량입니다. WFS (와이어 공급 속도) 및 필러 와이어의 직경과 같은 매스 소스 및 필러 와이어 조건,디w계산 영역에서 다음과 같은 관계가 있습니다.(A2)미디엄=∫미디엄에스디V=미디엄0+씨×ρ×W에프에스×π디w24×티어디, 미디엄총 질량, 미디엄0초기 총 질량, V볼륨입니다.씨단위 변환 계수입니다. 티시간입니다.

-운동량 보존 방정식,(A3)∂V→∂티+V→·∇V→=−1ρ∇피+ν∇2V→−케이V→+미디엄˙에스ρ(V에스→−V→)+지어디, 피압력입니다. ν동적 점도입니다. 케이뭉툭한 영역의 다공성 매체 모델에 대한 항력 계수, V에스→질량 소스에 대한 속도 벡터입니다. 지신체 힘으로 인한 신체 가속도입니다.

-에너지 절약 방정식,(A4)∂h∂티+V→·∇h=1ρ∇·(케이∇티)+h˙에스어디, h특정 엔탈피입니다. 케이열전도율, 티온도이고 h˙에스특정 엔탈피 소스로, Eq 의 질량 소스와 연관됩니다 (A1) . 계산 영역의 총 에너지,이자형다음과 같이 계산됩니다.(A5)이자형=∫미디엄에스h에스디V=∫미디엄에스씨Vw티w디V어디, 씨Vw질량 원의 비열, 티w질량 소스의 온도입니다.

또한, 엔탈피 기반 연속체 모델을 사용하여 고체-액체 상 전이를 고려했습니다.

-VOF 방정식,(A6)∂에프∂티+∇·(V→에프)=에프˙에스어디, 에프유체가 차지하는 부피 분율이며 0과 1 사이의 값을 가지며 에프˙에스질량의 소스와 연결된 유체의 체적 분율의 비율 식. (A1) . 질량 공급원에 해당하는 부피 분율은 다음에 할당됩니다.에프에스.

-스칼라 보존 방정식,(A7)∂Φ∂티+∇·(V→Φ)=Φ˙에스어디, Φ필러 와이어의 스칼라 값입니다. 셀의 유체가 전적으로 필러 와이어로 구성된 경우Φ1이고 유체에 대한 필러 와이어의 부피 분율에 따라 0과 1 사이에서 변경됩니다. Φ˙에스Eq 에서 질량 소스에 연결된 스칼라 소스의 비율입니다 (A1) . 스칼라 소스는 전적으로 필러 와이어이기 때문에 1에 할당됩니다. 확산 효과는 고려되지 않았습니다.

2 . 레이저 용접 모델 (Cho et al. [26] )

흡수율을 계산하기 위해 프레 넬 반사 모델을 사용했습니다. ㅏ=1−ρ씨재료의 표면 상에 도시 된 바와 같이 수학 식. (A8) 원 편광 빔의 경우.(A8)ㅏ=1−ρ씨=1−12(ρ에스+ρ피)어디,ρ에스=(엔1씨영형에스θ−피)2+큐2(엔1씨영형에스θ+피)2+큐2,ρ에스=(피−엔1에스나는엔θ티ㅏ엔θ)2+큐2(피+엔1에스나는엔θ티ㅏ엔θ)2+큐2,피2=12{[엔22−케이22−(엔1에스나는엔θ)2]2+2엔22케이22+[엔22−케이22−(엔1에스나는엔θ)2]},큐2=12{[엔22−케이22−(엔1에스나는엔θ)2]2+2엔22케이22−[엔22−케이22−(엔1에스나는엔θ)2]}.어디, 복잡한 인덱스 엔1과 케이1반사 지수와 공기의 흡수 지수이며 엔2과 케이2공작물을위한 것입니다. θ입사각입니다. 도시 된 바와 같이 수학 식. (A9)에서 , 혼합물의 흡수율은 식에서 얻은 모재 및 필러 와이어 분획의 가중 평균이됩니다 . (A7) .(A9)ㅏ미디엄나는엑스티유아르 자형이자형=Φㅏw나는아르 자형이자형+(1−Φ)ㅏ비ㅏ에스이자형어디, ㅏ비ㅏ에스이자형과 ㅏw나는아르 자형이자형각각 비금속과 필러 와이어의 흡수율입니다.

자유 표면 경계에서의 반동 압력 에이 싱은 Eq. (A10) .(A10)피아르 자형(티)≅0.54피에스ㅏ티(티)=0.54피0이자형엑스피(엘V티−티비아르 자형¯티티비)어디, 피에스ㅏ티포화 압력, 피0대기압입니다. 엘V기화의 잠열, 티비끓는 온도이고 아르 자형¯보편적 인 기체 상수입니다.

참고 문헌

D.J. Kotecki, D.L. Cheever, D.G. Howden
Mechanism of ripple formation during weld solidification
Weld. J., 51 (8) (1972), pp. 386s-391s
Google Scholar
[2]
M. Zacksenhouse, D.E. Hardt
Weld pool impedance identification for size measurement and control
J. Dyn. Syst. Meas. Control, 105 (3) (1983), pp. 179-184
CrossRefView Record in ScopusGoogle Scholar
[3]
V.V. Semak, J.A. Hopkins, M.H. McCay, T.D. McCay
Melt pool dynamics during laser welding
J. Phys. D, 28 (1995), pp. 2443-2450
CrossRefView Record in ScopusGoogle Scholar
[4]
A.J.R. Aendenroomer, G. den Ouden
Weld pool oscillation as a tool for penetration sensing during pulsed GTA welding
Weld. J., 77 (5) (1998), pp. 181s-187s
Google Scholar
[5]
M.J.M. Hermans, G. den Ouden
Process behavior and stability in short circuit gas metal arc welding
Weld. J., 78 (4) (1999), pp. 137-141
View Record in ScopusGoogle Scholar
[6]
B.Y.B. Yudodibroto, M.J.M. Hermans, Y. Hirata, G. den Ouden
Influence of filler wire addition on weld pool oscillation during gas tungsten arc welding
Sci. Technol. Weld. Join., 9 (2) (2004), pp. 163-168
View Record in ScopusGoogle Scholar
[7]
M. Geiger, K.-H. Leitz, H. Koch, A. Otto
A 3D transient model of keyhole and melt pool dynamics in laser beam welding applied to the joining of zinc coated sheets
Prod. Eng. Res. Dev., 3 (2009), pp. 127-136
CrossRefView Record in ScopusGoogle Scholar
[8]
C. Kägeler, M. Schmidt
Frequency-based analysis of weld pool dynamics and keyhole oscillations at laser beam welding of galvanized steel sheets
Phys. Procedia, 5 (2010), pp. 447-453
ArticleDownload PDFView Record in ScopusGoogle Scholar
[9]
Y. Shi, G. Zhang, X.J. Ma, Y.F. Gu, J.K. Huang, D. Fan
Laser-vision-based measurement and analysis of weld pool oscillation frequency in GTAW-P
Weld. J., 94 (2015), pp. 176s-187s
Google Scholar
[10]
J. Volpp, F. Vollertsen
Keyhole stability during laser welding—part I: modelling and evaluation
Prod. Eng.-Res. Dev., 10 (2016), pp. 443-457
CrossRefView Record in ScopusGoogle Scholar
[11]
N. Postacioglu, P. Kapadia, J. Dowden
Capillary waves on the weld pool in penetration welding with a laser
J. Phys. D, 22 (1989), pp. 1050-1061
CrossRefView Record in ScopusGoogle Scholar
[12]
N. Postacioglu, P. Kapadia, J. Dowden
Theory of the oscillations of an ellipsoidal weld pool in laser welding
J. Phys. D, 24 (1991), pp. 1288-1292
CrossRefView Record in ScopusGoogle Scholar
[13]
J. Kroos, U. Gratzke, M. Vicanek, G. Simon
Dynamic behaviour of the keyhole in laser welding
J. Phys. D, 26 (1993), pp. 481-486
View Record in ScopusGoogle Scholar
[14]
H. Maruo, Y. Hirata
Natural frequency and oscillation modes of weld pools. 1st Report: weld pool oscillation in full penetration welding of thin plate
Weld. Int., 7 (8) (1993), pp. 614-619
CrossRefView Record in ScopusGoogle Scholar
[15]
T. Klein, M. Vicanek, J. Kroos, I. Decker, G. Simon
Oscillations of the keyhole in penetration laser beam welding
J. Phys. D, 27 (1994), pp. 2023-2030
CrossRefView Record in ScopusGoogle Scholar
[16]
T. Klein, M. Vicanek, G. Simon
Forced oscillations of the keyhole in penetration laser beam welding
J. Phys. D, 29 (1996), pp. 322-332
View Record in ScopusGoogle Scholar
[17]
K. Andersen, G.E. Cook, R.J. Barnett, A.M. Strauss
Synchronous weld pool oscillation for monitoring and control
IEEE Trans. Ind. Appl., 33 (2) (1997), pp. 464-471
View Record in ScopusGoogle Scholar
[18]
W.-I. Cho, S.-J. Na, M.-H. Cho, J.-S. Lee
Numerical study of alloying element distribution in CO2 laser-GMA hybrid welding
Comput. Mater. Sci., 49 (2010), pp. 792-800
ArticleDownload PDFView Record in ScopusGoogle Scholar
[19]
W.-I. Cho, S.-J. Na, C. Thomy, F. Vollertsen
Numerical simulation of molten pool dynamics in high power disk laser welding
J. Mater. Process. Technol., 212 (2012), pp. 262-275
ArticleDownload PDFView Record in ScopusGoogle Scholar
[20]
A. Otto, A. Patschger, M. Seiler
Numerical and experimental investigations of humping phenomena in laser micro welding
Phys. Procedia, 83 (2016), pp. 1415-1423
ArticleDownload PDFView Record in ScopusGoogle Scholar
[21]
R. Lin, H.-P. Wang, F. Lu, J. Solomon, B.E. Carlson
Numerical study of keyhole dynamics and keyhole-induced porosity formation in remote laser welding of Al alloys
Int. J. Heat Mass Trans., 108 (2017), pp. 244-256
ArticleDownload PDFView Record in ScopusGoogle Scholar
[22]
S.H. Ko, C.D. Yoo, D.F. Farson, S.K. Choi
Mathematical modeling of the dynamic behavior of gas tungsten arc weld pools
Metall. Mater. Trans. B., 31B (2000), pp. 1465-1473
CrossRefView Record in ScopusGoogle Scholar
[23]
R. Hu, X. Chen, G. Yang, S. Gong, S. Pang
Metal transfer in wire feeding-based electron beam 3D printing: modes, dynamics, and transition criterion
Int. J. Heat Mass Transf., 126 (2018), pp. 877-887
ArticleDownload PDFView Record in ScopusGoogle Scholar
[24]
X. Meng, A. Artinov, M. Bachmann, M. Rethmeier
Theoretical study of influence of electromagnetic stirring on transport phenomena in wire feed laser beam welding
J. Laser Appl., 32 (2020), Article 022026
CrossRefGoogle Scholar
[25]
W.-I. Cho, V. Schultz, F. Vollertsen
Simulation of the buttonhole formation during laser welding with wire feeding and beam oscillation
L. Overmeyer, U. Reisgen, A. Ostendorf, M. Schmidt (Eds.), Proceedings of the Lasers in Manufacturing, German Scientific Laser Society, Munich, Germany (2017)
Google Scholar
[26]
W.-I. Cho, V. Schultz, P. Woizeschke
Numerical study of the effect of the oscillation frequency in buttonhole welding
J. Mater. Process. Technol., 261 (2018), pp. 202-212
ArticleDownload PDFView Record in ScopusGoogle Scholar
[27]
V. Schultz, T. Seefeld, F. Vollertsen
Bridging Large Air Gaps by Laser Welding with Beam Oscillation
International Conference on Application of Lasers in Manufacturing, New Delhi, India (2015), pp. 31-32
CrossRefGoogle Scholar
[28]
W.-I. Cho, S.-J. Na
Impact of wavelengths of CO2, disk, and green lasers on fusion zone shape in laser welding of steel
J. Weld. Join., 38 (3) (2020), pp. 235-240
CrossRefView Record in ScopusGoogle Scholar
[29]
FLOW-3D User Manual. 2017. Version 11.2.1.06, Flow Science Inc.
Google Scholar
[30]
W.-I. Cho, P. Woizeschke
Analysis of molten pool behavior with buttonhole formation in laser keyhole welding of sheet metal
Int. J. Heat Mass Transf., 152 (2020), Article 119528
ArticleDownload PDFView Record in ScopusGoogle Scholar
[31]
F. Vollertsen
Loopless production: definition and examples from joining
69th IIW Annual Assembly and International Conference, Melbourne, Australia (2016)
Google Scholar
[32]
V. Schultz, W.-I. Cho, A. Merkel, P. Woizeschke
Deep penetration laser welding with high seam surface quality due to buttonhole welding
Proc. of the IIW Annual Assembly, Com. IV, Bali, Indonesia (2018)
IIW-Doc. IV-1390-18

Fig. 2: Scheme of the LED photo-crosslinking and 3D-printing section of the microfluidic/3D-printing device. The droplet train is transferred from the chip microchannel into a microtubing in a straight section with nearly identical inner channel and inner microtubing diameter. Further downstream, the microtubing passes an LED-section for fast photo cross-linking to generate the microgels. This section is contained in an aluminum encasing to avoid premature crosslinking of polymer precursor in upstream channel sections by stray light. Subsequently, the microtubing is integrated into a 3D-printhead, where the microgels are jammed into a filament that is directly 3D-printed into the scaffold.

On-chip fabrication and in-flow 3D-printing of cellladen microgel constructs: From chip to scaffold materials in one integral process

cellladen 마이크로 겔 구조의 온칩 제작 및 인플 로우 3D 프린팅 : 하나의 통합 프로세스에서 칩에서 스캐폴드 재료까지

Benjamin Reineke 1,2, Ilona Paulus 3, Jonas Hazur 6, Madita Vollmer 4, Gültekin Tamgüney 4,5, Stephan Hauschild1
, Aldo R. Boccacini 6, Jürgen Groll 3, Stephan Förster *1,2
1 Jülich Centre for Neutron Science (JCNS-1/IBI-8), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich, Germany
2 Institute of Physical Chemistry, RWTH Aachen University, 52074 Aachen, Germany
3 Department of Functional Materials in Medicine and Dentistry (FMZ) and Bavarian Polymer Institute (BPI),
University of Würzburg, 97070 Würzburg, Germany
4 Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institute of Biological Information Processing – Structural Biochemistry (IBI7), Jülich, Germany
5 Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf, Institut für Physikalische Biologie, Düsseldorf, Germany
6 Institute of Biomaterials, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Cauerstr. 6, 91058, Erlangen, Germany

Summary

Bioprinting has evolved into a thriving technology for the fabrication of cell-laden scaffolds. Bioinks are the most critical component for bioprinting. Recently, microgels have been introduced as a very promising bioink enabling cell protection and the control of the cellular microenvironment. However, their microfluidic fabrication inherently seemed to be a limitation. Here we introduce a direct coupling of microfluidics and 3D-printing for the microfluidic production of cell-laden microgels with direct in-flow bioprinting into stable scaffolds. The methodology enables the continuous on-chip encapsulation of cells into monodisperse microdroplets with subsequent in-flow cross-linking to produce cell-laden microgels, which after exiting a microtubing are automatically jammed into thin continuous microgel filaments. The integration into a 3D printhead allows direct in-flow printing of the filaments into free-standing three-dimensional scaffolds. The method is demonstrated for different cross-linking methods and cell lines. With this advancement, microfluidics is no longer a bottleneck for biofabrication.

Bioprinting은 세포가있는 스캐 폴드 제작을 위한 번성하는 기술로 진화했습니다. 바이오 잉크는 바이오 프린팅에 가장 중요한 구성 요소입니다. 최근 마이크로 젤은 세포 보호 및 세포 미세 환경 제어를 가능하게 하는 매우 유망한 바이오 잉크로 도입되었습니다.

그러나 이들의 미세 유체 제작은 본질적으로 한계로 보였습니다. 여기에서 우리는 안정적인 스캐 폴드에 직접 유입 바이오 프린팅을 사용하여 세포가 실린 마이크로 겔의 미세 유체 생산을 위한 미세 유체 및 3D 프린팅의 직접 결합을 소개합니다.

이 방법론은 세포를 단 분산 미세 방울로 연속 온칩 캡슐화하고 후속 유입 교차 연결을 통해 세포가 가득한 마이크로 겔을 생성 할 수 있으며, 이는 마이크로 튜브를 종료 한 후 얇은 연속 마이크로 겔 필라멘트에 자동으로 걸린다. 3D 프린트 헤드에 통합되어 필라멘트를 독립형 3 차원 스캐 폴드로 직접 유입 인쇄 할 수 있습니다.

이 방법은 다양한 가교 방법 및 세포주에 대해 설명됩니다. 이러한 발전으로 미세 유체 학은 더 이상 바이오 패브리 케이션의 병목 현상이 아닙니다.

Bioprinting은 신체 조직을 모방하거나 대체하기위한 3 차원 세포 실장 구조를 제작하는 새로운 기술입니다.

(1) 조직 공학 및 약물 전달뿐만 아니라 질병 연구 및 치료 개발에 중요한 역할을합니다. 바이오 프린팅에서 세포와 물질은 바이오 잉크 (2,3)로 공식화되어 계층 적으로 구조화 된 3D 스캐 폴드로 직접 인쇄됩니다. 바이오 프린팅의 궁극적 인 목표는 3 차원 적으로 제작 된 구조적 배열이 생물학적 성숙을 촉진하고 가속화한다는 근거를 바탕으로 표적 조직 또는 기관의 전체 또는 부분 기능을 나타내는 세포가있는 스캐 폴드를 생산하는 것입니다.

(4) 따라서 바이오 잉크는 바이오 프린팅 기술의 중요한 구성 요소입니다. 그들은 주로 세포와 생물 활성 분자를 캡슐화 할 수있는 물질, 즉 하이드로 겔에 의존하며 압출 인쇄와 같은 적합한 인쇄 기술에 사용하여 원하는 3 차원 스캐 폴드 또는 구조물을 제작할 수 있습니다. 바이오 잉크의 설계는 유동성 및 탄성 특성을 미세 조정하여 압출 중에 충분히 전단 얇게 만들고,이어서 응고 후 원하는 기계적 안정성과 탄성을 빠르게 개발하여 안정적인 스캐 폴드를 형성해야하기 때문에 까다롭습니다.

또한, 바이오 잉크는 생체 적합성이어야하며 세포 생존력과 적절한 제조 후 행동을 촉진 할 수있을만큼 충분히 생체 기능적이어야하며 충분한 영양분과 산소를 ​​공급할 수 있어야합니다. 바이오 잉크로 가장 두드러진 하이드로 겔 전구체 용액이 사용되며, 때로는 약간 사전 가교된 형태로 사용되며, 프린팅 후 가교되어 구조를 안정화합니다.

종종 발생하는 문제는 세포 침강, 불균일 혼합 및 생체 적합성 제형과 인쇄 사이의 상충 관계이며, 세포가 유동 제형에서 전단력을 직접 경험하기 때문에 결과적인 모양 충실도입니다. 이러한 한계를 극복하기 위해 Highley et al.

(5) 최근 microgel bioinks의 사용을 제안했습니다. 콜로이드 특성으로 인해 마이크로 겔 바이오 잉크는 전단 얇아지고 정지 상태에서 빠르게 응고되는 반면 부드러운 콜로이드에로드 된 세포는 전단 보호됩니다. 인쇄 된 마이크로 겔 스캐 폴드는 계면 중합체 얽힘이 충분하지 않은 경우 2 차 가교에 의해 추가로 안정화 될 수 있습니다.

Microgels는 세포 미세 환경을 조정하는 이점을 더 제공합니다. 따라서, 세포가 가득 찬 마이크로 겔을 제조하는 방법은 이미 개발되었으며, 특히 매우 균일 한 크기의 마이크로 겔을 연속 공정으로 제작할 수있는 마이크로 유체 학 분야에서 이미 개발되었습니다. (6-8) 마이크로 겔은 EDTA- 복합체 (11,12) 또는 열 유도에 의해 조절 될 수있는 알기 네이트 / Ca2 + 이온 복합체 형성 (9,10)과 같은 물리적 가교에 의해 형성 될 수 있음이 입증되었습니다. 젤라틴 용액을 20 ° C 이하로 냉각하는 것과 같은 겔화. (9,13) 화학적 가교 반응은 마이크로 겔의 더 큰 안정성과 더 나은 기계적 특성을 제공합니다.

예를 들면 기능화 된 젤라틴, 히알루 노 레이트, 폴리에틸렌 글리콜 또는 폴리 글리세롤 (12, 14-16)에 대한 마이클 유형 반응, 폴리 글리세롤 (17) 및 광 가교 (18)에 대한 아 지드-알킨 클릭 반응은 다음과 같은 광개시제 및 가교기를 필요로 합니다. 폴리에틸렌 글리콜에 대해 나타났습니다.

캡슐화된 세포에는 줄기 세포 (9,12,14,15), 크립트 및 페 이어 세포 (10), 간 세포 (HepG2) 및 내피 세포 (HUVEC) (18), NIH 3T3 섬유 아세포 (6)가 포함됩니다. 지금까지 Fan et al.에 의해 세포가 실린 마이크로 겔을 기반으로하는 기능성 스캐 폴드의 제작이 보여졌습니다.

(19) 겔 -MA 마이크로 겔의 에멀젼 기반 제조 및 Compaan et al. (20) 젤라틴 마이크로 겔 충전제 입자. 미세 유체 생성 마이크로 겔의 경우 이것은 최근 Highley et al.에 의해 처음으로 입증되었습니다. (5). 마이크로 겔 기반 바이오 잉크 및 스캐 폴드에 대한 바이오 프린팅에 대한 지금까지 제한된 수의 연구에 대한 이유는 소량의 마이크로 겔을 생성하는 마이크로 유체의 필수 조합과 교차 결합, 준비를 포함하는 여러 포스트 칩 배치 공정 단계가 뒤 따르기 때문입니다. bioink의, 그리고 원하는 스캐 폴드에 후속 bioprinting.

이것은 현재 microgel biofabrication을 시간 소모적이고 생산성이 낮은 다단계 공정으로 만듭니다. 따라서 원하는 스캐 폴드의 제조를위한 마이크로 겔 및 바이오 프린팅을위한 미세 유체가 하나의 연속적이고 자동화 가능한 프로세스에 통합 될 수 있다면 매우 바람직 할 것입니다.

여기에서 우리는 미세 유체 칩이 세포를 방울로 온칩 캡슐화하도록 설계 될 수 있음을 보여줍니다. 이는 마이크로 겔을 생성하기 위해 흐름에서 광 가교 결합 된 다음 다운 스트림 마이크로 튜브에서 자동으로 잼되어 얇은 마이크로 겔 필라멘트를 지속적으로 형성합니다. 마이크로 튜브는 3D 프린터의 프린트 헤드에 통합되어 필라멘트를 독립형 3 차원으로 직접 유입 인쇄합니다.

Results and discussion

Microfluidic device and controlled droplet production

우리의 목표는 (i) 낮은 전단 응력 세포 캡슐화, (ii) 물리적 또는 화학적 가교에 대한 가변성, (iii) 미세 액적 직경의 큰 변화, (iv)이를 결합 할 수 있는 기능을 위한 미세 유체 칩을 3D 프린터로 설계하는 것이었습니다.

따라서 디자인은 높은 세포 생존력을 위해 좁은 채널 섹션 내의 세포에 대한 전단력을 최소화해야 합니다. 다양한 물리적 및 화학적 가교 반응을 수행 할 수 있도록 입구 채널 설계는 세포, 폴리머, 가교 및 추가 제제를 포함하는 용액의 순차적 혼합을 허용해야 합니다. 단일 세포 캡슐화가 필요한 경우 미세 방울은 300 µm에서 50 µm까지 제어 가능한 직경을 가져야 106 / ml의 세포 밀도에 도달 할 수 있습니다.

Fig. 1: Three-dimensional schematic view of the multilayer double 3D-focusing microfluidic channel system, (b) control of droplet diameter via the Capiilary number Ca, and accessible hydrodynamic regimes for droplet production: squeezing (c), dripping (d) and jetting (e). The scale bars are 200 µm.
Fig. 1: Three-dimensional schematic view of the multilayer double 3D-focusing microfluidic channel system, (b) control of droplet diameter via the Capiilary number Ca, and accessible hydrodynamic regimes for droplet production: squeezing (c), dripping (d) and jetting (e). The scale bars are 200 µm.

따라서 우리는 두 개의 후속 혼합 교차로 3 차원 흐름 초점을 허용 한 다음 제어 된 액적 형성을위한 하류 좁은 오리피스가 뒤 따르는 채널 설계를 사용했습니다. 디자인은 그림 1에 개략적으로 표시되어 있습니다. 여기에는 세포와 전구체 폴리머를 포함하는 중앙 스트림 용액을위한 입구 채널과 완충 용액, 배양 배지, 생리 활성 물질 또는 가교제를 포함 할 수있는 두 개의 측면 채널이 있습니다. 측면 채널 흐름은 입구 채널 흐름을 세포에 대한 전단력이 최소 인 채널의 중앙에 3 차원 적으로 집중시킵니다. 그 후, 수성 스트림은 액적 형성을 제어하는 ​​좁은 오리피스 섹션으로 들어가기 위해 오일 상으로 3 차원 적으로 집중됩니다. 좁은 섹션은 다양한 유체 역학 체제에 액세스하여 다양한 범위에 걸쳐 액적 크기를 변경할 수 있습니다. 다운 스트림 채널은 방울이 채널 중심 유선에서 안정적인 방울 트레인을 형성하도록 충분히 좁게 유지됩니다. 3D 이중 초점 칩은 다층 기술을 사용하는 소프트 리소그래피로 제작되었으며 지원 정보 (그림 S2-S4, S7)에 설명 된대로 흐름이 시뮬레이션되었습니다. 액적 분해는 외부 유체에 의해 가해지는 점성 전단력 𝐹𝑠ℎ𝑒ar 표면 장력에서 발생하는 고정 계면 력 𝐹𝐹𝛾𝛾을 초과 할 때 발생합니다. 두 힘은 직접 연속 유상 η 평균 유입 흐름 속도 (V)의 점도 환산 수 무차 모세관 수가 CA = 𝐹𝑠ℎ𝑒ar/𝐹γ, 그리고 CA = 𝐹𝑠ℎ𝑒ar/𝐹γ = 같은 표면 장력 γ가 관련 𝜂𝜂 𝛾. 캐 필러 리 수에 따라 액적 생성을위한 다양한 유체 역학 체제를 구별 할 수 있습니다. c) 분사 체제 (Ca> 1). (21-25) 그림 1에서 볼 수 있듯이 가변 3D 수축 설계를 사용하면 액적 생산을위한 세 가지 유체 역학 체제에 모두 액세스 할 수 있으며 모세관 수는 액적 생산을위한 주요 제어 매개 변수입니다. 체적 유량, 오일 점도 및 계면 장력을 조정하여 50 ~ 300 µm 범위의 목표 범위에서 액적 직경을 정밀하게 제어 할 수 있습니다. 각 점도 및 계면 장력은 지원 정보의 표 SI에 요약되어 있습니다.

Fig. 2: Scheme of the LED photo-crosslinking and 3D-printing section of the microfluidic/3D-printing device. The droplet train is transferred from the chip microchannel into a microtubing in a straight section with nearly identical inner channel and inner microtubing diameter. Further downstream, the microtubing passes an LED-section for fast photo cross-linking to generate the microgels. This section is contained in an aluminum encasing to avoid premature crosslinking of polymer precursor in upstream channel sections by stray light. Subsequently, the microtubing is integrated into a 3D-printhead, where the microgels are jammed into a filament that is directly 3D-printed into the scaffold.
Fig. 2: Scheme of the LED photo-crosslinking and 3D-printing section of the microfluidic/3D-printing device. The droplet train is transferred from the chip microchannel into a microtubing in a straight section with nearly identical inner channel and inner microtubing diameter. Further downstream, the microtubing passes an LED-section for fast photo cross-linking to generate the microgels. This section is contained in an aluminum encasing to avoid premature crosslinking of polymer precursor in upstream channel sections by stray light. Subsequently, the microtubing is integrated into a 3D-printhead, where the microgels are jammed into a filament that is directly 3D-printed into the scaffold.
Fig. 3: a) Photograph of a standard meander-shaped layer fabricated by microgel filament deposition printing. The lines have a thickness of 300 µm. b) photograph of a cross-bar pattern obtained by on-top deposition of several microgel filaments. The average linewidth is 1 mm. c) photograph of a donut-shaped microgel construct. The microgels have been fluorescently labelled by FITC-dextran to demonstrate the intrinsic microporosity corresponding to the black non-fluorescent regions, d) light microscopy image of a construct edge showing that fused adhesive microgels form a continuous, three-dimensional selfsupporting scaffold with intrinsic micropores.
Fig. 3: a) Photograph of a standard meander-shaped layer fabricated by microgel filament deposition printing. The lines have a thickness of 300 µm. b) photograph of a cross-bar pattern obtained by on-top deposition of several microgel filaments. The average linewidth is 1 mm. c) photograph of a donut-shaped microgel construct. The microgels have been fluorescently labelled by FITC-dextran to demonstrate the intrinsic microporosity corresponding to the black non-fluorescent regions, d) light microscopy image of a construct edge showing that fused adhesive microgels form a continuous, three-dimensional selfsupporting scaffold with intrinsic micropores.
Fig. 4: a) Scheme of the perfusion chamber consisting of an upstream and downstream chamber, perfusion ports, and removable scaffolds to stabilize the microgel construct during 3D-printing, b) photograph of a microgel construct in the perfusion chamber directly after printing and removal of the scaffolds, c) confocal microscopy image of the permeation front of a fluorescent dye, where the high dye concentration in the micropores can be clearly seen, d) confocal microscopy image of YFP-labelled HEK-cells within a microgel construct.
Fig. 4: a) Scheme of the perfusion chamber consisting of an upstream and downstream chamber, perfusion ports, and removable scaffolds to stabilize the microgel construct during 3D-printing, b) photograph of a microgel construct in the perfusion chamber directly after printing and removal of the scaffolds, c) confocal microscopy image of the permeation front of a fluorescent dye, where the high dye concentration in the micropores can be clearly seen, d) confocal microscopy image of YFP-labelled HEK-cells within a microgel construct.
Fig. 5: a) Layer-by-layer printing of microgel construct with integrated perfusion channel. After printing of the first layer, a hollow perfusion channel is inserted. Subsequently, the second and third layers are printed. b) The construct is directly printed into a perfusion chamber. The perfusion chamber provides whole construct permeation via flows cin and cout, as well as independent flow through the perfusion channel via flows vin and vout. c) Photograph of a perfusion chamber containing the construct directly after printing. The flow of the fluorescein solution through the integrated PVA hollow channel is clearly visible.
Fig. 5: a) Layer-by-layer printing of microgel construct with integrated perfusion channel. After printing of the first layer, a hollow perfusion channel is inserted. Subsequently, the second and third layers are printed. b) The construct is directly printed into a perfusion chamber. The perfusion chamber provides whole construct permeation via flows cin and cout, as well as independent flow through the perfusion channel via flows vin and vout. c) Photograph of a perfusion chamber containing the construct directly after printing. The flow of the fluorescein solution through the integrated PVA hollow channel is clearly visible.
Fig. 6: a) Photograph of an alginate capsule fiber formed after exiting the microtube. b) Confocal fluorescence microscopy image of part of a 3D-printed alginate capsule construct. The fluorescence arises from encapsulated fluorescently labelled polystyrene microbeads to demonstrate the integrity and stability of the alginate capsules.
Fig. 6: a) Photograph of an alginate capsule fiber formed after exiting the microtube. b) Confocal fluorescence microscopy image of part of a 3D-printed alginate capsule construct. The fluorescence arises from encapsulated fluorescently labelled polystyrene microbeads to demonstrate the integrity and stability of the alginate capsules.

  1. A. Atala, Chem. Rev. 2020, 120, 10545-10546.
  2. J. Groll, J. A. Burdick, D. W. Cho, B. Derby, M. Gelinsky, S. C. Heilshorn, T. Jüngst, J. Malda, V. A
    Mironov, K. Nakayama, A. Ovisanikov, W. Sun, S. Takeuchi, J. J. Yoo, T. B. F. Woodfield,
    Biofabrication 2019, 11, 013001.
  3. W. Sun, B. Starly, A. C. Daly, J. A. Burdick, J. Groll, G. Skeldon, W. Shu, Y. Sakai, M. Shinohara,
    M. Nishikawa, J. Jang, D.-W. Cho, M. Nie, S. Takeuchi, S. Ostrovidov, A. Khademhosseini, R. D. Kamm,
    V. Mironov, L. Moroni, I. T. Ozbolat, Biofabrication 2020, 12, 022002.
  4. R. Levato, T. Juengst, R. G. Scheuring, T. Blunk, J. Groll, J. Malda, Adv. Mater. 2020, 32, 1906423.
  5. C. B. Highley, K. H. Song, A. C. Daly, J. A. Burdick, Adv. Sci. 2019, 6, 1801076.
  6. D. Velasco, E. Tumarkin, E. Kumacheva, Small 2012, 8, 1633-1642.
  7. W. Jiang, M. Li, Z. Chen, K. W. Leong, Lab Chip 2016, 16, 4482-4506.
  8. A. C. Daly, L. Riley, T. Segura, J. A. Burdick, Nat. Rev. 2020, 5, 20-43.
  9. A. S. Mao, B. Özkale, N. J. Shah, K. H. Vining, T. Descombes, L. Zhang, C. M. Tringides, S.-W.
    Wong, J.-W. Shin, D. T. Scadden, D. A. Weitz, D. J. Mooney, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 2019, 116, 15392-
    15397.
  10. S. R. Pajoumshariati, M. Azizi, D. Wesner, P. G. Miller, M. L. Shuler, A. Abbaspourrad, ACS Appl.
    Mater. Interfaces 2018, 10, 9235-9246.
  11. A. S. Mao, J.-W. Shin, S. Utech, H. Wang, O. Uzun, W. Li, M. Cooper, Y. Hu, L. Zhang, D. A.
    Weitz, D. J. Mooney, Nat. Mater. 2017, 16, 236-243.
  12. P. S. Lienemann, T. Rossow, A. S. Mao, Q. Vallmajo-Martin, M. Ehrbar, D. J. Mooney, Lab Chip,
    2017, 17, 727.
  13. F. Chen, J. Xue, J. Zhang, M. Bai, X. Yu, X.; C. Fan, Y. Zhao, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2020, 142, 2889-
    2896.
  14. Q. Feng, Q. Li, H. Wen, J. Chen, M. Liang, H. Huang, D. Lan, H. Dong, X. Cao, Adv. Funct. Mater.,
    2019, 29, 1096690.
  15. L. P. B. Guerzoni, T. Yoshinari, D. B. Gehlen, D. Rommel, T. Haraszti, M. Akashi, L. De Laporte,
    Biomacromolecules 2019, 20, 3746-3754
  16. T. Rossow, J. A. Heyman, A. J. Ehrlicher, A. Langhoff, D. A. Weitz, R. Haag, S. Seiffert, J. Am.
    Chem. Soc. 2012, 134, 4983-4989.
  17. E. Kapourani, F. Neumann, K. Achazi, J. Dernedde, R. Haag, Macromol. Bioscience 2018, 18,
    1800116
  18. H. Wang, H. Liu, H. Liu, W. Su, W. Chen, J. Qin, Adv. Mater. Technol. 2019, 4, 1800632.
  19. C. Fan, S.-H. Zhan, Z.-X. Dong, W. Yang, W.-S. Deng, X. Liu, P. Suna, D.-A. Wang, Mater. Sci.
    Eng. C 2019, 108, 110399.
  20. A. M. Compaan, K. Song, W. Chai, Y. Huang, ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces 2020, 12, 7855-7868.
  21. S. L. Anna, H. C. Mayer, Phys. Fluids 2006, 18, 121512.
  22. T. Ward, M. Faivre, M. Abkarian, H. A. Stone, Electrophoresis 2005, 26, 3716-3724.
  23. F. Lapierre, N. Wu, Y. Zhu, Proc. SPIE 2011, 8204, 82040H-1.
  24. C. A. Stan, S. K. Y. Tang, G. M. Whitesides, Anal. Chem. 2009, 81, 2399-2402.
  25. J. Tan, J. H. Xu, S. W. Li, G. S. Luo, Chem. Eng. J. 2008, 136, 306-311.
  26. R.-C. Luo, C.-H. Chen, Soft 2012, 1, 1-23.
  27. C. H. Choi, J. H. Jung, T. S. Hwang, C. S. Lee, Macromol. Res. 2009, 17, 163-167.
  28. A. J. D. Krüger, O. Bakirman, P. B. Guerzoni, A. Jans, D. B. Gehlen, D. Rommel, T. Haraszti, A. J.
    C. Kuehne, L. De Laporte, Adv. Mater. 2019, 31, 1903668.
  29. D. B. Kolesky, K. A. Homan, M. A. Skylar-Scott, J. A. Lewis, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 2016, 113,
    3179-3184
  30. A. K. Miri, I. Mirzaee, S. Hassan, S. M. Oskui, D. Nieto, A. Khademhosseini, Y. S. Zhang, Lab Chip
    2019, 19, 2019.
  31. F. A. Plamper, W. Richtering Acc. Chem. Res. 2017, 50, 131-140.
  32. S. Sun, M. Li, A. Liu, Int. J. Adhesion Adhesives 2013, 41, 98-106.
Review on the evolution and technology of State-of-the-Art metal additive manufacturing processes

Review on the evolution and technology of State-of-the-Art metal additive manufacturing processes

최첨단 금속 적층 제조 공정의 진화 및 기술 검토

S.Pratheesh Kumar
S.ElangovanR.Mohanraj
J.R.Ramakrishna

Abstract

Nowadays, the requirements of customers undergo dynamic changes and industries are heading towards the manufacturing of customized end-user products, making market fluctuations extremely unpredictable. This demands the production industries to shift towards instantaneous product development strategies that can deliver products on the shortest lead time without compromise in the quality and accuracy. Direct metal deposition is one such evolving additive manufacturing (AM) technique that has found its application from rapid prototyping to production of real-time industrial components. In addition, the process is ideal for just-in-time manufacturing, producing parts-on-demand while offering the potential to reduce cost, energy consumption, and carbon footprint. The evolution of this advanced manufacturing technique had drastically reduced the manufacturing constraints and greatly improved the product versatility. This review provides insight into the evolution, current status, and challenges of metal additive manufacturing (MAM) techniques, starting from powder bed fusion and direct metal deposition. In addition to this, the review explores the variants of metal additive manufacturing with its process mechanism, merits, demerits, and applications. The efficiency of the processes is finally analysed using a time–cost triangle and the mechanical properties are comprehensively compared. The review will enhance the basic understanding of MAM and thus broaden the scope of research and development.

오늘날 고객의 요구 사항은 역동적 인 변화를 겪고 있으며 산업은 맞춤형 최종 사용자 제품의 제조로 향하고있어 시장 변동을 예측할 수 없게 만듭니다. 따라서 생산 산업은 품질과 정확성을 타협하지 않고 최단 리드 타임에 제품을 제공 할 수있는 즉각적인 제품 개발 전략으로 전환해야합니다. 직접 금속 증착은 쾌속 프로토 타이핑에서 실시간 산업 부품 생산에 이르기까지 응용 분야를 발견 한 진화하는 적층 제조 (AM) 기술 중 하나입니다. 또한이 프로세스는 적시 제조에 이상적이며 주문형 부품을 생산하는 동시에 비용, 에너지 소비 및 탄소 발자국을 줄일 수있는 잠재력을 제공합니다. 이 고급 제조 기술의 발전으로 제조 제약이 크게 줄어들고 제품의 다양성이 크게 향상되었습니다. 이 리뷰는 분말 베드 융합 및 직접 금속 증착에서 시작하여 금속 적층 제조 (MAM) 기술의 발전, 현재 상태 및 과제에 대한 통찰력을 제공합니다. 이 외에도이 리뷰에서는 프로세스 메커니즘, 장점, 단점 및 응용 프로그램과 함께 금속 적층 제조의 변형을 탐색합니다. 프로세스의 효율성은 마지막으로 시간-비용 삼각형을 사용하여 분석되고 기계적 특성이 포괄적으로 비교됩니다. 검토는 MAM에 대한 기본적인 이해를 높이고 연구 개발 범위를 넓힐 것입니다.

Keywords: Metal additive manufacturing, 3D Printing, Direct energy deposition, Electron beam meltingRapid prototyping

Figure 4. Calculate and simulate the injection of water in a single-channel injection chamber with a nozzle diameter of 60 μm and a thickness of 50 μm, at an operating frequency of 5 KHz, in the X-Y two-dimensional cross-sectional view, at 10, 20, 30, 40 and 200 μs.

DNA Printing Integrated Multiplexer Driver Microelectronic Mechanical System Head (IDMH) and Microfluidic Flow Estimation

DNA 프린팅 통합 멀티플렉서 드라이버 Microelectronic Mechanical System Head (IDMH) 및 Microfluidic Flow Estimation

by Jian-Chiun Liou 1,*,Chih-Wei Peng 1,Philippe Basset 2 andZhen-Xi Chen 11School of Biomedical Engineering, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 11031, Taiwan2ESYCOM, Université Gustave Eiffel, CNRS, CNAM, ESIEE Paris, F-77454 Marne-la-Vallée, France*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.

Abstract

The system designed in this study involves a three-dimensional (3D) microelectronic mechanical system chip structure using DNA printing technology. We employed diverse diameters and cavity thickness for the heater. DNA beads were placed in this rapid array, and the spray flow rate was assessed. Because DNA cannot be obtained easily, rapidly deploying DNA while estimating the total amount of DNA being sprayed is imperative. DNA printings were collected in a multiplexer driver microelectronic mechanical system head, and microflow estimation was conducted. Flow-3D was used to simulate the internal flow field and flow distribution of the 3D spray room. The simulation was used to calculate the time and pressure required to generate heat bubbles as well as the corresponding mean outlet speed of the fluid. The “outlet speed status” function in Flow-3D was used as a power source for simulating the ejection of fluid by the chip nozzle. The actual chip generation process was measured, and the starting voltage curve was analyzed. Finally, experiments on flow rate were conducted, and the results were discussed. The density of the injection nozzle was 50, the size of the heater was 105 μm × 105 μm, and the size of the injection nozzle hole was 80 μm. The maximum flow rate was limited to approximately 3.5 cc. The maximum flow rate per minute required a power between 3.5 W and 4.5 W. The number of injection nozzles was multiplied by 100. On chips with enlarged injection nozzle density, experiments were conducted under a fixed driving voltage of 25 V. The flow curve obtained from various pulse widths and operating frequencies was observed. The operating frequency was 2 KHz, and the pulse width was 4 μs. At a pulse width of 5 μs and within the power range of 4.3–5.7 W, the monomer was injected at a flow rate of 5.5 cc/min. The results of this study may be applied to estimate the flow rate and the total amount of the ejection liquid of a DNA liquid.

이 연구에서 설계된 시스템은 DNA 프린팅 기술을 사용하는 3 차원 (3D) 마이크로 전자 기계 시스템 칩 구조를 포함합니다. 히터에는 다양한 직경과 캐비티 두께를 사용했습니다. DNA 비드를 빠른 어레이에 배치하고 스프레이 유속을 평가했습니다.

DNA를 쉽게 얻을 수 없기 때문에 DNA를 빠르게 배치하면서 스프레이 되는 총 DNA 양을 추정하는 것이 필수적입니다. DNA 프린팅은 멀티플렉서 드라이버 마이크로 전자 기계 시스템 헤드에 수집되었고 마이크로 플로우 추정이 수행되었습니다.

Flow-3D는 3D 스프레이 룸의 내부 유동장과 유동 분포를 시뮬레이션 하는데 사용되었습니다. 시뮬레이션은 열 거품을 생성하는데 필요한 시간과 압력뿐만 아니라 유체의 해당 평균 출구 속도를 계산하는데 사용되었습니다.

Flow-3D의 “출구 속도 상태”기능은 칩 노즐에 의한 유체 배출 시뮬레이션을 위한 전원으로 사용되었습니다. 실제 칩 생성 프로세스를 측정하고 시작 전압 곡선을 분석했습니다. 마지막으로 유속 실험을 하고 그 결과를 논의했습니다. 분사 노즐의 밀도는 50, 히터의 크기는 105μm × 105μm, 분사 노즐 구멍의 크기는 80μm였다. 최대 유량은 약 3.5cc로 제한되었습니다. 분당 최대 유량은 3.5W에서 4.5W 사이의 전력이 필요했습니다. 분사 노즐의 수에 100을 곱했습니다. 분사 노즐 밀도가 확대 된 칩에 대해 25V의 고정 구동 전압에서 실험을 수행했습니다. 얻은 유동 곡선 다양한 펄스 폭과 작동 주파수에서 관찰되었습니다. 작동 주파수는 2KHz이고 펄스 폭은 4μs입니다. 5μs의 펄스 폭과 4.3–5.7W의 전력 범위 내에서 단량체는 5.5cc / min의 유속으로 주입되었습니다. 이 연구의 결과는 DNA 액체의 토 출액의 유량과 총량을 추정하는 데 적용될 수 있습니다.

Keywords: DNA printingflow estimationMEMS

Introduction

잉크젯 프린트 헤드 기술은 매우 중요하며, 잉크젯 기술의 거대한 발전은 주로 잉크젯 프린트 헤드 기술의 원리 개발에서 시작되었습니다. 잉크젯 인쇄 연구를 위한 대규모 액적 생성기 포함 [ 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5 , 6 , 7 , 8]. 연속 식 잉크젯 시스템은 고주파 응답과 고속 인쇄의 장점이 있습니다. 그러나이 방법의 잉크젯 프린트 헤드의 구조는 더 복잡하고 양산이 어려운 가압 장치, 대전 전극, 편향 전계가 필요하다. 주문형 잉크젯 시스템의 잉크젯 프린트 헤드는 구조가 간단하고 잉크젯 헤드의 다중 노즐을 쉽게 구현할 수 있으며 디지털화 및 색상 지정이 쉽고 이미지 품질은 비교적 좋지만 일반적인 잉크 방울 토출 속도는 낮음 [ 9 , 10 , 11 ].

핫 버블 잉크젯 헤드의 총 노즐 수는 수백 또는 수천에 달할 수 있습니다. 노즐은 매우 미세하여 풍부한 조화 색상과 부드러운 메쉬 톤을 생성할 수 있습니다. 잉크 카트리지와 노즐이 일체형 구조를 이루고 있으며, 잉크 카트리지 교체시 잉크젯 헤드가 동시에 업데이트되므로 노즐 막힘에 대한 걱정은 없지만 소모품 낭비가 발생하고 상대적으로 높음 비용. 주문형 잉크젯 기술은 배출해야 하는 그래픽 및 텍스트 부분에만 잉크 방울을 배출하고 빈 영역에는 잉크 방울이 배출되지 않습니다. 이 분사 방법은 잉크 방울을 충전할 필요가 없으며 전극 및 편향 전기장을 충전할 필요도 없습니다. 노즐 구조가 간단하고 노즐의 멀티 노즐 구현이 용이하며, 출력 품질이 더욱 개선되었습니다. 펄스 제어를 통해 디지털화가 쉽습니다. 그러나 잉크 방울의 토출 속도는 일반적으로 낮습니다. 열 거품 잉크젯, 압전 잉크젯 및 정전기 잉크젯의 세 가지 일반적인 유형이 있습니다. 물론 다른 유형이 있습니다.

압전 잉크젯 기술의 실현 원리는 인쇄 헤드의 노즐 근처에 많은 소형 압전 세라믹을 배치하면 압전 크리스탈이 전기장의 작용으로 변형됩니다. 잉크 캐비티에서 돌출되어 노즐에서 분사되는 패턴 데이터 신호는 압전 크리스탈의 변형을 제어한 다음 잉크 분사량을 제어합니다. 압전 MEMS 프린트 헤드를 사용한 주문형 드롭 하이브리드 인쇄 [ 12]. 열 거품 잉크젯 기술의 실현 원리는 가열 펄스 (기록 신호)의 작용으로 노즐의 발열체 온도가 상승하여 근처의 잉크 용매가 증발하여 많은 수의 핵 형성 작은 거품을 생성하는 것입니다. 내부 거품의 부피는 계속 증가합니다. 일정 수준에 도달하면 생성된 압력으로 인해 잉크가 노즐에서 분사되고 최종적으로 기판 표면에 도달하여 패턴 정보가 재생됩니다 [ 13 , 14 , 15 , 16 , 17 , 18 ].

“3D 제품 프린팅”및 “증분 빠른 제조”의 의미는 진화했으며 모든 증분 제품 제조 기술을 나타냅니다. 이는 이전 제작과는 다른 의미를 가지고 있지만, 자동 제어 하에 소재를 쌓아 올리는 3D 작업 제작 과정의 공통적 인 특징을 여전히 반영하고 있습니다 [ 19 , 20 , 21 , 22 , 23 , 24 ].

이 개발 시스템은 열 거품 분사 기술입니다. 이 빠른 어레이에 DNA 비드를 배치하고 스프레이 유속을 평가하기 위해 다른 히터 직경과 캐비티 두께를 설계하는 것입니다. DNA 제트 칩의 부스트 회로 시스템은 큰 흐름을 구동하기위한 신호 소스입니다. 목적은 분사되는 DNA 용액의 양과 출력을 조정하는 것입니다. 입력 전압을 더 높은 출력 전압으로 변환해야 하는 경우 부스트 컨버터가 유일한 선택입니다. 부스트 컨버터는 내부 금속 산화물 반도체 전계 효과 트랜지스터 (MOSFET)를 통해 전압을 충전하여 부스트 출력의 목적을 달성하고, MOSFET이 꺼지면 인덕터는 부하 정류를 통해 방전됩니다.

인덕터의 충전과 방전 사이의 변환 프로세스는 인덕터를 통한 전압의 방향을 반대로 한 다음 점차적으로 입력 작동 전압보다 높은 전압을 증가시킵니다. MOSFET의 스위칭 듀티 사이클은 확실히 부스트 비율을 결정합니다. MOSFET의 정격 전류와 부스트 컨버터의 부스트 비율은 부스트 ​​컨버터의 부하 전류의 상한을 결정합니다. MOSFET의 정격 전압은 출력 전압의 상한을 결정합니다. 일부 부스트 컨버터는 정류기와 MOSFET을 통합하여 동기식 정류를 제공합니다. 통합 MOSFET은 정확한 제로 전류 턴 오프를 달성하여 부스트 변압기를 보다 효율적으로 만듭니다. 최대 전력 점 추적 장치를 통해 입력 전력을 실시간으로 모니터링합니다. 입력 전압이 최대 입력 전력 지점에 도달하면 부스트 컨버터가 작동하기 시작하여 부스트 컨버터가 최대 전력 출력 지점으로 유리 기판에 DNA 인쇄를 하는 데 적합합니다. 일정한 온 타임 생성 회로를 통해 온 타임이 온도 및 칩의 코너 각도에 영향을 받지 않아 시스템의 안정성이 향상됩니다.

잉크젯 프린트 헤드에 사용되는 기술은 매우 중요합니다. 잉크젯 기술의 엄청난 발전은 주로 잉크젯 프린팅에 사용되는 대형 액적 이젝터 [ 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5 , 6 , 7 , 8 ]를 포함하여 잉크젯 프린트 헤드 기술의 이론 개발에서 시작되었습니다 . 연속 잉크젯 시스템은 고주파 응답과 고속 인쇄의 장점을 가지고 있습니다. 잉크젯 헤드의 총 노즐 수는 수백 또는 수천에 달할 수 있으며 이러한 노즐은 매우 복잡합니다. 노즐은 풍부하고 조화로운 색상과 부드러운 메쉬 톤을 생성할 수 있습니다 [ 9 , 10 ,11 ]. 잉크젯은 열 거품 잉크젯, 압전 잉크젯 및 정전 식 잉크젯의 세 가지 주요 유형으로 분류할 수 있습니다. 다른 유형도 사용 중입니다. 압전 잉크젯의 기능은 다음과 같습니다. 많은 소형 압전 세라믹이 잉크젯 헤드 노즐 근처에 배치됩니다. 압전 결정은 전기장 아래에서 변형됩니다. 그 후, 잉크는 잉크 캐비티에서 압착되어 노즐에서 배출됩니다. 패턴의 데이터 신호는 압전 결정의 변형을 제어한 다음 분사되는 잉크의 양을 제어합니다. 압전 마이크로 전자 기계 시스템 (MEMS) 잉크젯 헤드는 하이브리드 인쇄에 사용됩니다. [ 12]. 열 버블 잉크젯 기술은 다음과 같이 작동합니다. 가열 펄스 (즉, 기록 신호) 하에서 노즐의 가열 구성 요소의 온도가 상승하여 근처의 잉크 용매를 증발시켜 많은 양의 작은 핵 기포를 생성합니다. 내부 기포의 부피가 지속적으로 증가합니다. 압력이 일정 수준에 도달하면 노즐에서 잉크가 분출되고 잉크가 기판 표면에 도달하여 패턴과 메시지가 표시됩니다 [ 13 , 14 , 15 , 16 , 17 , 18 ].

3 차원 (3D) 제품 프린팅 및 빠른 프로토 타입 기술의 발전에는 모든 빠른 프로토 타입의 생산 기술이 포함됩니다. 래피드 프로토 타입 기술은 기존 생산 방식과는 다르지만 3D 제품 프린팅 생산 과정의 일부 특성을 공유합니다. 구체적으로 자동 제어 [ 19 , 20 , 21 , 22 , 23 , 24 ] 하에서 자재를 쌓아 올립니다 .

이 연구에서 개발된 시스템은 열 기포 방출 기술을 사용했습니다. 이 빠른 어레이에 DNA 비드를 배치하기 위해 히터에 대해 다른 직경과 다른 공동 두께가 사용되었습니다. 그 후, 스프레이 유속을 평가했다. DNA 제트 칩의 부스트 회로 시스템은 큰 흐름을 구동하기위한 신호 소스입니다. 목표는 분사되는 DNA 액체의 양과 출력을 조정하는 것입니다. 입력 전압을 더 높은 출력 전압으로 수정해야하는 경우 승압 컨버터가 유일한 옵션입니다. 승압 컨버터는 내부 금속 산화물 반도체 전계 효과 트랜지스터 (MOSFET)를 충전하여 출력 전압을 증가시킵니다. MOSFET이 꺼지면 부하 정류를 통해 인덕턴스가 방전됩니다. 충전과 방전 사이에서 인덕터를 변경하는 과정은 인덕터를 통과하는 전압의 방향을 변경합니다. 전압은 입력 작동 전압을 초과하는 지점까지 점차적으로 증가합니다. MOSFET 스위치의 듀티 사이클은 부스트 ​​비율을 결정합니다. MOSFET의 승압 컨버터의 정격 전류와 부스트 비율은 승압 컨버터의 부하 전류의 상한을 결정합니다. MOSFET의 정격 전류는 출력 전압의 상한을 결정합니다. 일부 승압 컨버터는 정류기와 MOSFET을 통합하여 동기식 정류를 제공합니다. 통합 MOSFET은 정밀한 제로 전류 셧다운을 실현할 수 있으므로 셋업 컨버터의 효율성을 높일 수 있습니다. 최대 전력 점 추적 장치는 입력 전력을 실시간으로 모니터링하는 데 사용되었습니다. 입력 전압이 최대 입력 전력 지점에 도달하면 승압 컨버터가 작동을 시작합니다. 스텝 업 컨버터는 DNA 프린팅을 위한 최대 전력 출력 포인트가 있는 유리 기판에 사용됩니다.

MEMS Chip Design for Bubble Jet

이 연구는 히터 크기, 히터 번호 및 루프 저항과 같은 특정 매개 변수를 조작하여 5 가지 유형의 액체 배출 챔버 구조를 설계했습니다. 표 1 은 측정 결과를 나열합니다. 이 시스템은 다양한 히터의 루프 저항을 분석했습니다. 100 개 히터 설계를 완료하기 위해 2 세트의 히터를 사용하여 각 단일 회로 시리즈를 통과하기 때문에 100 개의 히터를 설계할 때 총 루프 저항은 히터 50 개의 총 루프 저항보다 하나 더 커야 합니다. 이 연구에서 MEMS 칩에서 기포를 배출하는 과정에서 저항 층의 면저항은 29 Ω / m 2입니다. 따라서 모델 A의 총 루프 저항이 가장 컸습니다. 일반 사이즈 모델 (모델 B1, C, D, E)의 두 배였습니다. 모델 B1, C, D 및 E의 총 루프 저항은 약 29 Ω / m 2 입니다. 표 1 에 따르면 오류 범위는 허용된 설계 값 이내였습니다. 따라서야 연구에서 설계된 각 유형의 단일 칩은 동일한 생산 절차 결과를 가지며 후속 유량 측정에 사용되었습니다.

Table 1. List of resistance measurement of single circuit resistance.
Table 1. List of resistance measurement of single circuit resistance.

DNA를 뿌린 칩의 파워가 정상으로 확인되면 히터 버블의 성장 특성을 테스트하고 검증했습니다. DNA 스프레이 칩의 필름 두께와 필름 품질은 히터의 작동 조건과 스프레이 품질에 영향을 줍니다. 따라서 기포 성장 현상과 그 성장 특성을 이해하면 본 연구에서 DNA 스프레이 칩의 특성과 작동 조건을 명확히 하는 데 도움이 됩니다.

설계된 시스템은 기포 성장 조건을 관찰하기 위해 개방형 액체 공급 방법을 채택했습니다. 이미지 관찰을 위해 발광 다이오드 (LED, Nichia NSPW500GS-K1, 3.1V 백색 LED 5mm)를 사용하는 동기식 플래시 방식을 사용하여 동기식 지연 광원을 생성했습니다. 이 시스템은 또한 전하 결합 장치 (CCD, Flir Grasshopper3 GigE GS3-PGE-50S5C-C)를 사용하여 이미지를 캡처했습니다. 그림 1핵 형성, 성장, 거품 생성에서 소산에 이르는 거품의 과정을 보여줍니다. 이 시스템은 기포의 성장 및 소산 과정을 확인하여 시작 전압을 관찰하는 데 사용할 수 있습니다. 마이크로 채널의 액체 공급 방법은 LED가 깜빡이는 시간을 가장 큰 기포 발생에 필요한 시간 (15μs)으로 설정했습니다. 이 디자인은 부적합한 깜박임 시간으로 인한 잘못된 판단과 거품 이미지 캡처 불가능을 방지합니다.

Figure 1. The system uses CCD to capture images.
Figure 1. The system uses CCD to capture images.

<내용 중략>…….

Table 2. Open pool test starting voltage results.
Table 2. Open pool test starting voltage results.
Figure 2. Serial input parallel output shift registers forms of connection.
Figure 2. Serial input parallel output shift registers forms of connection.
Figure 3. The geometry of the jet cavity. (a) The actual DNA liquid chamber, (b) the three-dimensional view of the microfluidic single channel. A single-channel jet cavity with 60 μm diameter and 50 μm thickness, with an operating frequency of 5 KHz, in (a) three-dimensional side view (b) X-Z two-dimensional cross-sectional view, at 10, 20, 30, 40 and 200 μs injection conditions.
Figure 3. The geometry of the jet cavity. (a) The actual DNA liquid chamber, (b) the three-dimensional view of the microfluidic single channel. A single-channel jet cavity with 60 μm diameter and 50 μm thickness, with an operating frequency of 5 KHz, in (a) three-dimensional side view (b) X-Z two-dimensional cross-sectional view, at 10, 20, 30, 40 and 200 μs injection conditions.
Figure 4. Calculate and simulate the injection of water in a single-channel injection chamber with a nozzle diameter of 60 μm and a thickness of 50 μm, at an operating frequency of 5 KHz, in the X-Y two-dimensional cross-sectional view, at 10, 20, 30, 40 and 200 μs.
Figure 4. Calculate and simulate the injection of water in a single-channel injection chamber with a nozzle diameter of 60 μm and a thickness of 50 μm, at an operating frequency of 5 KHz, in the X-Y two-dimensional cross-sectional view, at 10, 20, 30, 40 and 200 μs.
Figure 5 depicts the calculation results of the 2D X-Z cross section. At 100 μs and 200 μs, the fluid injection orifice did not completely fill the chamber. This may be because the size of the single-channel injection cavity was unsuitable for the highest operating frequency of 10 KHz. Thus, subsequent calculation simulations employed 5 KHz as the reference operating frequency. The calculation simulation results were calculated according to the operating frequency of the impact. Figure 6 illustrates the injection cavity height as 60 μm and 30 μm and reveals the 2D X-Y cross section. At 100 μs and 200 μs, the fluid injection orifice did not completely fill the chamber. In those stages, the fluid was still filling the chamber, and the flow field was not yet stable.
Figure 5 depicts the calculation results of the 2D X-Z cross section. At 100 μs and 200 μs, the fluid injection orifice did not completely fill the chamber. This may be because the size of the single-channel injection cavity was unsuitable for the highest operating frequency of 10 KHz. Thus, subsequent calculation simulations employed 5 KHz as the reference operating frequency. The calculation simulation results were calculated according to the operating frequency of the impact. Figure 6 illustrates the injection cavity height as 60 μm and 30 μm and reveals the 2D X-Y cross section. At 100 μs and 200 μs, the fluid injection orifice did not completely fill the chamber. In those stages, the fluid was still filling the chamber, and the flow field was not yet stable.
Figure 6. Calculate and simulate water in a single-channel spray chamber with a spray hole diameter of 60 μm and a thickness of 50 μm, with an operating frequency of 10 KHz, in an XY cross-sectional view, at 10, 20, 30, 40, 100, 110, 120, 130, 140 and 200 μs injection situation.
Figure 6. Calculate and simulate water in a single-channel spray chamber with a spray hole diameter of 60 μm and a thickness of 50 μm, with an operating frequency of 10 KHz, in an XY cross-sectional view, at 10, 20, 30, 40, 100, 110, 120, 130, 140 and 200 μs injection situation.
Figure 7. The DNA printing integrated multiplexer driver MEMS head (IDMH).
Figure 7. The DNA printing integrated multiplexer driver MEMS head (IDMH).
Figure 8. The initial voltage diagrams of chip number A,B,C,D,E type.
Figure 8. The initial voltage diagrams of chip number A,B,C,D,E type.
Figure 9. The initial energy diagrams of chip number A,B,C,D,E type.
Figure 9. The initial energy diagrams of chip number A,B,C,D,E type.
Figure 10. A Type-Sample01 flow test.
Figure 10. A Type-Sample01 flow test.
Figure 11. A Type-Sample01 drop volume.
Figure 11. A Type-Sample01 drop volume.
Figure 12. A Type-Sample01 flow rate.
Figure 12. A Type-Sample01 flow rate.
Figure 13. B1-00 flow test.
Figure 13. B1-00 flow test.
Figure 14. C Type-01 flow test.
Figure 14. C Type-01 flow test.
Figure 15. D Type-02 flow test.
Figure 15. D Type-02 flow test.
Figure 16. E1 type flow test.
Figure 16. E1 type flow test.
Figure 17. E1 type ejection rate relationship.
Figure 17. E1 type ejection rate relationship.

Conclusions

이 연구는 DNA 프린팅 IDMH를 제공하고 미세 유체 흐름 추정을 수행했습니다. 설계된 DNA 스프레이 캐비티와 20V의 구동 전압에서 다양한 펄스 폭의 유동 성능이 펄스 폭에 따라 증가하는 것으로 밝혀졌습니다.

E1 유형 유량 테스트는 해당 유량이 3.1cc / min으로 증가함에 따라 유량이 전력 변화에 영향을 받는 것으로 나타났습니다. 동력이 증가함에 따라 유량은 0.75cc / min에서 3.5cc / min으로 최대 6.5W까지 증가했습니다. 동력이 더 증가하면 유량은 에너지와 함께 증가하지 않습니다. 이것은 이 테이블 디자인이 가장 크다는 것을 보여줍니다. 유속은 3.5cc / 분이었다.
작동 주파수가 2KHz이고 펄스 폭이 4μs 및 5μs 인 특수 설계된 DNA 스프레이 룸 구조에서 다양한 전력 조건 하에서 유량 변화를 관찰했습니다. 4.3–5.87 W의 출력 범위 내에서 주입 된 모노머의 유속은 5.5cc / 분이었습니다. 이것은 힘이 증가해도 변하지 않았습니다. DNA는 귀중하고 쉽게 얻을 수 없습니다. 이 실험을 통해 우리는 DNA가 뿌려진 마이크로 어레이 바이오칩의 수천 개의 지점에 필요한 총 DNA 양을 정확하게 추정 할 수 있습니다.

<내용 중략>…….

References

  1. Pydar, O.; Paredes, C.; Hwang, Y.; Paz, J.; Shah, N.; Candler, R. Characterization of 3D-printed microfluidic chip interconnects with integrated O-rings. Sens. Actuators Phys. 2014205, 199–203. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  2. Ohtani, K.; Tsuchiya, M.; Sugiyama, H.; Katakura, T.; Hayakawa, M.; Kanai, T. Surface treatment of flow channels in microfluidic devices fabricated by stereolitography. J. Oleo Sci. 201463, 93–96. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  3. Castrejn-Pita, J.R.; Martin, G.D.; Hoath, S.D.; Hutchings, I.M. A simple large-scale droplet generator for studies of inkjet printing. Rev. Sci. Instrum. 200879, 075108. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  4. Asai, A. Application of the nucleation theory to the design of bubble jet printers. Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. Regul. Rap. Short Notes 198928, 909–915. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  5. Aoyama, R.; Seki, M.; Hong, J.W.; Fujii, T.; Endo, I. Novel Liquid Injection Method with Wedge-shaped Microchannel on a PDMS Microchip System for Diagnostic Analyses. In Transducers’ 01 Eurosensors XV; Springer: Berlin, Germany, 2001; pp. 1204–1207. [Google Scholar]
  6. Xu, B.; Zhang, Y.; Xia, H.; Dong, W.; Ding, H.; Sun, H. Fabrication and multifunction integration of microfluidic chips by femtosecond laser direct writing. Lab Chip 201313, 1677–1690. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  7. Nayve, R.; Fujii, M.; Fukugawa, A.; Takeuchi, T.; Murata, M.; Yamada, Y. High-Resolution long-array thermal ink jet printhead fabricated by anisotropic wet etching and deep Si RIE. J. Microelectromech. Syst. 200413, 814–821. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  8. O’Connor, J.; Punch, J.; Jeffers, N.; Stafford, J. A dimensional comparison between embedded 3D: Printed and silicon microchannesl. J. Phys. Conf. Ser. 2014525, 012009. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  9. Fang, Y.J.; Lee, J.I.; Wang, C.H.; Chung, C.K.; Ting, J. Modification of heater and bubble clamping behavior in off-shooting inkjet ejector. In Proceedings of the IEEE Sensors, Irvine, CA, USA, 30 October–3 November 2005; pp. 97–100. [Google Scholar]
  10. Lee, W.; Kwon, D.; Choi, W.; Jung, G.; Jeon, S. 3D-Printed microfluidic device for the detection of pathogenic bacteria using size-based separation in helical channel with trapezoid cross-section. Sci. Rep. 20155, 7717. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  11. Shin, D.Y.; Smith, P.J. Theoretical investigation of the influence of nozzle diameter variation on the fabrication of thin film transistor liquid crystal display color filters. J. Appl. Phys. 2008103, 114905-1–114905-11. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  12. Kim, Y.; Kim, S.; Hwang, J.; Kim, Y. Drop-on-Demand hybrid printing using piezoelectric MEMS printhead at various waveforms, high voltages and jetting frequencies. J. Micromech. Microeng. 201323, 8. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  13. Shin, S.J.; Kuka, K.; Shin, J.W.; Lee, C.S.; Oha, Y.S.; Park, S.O. Thermal design modifications to improve firing frequency of back shooting inkjet printhead. Sens. Actuators Phys. 2004114, 387–391. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  14. Rose, D. Microfluidic Technologies and Instrumentation for Printing DNA Microarrays. In Microarray Biochip Technology; Eaton Publishing: Norwalk, CT, USA, 2000; p. 35. [Google Scholar]
  15. Wu, D.; Wu, S.; Xu, J.; Niu, L.; Midorikawa, K.; Sugioka, K. Hybrid femtosecond laser microfabrication to achieve true 3D glass/polymer composite biochips with multiscale features and high performance: The concept of ship-in-abottle biochip. Laser Photon. Rev. 20148, 458–467. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  16. McIlroy, C.; Harlen, O.; Morrison, N. Modelling the jetting of dilute polymer solutions in drop-on-demand inkjet printing. J. Non Newton. Fluid Mech. 2013201, 17–28. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  17. Anderson, K.; Lockwood, S.; Martin, R.; Spence, D. A 3D printed fluidic device that enables integrated features. Anal. Chem. 201385, 5622–5626. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  18. Avedisian, C.T.; Osborne, W.S.; McLeod, F.D.; Curley, C.M. Measuring bubble nucleation temperature on the surface of a rapidly heated thermal ink-jet heater immersed in a pool of water. Proc. R. Soc. A Lond. Math. Phys. Sci. 1999455, 3875–3899. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  19. Lim, J.H.; Kuk, K.; Shin, S.J.; Baek, S.S.; Kim, Y.J.; Shin, J.W.; Oh, Y.S. Failure mechanisms in thermal inkjet printhead analyzed by experiments and numerical simulation. Microelectron. Reliab. 200545, 473–478. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  20. Shallan, A.; Semjkal, P.; Corban, M.; Gujit, R.; Breadmore, M. Cost-Effective 3D printing of visibly transparent microchips within minutes. Anal. Chem. 201486, 3124–3130. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  21. Cavicchi, R.E.; Avedisian, C.T. Bubble nucleation and growth anomaly for a hydrophilic microheater attributed to metastable nanobubbles. Phys. Rev. Lett. 200798, 124501. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  22. Kamei, K.; Mashimo, Y.; Koyama, Y.; Fockenberg, C.; Nakashima, M.; Nakajima, M.; Li, J.; Chen, Y. 3D printing of soft lithography mold for rapid production of polydimethylsiloxane-based microfluidic devices for cell stimulation with concentration gradients. Biomed. Microdevices 201517, 36. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  23. Shin, S.J.; Kuka, K.; Shin, J.W.; Lee, C.S.; Oha, Y.S.; Park, S.O. Firing frequency improvement of back shooting inkjet printhead by thermal management. In Proceedings of the TRANSDUCERS’03. 12th International Conference on Solid-State Sensors.Actuators and Microsystems. Digest of Technical Papers (Cat. No.03TH8664), Boston, MA, USA, 8–12 June 2003; Volume 1, pp. 380–383. [Google Scholar]
  24. Laio, X.; Song, J.; Li, E.; Luo, Y.; Shen, Y.; Chen, D.; Chen, Y.; Xu, Z.; Sugoioka, K.; Midorikawa, K. Rapid prototyping of 3D microfluidic mixers in glass by femtosecond laser direct writing. Lab Chip 201212, 746–749. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef] [PubMed]
Fig. 1 Fixed staff gauge for head measurement at the upstream side of the Yuanshanzi Flood Diversion Work in the Keelung River, Taiwan

Velocity distribution and discharge calculation at a sharp-crested weir

Shun-Chung Tsung • Jihn-Sung Lai •
Der-Liang Young

sharp-crested weir에서 속도 분포 및 배출 계산

개방 수로의 harp-crested 위어는 수두-방류 관계를 통해 방류를 계산하는데 유용한 장치입니다. 그러나 수위 측정 사이트와 배출 계수는 배출 계산 정확도에 큰 영향을 미칩니다. 따라서 본 연구는 각각 16MHz MicroADV와 FLOW-3D를 사용하여 위어 부분의 속도 분포를 측정하고 시뮬레이션합니다. 감마 확률 밀도 함수를 사용하여 속도 분포를 특성화하기 위해 위어 섹션의 수심 및 표면 속도가 선택됩니다. 본 연구에서는 측정된 수심과 수면 속도에서 도출된 속도 분포를 기반으로 속도-면적 통합 방법으로 정확한 배출을 계산합니다. 이 연구의 주요 기여는 정확한 측정 사이트를 제공하고, 속도 분포와 방류를 연결하고, 방류 계수 영향을 피하고, 방류 계산 정확도를 향상시키는 것입니다.

A sharp-crested weir in open channel is a useful device to calculate discharge via head-discharge relationship. However, water stage measurement site and discharge coefficient significantly influence discharge calculation accuracy. Therefore, this study measures and simulates velocity distribution at the weir section using 16-MHz MicroADV and FLOW-3D, respectively. The water depth and surface velocity at the weir section are selected to characterize velocity distribution using gamma probability density function. In this study, accurate discharge is calculated by velocity–area integration method based on velocity distribution derived from measured water depth and surface velocity. The main contributions of this study are to give an exact measurement site, link velocity distribution and discharge, avoid discharge coefficient influence, and improve discharge calculation accuracy.

Fig. 1 Fixed staff gauge for head measurement at the upstream side of the Yuanshanzi Flood Diversion Work in the Keelung River, Taiwan
Fig. 1 Fixed staff gauge for head measurement at the upstream side of the Yuanshanzi Flood Diversion Work in the Keelung River, Taiwan

References

  • Ackers P, White WR, Perkins JA, Harrison AJM (1978) Weirs and flumes for flow measurement. Wiley, New York
  • Bagheri S, Heidarpour M (2010) Application of free vortex theory to estimating discharge coefficient for sharp-crested weirs. Biosyst Eng 105:423–427
  • Chanson H, Montes JS (1998) Overflow characteristics of circular weirs: effects of inflow conditions. J Irrig Drain Eng 124(3):152–162
  • Costa JE, Cheng RT, Haeni FP, Melcher N, Spicer KR, Hayes E, Plant W, Hayes K, Teague C, Barrick D (2006) Use of radars to monitor stream discharge by noncontact methods. Water Resour Res 42:1–14
  • Ferrari A (2010) SPH simulation of free surface flow over a sharpcrested weir. Adv Water Resour 33:270–276
  • Ghodsian M (2003) Supercritical flow over a rectangular side weir. Can J Civ Eng 30:596–600
  • Hirt CW, Nichols BD (1981) Volume of fluid (VOF) method for the dynamics of free boundaries. J Comput Phys 39:201–225
  • Hirt CW, Sicilian JM (1985) A porosity technique for the definition of obstacles in rectangular cell meshes. In: Proc. 4th Int. Conf. Ship Hydrodynamics, National Academy of Science, Washington, DChttp://www.flow3d.com/. Accessed 20 Nov 2012
  • Kindsvater CE, Carter R (1957) Discharge characteristics of rectangular thin-plate weirs. J Hydraul Div 83(3):1–36
  • Lai JS, Tsorng SC, Tan YC, Hwang CY (2008) Measurements and analysis of flow field over sharp-crested weir. Taiwan Water Conservancy 56(1):49–59 (in Chinese)
  • Lin C, Huang WY, Suen HF, Hsieh SC (2002) Study on the characteristics of velocity field of free overfalls over a vertical drop. In: Proc. Hydraul Meas Exp Methods Conf, Estes Park, CO, USA
  • Muson BR, Young DF, Okiishi TH (1990) Fundamentals of fluid mechanics. Wiley, New York
  • Qu J, Ramamurthy AS, Tadayon R, Chen Z (2009) Numerical simulation of sharp-crested weir flows. Can J Civ Eng 36:1530–1534
  • Rajaratnam N, Muralidhar D (1971) Pressure and velocity distribution for sharp-crested weirs. J Hydraul Res 9(2):241–248
  • Ramamurthy AS, Tim US, Rao MV (1987) Flow over sharp-crested weirs. J Irrig Drain Eng 113(2):163–172
  • Rehbock T (1929) Discussion of ‘‘precise weir measurements’’ by Schoder EW and Turner KB Trans ASCE 93: 1143–1162
  • Rouse H (1936) Discharge characteristics of the free overfall. Civ Eng ASCE 6(4):257–260
  • Samani AK, Ansari A, Borghei SM (2010) Hydraulic behaviour of flow over an oblique weir. J Hydraul Res 48(5):669–673
  • Sargisonl JE, Percy A (2009) Hydraulics of broad-crested weirs with varying side slopes. J Irrig Drain Eng 135(1):115–118
  • Subramanya K (1986) Flow in open channels. Tata McGraw-Hill, New Delhi
  • Swamee PK (1988) Generalized rectangular weir equation. J Hydraul Eng 114(8):945–949
  • Tadayon R, Ramamurthy AS (2009) Turbulence modeling of flows over circular spillways. J Irrig Drain Eng 135(4):493–498
  • U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (1997) Water measurement manual. 3rd (ed.), U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC
  • Versteeg HK, Malalasekera W (1995) An introduction to computational fluid dynamics: the finite volume method. Longman Scientific & Technical, UK
  • Zhang X, Yuan L, Peng R, Chen Z (2010) Hydraulic relations for clinging flow of sharp-crested weir. J Hydraul Eng 136(6): 385–390
Figure 1. Geometries and bed topography settings of the nine computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations with channel curvature (C) changed from 0.77 to 0

The Straightening of a River Meander Leads to Extensive Losses in Flow Complexity and Ecosystem Services

Abstract

하천 복원 노력을 지원하기 위해 우리는 하천 파괴 속도를 늦출 필요가 있습니다. 이 연구는 하천 곡률 보호를 위해 구불 구불 한 하천이 곧게 펴질 때 수리적 복잡성 손실에 대한 자세한 설명을 제공합니다.

전산 유체 역학 (CFD) 모델링을 사용하여 채널 곡률 (C)이 잘 확립된 사행 굽힘 (C = 0.77)에서 곡률이 없는 직선 채널 (C = 0)로 저하되는 9 개의 시뮬레이션에서 유동 역학의 차이를 문서화했습니다.

공변량을 제어하고 수리적 복잡성에 대한 손실률을 늦추기 위해 각 9 개 채널 구현은 동등한 베드 형태 지형을 가졌습니다. 분석된 수력학적 변수에는 흐름 표면 고도, 흐름 방향 및 횡단 단위 배출, 흐름 방향, 가로 방향 및 수직 방향의 유속, 베드 전단 응력, 흐름 함수 및 채널 베드에서의 수직 저 유량 유속 비율이 포함되었습니다.

수력 복잡성의 손실은 처음에 수로를 C = 0.77에서 C = 0.33 (즉, 수로의 반경이 수로 폭의 3 배임) 할 때 점차적으로 발생했으며, 추가 직선화는 수력 복잡성에 대한 급속한 손실을 초래했습니다.

다른 연구에서는 수리적 복잡성이 중요한 하천 서식지를 제공하고 생물 다양성과 양의 상관 관계가 있음을 보여주었습니다. 이 연구는 강을 풀 때 수력학적 복잡성이 점진적으로 사라졌다가 빠르게 사라지는 방법을 보여줍니다.

To assist river restoration efforts we need to slow the rate of river degradation. This study provides a detailed explanation of the hydraulic complexity loss when a meandering river is straightened in order to motivate the protection of river channel curvature. We used computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling to document the difference in flow dynamics in nine simulations with channel curvature (C) degrading from a well-established tight meander bend (C = 0.77) to a straight channel without curvature (C = 0). To control for covariates and slow the rate of loss to hydraulic complexity, each of the nine-channel realizations had equivalent bedform topography. The analyzed hydraulic variables included the flow surface elevation, streamwise and transverse unit discharge, flow velocity at streamwise, transverse, and vertical directions, bed shear stress, stream function, and the vertical hyporheic flux rates at the channel bed. The loss of hydraulic complexity occurred gradually when initially straightening the channel from C = 0.77 to C = 0.33 (i.e., the radius of the channel is three-times the channel width), and additional straightening incurred rapid losses to hydraulic complexity. Other studies have shown hydraulic complexity provides important riverine habitat and is positively correlated with biodiversity. This study demonstrates how hydraulic complexity can be gradually and then rapidly lost when unwinding a river, and hopefully will serve as a cautionary tale.

Figure 1. Geometries and bed topography settings of the nine computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations with channel curvature (C) changed from 0.77 to 0
Figure 1. Geometries and bed topography settings of the nine computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations with channel curvature (C) changed from 0.77 to 0
Figure 2. Flow surface elevation (h) normalized by H at C = 0.77, C = 0.33, and C = 0 conditions. n denotes the lateral coordination with n = 0 at channel center and B denotes the channel width.
Figure 2. Flow surface elevation (h) normalized by H at C = 0.77, C = 0.33, and C = 0 conditions. n denotes the lateral coordination with n = 0 at channel center and B denotes the channel width.
Figure 3. Normalized flow surface profiles for the nine simulations at the point bar apex 1.5 s/B. The insert plot shows the second order derivative of normalized flow surface elevation in the transverse direction, Fh00(n/B), which gives the convexity or concavity of the surface profile curves.
Figure 3. Normalized flow surface profiles for the nine simulations at the point bar apex 1.5 s/B. The insert plot shows the second order derivative of normalized flow surface elevation in the transverse direction, Fh00(n/B), which gives the convexity or concavity of the surface profile curves.
Figure 4. Streamwise unit discharge qs/UH for channel curvature C = 0.77, 0.33, and 0 conditions.
Figure 4. Streamwise unit discharge qs/UH for channel curvature C = 0.77, 0.33, and 0 conditions.
Figure 5. Transverse unit discharge qn/UH for channel curvature C = 0.77, 0.33, and 0 conditions.
Figure 5. Transverse unit discharge qn/UH for channel curvature C = 0.77, 0.33, and 0 conditions.

Reference : https://www.mdpi.com/2073-4441/12/6/1680

Figure 6. Transverse unit discharge averaged over the transverse direction. The inset shows the R2 of transverse unit discharge < qn/UH > between each curvature, C, and the straight channel condition (C = 0, R2 = 1); a lower R2 suggests greater hydraulic complexity for transverse unit discharge.
Figure 6. Transverse unit discharge averaged over the transverse direction. The inset shows the R2 of transverse unit discharge < qn/UH > between each curvature, C, and the straight channel condition (C = 0, R2 = 1); a lower R2 suggests greater hydraulic complexity for transverse unit discharge.
Figure 7. Normalized depth averaged streamwise velocity <vs>/U for channel curvature C = 0.77, 0.33, and 0 conditions.
Figure 7. Normalized depth averaged streamwise velocity /U for channel curvature C = 0.77, 0.33, and 0 conditions.
Figure 8. The first moment of normalized depth averaged streamwise velocity <vs>/U, which represents center of gravity of the streamwise flow distribution, along the channel. The inset shows the R2 of the first moment of <vs>/U between each curvature and the straight channel condition (C = 0, R2 = 1); a lower R2 suggests greater hydraulic complexity for the first moment of depth averaged streamwise velocity.
Figure 8. The first moment of normalized depth averaged streamwise velocity /U, which represents center of gravity of the streamwise flow distribution, along the channel. The inset shows the R2 of the first moment of /U between each curvature and the straight channel condition (C = 0, R2 = 1); a lower R2 suggests greater hydraulic complexity for the first moment of depth averaged streamwise velocity.
Figure 9. Distribution of river channel bed shear Cf for channel curvature C = 0.77, 0.33, and 0 conditions.
Figure 9. Distribution of river channel bed shear Cf for channel curvature C = 0.77, 0.33, and 0 conditions.
Figure 10. Normalized vertical hyporheic flux vzbed/U at 2 mm below sediment surface for channel curvature C = 0.77, 0.33, and 0 conditions. Positive indicates upwelling of groundwater into the river channel.
Figure 10. Normalized vertical hyporheic flux vzbed/U at 2 mm below sediment surface for channel curvature C = 0.77, 0.33, and 0 conditions. Positive indicates upwelling of groundwater into the river channel.
Figure 11. Normalized vertical velocity <vz>/U for channel curvature C = 0.77, 0.33, and 0 conditions, with positive values upward flows, negative values downward flows.
Figure 11. Normalized vertical velocity /U for channel curvature C = 0.77, 0.33, and 0 conditions, with positive values upward flows, negative values downward flows.
Figure 12. Transverse stream function distribution ψ/UBH reveals the secondary circulation of transverse flow cells rotating at the meander apex 1.5 s/B for channel curvature C = 0.77 (A), C = 0.33 (B), and C = 0 (C), with positive values representing clockwise rotation direction when facing upstream, and negative values representing counter-clockwise rotation when facing upstream.
Figure 12. Transverse stream function distribution ψ/UBH reveals the secondary circulation of transverse flow cells rotating at the meander apex 1.5 s/B for channel curvature C = 0.77 (A), C = 0.33 (B), and C = 0 (C), with positive values representing clockwise rotation direction when facing upstream, and negative values representing counter-clockwise rotation when facing upstream.

References

  1. Paper 422-H); U.S. Government Printing Office: Washington, DC, USA, 1966.
  2. Leopold, L.B.; Wolman, M.G. River meanders. Bull. Geol. Soc. Am. 196071, 769–793. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  3. Wohl, E. Rivers in the Landscape; John Wiley & Sons: Hoboken, NJ, USA, 2020. [Google Scholar]
  4. Dietrich, W.E.; Smith, J.D. Influence of the point bar on flow through curved channels. Water Resour. Res. 198319, 1173–1192. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  5. Harvey, J.W.; Bencala, K. The effects of streambed topography on surface-subsurface water exchange in mountains catchments. Water Resour. Res. 199329, 89–98. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  6. Bridge, J.S. Rivers and Floodplains: Forms, Processes, and Sedimentary Record; John Wiley & Sons: Hoboken, NJ, USA, 2009. [Google Scholar]
  7. Schumm, S.A. Patterns of alluvial rivers. Annu. Rev. Earth Planet. Sci. 198513, 5–27. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  8. Vermeulen, B.; Hoitink, A.J.F.; Labeur, R.J. Flow structure caused by a local cross-sectional area increase and curvature in a sharp river bend. J. Geophys. Res. Earth Surf. 2015120, 1771–1783. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  9. Konsoer, K.M.; Rhoads, B.L.; Best, J.L.; Langendoen, E.J.; Abad, J.D.; Parsons, D.R.; Garcia, M.H. Three-dimensional flow structure and bed morphology in large elongate meander loops with different outer bank roughness characteristics. Water Resour. Res. 201652, 9621–9641. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  10. Li, B.D.; Zhang, X.H.; Tang, H.S.; Tsubaki, R. Influence of deflection angles on flow behaviours in openchannel bends. J. Mt. Sci. 201815, 2292–2306. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  11. Gualtieri, C.; Abdi, R.; Ianniruberto, M.; Filizola, N.; Endreny, T.A. A 3D analysis of spatial habitat metrics about the confluence of Negro and Solimões rivers, Brazil. Ecohydrology 202013, e2166. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  12. Gualtieri, C.; Ianniruberto, M.; Filizola, N.; Santos, R.; Endreny, T. Hydraulic complexity at a large river confluence in the Amazon basin. Ecohydrology 201710, e1863. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  13. Kozarek, J.; Hession, W.; Dolloff, C.; Diplas, P. Hydraulic complexity metrics for evaluating in-stream brook trout habitat. J. Hydraul. Eng. 2010136, 1067–1076. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  14. McCoy, E.D.; Bell, S.S.; Mushinsky, H.R. Habitat structure: Synthesis and perspectives. In Habitat Structure; Springer: Berlin, Germany, 1991; pp. 427–430. [Google Scholar]
  15. Re-Engineering Britain’s Rivers. The Economist. 6 March 2020. Available online: https://www.latestnigeriannews.com/news/8279579/reengineering-britains-rivers.html (accessed on 12 April 2020).
  16. Palmer, M.A.; Bernhardt, E.; Allan, J.; Lake, P.S.; Alexander, G.; Brooks, S.; Carr, J.; Clayton, S.; Dahm, C.; Follstad Shah, J.; et al. Standards for ecologically successful river restoration. J. Appl. Ecol. 200542, 208–217. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  17. Abad, J.D.; Rhoads, B.L.; Güneralp, İ.; García, M.H. Flow structure at different stages in a meander-bend with bendway weirs. J. Hydraul. Eng. 2008134, 1052–1063. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  18. Blanckaert, K.; Schnauder, I.; Sukhodolov, A.; van Balen, W.; Uijttewaal, W. Meandering: Field Experiments, Laboratory Experiments and Numerical Modeling. Technical Report. 2009. Available online: https://infoscience.epfl.ch/record/146621/files/2009-695-Blanckaert_et_al-Meandering_field_experiments_laboratory_experiments_and_numerical.pdf (accessed on 12 April 2020).
  19. Constantinescu, G.; Koken, M.; Zeng, J. The structure of turbulent flow in an open channel bend of strong curvature with deformed bed: Insight provided by detached eddy simulation. Water Resour. Res. 201147. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  20. Sawyer, A.H.; Bayani Cardenas, M.; Buttles, J. Hyporheic exchange due to channel-spanning logs. Water Resour. Res. 201147. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  21. Zhou, T.; Endreny, T. Meander hydrodynamics initiated by river restoration deflectors. Hydrol. Process. 201226, 3378–3392. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  22. Hirt, C.W.; Nichols, B.D. Volume of fluid (VOF) method for the dynamics of free boundaries. J. Comput. Phys. 198139, 201–225. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  23. Van Balen, W.; Uijttewaal, W.; Blanckaert, K. Large-eddy simulation of a curved open-channel flow over topography. Phys. Fluids 201022, 075108. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  24. Blanckaert, K. Topographic steering, flow recirculation, velocity redistribution, and bed topography in sharp meander bends. Water Resour. Res. 201046. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  25. Zeng, J.; Constantinescu, G.; Blanckaert, K.; Weber, L. Flow and bathymetry in sharp open-channel bends: Experiments and predictions. Water Resour. Res. 200844. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  26. Elliott, A.H.; Brooks, N.H. Transfer of nonsorbing solutes to a streambed with bed forms: Laboratory experiments. Water Resour. Res. 199733, 137–151. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  27. Zhou, T.; Endreny, T.A. Reshaping of the hyporheic zone beneath river restoration structures: Flume and hydrodynamic experiments. Water Resour. Res. 201349, 5009–5020. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  28. Lane, S.; Bradbrook, K.; Richards, K.; Biron, P.; Roy, A. The application of computational fluid dynamics to natural river channels: Three-dimensional versus two-dimensional approaches. Geomorphology 199929, 1–20. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  29. Vardy, A. Fluid Principles; McGraw-Hill International Series in Civil Engineering; McGraw-Hill: London, UK, 1990. [Google Scholar]
  30. Rozovskii, I.L. Flow of Water in Bends of Open Channels; Academy of Sciences of the Ukrainian SSR: Kiev, Ukraine, 1957. [Google Scholar]
  31. Blanckaert, K.; De Vriend, H.J. Secondary flow in sharp open-channel bends. J. Fluid Mech. 2004498, 353–380. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  32. Johannesson, H.; Parker, G. Linear theory of river meanders. River Meand. 198912, 181–213. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  33. Camporeale, C.; Perona, P.; Porporato, A.; Ridolfi, L. Hierarchy of models for meandering rivers and related morphodynamic processes. Rev. Geophys. 200745. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  34. He, L. Distribution of primary and secondary currents in sine-generated bends. Water SA 201844, 118–129. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  35. Liao, J.C.; Beal, D.N.; Lauder, G.V.; Triantafyllou, M.S. Fish exploiting vortices decrease muscle activity. Science 2003302, 1566–1569. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  36. Crispell, J.K.; Endreny, T.A. Hyporheic exchange flow around constructed in-channel structures and implications for restoration design. Hydrol. Process. 20091168, 1158–1168. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  37. Hester, E.T.; Gooseff, M.N. Moving Beyond the Banks: Hyporheic Restoration Is Fundamental to Restoring Ecological Services and Functions of Streams. Environ. Sci. Technol. 201044, 1521–1525. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
CASE2-실험 결과와 FLOW-3D WELD에 의한 해석 결과와의 비교(단면 형상)

FLOW-3D WELD 용접 사례

FLOW-3D WELD를 이용한 용접 해석 사례를 소개합니다.

  1. 열전도 형 용접 (레이저)
      두께가 다른 모재 맞대기
  2. 하이브리드
      레이저 / 아크 하이브리드
  3. 깊이 용해 형 (키 홀)
      알루미늄 평판에 의한 용해 깊이, 형상 확인
  4. 레이저 고기 모듬
      파우더 공급 및 용해
  5. 아크 용접
      오버레이 피팅 관통 평가
  6. 레이저 용접 (무릎 관절)
      무릎 관절의 실험과의 비교
  7. Selective Laser Sintering (3D printing)
      3 차원 프린터에의 응용

레이저 용접의 특징

에너지 밀도가 높고, 다른 재료도 시간 차이없이 녹아구슬 폭이 좁은비접촉 표면 성상 및 품질이 좋은제어 성이 우수전기 ⇒ 광 변환 효율이 나쁘다반사율이 높은 흡수율이 떨어진다weld_example1

열전도 형 용접

weld_example2

열전도 형 용접 결과

weld_example3weld_example4

하이브리드

강판의 레이저 / 아크 하이브리드 용접의 분석을 실시했습니다.

분석 조건

weld_example5CO2 레이저 출력 : 3.5kw디 포커스 값 : 0 mm레이저 스폿 지름 : 0.3mm아크 전류 : 180A아크 전압 : 26V용접 속도 : 1m / min열원 사이의 거리 : 3mm금속 : 900 MPa high strength steel

메쉬

weld_example6

해석과 실험과의 비교

온도의 단위는 [K]입니다.

weld_example7

깊이 용해형 (키 홀)

해석 모델weld_example83D 온도 표시weld_example9

레이저 금속 침전 Laser Metal Deposition (LMD)

파우더 공급 레이저에 의한 용해

해석 모델weld_example103D 온도 표시weld_example11

아크 용접

TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas)방전 전극으로 텅스텐을 사용불활성 (Inert) 가스를 사용 (아르곤, 헬륨 등)목적에 따라 필러 금속을 첨가 (와이어 or 필러 봉)공업 적으로 사용되는 대부분의 금속에 대응weld_example12

분석 조건

weld_example13

분석 결과 : 온도 등고선 [K]

TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas)모재 온도가 상승하고 조금 늦게 용융 풀이 확대표면 장력에 의해 용융 풀 바닥은 녹아 떨어지지 않는 weld_example14

분석 결과 : 용융 부의 교반

TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas)상하 모재를 분류하고 교반의 모습을 확인weld_example15

분석 결과 : 용융 부 교반 유속 벡터

TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas)아크 압력 차폐 가스에 의한 함몰표면 장력에 의한 계면 위치의 회복계면의 진동weld_example16

분석 결과 : 구슬 모양

TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas)상하면 구슬 폭용접 시작부터 정상까지의 과도적인 변화weld_example17

분석 결과 : 고출력의 경우 온도 등고선 [K]

TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas)고출력 의해 함몰이 커진다용융 풀의 두께가 얇아지고 관통하는weld_example18

레이저 용접 (무릎 관절)

weld_example19

분석 결과와 실제의 단면 비교

weld_example20

Selective Laser Sintering (3D printing)

weld_example21

선택적 레이저 용융 분석

weld_example22weld_example24
weld_example23

Liquid Metal 3D Printing

Liquid Metal 3D Printing

This article was contributed by V.Sukhotskiy1,2, I. H. Karampelas3, G. Garg 1, A. Verma1, M. Tong 1, S. Vader2, Z. Vader2, and E. P. Furlani1
1
University at Buffalo SUNY, 2Vader Systems, 3Flow Science, Inc.

Drop-on-demand 잉크젯 인쇄는 상업 및 소비자 이미지 재생을 위한 잘 정립 된 방법입니다. 이 기술을 주도하는 동일한 원리는 인쇄 및 적층 제조 분야에도 적용될 수 있습니다. 기존의 잉크젯 기술은 폴리머에서 살아있는 세포에 이르기까지 다양한 재료를 증착하고 패턴화하여 다양한 기능성 매체, 조직 및 장치를 인쇄하는 데 사용되었습니다 [1, 2]. 이 작업의 초점은 잉크젯 기반 기술을 3D 솔리드 금속 구조 인쇄로 확장하는 데 있습니다 [3, 4]. 현재 대부분의 3D 금속 프린팅 응용 프로그램은 고체 물체를 형성하기 위해 레이저 [6] 또는 전자 빔 [7]과 같은 외부 지향 에너지 원의 영향을 받아 증착 된 금속 분말 소결 또는 용융을 포함합니다. 그러나 이러한 방법은 비용 및 프로세스 복잡성 측면에서 단점이 있습니다. 예를 들어, 3D 프린팅 프로세스에 앞서 분말을 생성하기 위해 시간과 에너지 집약적인 기술이 필요합니다.

이 기사에서는 MHD (자기 유체 역학) drop-on-demand 방출 및 움직이는 기판에 액체 방울 증착을 기반으로 3D 금속 구조의 적층 제조에 대한 새로운 접근 방식에 대해 설명합니다. 프로세스의 각 부분을 연구하기 위해 많은 시뮬레이션이 수행되었습니다.

단순화를 위해 이 연구는 두 부분으로 나뉘었습니다.

첫 번째 부분에서는 MHD 분석을 사용하여 프린트 헤드 내부의 Lorentz 힘 밀도에 의해 생성 된 압력을 추정 한 다음 FLOW-3D 모델의 경계 조건으로 사용됩니다. 액적 방출 역학을 연구하는 데 사용되었습니다.

두 번째 부분에서는 이상적인 액적 증착 조건을 식별하기 위해 FLOW-3D 매개 변수 분석을 수행했습니다. 모델링 노력의 결과는 그림 1에 표시된 장치의 설계를 안내하는데 사용되었습니다.

코일은 배출 챔버를 둘러싸고 전기적으로 펄스되어 액체 금속을 투과하고 폐쇄 루프를 유도하는 과도 자기장을 생성합니다. 그 안에 일시적인 전기장. 전기장은 순환 전류 밀도를 발생시키고, 이는 과도장에 역 결합되고 챔버 내에서 자홍 유체 역학적 로렌츠 힘 밀도를 생성합니다. 힘의 방사형 구성 요소는 오리피스에서 액체 금속 방울을 분출하는 역할을 하는 압력을 생성합니다. 분출된 액적은 기질로 이동하여 결합 및 응고되어 확장된 고체 구조를 형성합니다. 임의의 형태의 3 차원 구조는 입사 액적의 정확한 패턴 증착을 가능하게 하는 움직이는 기판을 사용하여 층별로 인쇄 될 수 있습니다. 이 기술은 상표명 MagnetoJet으로 Vader Systems (www.vadersystems.com)에 의해 특허 및 상용화되었습니다.

MagnetoJet 프린팅 공정의 장점은 상대적으로 높은 증착 속도와 낮은 재료 비용으로 임의 형상의 3D 금속 구조를 인쇄하는 것입니다 [8, 9]. 또한 고유한 금속 입자 구조가 존재하기 때문에 기계적 특성이 개선된 부품을 인쇄 할 수 있습니다.

프로토타입 디바이스 개발

Vader Systems의 3D 인쇄 시스템의 핵심 구성 요소는 두 부분의 노즐과 솔레노이드 코일로 구성된 프린트 헤드 어셈블리입니다. 액체화는 노즐의 상부에서 발생합니다. 하부에는 직경이 100μm ~ 500μm 인 서브 밀리미터 오리피스가 있습니다. 수냉식 솔레노이드 코일은 위 그림에 표시된 바와 같이 오리피스 챔버를 둘러싸고있습니다 (냉각 시스템은 도시되지 않음). 다수의 프린트 헤드 디자인의 반복적인 개발은 액체 금속 배출 거동뿐만 아니라, 액체 금속 충전 거동에 대한 사출 챔버 기하적인 효과를 분석하기 위해 연구되었습니다.

이 프로토타입 시스템은 일반적인 알루미늄 합금으로 만들어진 견고한 3D 구조를 성공적으로 인쇄했습니다 (아래 그림 참조). 액적 직경, 기하학, 토출 빈도 및 기타 매개 변수에 따라 직경이 50 μm에서 500 μm까지 다양합니다. 짧은 버스트에서 최대 5000 Hz까지 40-1000 Hz의 지속적인 방울 분사 속도가 달성 되었습니다.

Computational Models

프로토 타입 장치 개발의 일환으로, 성능 (예 : 액적 방출 역학, 액적-공기 및 액적-기질 상호 작용)에 대한 설계 개념을 스크리닝하기 위해 프로토타입 제작 전에 계산 시뮬레이션을 수행했습니다. 분석을 단순화하기 위해 CFD 분석 뿐만 아니라 컴퓨터 전자기(CE)를 사용하는 두 가지 다른 보완 모델이 개발되었습니다. 첫 번째 모델에서는 2 단계 CE 및 CFD 분석을 사용하여 MHD 기반 액적 분출 거동과 효과적인 압력 생성을 연구했습니다. 두 번째 모델에서는 열-유체 CFD 분석을 사용하여 기판상의 액적 패턴화, 유착 및 응고를 연구했습니다.

MHD 분석 후, 첫 번째 모델에서 등가 압력 프로파일을 추출하여 액적 분출 및 액적-기질 상호 작용의 과도 역학을 탐구하도록 설계된 FLOW-3D 모델의 입력으로 사용되었습니다. FLOW-3D 시뮬레이션은 액적 분출에 대한 오리피스 안과 주변의 습윤 효과를 이해하기 위해 수행되었습니다. 오리피스 내부와 외부 모두에서 유체 초기화 수준을 변경하고 펄스 주파수에 의해 결정된 펄스 사이의 시간을 허용함으로써 크기 및 속도를 포함하여 분출 된 액 적의 특성 차이를 식별 할 수있었습니다.

Droplet 생성

MagnetoJet 인쇄 프로세스에서, 방울은 전압 펄스 매개 변수에 따라 일반적으로 1 – 10m/s 범위의 속도로 배출되고 기판에 충돌하기 전에 비행 중에 약간 냉각됩니다. 기판상의 액적들의 패터닝 및 응고를 제어하는 ​​능력은 정밀한 3D 솔리드 구조의 형성에 중요합니다. 고해상도 3D 모션베이스를 사용하여 패터닝을 위한 정확한 Droplet 배치가 이루어집니다. 그러나 낮은 다공성과 원하지 않는 레이어링 artifacts가 없는 잘 형성된 3D 구조를 만들기 위해 응고를 제어하는 ​​것은 다음과 같은 제어를 필요로하기 때문에 어려움이 있습니다.

  • 냉각시 액체 방울로부터 주변 물질로의 열 확산,
  • 토출된 액적의 크기,
  • 액적 분사 빈도 및
  • 이미 형성된 3D 물체로부터의 열 확산.

이들 파라미터를 최적화 함으로써, 인쇄된 형상의 높은 공간 분해능을 제공하기에 충분히 작으며, 인접한 액적들 및 층들 사이의 매끄러운 유착을 촉진하기에 충분한 열 에너지를 보유 할 것입니다. 열 관리 문제에 직면하는 한 가지 방법은 가열된 기판을 융점보다 낮지만 상대적으로 가까운 온도에서 유지하는 것입니다. 이는 액체 금속 방울과 그 주변 사이의 온도 구배를 감소시켜 액체 금속 방울로부터의 열의 확산을 늦춤으로써 유착을 촉진시키고 고형화하여 매끄러운 입체 3D 덩어리를 형성합니다. 이 접근법의 실행 가능성을 탐구하기 위해 FLOW-3D를 사용한 파라 메트릭 CFD 분석이 수행되었습니다.

액체 금속방울 응집과 응고

우리는 액체 금속방울 분사 주파수뿐만 아니라 액체 금속방울 사이의 중심 간 간격의 함수로서 가열된 기판에서 내부 층의 금속방울 유착 및 응고를 조사했습니다. 이 분석에서 액체 알루미늄의 구형 방울은 3mm 높이에서 가열 된 스테인리스 강 기판에 충돌합니다. 액적 분리 거리 (100)로 변화 될 때 방울이 973 K의 초기 온도를 가지고, 기판이 다소 943 K.도 3의 응고 온도보다 900 K로 유지됩니다. 실선의 인쇄 중에 액적 유착 및 응고를 도시 50㎛의 간격으로 500㎛에서 400㎛까지 연속적으로 유지하고, 토출 주파수는 500Hz에서 일정하게 유지 하였습니다.

방울 분리가 250μm를 초과하면 선을 따라 입자가 있는 응고된 세그먼트가 나타납니다. 350μm 이상의 거리에서는 세그먼트가 분리되고 선이 채워지지 않은 간극이 있어 부드러운 솔리드 구조를 형성하는데 적합하지 않습니다. 낮은 온도에서 유지되는 기질에 대해서도 유사한 분석을 수행했습니다(예: 600K, 700K 등). 3D 구조물이 쿨러 기질에 인쇄될 수 있지만, 그것들은 후속적인 퇴적 금속 층들 사이에 강한 결합의 결여와 같은 바람직하지 않은 공예품을 보여주는 것이 관찰되었습니다. 이는 침전된 물방울의 열 에너지 손실률이 증가했기 때문입니다. 기판 온도의 최종 선택은 주어진 용도에 대해 물체의 허용 가능한 인쇄 품질에 따라 결정될 수 있습니다. 인쇄 중에 부품이 커짐에 따라 더 높은 열 확산에 맞춰 동적으로 조정할 수도 있습니다.

FLOW-3D 결과 검증

위 그림은 가열된 기판 상에 인쇄된 컵 구조 입니다. 인쇄 과정에서 가열된 인쇄물의 온도는 인쇄된 부분의 순간 높이를 기준으로 실시간으로 733K (430 ° C)에서 833K (580 ° C)로 점차 증가했습니다. 이것은 물체 표면적이 증가함에 따라 국부적인 열 확산의 증가를 극복하기 위해 행해졌습니다. 알루미늄의 높은 열전도율은 국부적인 온도 구배에 대한 조정이 신속하게 이루어져야 하기 때문에 특히 어렵습니다. 그렇지 않으면 온도가 빠르게 감소하고 층내 유착을 저하시킵니다.

결론

시뮬레이션 결과를 바탕으로, Vader System의 프로토타입 마그네슘 유체 역학 액체 금속 Drop-on-demand 3D 프린터 프로토 타입은 임의의 형태의 3D 솔리드 알루미늄 구조를 인쇄할 수 있었습니다. 이러한 구조물은 서브 밀리미터의 액체 금속방울을 층 단위로 패턴화하여 성공적으로 인쇄되었습니다. 시간당 540 그램 이상의 재료 증착 속도는 오직 하나의 노즐을 사용하여 달성 되었습니다.

이 기술의 상업화는 잘 진행되고 있지만 처리량, 효율성, 해상도 및 재료 선택면에서 최적의 인쇄 성능을 실현하는 데는 여전히 어려움이 있습니다. 추가 모델링 작업은 인쇄 과정 중 과도 열 영향을 정량화하고, 메니스커스 동작뿐만 아니라 인쇄된 부품의 품질을 평가하는 데 초점을 맞출 것입니다.

References
[1] Roth, E.A., Xu, T., Das, M., Gregory, C., Hickman, J.J. and Boland, T., “Inkjet printing for high-throughput cell patterning,” Biomaterials 25(17), 3707-3715 (2004).

[2] Sirringhaus, H., Kawase, T., Friend, R.H., Shimoda, T., Inbasekaran, M., Wu, W. and Woo, E.P., “High-resolution inkjet printing of all-polymer transistor circuits,” Science 290(5499), 2123-2126 (2000).

[3] Tseng, A.A., Lee, M.H. and Zhao, B., “Design and operation of a droplet deposition system for freeform fabrication of metal parts,” Transactions-American Society of Mechanical Engineers Journal of Engineering Materials and Technology 123(1), 74-84 (2001).

[4] Suter, M., Weingärtner, E. and Wegener, K., “MHD printhead for additive manufacturing of metals,” Procedia CIRP 2, 102-106 (2012).

[5] Loh, L.E., Chua, C.K., Yeong, W.Y., Song, J., Mapar, M., Sing, S.L., Liu, Z.H. and Zhang, D.Q., “Numerical investigation and an effective modelling on the Selective Laser Melting (SLM) process with aluminium alloy 6061,” International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer 80, 288-300 (2015).

[6] Simchi, A., “Direct laser sintering of metal powders: Mechanism, kinetics and microstructural features,” Materials Science and Engineering: A 428(1), 148-158 (2006).

[7] Murr, L.E., Gaytan, S.M., Ramirez, D.A., Martinez, E., Hernandez, J., Amato, K.N., Shindo, P.W., Medina, F.R. and Wicker, R.B., “Metal fabrication by additive manufacturing using laser and electron beam melting technologies,” Journal of Materials Science & Technology, 28(1), 1-14 (2012).

[8] J. Jang and S. S. Lee, “Theoretical and experimental study of MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) micropump,” Sensors & Actuators: A. Physical, 80(1), 84-89 (2000).

[9] M. Orme and R. F. Smith, “Enhanced aluminum properties by means of precise droplet deposition,” Journal of Manufacturing Science and Engineering, Transactions of the ASME, 122(3), 484-493, (2000)

igure 1:Essential componentsof the MHD printhead (a) cross-sectional view of printhead showing flow of liquid metal.(b) simulation model showing the magneticfield generated by a pulsed magnetic coil as well as an ejecteddroplet of liquid aluminum.

Timeline of molten metal droplet ejection

용융 금속 액적 분출 타임 라인

Keywords: Magnetohydrodynamicdroplet ejection, droplet on demandprinting, 3D printing of molten metal, additive manufacturing, thermo-fluidic analysis, molten aluminum.

우리는 액체 금속 방울을 사용하여 3D 고체 금속 구조의 DOD (drop-on-demand) 프린팅을 위한 새로운 방법을 제시합니다. 이 방법은 MHD (Magnetohydrodynamic) 기반 방울 생성에 의존합니다. 특히, 외부 코일에 의해 공급되는 맥동 자기장은 액체 금속으로 채워진 분사 챔버 내에서 MHD 기반 힘 밀도를 유도하여 물방울이 노즐을 통해 분사되도록 합니다.

임의의 모양의 3 차원 (3D) 고체 금속 구조는 드롭 방식의 유착 및 응고와 함께 방울의 층별 패턴 증착을 통해 인쇄 할 수 있습니다. 샘플 인쇄 구조와 함께 이 프로토 타입 MHD 인쇄 시스템을 소개합니다. 또한 드롭 생성을 제어하는 기본 물리학에 대해 논의하고 장치 성능을 예측하기 위한 계산 모델을 소개합니다.

주문형 잉크젯 인쇄는 상업용 및 소비자용 이미지 재생을 위한 잘 정립된 방법입니다. 이 기술을 주도하는 동일한 원리는 기능 인쇄 및 적층 제조 분야에도 적용될 수 있습니다. 기존의 잉크젯 기술은 폴리머에서 살아있는 세포에 이르기까지 다양한 재료를 증착하고 패턴 화하여 다양한 기능성 매체, 조직 및 장치를 인쇄하는 데 사용되어 왔습니다 [1, 2]. 이 작업의 초점은 잉크젯 기반 기술을 3D 솔리드 금속 구조 프린팅으로 확장하는 데 있습니다 [3, 4]. 현재 대부분의 3D 금속 프린팅 응용 분야에는 레이저 (예 : 선택적 레이저 소결 [5] 및 직접 레이저 금속 소결 [6]) 또는 전자 빔 (예 : 레이저 소결 [6])과 같은 외부 지향 에너지 원의 영향으로 증착 된 금속 분말 소결 또는 용융이 포함됩니다. 전자빔 용융 [7])을 사용하여 고체 물체를 형성합니다. 그러나 이러한 방법은 비용 및 복잡성 측면에서 단점이 있습니다. 3D 프린팅 프로세스에 앞서 금속을 밀링해야 합니다.

igure  1:Essential componentsof the MHD printhead (a) cross-sectional  view  of  printhead  showing  flow  of liquid metal.(b) simulation model showing the magneticfield  generated  by  a  pulsed  magnetic  coil  as  well  as an ejecteddroplet of liquid aluminum.
igure 1:Essential componentsof the MHD printhead (a) cross-sectional view of printhead showing flow of liquid metal.(b) simulation model showing the magneticfield generated by a pulsed magnetic coil as well as an ejecteddroplet of liquid aluminum.

이 작업에서 우리는 자기 유체 역학의 원리에 기반한 금속 구조물의 적층 제조에 대한 새로운 접근 방식을 소개합니다. 이 방법에서는 감긴 고체 금속 와이어가 MHD 프린트 헤드의 아세라 미치 팅 챔버에 연속적으로 공급되고 용융되어 그림 1에 표시된 것처럼 모세관 힘을 통해 배출 챔버에 공급되는 액체 금속 저장소를 형성합니다. 코일이 배출 챔버를 둘러싸고 있습니다. 액체 금속 내에서 과도 전기장을 유도하는 과도 자기장을 생성하도록 전기적으로 펄스됩니다. 전기장은 유도 된 순환 전류 밀도를 생성하며, 이는 적용된 자기장과 결합하여 챔버 내에서 오리피스의 액체 금속 방울을 방출하는 역할을하는 로렌츠 힘 밀도 (fMHD)를 생성합니다. 분출 된 액 적은 기질로 이동하여 결합 및 응고되어 확장 된 고체 구조를 형성합니다. 임의의 형태의 3 차원 구조는 입사 액 적의 정확한 패턴 증착을 가능하게하는 움직이는 기판을 사용하여 층별로 인쇄 될 수 있습니다. 이 기술은 Vader Systems (www.vadersystems.com)에서 MagnetoJet이라는 상표명으로 개척하고 상용화했습니다. MagnetoJet 인쇄 공정의 장점은 상대적으로 높은 증착 속도와 낮은 재료 비용으로 임의의 모양의 3D 금속 구조를 인쇄하는 것입니다. 이 작업에서는 MagnetoJet 프로토 타입 프린팅 프로세스에 대해 논의하고 샘플 3D 프린팅 구조를 시연하며 합리적인 설계 및 장치 성능 예측을 가능하게하는 계산 모델을 소개합니다.

Figure 2:Printed     3D structures: (a) ring showing as printed base and processed    upper    portion, and (b) cat
Figure 2:Printed 3D structures: (a) ring showing as printed base and processed upper portion, and (b) cat

Laser Metal Deposition and Fluid Particles

Laser Metal Deposition and Fluid Particles

FLOW-3D는 신규 모듈을 개발 하면서, 입자 모델의 새로운 입자 클래스 중 하나인 유체 입자의 기능에 초점을 맞출 것입니다. 유체 입자는 증발 및 응고를 포함하여 유체 속성을 본질적으로 부여합니다. 유체 입자가 비교적 간단한 강우 모델링(아래의 애니메이션)에서 복잡한 레이저 증착(용접) 모델링에 이르기까지 다양한 사례가 있을 수 있습니다.

Fluid Particles

FLOW-3D에서 유체 입자 옵션이 활성화 되면 사용자는 다양한 직경과 밀도로 다양한 유체 입자 종을 설정할 수 있습니다. 또한 유체 입자의 동력학은 확산 계수, 항력 계수, 난류 슈미트 수, 반발 계수 및 응고된 반발 계수와 같은 특성에 의해 제어 될 수 있습니다. 유체 입자는 열적 및 전기적 특성을 지정할 수 있습니다.

사용자는 유체 입자 생성을 위해 여러 소스를 설정할 수 있습니다. 각 소스는 이전에 정의 된 모든 유체 입자 종 또는 일부 유체 입자 종의 혼합을 가질 수 있습니다. 또한 사용자는 무작위 또는 균일한 입자 생성을 선택하고 입자가 소스에서 방출되는 속도를 정의 할 수 있습니다.

Laser Metal Deposition

레이저 금속 증착은 미세한 금속 분말을 함께 융합하여 3차원 금속 부품을 제작하는 3D printing 공정입니다. 레이저 금속 증착은 항공 우주 및 의료 정형 외과 분야에서 다양한 응용 분야에 적용됩니다. 레이저 금속 증착의 개략도는 아래와 같습니다. 전력 강도 분포, 기판의 이동 속도, 차폐 가스 압력 및 용융/응고, 상 변화 및 열전달과 같은 물리적 제어와 같은 제어 매개 변수가 함께 작동하여 레이저 금속 증착을 효과적인 적층 제조 공정으로 만듭니다.

Setting Up Laser Metal Deposition

새로운 유체 입자 모델은 분말 강도 분포를 할당하고 용융 풀 내부 및 주변에서 발생하는 복잡한 입자 – 기판 상호 작용을 포착하기 때문에 레이저 금속 증착 시뮬레이션을 설정하는 데 없어서는 안될 부분입니다.

일반 사용자들은 FLOW-3D에서 시뮬레이션을 쉽게 설정할 수 있다는 것을 알고 있습니다. 레이저 금속 증착 설정의 경우에도 다른 점은 없습니다. IN-718의 물리적 특성, 형상 생성, 입자 분말 강도 분포, 메쉬 생성 및 시뮬레이션 실행과 같은 모든 설정 단계가 간단하고 사용자 친화적입니다.

IN-718의 물성은 기판과 응고된 유체 입자 모두에 사용됩니다. 40 미크론 유체 입자가 무작위 방식으로 초당 500,000의 속도로 입자 영역에서 계산 영역으로 주입됩니다. 입자 빔은 기판의 운동 방향이 변화 될 때마다 순간적으로 정지되어 용융 풀이 급격한 속도 변화에 적응하도록 합니다.

이렇게 하면 기판에서 입자가 반사되는 것을 방지 할 수 있습니다. 기판이 5초마다 회전하기 때문에 입자 생성 속도는 아래 그림과 같이 5 초마다 0으로 떨어집니다. 기판 이동 자체는 표 형식의 속도 데이터를 사용하여 FLOW-3D에 지정됩니다. 입자는 응고된 유체 입자로 주입되어 고온의 용융 풀에 부딪혀 녹아 용융 풀 유체의 일부가 됩니다.


Substrate velocity

입자 모델 외에도 FLOW-3D의 밀도 평가, 열 전달, 표면 장력, 응고 및 점도 모델이 사용됩니다. 보다 구체적으로, 온도에 따른 표면 장력은 증착된 층의 형태에 큰 영향을 주는 Marangoni 효과를 일으킵니다.

레이저를 복제하기 위해 100 % 다공성 구성 요소가 있는 매우 기본적인 설정이 열원으로 사용됩니다. 100 % 다공성은 구성 요소 주변의 유동 역학에 영향을 미치지 않습니다. 오히려 그것은 특정 영역의 기판에 열을 효과적으로 추가합니다. 이 예비 가열 메커니즘을 자회사인 Flow Science Japan이 개발한 고급 레이저 모듈로 교체하는 작업이 현재 본격적으로 진행 중입니다. 가열 다공성 구성 요소는 각각의 층이 동일한 양의 열을 얻도록 각 층이 증착된 후에 약간 위로 이동됩니다.

Results and discussion

아래 애니메이션은 다중 층 증착을 이용한 레이저 금속 증착 공정을 보여줍니다. 기판이 방향을 변경할 때마다 입자 빔 모션이 일시적으로 중지됩니다. 또한 층이 증착됨에 따라 다공성 열원에서 각 층에 불균등 한 열이 추가되어 새로운 층의 모양이 변경됩니다.  각 층을 증착 한 후에 열원을 위로 이동해야 하는 양을 측정하는 것은 현재의 기능에서는 어렵습니다. 다만  준비중인 Flow Science Japan의 레이저 모듈은 이 문제를 해결할 수 있습니다.

전반적으로 입자 모델은 레이저 금속 증착에서 매우 중요한 공정 매개 변수인 분말 강도 분포를 정확하게 재현합니다. 입자 모델에 대한 이러한 수준의 제어 및 정교함은 적층 제조 분야의 사용자와 공급자 모두가 제조 공정을 미세 조정하는 데 도움이 될 것으로 기대합니다.

Figure 2. Ink fraction contours for mesh 1 through 4 (left to right) at the following four time steps: (a) 6 µs, (b) 12 µs, (c) 18 µs, and (d) 24 µs.

Coupled CFD-Response Surface Method (RSM) Methodology for Optimizing Jettability Operating Conditions

분사성 작동 조건을 최적화하기 위한 결합된 CFD-Response Surface Method(RSM)

Nuno Couto 1, Valter Silva 1,2,* , João Cardoso 2, Leo M. González-Gutiérrez 3 and Antonio Souto-Iglesias 41
INEGI-FEUP, Faculty of Engineering, Porto University, 4200-465 Porto, Portugal;
nunodiniscouto@hotmail.com
2 VALORIZA, Polytechnic Institute of Portalegre, 7300-110 Portalegre, Portugal; jps.cardoso@ipportalegre.pt
3 CEHINAV, DMFPA, ETSIN, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid, Spain; leo.gonzalez@upm.es
4 CEHINAV, DACSON, ETSIN, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid, Spain;
antonio.souto@upm.es

  • Correspondence: valter.silva@ipportalegre.pt; Tel.: +351-245-301-592

소개

물방울 생성에 대한 이해는 여러 산업 응용 분야에서 매우 중요합니다 [ 1 ]. 잉크젯 프린팅 프로세스는 일반적으로 10 ~ 100 μm [ 1 ] 범위의 독특하고 작은 액적 크기를 특징으로 하며 연속적 또는 충동적 흐름을 사용하여 얻을 수 있습니다 (마지막 방식은 주문형 드롭 (DoD)이라고도 함). 잉크젯).

여러 장점 덕분에 DoD 방법은 산업 환경에서 상당한 수용을 얻고 있습니다 [ 2 ].DoD는 복잡한 프로세스이며 유체 속성, 노즐 형상 및 구동 파형 [ 1 , 3 ]의 세 가지 주요 범주로 분류되는 여러 매개 변수에 따라 달라집니다 .그러나 길이와 시간 척도가 모두 마이크로 오더 [ 4 ] 이기 때문에 실험을하기가 어렵습니다 .

결과적으로 실험 설정은 항상 비용이 많이 들고 복잡하며 CFD (전산 유체 역학)와 같은 고급 수치 접근 방식이 엄격한 요구 사항입니다 [ 5 , 6 ]. VOF (volume-of-fluid) 접근 방식은 액체 분해 및 액적 생성에 대한 다상 공정을 시뮬레이션하기위한 적절한 대안으로 밝혀졌으며 과거 연구에서 그대로 사용되었습니다 [ 7 , 8], 인쇄 프로세스의 맥락에서 전자는 여전히 현재 연구의 주제입니다. 

또한 VOF 체계를 사용하면 단일 운동량 방정식 세트를 해결하고 도메인 전체에 걸쳐 각 유체의 체적 분율을 추적하여 명확하게 정의된 인터페이스로 둘 이상의 혼합 불가능한 유체를 효과적으로 시뮬레이션 할 수 있습니다. Feng [ 9 ]는 VOF 접근 방식을 사용하여 일시적인 유체 인터페이스 변형 및 중단을 효과적으로 추적하는 패키지 FLOW-3D를 사용하여 낙하 배출 중 복잡한 유체 역학 프로세스를 시뮬레이션하는 선구자 작업 중 하나를 수행했습니다.

주요 목표는 볼륨 및 속도와 같은 민감한 변수를 더 잘 이해하면서 장치 개발에서 일반적인 설계 규칙을 구현하는 것이 었습니다. 이러한 종류의 공정과 관련된 주요 질문 중 하나는 안정적인 액적 형성을 위한 작동 범위의 정의입니다.

Fromm [ 10 ]은 Reynolds 수와 Weber 수의 제곱근 비율이 2보다 작으면 안정적인 방울을 생성 할 수 없다는 것을 확인했습니다. 이 무차원 값은 나중에 Z 번호로 알려졌으며 분사 가능성 범위 [ 11 ]를 정의합니다 . 문헌에서 분사 가능성을 위한 Z 간격은 1 ~ 10 [ 12 ], 4 ~ 14 [ 13 ] 또는 0.67 ~ 50 [ 14]을 찾을 수 있습니다. 

이것은 Z 값 만으로는 분사 가능성 조건을 나타낼 수 없음을 분명히 의미합니다. 실제로, 다른 속성을 가진 유체는 다른 인쇄 품질을 나타내면서 동일한 Z 값을 나타낼 수 있습니다. 액적 생성 공정과 해당 분사 성은 주로 전체 공정 품질에 큰 영향을 미치는 매개 변수 세트에 의해 결정됩니다. 

토대 메커니즘을 더 잘 이해하려면 확장 된 작동 조건 및 매개 변수 세트를 고려하여 여러 실험 또는 수치 실행을 수행해야 합니다. DoE (design-of-experiment) 접근 방식과 같은 체계적인 접근 방식이 없으면 이것은 달성하기 매우 어려운 작업이 될 수 있습니다. 최적화 문제를 해결하기 위해 반응 표면 방법을 사용하여 처음으로 체계화된 접근 방식이 개발된 Box and Wilson [ 15 ] 의 선구자 기사 이후 ,이 입증된 방법론은 많은 화학 및 산업 공정[ 16 ] 및 기타 관련 학계에 성공적으로 적용되었습니다.

예를 들어 Silva와 Rouboa [ 17 ]는 직접 메탄올 연료 전지의 출력 밀도에 영향을 미치는 관련 매개 변수를 식별하기 위해 반응 표면 방법론 (RSM)을 사용했습니다. 많은 실제 산업 응용 분야에서 실험 연구는 작동 매개 변수를 조절하기 어렵 기 때문에 제한적이지만 주로 설정을 개발하거나 실험을 실행하는 데 드는 비용이 높기 때문입니다. 

따라서 솔루션은 주요 시스템 응답을 시뮬레이션하고 예측할 수 있는 효과적인 수학적 모델의 개발에 의존합니다. DoE와 같은 최적화 방법론을 수치 모델과 결합하면 비용이 많이 들고 시간이 많이 걸리는 실험을 피하고 다양한 입력 조합을 사용하여 최적의 조건을 얻을 수 있습니다 [ 16 ]. 

실바와 루 보아 [ 18] CFD 프레임 워크 하에서 개발 된 2D Eulerian-Eulerian 바이오 매스 가스화 모델에서 얻은 결과를 RSM과 결합하여 다양한 응용 분야에서 합성 가스를 생성하기 위한 최적의 작동 조건을 찾습니다. 

저자는 입력 요인으로 인한 최상의 응답과 최소한의 변동을 모두 보장하는 작동 조건을 찾을 수 있었습니다. Frawley et al. [ 19 ] CFD 및 DoE 기술 (특히 RSM)을 결합하여 파이프의 팔꿈치에서 고체 입자 침식에 대한 다양한 주요 요인의 영향을 조사하여 침식 예측 모델을 개발할 수 있습니다.우리가 아는 한, DoD 잉크젯 프로세스의 개선 및 더 나은 이해에 적용되는 DoE 접근법 (실험적으로 또는 모든 종류의 수치 모델과 결합)을 구현하는 연구는 없습니다. 선도 기업이 이러한 접근 방식을 적용 할 가능성이 있지만 관련 결과는 민감할 수 있으므로 더 넓은 커뮤니티에서 사용할 수 없습니다. 이 사실은 DoD 잉크젯 공정에서 액적 생성에 대한 여러 매개 변수의 영향을 평가하기 위한 이러한 종류의 연구로서 현재 논문의 영향을 증가 시킬 수 있습니다.

CFD 프레임 워크 내에서 VOF 접근 방식을 사용하여 여러 컴퓨터 실험의 설계를 개발하고 RSM을 분석 도구로 사용했습니다. 충분한 수치 정확도와 수용 가능한 시간 계산 시뮬레이션의 균형을 맞추기 위해 메쉬 수렴 연구가 수행되었습니다. 설계 목적을 위해 점도, 표면 장력, 입구 속도 및 노즐 직경이 입력 요인으로 선택되었습니다. 응답은 break-up 시간과 break-up 길이였습니다.

Figure 1. Schematic of the computational domain
Figure 1. Schematic of the computational domain
Figure 2. Ink fraction contours for mesh 1 through 4 (left to right) at the following four time steps: (a) 6 µs, (b) 12 µs, (c) 18 µs, and (d) 24 µs.
Figure 2. Ink fraction contours for mesh 1 through 4 (left to right) at the following four time steps: (a) 6 µs, (b) 12 µs, (c) 18 µs, and (d) 24 µs.
Figure 3. Comparison between surface tensions at the following four time steps: (a) 6 µs, (b) 12 µs, (c) 18 µs, and (d) 24 µs
Figure 3. Comparison between surface tensions at the following four time steps: (a) 6 µs, (b) 12 µs, (c) 18 µs, and (d) 24 µs
Figure 4. Comparison between viscosity values at the following four time steps: (a) 6 μs, (b) 12 μs, (c) 18 μs, and (d) 24 μs.
Figure 4. Comparison between viscosity values at the following four time steps: (a) 6 μs, (b) 12 μs, (c) 18 μs, and (d) 24 μs.
Figure 5. Comparison between different nozzle diameters at the following four time steps: (a) 6 µs, (b) 12 µs, (c) 18 µs, and (d) 24 µs
Figure 5. Comparison between different nozzle diameters at the following four time steps: (a) 6 µs, (b) 12 µs, (c) 18 µs, and (d) 24 µs
Figure 6. Comparison between different inlet velocities at the following four time steps: (a) 6 µs, (b) 12 µs, (c) 18 µs, and (d) 24 µs
Figure 6. Comparison between different inlet velocities at the following four time steps: (a) 6 µs, (b) 12 µs, (c) 18 µs, and (d) 24 µs
Figure 8. Contour response plots for break-up time as a function of (a) surface tension and viscosity, (b) nozzle diameter and viscosity, (c) inlet velocity and viscosity, (d) nozzle diameter and surface tension, (e) inlet velocity and surface tension, and (f) inlet velocity and nozzle diameter.
Figure 8. Contour response plots for break-up time as a function of (a) surface tension and viscosity, (b) nozzle diameter and viscosity, (c) inlet velocity and viscosity, (d) nozzle diameter and surface tension, (e) inlet velocity and surface tension, and (f) inlet velocity and nozzle diameter.
Figure 12. Break-up length as a function of the We–Ca space (obtained from the 25 runs).
Figure 12. Break-up length as a function of the We–Ca space (obtained from the 25 runs).

References

  1. Hutchings, I.M.; Martin, G.D. Inkjet Technology for Digital Fabrication; John Wiley & Sons Ltd.: Hoboken, NJ,
    USA, 2013.
  2. Waasdorp, R.; Heuvel, O.; Versluis, F.; Hajee, B.; GhatKesar, M. Acessing individual 75-micron diameter
    nozzles of a desktop inkjet printer to dispense picoliter droplets on demand. RSC Adv. 2018, 8, 14765.
  3. Zhang, H.; Wang, J.; Lu, G. Numerical investigation of the influence of companion drops on drop-ondemand ink jetting. Appl. Phys. Eng. 2012, 13, 584–595.
  4. Dong, H.; Carr, W. An experimental study of drop-on-demand drop formation. Phys. Fluids 2006, 18,
    072102.
  5. Patel, M.; Pericleous, K.; Cross, M. Numerical Modelling of Circulating Fluidized beds. Int. J. Comput.
  6. Fluid Dyn. 1993, 1, 161–176. [CrossRef]
  7. Zhao, X.; Glenn, C.; Xiao, Z.; Zhang, S. CFD development for macro particle simulations. Int. J. Comput.
  8. Fluid Dyn. 2014, 28, 232–249. [CrossRef]
  9. Hasan, M.N.; Chandy, A.; Choi, J.W. Numerical analysis of post-impact droplet deformation for direct-print.
  10. Eng. Appl. Comput. Fluid Mech. 2015, 9, 543–555. [CrossRef]
  11. Ghafouri-Azar, R.; Mostaghimi, J.; Chandra, S. Numerical study of impact and solidification of a droplet
  12. over a deposited frozen splat. Int. J. Comput. Fluid Dyn. 2004, 18, 133–138. [CrossRef]
  13. Feng, J. A General Fluid Dynamic Analysis of Drop Ejection in Drop-on-Demand Ink Jet Devices. J. Imaging
  14. Sci. Technol. 2002, 46, 398–408.
  15. Fromm, J. Numerical Calculation of the Fluid Dynamics of Drop-on-Demand Jets. IBM J. Res. Dev. 1984, 28,
  16. 322–333. [CrossRef]
  17. Nallan, H.; Sadie, J.; Kitsomboonloha, R.; Volkman, S.; Subramanian, V. Systematic Design of Jettable
  18. Nanoparticle-Based Inkjet Inks: Rheology, Acoustics and Jettability. Langmuir 2014, 30, 13470–13477.
  19. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  20. Reis, N.; Derby, B. Ink Jet Deposition of Ceramic Suspensions: Modelling and Experiments of Droplet Formation;
  21. Chapter in MRS Online Proceeding Library Archive; Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, UK, 2000;
  22. Volume 624, pp. 117–122.
  23. Jang, D.; Kim, D.; Moon, J. Influence of Fluid Physical Properties on Ink-Jet Printability. Langmuir 2009, 25,
  24. 2629–2635. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  25. Tai, J.; Gan, H.Y.; Liang, Y.N.; Lok, B.K. Control of Droplet Formation in Inkjet Printing Using Ohnesorge
  26. Number Category: Materials and Processes. In Proceedings of the 10th Electronics Packaging Technology
  27. Conference, EPTC, Singapore, 9–12 December 2008; pp. 761–766.
  28. Box, G.; Wilson, K. On the Experimental Attainment of Optimum Conditions. J. R. Stat. Soc. Ser. B 1951, 13,
  29. 1–45.
  30. Silva, V.; Rouboa, A. Optimizing the gasification operating conditions of forest residues by coupling a
  31. two-stage equilibrium model with a response surface methodology. Fuel Process. Technol. 2014, 122, 163–169.
  32. [CrossRef]
  33. Silva, V.; Rouboa, A. Optimizing the DMFC Operating Conditions using a Response Surface Method.
  34. Appl. Math. Comput. 2012, 218, 6733–6743. [CrossRef]
  35. Silva, V.; Rouboa, A. Combining a 2-D multiphase CFD model with a Response Surface Methodology to
  36. optimize the gasification of Portuguese biomasses. Energy Convers. Manag. 2015, 99, 28–40. [CrossRef]
  37. Frawley, P.; Corish, J.; Niven, A.; Geron, M. Combination of CFD and DOE to analyse solid particle erosion
  38. in elbows. Int. J. Comput. Fluid Dyn. 2009, 23, 411–426. [CrossRef]
  39. Morrison, N.F.; Harlen, O.G. Viscoelasticity in inkjet printing. Rheol. Acta 2010, 49, 619–632. [CrossRef]
  40. ANSYS Inc. ANSYS Fluent Tutorial Guide; Release 15.0; ANSYS Inc.: Canonsburg, PA, USA, November 2013.
  41. ANSYS Inc. ANSYS Fluent Theory Guide; Release 17.0; ANSYS Inc.: Canonsburg, PA, USA, January 2016.
  42. Dinsenmeyer, R.; Fourmigué, J.F.; Caney, N.; Marty, P. Volume of fluid approach of boiling flows in
  43. concentrated solar plants. Int. J. Heat Fluid Flow 2017, 65, 177–191. [CrossRef]
  44. Das, S.; Weerasiri, L.D.; Yang, W. Influence of surface tension on bubble nucleation, formation and onset of
  45. sliding. Colloids Surf. A Physicochem. Eng. Asp. 2017, 516, 23–31. [CrossRef]
  46. Du, W.; Zhang, J.; Lu, P.; Xu, J.; Wei, W.; He, G.; Zhang, L. Advanced understanding of local wetting
  47. behaviour in gas-liquid-solid packed beds using CFD with a volume of fluid (VOF) method. Chem. Eng. Sci.
  48. 2017, 170, 378–392. [CrossRef]
  49. Shrestha, S.; Chou, K. A build surface study of Powder-Bed electron beam additive manufacturing by
  50. 3D thermo-fluid simulation and white-light interferometry. Int. J. Mach. Tools Manuf. 2017, 121, 37–49.
  51. [CrossRef]
  52. Zhong, Y.; Fang, H.; Ma, Q.; Dong, X. Analysis of droplet stability after ejection from an inkjet nozzle. J. Fluid
  53. Mech. 2018, 845, 378–391. [CrossRef]
  54. Zhang, X. Dynamics of drop formation in viscous flows. Chem. Eng. Sci. 1999, 54, 1759–1774. [CrossRef]
  55. Calvert, P. Inkjet printing for materials and devices. Chem. Mater. 2001, 13, 3299–3305. [CrossRef]
  56. Kim, C.S.; Park, S.; Sim, W.; Kim, Y.; Yoo, Y. Modelling and characterization of an industrial inkjet head for
  57. micro-patterning on printed circuit boards. Comput. Fluids 2009, 38, 602–612. [CrossRef]
  58. ChemEngineering 2018, 2, 51 19 of 19
  59. Wang, P. Numerical Analysis of Droplet Formation and Transport of a Highly Viscous Liquid. Master’s Thesis,
  60. University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USA, 2014.
  61. Zhang, Z.; Xiong, R.; Corr, D.; Huang, Y. Study of Impingement Types and Printing Quality during Laser
  62. Printing of Viscoelastic Alginate Solutions. Langmuir 2016, 32, 3004–3014. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  63. Derby, B. Inkjet Printing Ceramics: From Drops to Solid. J. Eur. Ceram. Soc. 2011, 31, 2543–2550. [CrossRef]
  64. Kim, E.; Baek, J. Numerical Study on the Effects of Non Dimensional Parameters on Drop-on-Demand
  65. Droplet Formation Dynamics and Printability Range in the up-Scaled Model. Phys. Fluids 2012, 24, 082103.
  66. [CrossRef]
Figure 1.1: A water droplet with a radius of 1 mm resting on a glass substrate. The surface of the droplet takes on a spherical cap shape. The contact angle θ is defined by the balance of the interfacial forces.

Effect of substrate cooling and droplet shape and composition on the droplet evaporation and the deposition of particles

기판 냉각 및 액적 모양 및 조성이 액적 증발 및 입자 증착에 미치는 영향

by Vahid Bazargan
M.A.Sc., Mechanical Engineering, The University of British Columbia, 2008
B.Sc., Mechanical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, 2006
B.Sc., Chemical & Petroleum Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, 2006

고착 방울은 평평한 기판에 놓인 액체 방울입니다. 작은 고정 액적이 증발하는 동안 액적의 접촉선은 고정된 접촉 영역이 있는 고정된 단계와 고정된 접촉각이 있는 고정 해제된 단계의 두 가지 단계를 거칩니다. 고정된 접촉 라인이 있는 증발은 액적 내부에서 접촉 라인을 향한 흐름을 생성합니다.

이 흐름은 입자를 운반하고 접촉 선 근처에 침전시킵니다. 이로 인해 일반적으로 관찰되는 “커피 링”현상이 발생합니다. 이 논문은 증발 과정과 고착성 액적의 증발 유도 흐름에 대한 연구를 제공하고 콜로이드 현탁액에서 입자의 침착에 대한 통찰력을 제공합니다. 여기서 우리는 먼저 작은 고착 방울의 증발을 연구하고 증발 과정에서 기판의 열전도도의 중요성에 대해 논의합니다.

현재 증발 모델이 500µm 미만의 액적 크기에 대해 심각한 오류를 생성하는 방법을 보여줍니다. 우리의 모델에는 열 효과가 포함되어 있으며, 특히 증발 잠열의 균형을 맞추기 위해 액적에 열을 제공하는 기판의 열전도도를 포함합니다. 실험 결과를 바탕으로 접촉각의 진화와 관련된 접촉 선의 가상 움직임을 정의하여 고정 및 고정 해제 단계의 전체 증발 시간을 고려합니다.

우리의 모델은 2 % 미만의 오차로 500 µm보다 작은 물방울에 대한 실험 결과와 일치합니다. 또한 유한한 크기의 라인 액적의 증발을 연구하고 증발 중 접촉 라인의 복잡한 동작에 대해 논의합니다. 에너지 공식을 적용하고 접촉 선이 구형 방울의 후퇴 접촉각보다 높은 접촉각을 가진 선 방울의 두 끝에서 후퇴하기 시작 함을 보여줍니다. 그리고 라인 방울 내부의 증발 유도 흐름을 보여줍니다.

마지막으로, 계면 활성제 존재 하에서 접촉 라인의 거동을 논의하고 입자 증착에 대한 Marangoni 흐름 효과에 대해 논의합니다. 열 Marangoni 효과는 접촉 선 근처에 증착 된 입자의 양에 영향을 미치며, 기판 온도가 낮을수록 접촉 선 근처에 증착되는 입자의 양이 많다는 것을 알 수 있습니다.

Figure 1.1: A water droplet with a radius of 1 mm resting on a glass substrate. The surface of the droplet takes on a spherical cap shape. The contact angle θ is defined by the balance of the interfacial forces.
Figure 1.1: A water droplet with a radius of 1 mm resting on a glass substrate. The surface of the droplet takes on a spherical cap shape. The contact angle θ is defined by the balance of the interfacial forces.
Figure 2.1: Evaporation modes of sessile droplets on a substrate: (a) evaporation at constant contact angle (de-pinned stage) and (b) evaporation at constant contact area (pinned stage)
Figure 2.1: Evaporation modes of sessile droplets on a substrate: (a) evaporation at constant contact angle (de-pinned stage) and (b) evaporation at constant contact area (pinned stage)
Figure 2.2: A sessil droplet with its image can be profiled as the equiconvex lens formed by two intersecting spheres with radius of a.
Figure 2.2: A sessil droplet with its image can be profiled as the equiconvex lens formed by two intersecting spheres with radius of a.
Figure 2.3: The droplet life time for both evaporation modes derived from Equation 2.2.
Figure 2.3: The droplet life time for both evaporation modes derived from Equation 2.2.
Figure 2.4: A probability of escape for vapor molecules at two different sites of the surface of the droplet for diffusion controlled evaporation. The random walk path initiated from a vapor molecule is more likely to result in a return to the surface if the starting point is further away from the edge of the droplet.
Figure 2.4: A probability of escape for vapor molecules at two different sites of the surface of the droplet for diffusion controlled evaporation. The random walk path initiated from a vapor molecule is more likely to result in a return to the surface if the starting point is further away from the edge of the droplet.
Figure 2.5: Schematic of the sessile droplet on a substrate
Figure 2.5: Schematic of the sessile droplet on a substrate. The evaporation rate at the surface of the droplet is enhanced toward the edge of the droplet.
Figure 2.6: The domain mesh (a) and the solution of the Laplace equation for diffusion of the water vapor molecule with the concentration of Cv = 1.9×10−8 g/mm3 at the surface of the droplet into the ambient air with the relative humidity of 55%, i.e. φ = 0.55 (b).
Figure 2.6: The domain mesh (a) and the solution of the Laplace equation for diffusion of the water vapor molecule with the concentration of Cv = 1.9×10−8 g/mm3 at the surface of the droplet into the ambient air with the relative humidity of 55%, i.e. φ = 0.55 (b).
Figure 3.1: The portable micro printing setup. A motorized linear stage from Zaber Technologies Inc. was used to control the place and speed of the micro nozzle.
Figure 3.1: The portable micro printing setup. A motorized linear stage from Zaber Technologies Inc. was used to control the place and speed of the micro nozzle.
Figure 4.6: Temperature contours inside the substrate adjacent to the droplet
Figure 4.6: Temperature contours inside the substrate adjacent to the droplet
Figure 4.7: The effect of substrate cooling on the evaporation rate, the basic model shows the same value for all substrates.
Figure 4.7: The effect of substrate cooling on the evaporation rate, the basic model shows the same value for all substrates.

Bibliography

[1] R. G. Picknett and R. Bexon, “The evaporation of sessile or pendant drops in still air,” Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, vol. 61, pp. 336–350, Sept. 1977. → pages viii, 8, 9, 18, 42
[2] H. Y. Erbil, “Evaporation of pure liquid sessile and spherical suspended drops: A review,” Advances in Colloid and Interface Science, vol. 170, pp. 67–86, Jan. 2012. → pages 1
[3] R. Sharma, C. Y. Lee, J. H. Choi, K. Chen, and M. S. Strano, “Nanometer positioning, parallel alignment, and placement of single anisotropic nanoparticles using hydrodynamic forces in cylindrical droplets,” Nano Lett., vol. 7, no. 9, pp. 2693–2700, 2007. → pages 1, 54, 71
[4] S. Tokonami, H. Shiigi, and T. Nagaoka, “Review: Micro- and nanosized molecularly imprinted polymers for high-throughput analytical applications,” Analytica Chimica Acta, vol. 641, pp. 7–13, May 2009. →pages 71
[5] A. A. Sagade and R. Sharma, “Copper sulphide (CuxS) as an ammonia gas sensor working at room temperature,” Sensors and Actuators B: Chemical, vol. 133, pp. 135–143, July 2008. → pages
[6] W. R. Small, C. D. Walton, J. Loos, and M. in het Panhuis, “Carbon nanotube network formation from evaporating sessile drops,” The Journal of Physical Chemistry B, vol. 110, pp. 13029–13036, July 2006. → pages 71
[7] S. H. Ko, H. Lee, and K. H. Kang, “Hydrodynamic flows in electrowetting,” Langmuir, vol. 24, pp. 1094–1101, Feb. 2008. → pages 42
[8] T. T. Nellimoottil, P. N. Rao, S. S. Ghosh, and A. Chattopadhyay, “Evaporation-induced patterns from droplets containing motile and nonmotile bacteria,” Langmuir, vol. 23, pp. 8655–8658, Aug. 2007. → pages 1
[9] R. Sharma and M. S. Strano, “Centerline placement and alignment of anisotropic nanotubes in high aspect ratio cylindrical droplets of nanometer diameter,” Advanced Materials, vol. 21, no. 1, p. 6065, 2009. → pages 1, 54, 71
[10] V. Dugas, J. Broutin, and E. Souteyrand, “Droplet evaporation study applied to DNA chip manufacturing,” Langmuir, vol. 21, pp. 9130–9136, Sept. → pages 2, 71
[11] Y.-C. Hu, Q. Zhou, Y.-F. Wang, Y.-Y. Song, and L.-S. Cui, “Formation mechanism of micro-flows in aqueous poly(ethylene oxide) droplets on a substrate at different temperatures,” Petroleum Science, vol. 10, pp. 262–268, June 2013. → pages 2, 34, 54
[12] T.-S. Wong, T.-H. Chen, X. Shen, and C.-M. Ho, “Nanochromatography driven by the coffee ring effect,” Analytical Chemistry, vol. 83, pp. 1871–1873, Mar. 2011. → pages 71
[13] J.-H. Kim, S.-B. Park, J. H. Kim, and W.-C. Zin, “Polymer transports inside evaporating water droplets at various substrate temperatures,” The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, vol. 115, pp. 15375–15383, Aug. 2011. → pages 54
[14] S. Choi, S. Stassi, A. P. Pisano, and T. I. Zohdi, “Coffee-ring effect-based three dimensional patterning of Micro/Nanoparticle assembly with a single droplet,” Langmuir, vol. 26, pp. 11690–11698, July 2010. → pages
[15] D. Wang, S. Liu, B. J. Trummer, C. Deng, and A. Wang, “Carbohydrate microarrays for the recognition of cross-reactive molecular markers of microbes and host cells,” Nature biotechnology, vol. 20, pp. 275–281, Mar. PMID: 11875429. → pages 2, 54, 71
[16] H. K. Cammenga, “Evaporation mechanisms of liquids,” Current topics in materials science, vol. 5, pp. 335–446, 1980. → pages 3
[17] C. Snow, “Potential problems and capacitance for a conductor bounded by two intersecting spheres,” Journal of Research of the National Bureau of Standards, vol. 43, p. 337, 1949. → pages 9
[18] R. D. Deegan, O. Bakajin, T. F. Dupont, G. Huber, S. R. Nagel, and T. A. Witten, “Contact line deposits in an evaporating drop,” Physical Review E, vol. 62, p. 756, July 2000. → pages 10, 14, 18, 27, 53, 54, 71, 84
[19] H. Hu and R. G. Larson, “Evaporation of a sessile droplet on a substrate,” The Journal of Physical Chemistry B, vol. 106, pp. 1334–1344, Feb. 2002. → pages 12, 18, 29, 43, 44, 48, 49, 53, 61, 71, 84
[20] Y. O. Popov, “Evaporative deposition patterns: Spatial dimensions of the deposit,” Physical Review E, vol. 71, p. 036313, Mar. 2005. → pages 14, 27, 43, 44, 45, 54
[21] H. Gelderblom, A. G. Marin, H. Nair, A. van Houselt, L. Lefferts, J. H. Snoeijer, and D. Lohse, “How water droplets evaporate on a superhydrophobic substrate,” Physical Review E, vol. 83, no. 2, p. 026306,→ pages
[22] F. Girard, M. Antoni, S. Faure, and A. Steinchen, “Influence of heating temperature and relative humidity in the evaporation of pinned droplets,” Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects, vol. 323, pp. 36–49, June 2008. → pages 18
[23] Y. Y. Tarasevich, “Simple analytical model of capillary flow in an evaporating sessile drop,” Physical Review E, vol. 71, p. 027301, Feb. 2005. → pages 19, 54, 62, 72
[24] A. J. Petsi and V. N. Burganos, “Potential flow inside an evaporating cylindrical line,” Physical Review E, vol. 72, p. 047301, Oct. 2005. → pages 22, 55, 62, 68, 71
[25] A. J. Petsi and V. N. Burganos, “Evaporation-induced flow in an inviscid liquid line at any contact angle,” Physical Review E, vol. 73, p. 041201, Apr.→ pages 23, 53, 55, 72
[26] H. Masoud and J. D. Felske, “Analytical solution for stokes flow inside an evaporating sessile drop: Spherical and cylindrical cap shapes,” Physics of Fluids, vol. 21, pp. 042102–042102–11, Apr. 2009. → pages 23, 55, 62, 71, 72
[27] H. Hu and R. G. Larson, “Analysis of the effects of marangoni stresses on the microflow in an evaporating sessile droplet,” Langmuir, vol. 21, pp. 3972–3980, Apr. 2005. → pages 24, 28, 53, 54, 56, 62, 68, 71, 72, 74, 84
[28] R. Bhardwaj, X. Fang, and D. Attinger, “Pattern formation during the evaporation of a colloidal nanoliter drop: a numerical and experimental study,” New Journal of Physics, vol. 11, p. 075020, July 2009. → pages 28
[29] A. Petsi, A. Kalarakis, and V. Burganos, “Deposition of brownian particles during evaporation of two-dimensional sessile droplets,” Chemical Engineering Science, vol. 65, pp. 2978–2989, May 2010. → pages 28
[30] J. Park and J. Moon, “Control of colloidal particle deposit patterns within picoliter droplets ejected by ink-jet printing,” Langmuir, vol. 22, pp. 3506–3513, Apr. 2006. → pages 28
[31] H. Hu and R. G. Larson, “Marangoni effect reverses coffee-ring depositions,” The Journal of Physical Chemistry B, vol. 110, pp. 7090–7094, Apr. 2006. → pages 29, 74
[32] K. H. Kang, S. J. Lee, C. M. Lee, and I. S. Kang, “Quantitative visualization of flow inside an evaporating droplet using the ray tracing method,” Measurement Science and Technology, vol. 15, pp. 1104–1112, June 2004. → pages 34
[33] S. T. Beyer and K. Walus, “Controlled orientation and alignment in films of single-walled carbon nanotubes using inkjet printing,” Langmuir, vol. 28, pp. 8753–8759, June 2012. → pages 42, 71
[34] G. McHale, “Surface free energy and microarray deposition technology,” Analyst, vol. 132, pp. 192–195, Feb. 2007. → pages 42
[35] R. Bhardwaj, X. Fang, P. Somasundaran, and D. Attinger, “Self-assembly of colloidal particles from evaporating droplets: Role of DLVO interactions and proposition of a phase diagram,” Langmuir, vol. 26, pp. 7833–7842, June→ pages 42
[36] G. J. Dunn, S. K. Wilson, B. R. Duffy, S. David, and K. Sefiane, “The strong influence of substrate conductivity on droplet evaporation,” Journal of Fluid Mechanics, vol. 623, no. 1, p. 329351, 2009. → pages 44
[37] M. S. Plesset and A. Prosperetti, “Flow of vapour in a liquid enclosure,” Journal of Fluid Mechanics, vol. 78, pp. 433–444, 1976. → pages 44
[38] S. Das, P. R. Waghmare, M. Fan, N. S. K. Gunda, S. S. Roy, and S. K. Mitra, “Dynamics of liquid droplets in an evaporating drop: liquid droplet coffee stain? effect,” RSC Advances, vol. 2, pp. 8390–8401, Aug. 2012. → pages 53
[39] B. J. Fischer, “Particle convection in an evaporating colloidal droplet,” Langmuir, vol. 18, pp. 60–67, Jan. 2002. → pages 54
[40] J. L. Wilbur, A. Kumar, H. A. Biebuyck, E. Kim, and G. M. Whitesides, “Microcontact printing of self-assembled monolayers: applications in microfabrication,” Nanotechnology, vol. 7, p. 452, Dec. 1996. → pages 54
[41] T. Kawase, H. Sirringhaus, R. H. Friend, and T. Shimoda, “Inkjet printed via-hole interconnections and resistors for all-polymer transistor circuits,” Advanced Materials, vol. 13, no. 21, p. 16011605, 2001. → pages 71
[42] B.-J. de Gans, P. C. Duineveld, and U. S. Schubert, “Inkjet printing of polymers: State of the art and future developments,” Advanced Materials, vol. 16, no. 3, p. 203213, 2004. → pages 71
[43] H. Sirringhaus, T. Kawase, R. H. Friend, T. Shimoda, M. Inbasekaran, W. Wu, and E. P. Woo, “High-resolution inkjet printing of all-polymer transistor circuits,” Science, vol. 290, pp. 2123–2126, Dec. 2000. PMID:→ pages
[44] D. Soltman and V. Subramanian, “Inkjet-printed line morphologies and temperature control of the coffee ring effect,” Langmuir, vol. 24, pp. 2224–2231, Mar. 2008. → pages 54
[45] R. Tadmor and P. S. Yadav, “As-placed contact angles for sessile drops,” Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, vol. 317, pp. 241–246, Jan. 2008. → pages 56
[46] J. Drelich, “The significance and magnitude of the line tension in three-phase (solid-liquid-fluid) systems,” Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects, vol. 116, pp. 43–54, Sept. 1996. → pages 56
[47] R. Tadmor, “Line energy, line tension and drop size,” Surface Science, vol. 602, pp. L108–L111, July 2008. → pages 69
[48] C.-H. Choi and C.-J. C. Kim, “Droplet evaporation of pure water and protein solution on nanostructured superhydrophobic surfaces of varying heights,” Langmuir, vol. 25, pp. 7561–7567, July 2009. → pages 71
[49] K. F. Baughman, R. M. Maier, T. A. Norris, B. M. Beam, A. Mudalige, J. E. Pemberton, and J. E. Curry, “Evaporative deposition patterns of bacteria from a sessile drop: Effect of changes in surface wettability due to exposure to a laboratory atmosphere,” Langmuir, vol. 26, pp. 7293–7298, May 2010.
[50] D. Brutin, B. Sobac, and C. Nicloux, “Influence of substrate nature on the evaporation of a sessile drop of blood,” Journal of Heat Transfer, vol. 134, pp. 061101–061101, May 2012. → pages 71
[51] D. Pech, M. Brunet, P.-L. Taberna, P. Simon, N. Fabre, F. Mesnilgrente, V. Condra, and H. Durou, “Elaboration of a microstructured inkjet-printed carbon electrochemical capacitor,” Journal of Power Sources, vol. 195, pp. 1266–1269, Feb. 2010. → pages 71
[52] J. Bachmann, A. Ellies, and K. Hartge, “Development and application of a new sessile drop contact angle method to assess soil water repellency,” Journal of Hydrology, vol. 231232, pp. 66–75, May 2000. → pages 71
[53] H. Y. Erbil, G. McHale, and M. I. Newton, “Drop evaporation on solid surfaces: constant contact angle mode,” Langmuir, vol. 18, no. 7, pp. 2636–2641, 2002. → pages
[54] X. Fang, B. Li, J. C. Sokolov, M. H. Rafailovich, and D. Gewaily, “Hildebrand solubility parameters measurement via sessile drops evaporation,” Applied Physics Letters, vol. 87, pp. 094103–094103–3, Aug.→ pages
[55] Y. C. Jung and B. Bhushan, “Wetting behaviour during evaporation and condensation of water microdroplets on superhydrophobic patterned surfaces,” Journal of Microscopy, vol. 229, no. 1, p. 127140, 2008. → pages 71
[56] J. Drelich, J. D. Miller, and R. J. Good, “The effect of drop (bubble) size on advancing and receding contact angles for heterogeneous and rough solid surfaces as observed with sessile-drop and captive-bubble techniques,”
Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, vol. 179, pp. 37–50, Apr. 1996. →pages 72, 75
[57] D. Bargeman and F. Van Voorst Vader, “Effect of surfactants on contact angles at nonpolar solids,” Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, vol. 42, pp. 467–472, Mar. 1973. → pages 73
[58] J. Menezes, J. Yan, and M. Sharma, “The mechanism of alteration of macroscopic contact angles by the adsorption of surfactants,” Colloids and Surfaces, vol. 38, no. 2, pp. 365–390, 1989. → pages
[59] T. Okubo, “Surface tension of structured colloidal suspensions of polystyrene and silica spheres at the air-water interface,” Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, vol. 171, pp. 55–62, Apr. 1995. → pages 73, 76
[60] R. Pyter, G. Zografi, and P. Mukerjee, “Wetting of solids by surface-active agents: The effects of unequal adsorption to vapor-liquid and solid-liquid interfaces,” Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, vol. 89, pp. 144–153, Sept. 1982. → pages 73
[61] T. Mitsui, S. Nakamura, F. Harusawa, and Y. Machida, “Changes in the interfacial tension with temperature and their effects on the particle size and stability of emulsions,” Kolloid-Zeitschrift und Zeitschrift fr Polymere, vol. 250, pp. 227–230, Mar. 1972. → pages 73
[62] S. Phongikaroon, R. Hoffmaster, K. P. Judd, G. B. Smith, and R. A. Handler, “Effect of temperature on the surface tension of soluble and insoluble surfactants of hydrodynamical importance,” Journal of Chemical & Engineering Data, vol. 50, pp. 1602–1607, Sept. 2005. → pages 73, 80
[63] V. S. Vesselovsky and V. N. Pertzov, “Adhesion of air bubbles to the solid surface,” Zh. Fiz. Khim, vol. 8, pp. 245–259, 1936. → pages 75
[64] Hideo Nakae, Ryuichi Inui, Yosuke Hirata, and Hiroyuki Saito, “Effects of surface roughness on wettability,” Acta Materialia, vol. 46, pp. 2313–2318, Apr. 1998. → pages
[65] R. J. Good and M. Koo, “The effect of drop size on contact angle,” Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, vol. 71, pp. 283–292, Sept. 1979. → pages

Damascene templates

High-Rate Nanoscale Offset Printing Process Using Directed Assembly and Transfer of Nanomaterials

지난 10 년 동안 나노 크기의 재료와 공정을 제품에 통합하는 데 제한적인 성공을 거두면서 나노 기술에 상당한 투자와 발전이 있었습니다.

잉크젯, 그라비아, 스크린 프린팅과 같은 접근 방식은 나노 물질을 사용하여 구조와 장치를 만드는 데 사용됩니다. [1–7] 그러나 상당히 느리고 µm 스케일 분해능 만 제공 할 수 있습니다. 다양한 모양과 크기의 100nm 미만의 특징을 달성하기 위해 딥펜 리소그래피 (DPN) [8-11] 및 소프트 리소그래피 [12-16]와 같은 다양한 기술이 개발되고 광범위하게 연구되었습니다.

DPN은 직접 쓰기 기술로, atomic force microscopy 현미경 팁을 사용하여 다양한 기판에 여러 패턴을 생성합니다. DPN을 사용한 확장 성을 해결하기 위해 단일 AFM 팁 대신 2D 형식으로 배포 된 AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy) 팁 [17,18]이 사용되었습니다. 소프트 리소그래피에서는 나노 물질을 포함하는 잉크로 적셔진 원하는 릴리프 패턴을 가진 경화된 엘라스토머가 기판과 컨 포멀 접촉하게 되며, 여기서 패턴 화 된 나노 물질이 전달되어 기판에서 원하는 특징을 달성합니다.

이 논문에서는 작거나 큰 영역에서 몇 분 만에 나노, 마이크로 또는 거시적 구조를 인쇄 할 수 있는 다중 스케일 오프셋 인쇄 접근 방식을 제시합니다. 이 프로세스는 나노 입자 (NP), 탄소 나노 튜브 (CNT) 또는 용해 된 폴리머를 포함하는 서스펜션 (잉크)에서 나노 물질의 전기 영동 방향 조립을 사용하여 특별히 제작 된 재사용 가능한 Damascene 템플릿에 패턴을 “inking” 하는 것으로 시작됩니다. 이 잉크 프로세스는 실온과 압력에서 수행됩니다.

두 번째 단계는 템플릿에 조립된 나노 물질이 다른 기판으로 전송되는 “printing”로 구성됩니다. 전송 프로세스가 끝나면 템플릿은 다음 조립 및 전송주기에서 즉시 재사용 할 수 있습니다. 이 오프셋 인쇄 프로세스를 통해 NP (폴리스티렌 라텍스 (PSL), 실리카,은) 및 CNT (다중 벽 및 단일 벽)를 100μm에서 500nm까지의 크기 범위를 가진 패턴에 조립하고 유동성 기판에 성공적으로 옮깁니다.

다양한 나노 물질을 다양한 아키텍처로 조립하기 위해 템플릿 유도 유동, 대류, 유전 영동 (DEP) 및 전기 영동 조립과 같은 몇 가지 직접 조립 프로세스가 조사되었습니다. 모세관력이 지배적인 조립 메커니즘인 유체 조립 공정은 다양한 나노 물질에 적용 할 수 있습니다.

대류 조립 공정은 현탁 메니 스커 스와 증발을 활용하여 단일 나노 입자 분해능으로 정밀 조립을 가능하게 합니다. 이러한 조립 공정 중 많은 부분이 트렌치와 같은 마이크로 및 나노 스케일 기능으로 고해상도의 직접 조립을 보여 주었지만, 확장성 부족, 느린 공정 속도 및 반복성과 같은 많은 단점이 있습니다.

DEP 어셈블리는 NP와 전극 사이에 고배향 탄소 나노 튜브 어셈블리를 사용하여 나노 와이어 및 구조를 만드는 데 사용되었습니다. 조립 효율은 전기장과 전기장 구배에 상당한 영향을 미치는 전극의 기하학적 구조와 간격에 크게 좌우됩니다. 전기 영동 기반 조립 공정은 유체 조립에 비해 훨씬 짧은 시간에 전도성 표면에 표면 전하를 가진 나노 물질을 조립하는 것을 포함합니다. [34–37]

그러나 전기 영동 조립은 조립이 전도성 표면에 발생해야 하므로 다양한 장치를 만드는 데 실용적이지 않습니다. 한 가지 해결책은 원하는 나노 스케일 구조를 기반으로 전도성 패턴이 있는 템플릿을 만들고, 전기 영동 공정을 사용하여 패턴 위에 나노 물질을 조립 한 다음 조립 된 구조를 수용 기판에 옮기는 것입니다.

그림 1a와 같이 절연 필름에 전도성 와이어와 같은 패턴 구조가있는 기존 템플릿을 사용하면 나노 스케일 와이어의 잠재적 인 큰 강하로 인해 어셈블리가 불균일 해지며 대부분의 입자는 그림 1에 표시된 마이크로 와이어 b. 또한 NP는 3D 와이어의 측벽에도 조립되므로 바람직하지 않습니다. 또한 나노 스케일 와이어와 템플릿 사이의 작은 접촉 면적으로 인해 나노 스케일 와이어는 이송 과정에서 쉽게 벗겨집니다.

Damascene templates
Figure 1. Damascene templates: a) A schematic of a conventional wire template used for electrophoretic assembly. In these templates nanowire are connected to a micrometer scale electrodes, which are in turn connected, to a large metal pad through which the potential is applied. b) SEM images of a typical nanoparticle assembly result obtained for confi guration shown in (a). c) A schematic of a Damascene template where all of the wires (nano- or micrometer scale) and the metal pad are connected to a conductive fi lm underneath the insulating fi lm. d) A schematic of Damascene template fabrication. Inset is artifi cially colored cross-sectional SEM image showing the metal nanowires to be at the same height as that of the SiO 2 and showing the conductive fi lm underneath the insulator. e) An optical image of a 3 inch Damascene template.
Offset printing
Figure 2. Offset printing: a) A schematic of the nanoscale offset printing approach. The insulating (SiO 2 ) surface of the Damascene template is selectively coated with a hydrophobic SAM (OTS). Using electrophoresis, nanomaterials are assembled on the conductive patterns of the Damascene template (“inking”), which are then transferred to a recipient substrate (“printing”). After the transfer, the template is ready for the next assembly and transfer cycle. b) SEM image of 50 nm PSL particles assembly with high density on 1 µm wide electrodes. c) Silica particles (20 nm) assembly on crossbar 2D patterns demonstrating the versatility of the Damascene template. Inset fi gure is a high-resolution image of assembled silica particles. d) SEM image of assembled SWNTs on micrometer scale patterns. e) MWNTs assembled on 100 µm features. f) Cellulose assembled on 2 µm electrodes. g) SWNTs assembled in cross bar architecture patterns. h) Flexible devices with array of transferred SWNTs and metal electrodes (printed on PEN). Inset is the microscopy image of two electropads and transferred SWNTs on PEN fi lm.
Analysis of nanomaterial assembly on electrodes
Figure 3. Analysis of nanomaterial assembly on electrodes

이것은 또한 그림 3b에 표시된대로 유한 체적 모델링 (Flow 3D)을 사용하는 전기장 윤곽 시뮬레이션 결과에 의해 확인됩니다. 전기장 강도의 윤곽은 전도성 패턴의 가장자리에있는 전기장이 중앙에있는 것보다 더 강하다는 것을 나타냅니다. 그러나 적용된 전위가 2.5V로 증가하면 그림 3c에 표시된대로 100nm 실리카 입자가 Damascene 템플릿을 가로 질러 전도성 패턴의 표면에 완전히 조립되어 조립을위한 임계 전기장 강도에 도달했음을 나타냅니다. 정렬 된 SWNT는 여과 전달 경로를 피하고 나노 튜브 사이의 접합 저항을 최소화하여 소자 성능의 최소 변화를 가져 오기 때문에 많은 응용 분야에서 고도로 조직화 된 SWNT가 필요합니다.

References

[1] M.Abulikemu, E.H.Da’as, H.Haverinen, D.Cha, M.A.Malik, G.E.Jabbour, Angew.Chem.Int.Ed.2014, 53, 599.
[2] a) Z.Lu, M.Layani, X.Zhao, L.P.Tan, T.Sun, S.Fan, Q.Yan, S.Magdassi, H.H.Hng, Small 2014, 10, 3551; b) H.Ko, J.Lee, Y.Kim, B.Lee, C.H.Jung, J.H.Choi, O.S.Kwon, K.Shin, Adv.Mater.2014, 26, 2286.
[3] C.J.Hansen, R.Saksena, D.B.Kolesky, J.J.Vericella, S.J.Kranz, G.P.Muldowney, K.T.Christensen, J.A.Lewis, Adv.Mater.2013, 25, 2.
[4] F.C.Krebs, N.Espinosa, M.Hösel, R.R.Søndergaard, M.Jørgensen, Adv.Mater.2014, 26, 29.
[5] W.Honda, S.Harada, T.Arie, S.Akita, K.Takei, Adv.Funct.Mater. 2014, 24, 3298.
[6] R.Guo, Y.Yu, Z.Xie, X.Liu, X.Zhou, Y.Gao, Z.Liu, F.Zhou, Y.Yang, Z.Zheng, Adv.Mater.2013, 25, 3343.
[7] A.Dzwilewski, T.Wågberg, L.Edman, J.Am.Chem.Soc.2009, 131, 4006.
[8] R.D.Piner, J.Zhu, F.Xu, S.Hong, C.A.Mirkin, Science 1999, 283, 661.
[9] J.-H.Lim, C.A.Mirkin, Adv.Mater.2002, 14, 1474.
[10] X.Liu, L.Fu, S.Hong, V.P.Dravid, C.A.Mirkin, Adv.Mater.2002,14, 231.
[11] D.A.Weinberger, S.Hong, C.A.Mirkin, B.W.Wessels, T.B.Higgins, Adv.Mater.2000, 12, 1600.
[12] J.P.Rolland, E.C.Hagberg, G.M.Denison, K.R.Carter, J.M.DeSimone, Angew.Chem.2004, 116, 5920.
[13] T.Granlund, T.Nyberg, L.S.Roman, M.Svensson, O.Inganäs, Adv.Mater.2000, 12, 269.
[14] Y.Xia, G.M.Whitesides, Annu.Rev.Mater.Sci.1998, 28, 153.
[15] W.S.Beh, I.T.Kim, D.Qin, Y.Xia, G.M.Whitesides.Adv.Mater. 1999, 11, 1038.
[16] Y.Yin, B.Gates, Y.Xia.Adv.Mater.2000, 12, 1426.
[17] K.Salaita, Y.Wang, J.Fragala, R.A.Vega, C.Liu, C.A.Mirkin,Angew.Chem.2006, 118, 7378.
[18] D.Bullen, S.-W.Chung, X.Wang, J.Zou, C.A.Mirkin, C.Liu, Appl.Phys.Lett.2004, 84, 789.
[19] Y.L.Kim, H.Y.Jung, S.Park, B.Li, F.Liu, J.Hao, Y.-K.Kwon, Y.J.Jung, S.Kar, Nat.Photonics 2014, 8, 239.
[20] X.Xiong, L.Jaberansari, M.G.Hahm, A.Busnaina, Y.J.Jung, Small 2007, 3, 2006.
[21] A.B.Marciel, M.Tanyeri, B.D.Wall, J.D.Tovar, C.M.Schroeder, W.L.Wilson, Adv.Mater.2013, 25, 6398.
[22] J.T.Wang, J.Wang, J.J.Han, Small 2011, 7, 1728.
[23] S.Y.Lee, S.H.Kim, H.Hwang, J.Y.Sim, S.M.Yang, Adv.Mater. 2014, 26, 2391.
[24] J.Y.Oh, J.T.Park, H.J.Jang, W.J.Cho, M.S.Islam, Adv.Mater. 2014, 26, 1929.
[25] K.W.Song, R.Costi, V.Bulovi, Adv.Mater.2013, 25, 1420.
[26] P.Maury, M.Escalante, D.N.Reinhoudt, J.Huskens, Adv.Mater. 2005, 17, 2718.
[27] Y.Xia, Y.Yin, Y.Lu, J.McLellan, Adv.Funct.Mater.2003, 13, 907.
[28] L.Jaber-Ansari, M.G.Hahm, S.Somu, Y.E.Sanz, A.Busnaina, Y.J.Jung, J.Am.Chem.Soc.2008, 131, 804.
[29] T.Kraus, L.Malaquin, H.Schmid, W.Riess, N.D.Spencer, H.Wolf,Nat.Nanotechnol.2007, 2, 570.
[30] K.D.Hermanson, S.O.Lumsdon, J.P.Williams, E.W.Kaler, O.D.Velev, Science 2001, 294, 1082.
[31] H.-W.Seo, C.-S.Han, D.-G.Choi, K.-S.Kim, Y.-H.Lee, Microelectron.Eng.2005, 81, 83.
[32] E.M.Freer, O.Grachev, X.Duan, S.Martin, D.P.Stumbo, Nat.Nanotechnol.2010, 5, 525.
[33] D.Xu, A.Subramanian, L.Dong, B.J.Nelson, IEEE Trans.Nanotechnol.2009, 8, 449.
[34] X.Xiong, P.Makaram, A.Busnaina, K.Bakhtari, S.Somu, N.McGruer, J.Park, Appl.Phys.Lett.2006, 89, 193108.
[35] R.C.Bailey, K.J.Stevenson, J.T.Hupp, Adv.Mater.2000, 12, 1930.
[36] Q.Zhang, T.Xu, D.Butterfi eld, M.J.Misner, D.Y.Ryu, T.Emrick, T.P.Russell, Nano Lett.2005, 5, 357.
[37] E.Kumacheva, R.K.Golding, M.Allard, E.H.Sargent, Adv.Mater. 2002, 14, 221.
[38] M.Wei, Z.Tao, X.Xiong, M.Kim, J.Lee, S.Somu, S.Sengupta, A.Busnaina, C.Barry, J.Mead, Macromol.Rapid Commun.2006, 27, 1826.
[39] a) D.Schwartz, S.Steinberg, J.Israelachvili, J.Zasadzinski, Phys.Rev.Lett.1992, 69, 3354; b) W.Yang, P.Thordarson, J.J.Gooding, S.P.Ringer, F.Braet, Nanotechnology 2007, 18, 412001.
[40] S.Siavoshi, C.Yilmaz, S.Somu, T.Musacchio, J.R.Upponi, V.P.Torchilin, A.Busnaina, Langmuir 2011, 27, 7301.
[41] E.Artukovic, M.Kaempgen, D.Hecht, S.Roth, G.Grüner, NanoLett.2005, 5, 757.
[42] L.Hu, D.Hecht, G.Grüner, Nano Lett.2004, 4, 2513.
[43] M.Fuhrer, J.Nygård, L.Shih, M.Forero, Y.G.Yoon, H.J.Choi, J.Ihm, S.G.Louie, A.Zettl, P.L.McEuen, Science 2000, 288,
494.
[44] J.J.Gooding, A.Chou, J.Liu, D.Losic, J.G.Shapter, D.B.Hibbert,Electrochem.Commun.2007, 9, 1677.
[45] A.Chou, T.Böcking, N.K.Singh, J.J.Gooding, Chem.Commun. 2005, 7, 842.
[46] D.Hines, V.Ballarotto, E.Williams, Y.Shao, S.Solin, J.Appl.Phys. 2007, 101, 024503.
[47] H.Park, A.Afzali, S.-J.Han, G.S.Tulevski, A.D.Franklin, J.Tersoff, J.B.Hannon, W.Haensch, Nat.Nanotechnol.2012, 7, 787.
[48] S.Somu, H.Wang, Y.Kim, L.Jaberansari, M.G.Hahm, B.Li, T.Kim, X.Xiong, Y.J.Jung, M.Upmanyu, A.Busnaina, ACS Nano 2010, 4, 4142.
[49] L.Jaber-Ansari, M.G.Hahm, T.H.Kim, S.Somu, A.Busnaina, Y.J.Jung, Appl.Phys.A 2009, 96, 373.
[50] B.Li, M.G.Hahm, Y.L.Kim, H.Y.Jung, S.Kar, Y.J.Jung, ACS Nano 2011, 5, 4826.
[51] B.Li, H.Y.Jung, H.Wang, Y.L.Kim, T.Kim, M.G.Hahm, A.Busnaina, M.Upmanyu, Y.J.Jung, Adv.Funct.Mater.2011, 21, 1810.
[52] M.A.Meitl, Z.T.Zhu, V.Kumar, K.J.Lee, X.Feng, Y.Y.Huang, I.Adesida, R.G.Nuzzo, J.A.Rogers, Nat.Mater.2005, 5, 33.
[53] F.N.Ishikawa, H.Chang, K.Ryu, P.Chen, A.Badmaev, L.GomezDe Arco, G.Shen, C.Zhou, ACS Nano 2008, 3, 73.
[54] N.Inagaki, Plasma Surface Modifi cation and Plasma Polymerization, CRC, Boca Raton, FL, USA 1996.
[55] E.Liston, L.Martinu, M.Wertheimer, J.Adhes.Sci.Technol.1993, 7, 1091.
[56] T.Tsai, C.Lee, N.Tai, W.Tuan, Appl.Phys.Lett.2009, 95, 013107.
[57] J.G.Bai, Z.Z.Zhang, J.N.Calata, G.-Q.Lu, IEEE Trans.Compon.Packag.Technol.2006, 29, 589.
[58] J.G.Toffaletti, Crit.Rev.Clin.Lab.Sci.1991, 28, 253.
[59] J.-L.Vincent, P.Dufaye, J.Berré, M.Leeman, J.-P.Degaute, R.J.Kahn, Crit.Care Med.1983, 11, 449.
[60] R.Henning, M.Weil, F.Weiner, Circ.Shock 1982, 9, 307.

Result of simulation by changing surface tension

잉크젯 프린팅에서 해상력에 관한 컴퓨터 시뮬레이션 연구

A Study on the Simulation of the Resolution for Ink-Jet Printing

  • Lee, Ji-Eun (Dept. of Graphic Arts Engineering, Graduate School, Pukyong National University) ;
  • Youn, Jong-Tae (Dept. of Graphic Arts Information, College of Engineering, Pukyong National University) ;
  • Koo, Chul-Whoi (Dept. of Graphic Arts Information, College of Engineering, Pukyong National University)
  • 이지은 (부경대학교 대학원 인쇄공학과) ;
  • 윤종태 (부경대학교 공과대학 인쇄정보공학과) ;
  • 구철회 (부경대학교 공과대학 인쇄정보공학과)

초록

Ink-jet is part of the non impact printing that shooting the ink drop from the nozzle to paper. It is very silence and express good color. There are two types of printing that continuous and drop on demand. But drop on demand process is becoming the mainstream. these days, LCD, PDP is passed more than semiconductor industry. And we expect organic EL, FED as a next display. But product equipment, main component and technology have a gap between an advanced country and us nevertheless physical development. Expecially, previous process part is depended on imports. Ink-jet printing technology that there isn’t complicated photo lithography process is attracted, so ink-jet printing resolution is more embossed. But there were not many of ink-jet resolution thesis but ink-jet head or nozzle. Because, to out of the ink from the nozzle is unseeable and hard to experiment. Therefore this thesis was experimented and simulated how can ink-jet printer improved resolution by flow-3d simulation package program.

잉크젯은 노즐에서 종이로 잉크 방울을 분사하는 비 충격 인쇄의 일부입니다. 매우 조용하고 좋은 색상을 표현합니다. 연속 및 요청시 드롭되는 두 가지 유형의 인쇄가 있습니다. 그러나 주문형 드롭 프로세스가 주류가되고 있습니다. 요즘 LCD, PDP는 반도체 산업을 넘어서고 있습니다. 그리고 우리는 유기 EL, FED를 다음 디스플레이로 기대합니다. 그러나 제품 장비, 주요 부품 및 기술은 선진국과 우리의 물리적 발달 사이에 격차가 있습니다. 특히 이전 공정 부분은 수입품에 의존합니다. 복잡한 포토 리소그래피 공정이없는 잉크젯 프린팅 기술이 매료되어 잉크젯 프린팅 해상도가 더욱 강조됩니다. 하지만 잉크젯 해상도 논문은 많지 않고 잉크젯 헤드 나 노즐이 많았습니다. 왜냐하면 노즐에서 잉크가 빠져 나가는 것은 보이지 않고 실험하기 어렵 기 때문입니다. 따라서이 논문은 flow-3d 시뮬레이션 패키지 프로그램을 통해 잉크젯 프린터가 해상도를 향상시킬 수있는 방법을 실험하고 시뮬레이션했습니다.

국내 및 해외에 다양한 인쇄 기술이 보급되어 있는 상황에서 잉크젯 기술은 1990년대 후반부터 궤도에 올랐다. 잉크젯은 비접촉성 인쇄 기술의 하나로 인쇄 표면에 잉크 방울 들을 투사해 전자적으로 조정하기 때문에 여러 가지 장점들이 있다. 원하는 양을 원하는 때 제작 가능하고 2,400dpi이상의 높은 해상도를 가지며 잉크 방울의 크기를 조절하여 보다 정확한 이미지인 그레이 스케일 이미지를 얻을 수 있다. 따라서 사진과 같은 이미 지를 만들 수 있다. 또한 기존의 붓을 이용한 디자인에 비해 높은 해상도의 이미지를 손 쉽게 만들 수 있으므로 그래픽 디자인에 대한 적용 범위를 확장할 수 있다. 그리고 카트 리지에 저장되어 있는 잉크를 이미지에 필요한 양만큼 소비하기 때문에 생산비 절감에 유리하다. 이는 코팅 기술이 가지고 있는 원료의 소모를 획기적으로 개선할 수 있다.또 한 코팅 방법과는 달리 기판에 영향을 주지 않는다. 거칠거나 민감한 모든 종류의 표면 위에 인쇄가 가능하며, 1분당 100,000라인의 인쇄 속도로 고속 처리에 적합하다. 현재 잉 크젯 프린터의 성능을 평가하는 방법 중에 가장 기본적인 것은 해상도이다. 그렇기 때문 에 인쇄물의 해상도에서는 dpi가 무척 중요하다. dpi는 dot per inch의 약자로 1인치당 찍은 점의 수이다. dpi는 인쇄물의 해상력을 결정하는 단위이다. 예를 들어 300dpi는 1인 치에 300개의 점을 찍는 밀도로 잉크 점을 찍어 인쇄를 한다는 뜻이다. 당연히 dpi는 숫 자가 클수록 인쇄물이 더 정교해진다. 그러나 제조업체에 따라 출력 dpi 수가 다르며 요 구되는 최적의 해상도도 프린터 엔진의 특성에 따라 다르다. 일반적인 인쇄물은 200dpi 면 좋은 품질이며, 300dpi를 넘으면 매우 우수한 품질이 된다. 우리가 일상생활에서 보 는 대부분의 인쇄물은 100~300dpi 정도롤 사용한다. 잉크젯 프린터에 1,440dpi라고 쓰여 있는 것은 dot의 실질적인 것을 말하는 것이 아니라, 이상적인 종이에 잉크 방울을 려 구현할 수 있는 이론상의 수치이다. 종이에 작은 잉크 입자돌을 뿌려 번지게 하는 방법 으로 인해, 표시된 해상력만큼 재현하지 못하는 경우가 많다. 따라서 실제로는 600dpi 잉크젯 프린터라고 해도 인쇄소에서 300dpi로 출력한 것보다 품질이 떨어지기도 한다. 그러므로 좋은 품질을 얻기 위해서는 목표로 한 해상력 보다 높게 인쇄해야 하는데 그 러기 위해서는 잉크젯의 해상력에 관한 연구가 필수적이다. 잉크에서는 주로 헤드와 노즐에 관한 연구들이 많이 있지만,~9 본 논문에서는 잉크젯의 해상력에 관한 연구를 하고자 한다. 본 연구의 목적은 FLOW-3D 시뮬레이션 프로그램을 이용하여 액적의 비산 모양을 시뮬레이션 함으로서 해상력에 대한 예측을 하기 위한 것이다. 잉크 방울의 크기가 해상 력에 미친다는 것을 알고, 잉크의 물성을 변화시켜가며 액적을 줄이기 위한 시뮬레이션 을 하였다.

Simulation of the bubble jet printing by FLOW-3D
ZSimulation of the bubble jet printing by FLOW-3D
Result of simulation by changing surface tension
Result of simulation by changing surface tension
Fig. 3. Comparison of SEM photographs and simulation results of two neighboring aluminum droplets from (a) top view, (b) side view and (c) bottom view. The scale bar is 100 µm.

Effect of the surface morphology of solidified droplet on remelting
between neighboring aluminum droplets

Abstract

인접한 물방울 사이의 좋은 야금학적 결합은 droplet 기반 3D 프린팅에서 필수적입니다. 그러나 재용해 메커니즘이 명확하게 마스터되었지만, 콜드 랩은 균일한 알루미늄 액적 증착 제조에서 형성된 부품의 일반적인 내부 결함이며, 이는 응고된 액 적의 표면 형태를 간과하기 때문입니다.

여기에서 처음으로 물방울 사이의 융합에 대한 잔물결과 응고각의 차단 효과가 드러났습니다. 재용해의 자세한 과정을 조사하기 위해 VOF (체적 부피) 방법을 기반으로 3D 수치 모델을 개발했습니다. 실험과 시뮬레이션을 통해 인접한 액적 간의 재 용융 공정은 두 번째 액 적과 기판 사이의 과도 접촉에 따라 두 단계로 나눌 수 있음을 보여줍니다.

첫 번째 단계에서는 재용해 조건이 이론적으로 충족 되더라도 콜드 랩이 형성 될 수 있다는 직관적이지 않은 결과가 관찰됩니다. 이전에 증착된 액적 표면의 잔물결은 새로운 액적과의 직접 접촉을 차단합니다. 두 번째 단계에서는 응고 각도가 90 °보다 클 때 액체 금속이 불완전하게 채워져 바닥 표면에 콜드랩이 형성됩니다. 또한 이러한 콜드 랩은 온도 매개 변수를 개선하여 완전히 피하는 것이 어렵습니다.

이 문제를 해결하기 위해 기판의 열전도 계수를 감소시키는 새로운 전략이 제안 되었습니다. 이 방법은 잔물결을 제거하고 응고 각도를 줄임으로써 물방울 사이의 재용해를 효과적으로 촉진합니다.

Keywords: 3D printing; aluminum droplets; metallurgical bonding; ripples; solidification angle.

Fig. 1. Schematic diagram of (a) experimental setup and (b) process principle of uniform aluminum droplet deposition manufacturing.
Fig. 1. Schematic diagram of (a) experimental setup and (b) process principle of uniform aluminum droplet deposition manufacturing.
Fig. 2. Schematic diagram of the numerical model of two droplets successively depositing on the substrate.
Fig. 2. Schematic diagram of the numerical model of two droplets successively depositing on the substrate.
Fig. 3. Comparison of SEM photographs and simulation results of two neighboring aluminum droplets from (a) top view, (b) side view and (c) bottom view. The scale bar is 100 µm.
Fig. 3. Comparison of SEM photographs and simulation results of two neighboring aluminum droplets from (a) top view, (b) side view and (c) bottom view. The scale bar is 100 µm.
Fig. 4. Experimental and simulation images of shape evolution during two neighboring droplets successively impacting at (a) t, (b) t+0.5 ms, (c) t+1 ms, (d) t+2 ms, (e) t+3 ms and (f) t+5 ms.
Fig. 4. Experimental and simulation images of shape evolution during two neighboring droplets successively impacting at (a) t, (b) t+0.5 ms, (c) t+1 ms, (d) t+2 ms, (e) t+3 ms and (f) t+5 ms.
Fig. 5. SEM observation of (a) side view and (b) bottom view of successive deposition of aluminum droplets; (c) enlarged side view of the section of the printed metal trace in (a); (d) fracture of two neighboring droplets; (e) cross-section of two droplets successive deposition; (f) enlarged view of the selected section in (e).
Fig. 5. SEM observation of (a) side view and (b) bottom view of successive deposition of aluminum droplets; (c) enlarged side view of the section of the printed metal trace in (a); (d) fracture of two neighboring droplets; (e) cross-section of two droplets successive deposition; (f) enlarged view of the selected section in (e).
Fig. 6. Simulation results of (a) shape evolution and solid fraction distribution in Y- Z middle cross-section of two successively-deposited droplets; (b) temperature variation with time at three points (labeled A-C) on the surface of the first droplet during the deposition of the second droplet.
Fig. 6. Simulation results of (a) shape evolution and solid fraction distribution in Y- Z middle cross-section of two successively-deposited droplets; (b) temperature variation with time at three points (labeled A-C) on the surface of the first droplet during the deposition of the second droplet.

References

[1] D. Zhang, L. Qi, J. Luo, H. Yi, X. Hou, Direct fabrication of unsupported inclined aluminum pillars
based on uniform micro droplets deposition, International Journal of Machine Tools and Manufacture,
116 (2017) 18-24.
[2] H. Yi, L. Qi, J. Luo, Y. Jiang, W. Deng, Pinhole formation from liquid metal microdroplets impact
on solid surfaces, Applied Physics Letters, 108 (2016) 041601.
[3] T. Zhang, X. Wang, T. Li, Q. Guo, J. Yang, Fabrication of flexible copper-based electronics with
high-resolution and high-conductivity on paper via inkjet printing, Journal of Materials Chemistry C, 2
(2014) 286-294.
[4] T. Zhang, M. Hu, Y. Liu, Q. Guo, X. Wang, W. Zhang, W. Lau, J. Yang, A laser printing based
approach for printed electronics, Applied Physics Letters, 108 (2016) 103501.
[5] H. Gorter, M. Coenen, M. Slaats, M. Ren, W. Lu, C. Kuijpers, W. Groen, Toward inkjet printing of
small molecule organic light emitting diodes, Thin Solid Films, 532 (2013) 11-15.
[6] R. Vellacheri, A. Al-Haddad, H. Zhao, W. Wang, C. Wang, Y. Lei, High performance supercapacitor
for efficient energy storage under extreme environmental temperatures, Nano Energy, 8 (2014) 231-237.
[7] C.W. Visser, R. Pohl, C. Sun, G.W. Römer, B. Hu is in‘t Veld, D. Lohse, Toward 3D printing of
pure metals by laser‐induced forward transfer, Advanced materials, 27 (2015) 4087-4092.
[8] M. Fang, S. Chandra, C. Park, Heat transfer during deposition of molten aluminum alloy droplets to
build vertical columns, Journal of Heat Transfer, 131 (2009) 112101.
[9] Q. Xu, V. Gupta, E. Lavernia, Thermal behavior during droplet-based deposition, Acta materialia,
48 (2000) 835-849.
[10] W. Liu, G. Wang, E. Matthys, Thermal analysis and measurements for a molten metal drop
impacting on a substrate: cooling, solidification and heat transfer coefficient, International Journal of
Heat and Mass Transfer, 38 (1995) 1387-1395.
[11] R. Rangel, X. Bian, Metal-droplet deposition model including liquid deformation and substrate
remelting, International journal of heat and mass transfer, 40 (1997) 2549-2564.
[12] B. Kang, Z. Zhao, D. Poulikakos, Solidification of liquid metal droplets impacting sequentially on
a solid surface, TRANSACTIONS-AMERICAN SOCIETY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERS
JOURNAL OF HEAT TRANSFER, 116 (1994) 436-436.

Figure 6: Fluid firing of test model

버블 제트 마이크로 액추에이터에서 기포 성장 및 액체 흐름의 수치 시뮬레이션

Numerical analysis of liquid flow characteristics according to the design parameters of a bubble jet microactuator

마이크로 액추에이터 챔버 및 노즐 내부의 유체 역학의 수치 모델이 제공됩니다. 모델에는 저장소로부터의 잉크 흐름, 기포 형성 및 성장, 노즐을 통한 배출, 리필 프로세스의 역학이 포함됩니다. 고 테이퍼 노즐은 전체 액추에이터 성능 설계에 매우 중요한 매개 변수 중 하나이기 때문에 노즐 두께, 직경 및 테이퍼 각도의 변화에 ​​따른 효과를 시뮬레이션하고 일부 결과를 실험 결과와 비교합니다.

얇고 테이퍼형 노즐을 통한 잉크 방울 배출이 보다 안정적이고 빠르고 견고하다는 것이 확인되었습니다.

키워드: Numerical smulation, Micro actuator; Bubble growth, Drop ejection, Volume of fluid

Figure 1: The commercial thermal micro actuator
Figure 1: The commercial thermal micro actuator
Table 1: Prediction results of the effects of nozzle thickness and diameter change
Table 1: Prediction results of the effects of nozzle thickness and diameter change
Figure 2: Designed polyimide nozzles
Figure 2: Designed polyimide nozzles
Figure 3: SEM photograph of one nozzle
Figure 3: SEM photograph of one nozzle
Figure 5: Geometry of test model
Figure 5: Geometry of test model
Figure 6: Fluid firing of test model
Figure 6: Fluid firing of test model

Conclusions

수치 시뮬레이션은 마이크로 버블 증가 및 낙하 방출 현상의 예측에 성공적으로 적용됩니다. 노즐 두께의 변화 결과와 비교했을 때, 우리는 얇은 노즐이 더 빠른 방울을 만든다는 것을 발견했습니다. 또한 노즐 직경이 증가하면 방울 부피가 증가할 수 있습니다. 이 수치 시뮬레이션에서는 노즐 직경의 20%를 증가시키면 방울 부피는 49.3% 증가하고 노즐 두께의 20%를 감소시키면 방울 속도는 약 8.5% 증가합니다. 노즐 테이퍼 각도 변경의 예측 결과에 따르면, 테이퍼형 노즐이 더 빠른 속도로 거의 동일한 유체량을 보인다는 결론을 내렸습니다. 방울 속도만이 방울 배출의 품질을 향상시킬 수 있는 유일한 요인은 아니지만, 방울이 빠르면 일반적으로 위성이 줄어들고, 물에 젖지 않는 상태가 개선되며, 정렬 효과가 좋아지며, 직선 방출이 가능합니다.

References

SHOWING 1-9 OF 9 REFERENCESThree-Dimensional Calculation of Bubble Growth and Drop Ejection in a Bubble Jet Printer

SaveAlertResearch FeedBubble Dynamics in Boiling Under High Heat Flux Pulse Heating

SaveAlertResearch FeedLBM simulation on friction and mass flow analysis in a rough microchannel

SaveAlertResearch FeedAnalysis on the performance and internal flow of a tubular type hydro turbine for vessel cooling system

SaveAlertResearch FeedAn Introduction to Microelectromechanical Systems Engineering

  • View 2 excerpts, references background

SaveAlertResearch FeedInkjet technology and product development strategies

  • Carlsbad: Torrey Pines Research, pp. 115-117, 2000.
  • 2000

Particle tolerant architecture

  • IS&T’s NIP 16 International Conference on Digital Printing Technology, pp. 39-43, 2000.
  • 2000

Drop Generation Process in TIJ Printheads

  • IS&T’s 10th International Congress on Advances in Non-Impact Printing Technologies, pp. 169-171, 1994.
  • 1994

Bubble generation mechanism in the bubble jet recording process

  • Journal of Imaging Technology, vol. 14, pp. 120-123, 1988.
  • 1988

FLOW-3D Weld

FLOW-3D Weld

FLOW-3D  WELD 는 레이저 용접 공정에 대한 강력한 통찰력을 제공하여 공정 최적화를 달성합니다. 더 나은 공정 제어를 통해 다공성, 열 영향 영역을 최소화하고, 미세 구조 변화를 제어 할 수 있습니다. 레이저 용접 프로세스를 정확하게 시뮬레이션하기 위해 FLOW-3D WELD 는 레이저 열원, 레이저-재료 상호 작용, 유체 흐름, 열 전달, 표면 장력, 응고, 다중 레이저 반사 및 위상 변화와 같은 모든 관련 물리학을 구현합니다.

 

낮은 열 입력,  뛰어난 생산성, 속도는 기존의 용접 방법을 대체하는 레이저 용접 프로세스로 이어집니다. 레이저 용접이 제공하는 장점 중 일부는 더 나은 용접 강도, 더 작은 열 영향 영역, 더 정밀한 정밀도, 최소 변형 및 강철, 알루미늄, 티타늄 및 이종 금속을 포함한 광범위한 금속 / 합금을 용접 할 수있는 능력을 포함합니다.

공정 최적화

FLOW-3D WELD 는 레이저 용접 공정에 대한 강력한 통찰력을 제공하고 궁극적으로 공정 최적화를 달성하는 데 도움이됩니다. 더 나은 공정 제어로 다공성을 최소화하고 열 영향을받는 영역을 제한하며 미세 구조 변화를 제어 할 수 있습니다. FLOW-3D WELD 는 자유 표면 추적 알고리즘으로 인해 매우 복잡한 용접 풀을 시뮬레이션하는 데 매우 적합합니다. FLOW-3D WELD 는 관련 물리적 모델을 FLOW-3D 에 추가로 통합하여 개발되었습니다.  레이저 소스에 의해 생성된 열유속, 용융 금속의 증발 압력, 차폐 가스 효과, 용융 풀의 반동 압력 및 키홀 용접의 다중 레이저 반사. 현실적인 공정 시뮬레이션을 위해 모든 관련 물리 현상을 포착하는 것이 중요합니다.

 

얕은 용입 용접 (왼쪽 상단); 실드 가스 효과가 있는 깊은 용입 용접 (오른쪽 상단); 쉴드 가스 및 증발 압력을 사용한 심 용입 용접 (왼쪽 하단); 쉴드 가스, 증발 압력 및 다중 레이저 반사 효과 (오른쪽 하단)를 사용한 깊은 침투 용접.

FLOW-3D WELD 는 레이저 용접의 전도 모드와 키홀 모드를 모두 시뮬레이션 할 수 있습니다. 전 세계의 연구원들은 FLOW-3D WELD 를 사용하여 용융 풀 역학을 분석하고 공정 매개 변수를 최적화하여 다공성을 최소화하며 레이저 용접 수리 공정에서 결정 성장을 예측합니다.

완전 관통 레이저 용접 실험

한국의 KAIST와 독일의 BAM은 16K kW 레이저를 사용하여 10mm 강판에 완전 침투 레이저 용접 실험을 수행했습니다. CCD 카메라의 도움으로 그들은 완전 침투 레이저 용접으로 인해 형성된 상단 및 하단 용융 풀 역학을 포착 할 수있었습니다. 그들은 또한 FLOW-3D WELD 에서 프로세스를  시뮬레이션하고 시뮬레이션과 실험 결과 사이에 좋은 일치를 얻었습니다.

실험 설정 레이저 용접
CCD 카메라로 상단 및 하단 용융 풀을 관찰하는 실험 설정
레이저 용접 회로도
FLOW-3D의 계산 영역 개략도
레이저 용접 시뮬레이션 실험 결과
상단의 시뮬레이션 결과는 용융 풀 길이가 8mm 및 15mm 인 반면 실험에서는 용융 풀 길이가 7mm 및 13mm임을 나타냅니다.
 

레이저 용접 다공성 사례 연구

General Motors, Michigan 및 Shanghai University는 중국의 공정 매개 변수, 즉 용접 속도 및 용접 경사각이 키홀 용접에서 다공성 발생에 미치는 영향을 이해하기 위해 상세한 연구를 공동으로 진행했습니다.

키홀 유도 용접 다공성
레이저 용접된 알루미늄 조인트 단면의 용접 다공성, 키홀 유도 다공성은 유동 역학으로 인해 발생하며 균열을 일으킬 수 있습니다. 최적화 된 공정 매개 변수는 이러한 종류의 다공성을 완화 할 수 있습니다.

연구원들은 FLOW-3D WELD를 사용 하여 증발 및 반동 압력, 용융풀 역학, 온도 의존적 ​​표면 장력 및 키홀 내에서 여러 번의 레이저 반사 동안 프레넬 흡수를 포함한 모든 중요한 물리적 현상을 설명했습니다.

시뮬레이션 모델을 기반으로 연구진은 키홀 용접에서 유도 다공성의 주요 원인으로 불안정한 키홀을 식별했습니다. 아래 이미지에서 볼 수 있듯이 후방 용융 풀의 과도한 재순환으로 인해 후방 용융 풀이 전방 용융 풀 벽에서 붕괴되고 공극이 발생하여 다공성이 발생합니다. 이러한 갇힌 공극이 진행되는 응고 경계에 의해 포착되었을 때 다공성이 유도되었습니다.

높은 용접 속도에서는 더 큰 키홀 개구부가 있으며 이는 일반적으로 더 안정적인 키홀 구성을 가져옵니다. 사용 FLOW-3D 용접 , 연구진은 그 높은 용접 속도와 경사도 완화 다공성의 큰 용접 각도를 예측했습니다.

레이저 용접 수치 실험 결과
시뮬레이션 (위) 및 실험 (아래)에서 볼 수있는 세로 용접 섹션의 다공성 분포

FLOW Weld

FLOW Weld  모듈은 용접 해석에 필요한 모델을 FLOW-3D 에 추가하는 추가 모듈입니다.

FLOW-3D 의 표면 장력 자유 표면 분석, 용융, 응고, 증발, 상 변화 모델 등의 기본 기능을

응용하여 각종 용접 현상을 분석 할 수 있습니다.

주요 기능 :열원 모델 (출력 지정, 가우스분포, 디 포커스 등) 열원의 자유로운 이동 증발 압력 (그에 따른 반력) 실드 가스 압력 다중 반사 용접에 관한 대표적인 출력 (온도 구배 냉각 속도, 에너지 분포 등)
분석 용도 :높은 방사선 강도와 고온에 의해 직접 관찰이 어려운 현상을 시각화 온도, 열, 용접 속도, 위치 관계, 재료 물성 등의 매개 변수 연구 결함 예측 (기공, 응고, 수축 등)

FLOW -3D Weld 분석 기능

weld_flow
  1. 열원 모델의 이동
      출력량 지정, 가우스분포
  2. 에너지 밀도의 분포 , 가공 속도
      가우스 테이블 입력
  3. 증발 압력
      온도 의존성
  4. 다중 반사
      용해 깊이에 미치는 영향
  5. 결과 처리
      용해 모양, 에너지 분포, 온도 구배 냉각 속도
  6. 다양항형상의 레이저와 거동 (+ csv 파일로드)
      다양한 모양을 csv 파일 형식으로 정의 회전 + 이동
      임의 형상 이동을 csv 파일로 로드 (나선형)
  7.  이종 재료
      이종 재료의 용접
  8.  3D Printing Method  
      Cladding 적층공정

1. 열원 모델의 이동

weld16-1weld16-2
에너지 밀도공간 분포

2. 에너지 밀도의 분포, 가공 속도

열 플럭스 r 방향의 분포 단면은 원형으로, r 방향으로 열유속 분포를 제공합니다.

에너지 밀도의 공간적 분포

가우스 : 원추형의 경우는 조사 방향으로 변화하고 열유속의 면적 분은 동일합니다.

가공 속도

가공 노즐을 x, y, z 방향, 시간 – 속도의 테이블에서 지정합니다.
또한 노즐 (광원) 위치 좌표 조사 방향 벡터 성분을 지정합니다.

3. 증발 압력

에너지 밀도가 높은 경우, 용융 부 계면이 증발하고 그 반력에 의해 계면에 함몰이 발생합니다.
특히 깊은 용융부를 포함한 레이저 용접은 증발 압력을 고려한 모델링이 필요합니다.

증발 압력의 평가는 일반적인 수학적 모델이 없기 때문에 다음 모델 식을 사용합니다.

증발 가스의 상승 효과 (키 홀, 스퍼터 등)

증기의 상승 흐름의 영향을 동압, 전단력으로 평가합니다.

weld5-1 

4. 다중 반사

키홀 거동의 비교

weld9
다중 반사 없음다중 반사 있음

다중 반사를 고려한 레이저

weld10

5. 결과 처리

용접 기능에 관한 대표적인 출력 예입니다.

6. 다양한 형상의 레이저와 거동 (+ csv 파일 읽기)

weld17weld18

7. 이종 재료

이종 재료 간이 분석

재료 : 철, 구리

밀도고상율
weld19

이종 재료를 이용한 레이저 용접

재료 : 구리, 철

재료 체적 비율온도
weld20

8. 금속 3D 프린팅 기법  

– 적층 제조 (Additive Manufacturing) 공정

– DED(Direct Energy Deposition) 공정 

주조 분야

Metal Casting

주조제품, 금형의 설계 과정에서 FLOW-3D의 사용은 회사의 수익성 개선에 직접적인 영향을 줍니다.
(주)에스티아이씨앤디에서는  FLOW-3D를 통해 해결한 수많은 경험과 전문 지식을 엔지니어와 설계자에게 제공합니다.

품질 및 생산성 문제는 빠른 시간 안에 시뮬레이션을 통해 예측 가능하므로 낮은 비용으로 해결 할수 있습니다. FLOW-3D는 특별히 주조해석의 정확성 향상을 위한 다양한 설계 물리 모델들을 포함하고 있습니다.

이 모델에는 Lost Foam 주조, Non-newtonian 유체 및 금형의 다이싸이클링 해석에 대한 알고리즘 등을 포함하고 있습니다. 시뮬레이션의 정확성과 주조 제품의 품질을 향상시키고자 한다면, FLOW-3D는 여러분들의 이러한 요구를 충족시키는 제품입니다.

Ladle Pour Simulation by Nemak Poland Sp. z o.o.


관련 기술자료

Fig. 1. (a) Dimensions of the casting with runners (unit: mm), (b) a melt flow simulation using Flow-3D software together with Reilly's model[44], predicted that a large amount of bifilms (denoted by the black particles) would be contained in the final casting. (c) A solidification simulation using Pro-cast software showed that no shrinkage defect was contained in the final casting.

AZ91 합금 주물 내 연행 결함에 대한 캐리어 가스의 영향

Effect of carrier gases on the entrainment defects within AZ91 alloy castings Tian Liab J.M.T.Daviesa Xiangzhen ZhucaUniversity of Birmingham, Birmingham ...
더 보기
Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Civil, Offshore and Environmental Engineering (ICCOEE2020)

Numerical Simulation to Assess Floating Instability of Small Passenger Vehicle Under Sub-critical Flow

미 임계 흐름에서 소형 승용차의 부동 불안정성을 평가하기 위한 수치 시뮬레이션 Proceedings of the International Conference on Civil, Offshore and ...
더 보기
Simulating Porosity Factors

다공성 요인 시뮬레이션

Simulating Porosity Factors https://www.foundrymag.com/issues-and-ideas/article/21926214/simulating-porosity-factorsPamela Waterman 수치 모델링 도구는 일반적이지만 원인을 파악하기가 너무 어렵 기 때문에 코어 가스 블로우 결함을 거의 ...
더 보기
Figure 1. Steady-state shear stress a as a function of shear rate y in Sn-Pb alloy [10).

Numerical Modelling of Semi-Solid Flow under Processing Conditions

처리조건에서의 반고체유동의 수치모델링 David H. Kirkwood and Philip J. WardDepartment of Engineering Materials, University of Sheffield, Sheffield I UK Keywords: ...
더 보기
Fig. 2 Temperature distributions of oil pans (Cycling)

내열마그네슘 합금을 이용한 자동차용 오일팬의 다이캐스팅 공정 연구

A Study on Die Casting Process of the Automobile Oil Pan Using the Heat Resistant Magnesium Alloy 한국자동차공학회논문집 = Transactions ...
더 보기
Fig. 1.Schematic of wire feeding in a melting line.

Evaluation on the Efficiency of Cored Wire Feeding in Addition of Alloying Elements into Cu Melt

Bok-Hyun Kang*, Ki-Young KimKorea University of Technology and Education 코어드 와이어 피딩에 의한 Cu 용탕에의 합금 첨가 시 효율 평가 ...
더 보기
Fig. 6: Proposed Pattern Layout

Casting Defect Analysis on Caliper Bracket using Mold flow Simulation

금형 흐름 시뮬레이션을 사용한 캘리퍼 브래킷의 주조 결함 분석 Abstract 이 작업에서는 컴퓨터 보조 주조 시뮬레이션 기술을 사용하여 Green sand ...
더 보기
Figure 4.9 Flow analysis results using FLOW3D of the metal flow and solidification in the main cavity. (The velocity is in m/s.)

Numerical Analysis of Die-Casting Process in Thin Cavities Using Lubrication Approximation

Alexandre ReikherA Dissertation Submitted inPartial Fulfillment of theRequirements for the Degree ofDoctor of PhilosophyIn EngineeringatThe University of Wisconsin MilwaukeeDecember 2012 ...
더 보기
Figure 2.12: (Top) The sequence in the DISAMATIC process (1)-(5). (Middle) The performed experiments placed on the Mohr circle (I)-(V). (Bottom) The five names of the mechanical behaviours.

Numerical simulation of flow and compression of green sand

Abstract 산업 박사 프로젝트의 초점은 주조 부품에 최종 기하학적 모양을 제공하는 모래 주형 (녹색 모래)의 생산에 집중되었습니다. 주조 부품의 고품질을 ...
더 보기
Figure 9: Predicted three-dimensional spreading splats for a 90 µm diameter Nylon-11 droplet.

Effect of Substrate Roughness on Splatting Behavior of HVOF Sprayed Polymer Particles: Modeling and Experiments

International Thermal Spray Conference – ITSC-2006Seattle, Washington, U.S.A., May 2006 M. Ivosevic, V. Gupta, R. A. Cairncross, T. E. Twardowski, ...
더 보기
Schematic section view of siphon spillway

사이폰 여수로 | Siphon Spillways

Siphon Spillways

This article was contributed by Ali Habibzadeh (Project Engineer) and Jose (Pepe) Vasquez (Principal Engineer) at Northwest Hydraulic Consultants.

원문 : https://www.flow3d.com/siphon-spillways/

CFD 모델링은 여수로 구조물의 수력학 설계를 평가하기 위한 강력한 도구입니다. 설계 흐름에서 여수로의 용량은 댐 안전성 측면에서 가장 중요합니다(USBR 1987). 노스웨스트 수력학 컨설턴트는 기존 또는 새로운 여수로 설계에 대한 수많은 사례 연구에 CFD 모델링을 적용했습니다. 다음 글은 기존의 사이펀 여수로에서 수행한 샘플 사례 연구를 보여줍니다.

공기 조절식 사이펀 여수로는 상류 수위에 따라 다른 유압 조건에서 작동합니다(McBirney 1957). 유출로의 파고(crest) 위에 있는 비교적 작은 머리들의 경우, 사이펀은 사이펀 배럴 내부에 대기압을 가진 자유 위어처럼 작동합니다(즉, discharge 은 h에w3/2 비례합니다). 헤드가 증가하면 사이펀 배럴 내부의 흐름이 가압된 흐름으로 전환됩니다.

사이펀 배럴은 하위 대기압으로 프라이밍됩니다. 그 단계에서 사이펀 배럴을 통한 배출은 오리피스의 배출과 같습니다(즉o1/2 배출은 h에 비례한다). 프라이밍된 사이펀을 통과하는 드라이빙 헤드는 사이펀 출구의 상류 수위와 하류 바로 아래 수위 사이의 디퍼렌셜 헤드와 동일합니다. 

프라이밍드 사이펀(ho)의 유효 헤드는 일반적으로 프리 사이펀(hw)보다 상당히 크기 때문에 프라이밍된 사이펀은 상류 수위(Ervine 1976년)가 약간 증가한 프리 사이펀과 비교할 때 상당히 많은 양의 흐름을 전달할 수 있다. 

그러나 이는 사이펀이 실제로 프리임(Tadayon and Ramamurthy, 2013)을 할 경우에만 해당됩니다. 홍수와 비상사태 때, 인간의 개입이 없는 사이펀의 작동은 지극히 중요하지만, 이것이 항상 일어나는 것은 아닙니다.

프라이밍을 강화하기 위해 종종 디플렉터를 사이펀 바닥에 설치하여 제한된 공기량을 둘러싸기 위해 반대쪽 벽을 향해 향하는 제트를 생성합니다. 제트에 의해 발생되는 증가된 난기류는 점차적으로 제한된 공기를 제거하여 통 안의 압력을 떨어뜨립니다.

상류 수위가 내려가면서 사이펀 내 원수가 끊기고 유량이 다시 대기압으로 전환됩니다. 이 전환이 일어나면 헤드 방전 관계가 오리피스에서 보로 전환되면서 배출이 크게 감소합니다.

Schematic section view of siphon spillway
Schematic section view of siphon spillway; weir flow (left) and orifice flow (right).

FLOW-3D Modeling of a Siphon Spillway

노스웨스트 수리학 컨설턴트는 FLOW-3D를 사용하여 기존 3피트 높이의 직사각형 사이펀 유출로의 배출 용량을 평가하였습니다. 기존 사이펀은 홍수 때 셀프 프라이밍 문제가 발생했기 때문에 입구의 후드형 환기구와 배럴 내 바닥 디플렉터가 추가되었습니다. 아래의 첫 번째 애니메이션은 상류 수위 상승과 함께 사이펀의 단면 모델을 보여줍니다.

첫 번째 애니메이션은 기존 유출로의 현장 관찰에서 결정된 고정된 상류 수위(水位)로 진행되었습니다. 플로어 디플렉터에 의한 흐름의 편향으로 인해 배럴 내에 공기량이 제한됩니다. 시간이 지남에 따라 이 공기는 유동에 의해 유입되어 배럴 내의 절대 압력이 대기권(~2,115 lb/ft2)에서 대기권(약 1,500 lb/ft2)으로 떨어집니다. 압력이 배럴 내에서 떨어지면서 공기가 제거되고 물로 대체됩니다. 사이펀을 통한 배출은 사이펀이 프라이밍되면 1cfs 미만에서 16cf 이상으로 증가하며, 배럴은 가득 차게 작동됩니다.

두 번째 애니메이션은 상류 수면 표고가 감소함에 따라 사이펀 프라임 브레이크 액션을 보여줍니다. 사이펀 프라임 브레이크 과정은 사이펀 배럴의 크라운에서 대기 외압과 압력 간의 차이가 사이펀에 공기를 삽입하는 데 필요한 차동 헤드를 초과할 때 발생합니다. 따라서 사이펀 프라임은 깨지고 공기가 배럴 내의 액체를 대체합니다. 이 애니메이션에서 볼 수 있듯이, 사이펀 프라임 브레이크 액션이 완료된 후 배럴을 통한 내부 압력과 방전이 원래의 위어 흐름 값으로 돌아갑니다.

FLOW-3D의 결과는 노스웨스트 유압 컨설턴트의 수력학 연구소에서 수행한 물리적 모델 연구에 의해 확인되었습니다. 

References

Ervine, D. A., (1976). “The Design and Modelling of Air-Regulated Siphon Spillways.”, Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers, Vol. 61, pp. 383-400.

McBirney, W. B. (1957). “Some Experiments with Emergency Siphon Spillways.”, US Bureau of Reclamation, PAP-97.

Tadayon, R. and Ramamurthy, A. S., (2013). “Discharge Coefficient for Siphon Spillways.”, ASCE Journal of Irrigation and Drainage Engineering, Vol. 139, No. 3, pp. 267-270.

USBR. (1987). “Design of Small Dams.”, 3rd Ed., U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC.

Simulation results from FLOW-3D highlighting the droplet formation and the input pressure pulse

연속 잉크젯 인쇄

Continuous Inkjets

연속 잉크젯 인쇄는 약 150 년 동안 축적 된 기술입니다. 간단히 말해, 프린트 헤드가 작동하면 연속적인 유체 흐름이있는 액적 생성 방법입니다. 이 개념은 1867 년 Lord Kelvin에 의해 처음 특허를 받았지만 80 년 이상 지난 1951 년 Siemens가 최초의 상용 장치를 선보였습니다. 처음에 이 기술은 만료일, 배치 코드, 이름 및 제품 로고와 같은 가변 정보의 비접촉식 고속 인쇄에 사용되었습니다.

물방울 생성

노즐 크기 선택

액적 생성을위한 시스템 매개 변수를 계산하기 위해 Rayleigh 제트 불안정성 이론을 사용할 수 있습니다. 이 이론에 따르면 물방울 형성으로 이어지는 제트 분리에 대한 자극의 최적 파장 (λ)은 대략 다음과 같습니다.

Nozzle size selection
Nozzle size selection

작동 주파수 선택

최적의 드롭 생성 주파수는 최적의 파장에서 직접 계산할 수 있습니다. 위의 이론과 알려진 산업 매개 변수를 사용하여 FLOW-3D 에서 계산 모델을 설정하는 동안 125μm의 노즐 반경과 10kHz의 주파수가 사용되었습니다

FLOW-3D 결과 검증

FLOW-3D 는 강력하고 정확한 표면 장력 모델로 인해 연속 잉크젯 인쇄와 같은 액적 기반 공정을 시뮬레이션하는 데 적합합니다.

아래 시뮬레이션 결과에서 10kHz의 주파수에서 진동하는 입력 압력 펄스를 볼 수 있습니다. 평균 액적 크기는 약 240 μm이며 이론적으로 추정 된 액적 크기 약 250 μm와 잘 일치합니다.

Simulation results from FLOW-3D highlighting the droplet formation and the input pressure pulse
Simulation results from FLOW-3D highlighting the droplet formation and the input pressure pulse

OLED Mura Problem

이론적으로는 정확히 동일한 진폭으로 압력 펄스를 생성 할 수 있습니다. 그러나 OLED의 잉크젯 인쇄와 같은 산업 응용 분야에서 모든 노즐은 본질적으로 불완전한 제조 또는 작동 매개 변수로 인해 약간 다릅니다. 이러한 모든 결함은 액적 부피의 변동을 일으켜 OLED 패널의 각 하위 픽셀에 증착 된 유기 화합물의 부피를 변화시켜 증착 된 필름 두께의 비례적인 변화를 초래합니다. 이러한 두께 변화는 잉크젯 인쇄 OLED 디스플레이에서 패널 휘도 불균일의 가장 중요한 원인 중 하나입니다 (Madigan et al. ). 이러한 패널 휘도의 불균일성을 “무라 효과”라고합니다.

무라 문제를 해결하는 한 가지 접근 방식은 평균 법칙을 사용하는 것입니다. 이것이 의미하는 바는 서로 다른 노즐 (픽셀 내 혼합)의 방울을 무작위로 결합하여 방울 부피의 양 및 음 오류를 평균화하여 방울 부피 오류를 거의 0에 가깝게 만드는 것입니다.

FLOW-3D 에서 픽셀 내 혼합 과정을 시뮬레이션하기 위해 입력 압력 펄스 진폭에 약간의 임의성이 추가되었습니다. 최대 변동의 크기는 1.7MPa의 원래 압력 진폭에 더하여 200kPa로 설정되었습니다. 아래 애니메이션은 무작위성이있는 케이스와 무작위성이없는 초기 케이스의 비교를 보여줍니다.

압력 펄스의 무작위성 대 일정한 진폭의 경우를 비교하는 애니메이션.

예상대로 액적 생성은 액적 모양, 액적 크기, 액적 간 간격 및 비행 속도 측면에서 균일하지 않습니다. 그러나 오른쪽의 일정한 진폭 케이스는 균일 한 모양과 크기의 균일 한 간격의 물방울을 생성합니다.

연속 잉크젯 인쇄는 저장소에서 마이크로 미터 크기의 노즐 뱅크로 액체를 보내는 고압 펌프로 시작하여 진동하는 압전 결정의 진동에 의해 결정되는 주파수에서 연속적인 물방울 흐름을 생성합니다. 특히 인쇄 응용 분야의 경우, 잉크 방울은 외부 전기장의 존재로 인해 연속 흐름에서 편향됩니다. 이것은 인쇄 매체의 표면에 패턴을 생성합니다. 이 기술의 장점 중 일부는 높은 처리량, 높은 액적 속도, 프린트 헤드에서 기판까지의 거리 증가, 연속 작동으로 인한 노즐 막힘 없음입니다. 이러한 긍정적 인 특성 덕분에이 기술은 오늘날 종이에 일반 인쇄 잉크에서 다양한 재료 (생존 세포 포함)를 증착하는 것으로 발전했습니다.

Continuous inkjet animation

결론

FLOW-3D 는 연속 잉크젯 인쇄 프로세스와 관련된 물리학에 대한 이해를 촉진하는 데 사용되었습니다. 강력한 표면 장력 모델 덕분에 FLOW-3D 는 다양한 고급 액적 생성 및 증착 응용 분야에서도 유용 할 수 있습니다. 예를 들어 OLED 프린팅의 경우 FLOW-3D 를 사용하여 픽셀 내 혼합 중에 발생하는 액 적의 변화를 효과적으로 이해하여 OLED 패널의 품질을 높일 수 있습니다.

References

Madigan C. F., Hauf C. R., Barkley L. D., Harjee N., Vronsky E., Slyke S. A. V., Advancements in Inkjet Printing for OLED Mass Production. Kateeva, Inc.

Advances in Magnetohydrodynamic Liquid Metal Jet Printing

Advances in Magnetohydrodynamic Liquid Metal Jet Printing

Scott Vader1, Zachary Vader1, Ioannis H. Karampelas2 and Edward P. Furlani2, 3
1Vader Systems, Buffalo, NY
2Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering, 3 Dept. of Electrical Engineering,
University at Buffalo SUNY, NY 14260, Office: (716) 645-1194, Fax: (716) 645-3822, efurlani@buffalo.edu

ABSTRACT

자기유체역학적 액체 금속 제트 프린팅

우리는 용해된 금속 방울을 3D 물체로 만드는 새로운 주문형 DOD(Drop-on-Demand) 인쇄 방법을 제안합니다. 이 접근 방식에서는 단단한 금속 와이어가 인쇄 헤드 내에서 용해된 다음 펄스 자기장에 노출됩니다.

적용된 필드가 챔버에 침투하여 액상 금속 내에 자기 유압(MHD) 기반 압력 펄스를 유도하여 금속 일부가 노즐 챔버를 통해 이동된 후 배출됩니다. 표면 장력은 분출된 금속 위에 작용하여 가해진 압력에 따라 초 당 수 미터 범위의 속도로 구형 방울을 형성합니다.

잠시 비행한 후 방울이 기질에 충돌하여 냉각되어 고체 덩어리를 형성합니다. 따라서 패턴이 있는 증착 및 드롭 방식의 고형화를 통해 3D 솔리드 구조를 인쇄할 수 있습니다.

현재 연구에서는 샘플 프린팅 구조와 함께 시제품 MHD 프린팅 시스템 개발에 대한 발전된 점을 제시합니다. 또한 드롭 생성을 관리하는 기본 물리학에 대해 논의하고 장치 성능을 예측하기 위한 새로운 컴퓨팅 모델을 소개합니다.

Computational model of magnetohydrodynamic-based drop generation
Computational model of magnetohydrodynamic-based drop generation (printhead reservoir and ejection chamber
not shown): (a) the magnetic field generated by a pulsed coil is shown

INTRODUCTION

주문형 드롭온 잉크젯 프린팅은 상업 및 소비자 이미지 재현을 위한 잘 확립된 방법입니다. 이 기술을 추진하는 원리와 동일한 원리가 기능 인쇄 및 적층 제조 분야에도 적용될 수 있습니다.

Early stage prototype of a single nozzle printhead
Early stage prototype of a single nozzle printhead

기존의 잉크젯 기술은 폴리머에서 살아있는 세포에 이르는 다양한 재료를 증착하고 패터링하여 다양한 기능성 매체, 조직 및 장치를 프린팅하는 데 사용되어 왔습니다. 현재 진행 중인 작업을 통해 잉크젯 인쇄를 3D 금속 부품으로 확장하려고 시도하고 있습니다.

현재, 대부분의 3D 금속 인쇄 애플리케이션은 고체 물체를 형성하기 위해 레이저(예: 선택적 레이저 소거 [1] 및 직접 금속 소거[2]) 또는 전자 빔(예: 전자 빔 용해 [3])과 같은 외부 유도 에너지원에 의해 소거 또는 녹는 퇴적 금속 분말을 포함합니다.

그러나 이러한 방법은 비용과 복잡성, 즉 3D 프린팅 공정에 앞서 금속을 분쇄해야 한다는 점에서 일정한 단점이 있을 수 있습니다.

이 프레젠테이션에서는 자기 유압 역학 원리를 기반으로 하는 금속 적층 제조의 근본적으로 다른 접근 방식을 제안합니다. 이 방법은 스풀링된 고체 금속 와이어를 인쇄 헤드에 공급하고 노즐에서 업스트림을 예열하여 노즐 챔버에 공급되는 액체 금속 저장소를 형성하는 것입니다. 챔버가 채워지면 액체 금속 내에서 과도 전류를 유도하는 펄스 자기장이 인가됩니다. 유도 전류가 인가된 필드에 결합되어 로렌츠 힘 밀도를 생성하여, 인가된 압력에 따라 속도가 달라지는 용융 금속 방울을 배출하는 작용을 하는 챔버 내의 유사 압력을 제공합니다.

방울은 냉각된 기질에 투영되어 고체 덩어리를 형성합니다. 3D 솔리드 구조를 패터닝으로 인쇄할 수 있습니다. 방울의 침적과 방울의 현명한 응고입니다. 이 유망한 신기술은 낮은 재료 비용, 높은 제조율 및 매력적인 재료 특성 때문에 적층 제조 애플리케이션에 광범위한 영향을 미칠 수 있습니다.

현재 작업에서는 새로운 3D 인쇄 시스템을 도입하고 기기 개발의 진보를 설명하고 샘플 인쇄 구조를 시연합니다. 또한 드롭 생성-배출 메커니즘에 대해 설명하고 인쇄 성능을 예측하기 위한 일련의 새로운 컴퓨팅 모델을 제시합니다.

자세한 내용은 본문을 참고하시기 바랍니다.

FLOW-3D CAST Bibliography

FLOW-3D CAST bibliography

아래는 FSI의 금속 주조 참고 문헌에 수록된 기술 논문 모음입니다. 이 모든 논문에는 FLOW-3D CAST 해석 결과가 수록되어 있습니다. FLOW-3D CAST를 사용하여 금속 주조 산업의 응용 프로그램을 성공적으로 시뮬레이션하는 방법에 대해 자세히 알아보십시오.

Below is a collection of technical papers in our Metal Casting Bibliography. All of these papers feature FLOW-3D CAST results. Learn more about how FLOW-3D CAST can be used to successfully simulate applications for the Metal Casting Industry.

33-20     Eric Riedel, Martin Liepe Stefan Scharf, Simulation of ultrasonic induced cavitation and acoustic streaming in liquid and solidifying aluminum, Metals, 10.4; 476, 2020. doi.org/10.3390/met10040476

20-20   Wu Yue, Li Zhuo and Lu Rong, Simulation and visual tester verification of solid propellant slurry vacuum plate casting, Propellants, Explosives, Pyrotechnics, 2020. doi.org/10.1002/prep.201900411

17-20   C.A. Jones, M.R. Jolly, A.E.W. Jarfors and M. Irwin, An experimental characterization of thermophysical properties of a porous ceramic shell used in the investment casting process, Supplimental Proceedings, pp. 1095-1105, TMS 2020 149th Annual Meeting and Exhibition, San Diego, CA, February 23-27, 2020. doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-36296-6_102

12-20   Franz Josef Feikus, Paul Bernsteiner, Ricardo Fernández Gutiérrez and Michal Luszczak , Further development of electric motor housings, MTZ Worldwide, 81, pp. 38-43, 2020. doi.org/10.1007/s38313-019-0176-z

09-20   Mingfan Qi, Yonglin Kang, Yuzhao Xu, Zhumabieke Wulabieke and Jingyuan Li, A novel rheological high pressure die-casting process for preparing large thin-walled Al–Si–Fe–Mg–Sr alloy with high heat conductivity, high plasticity and medium strength, Materials Science and Engineering: A, 776, art. no. 139040, 2020. doi.org/10.1016/j.msea.2020.139040

07-20   Stefan Heugenhauser, Erhard Kaschnitz and Peter Schumacher, Development of an aluminum compound casting process – Experiments and numerical simulations, Journal of Materials Processing Technology, 279, art. no. 116578, 2020. doi.org/10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2019.116578

05-20   Michail Papanikolaou, Emanuele Pagone, Mark Jolly and Konstantinos Salonitis, Numerical simulation and evaluation of Campbell running and gating systems, Metals, 10.1, art. no. 68, 2020. doi.org/10.3390/met10010068

102-19   Ferencz Peti and Gabriela Strnad, The effect of squeeze pin dimension and operational parameters on material homogeneity of aluminium high pressure die cast parts, Acta Marisiensis. Seria Technologica, 16.2, 2019. doi.org/0.2478/amset-2019-0010

94-19   E. Riedel, I. Horn, N. Stein, H. Stein, R. Bahr, and S. Scharf, Ultrasonic treatment: a clean technology that supports sustainability incasting processes, Procedia, 26th CIRP Life Cycle Engineering (LCE) Conference, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA, May 7-9, 2019. 

93-19   Adrian V. Catalina, Liping Xue, Charles A. Monroe, Robin D. Foley, and John A. Griffin, Modeling and Simulation of Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of AlSi- and AlCu-based Alloys, Transactions, 123rd Metalcasting Congress, Atlanta, GA, USA, April 27-30, 2019. 

84-19   Arun Prabhakar, Michail Papanikolaou, Konstantinos Salonitis, and Mark Jolly, Sand casting of sheet lead: numerical simulation of metal flow and solidification, The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, pp. 1-13, 2019. doi.org/10.1007/s00170-019-04522-3

72-19   Santosh Reddy Sama, Eric Macdonald, Robert Voigt, and Guha Manogharan, Measurement of metal velocity in sand casting during mold filling, Metals, 9:1079, 2019. doi.org/10.3390/met9101079

71-19   Sebastian Findeisen, Robin Van Der Auwera, Michael Heuser, and Franz-Josef Wöstmann, Gießtechnische Fertigung von E-Motorengehäusen mit interner Kühling (Casting production of electric motor housings with internal cooling), Geisserei, 106, pp. 72-78, 2019 (in German).

58-19     Von Malte Leonhard, Matthias Todte, and Jörg Schäffer, Realistic simulation of the combustion of exothermic feeders, Casting, No. 2, pp. 28-32, 2019. In English and German.

52-19     S. Lakkum and P. Kowitwarangkul, Numerical investigations on the effect of gas flow rate in the gas stirred ladle with dual plugs, International Conference on Materials Research and Innovation (ICMARI), Bangkok, Thailand, December 17-21, 2018. IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering, Vol. 526, 2019. doi.org/10.1088/1757-899X/526/1/012028

47-19     Bing Zhou, Shuai Lu, Kaile Xu, Chun Xu, and Zhanyong Wang, Microstructure and simulation of semisolid aluminum alloy castings in the process of stirring integrated transfer-heat (SIT) with water cooling, International Journal of Metalcasting, Online edition, pp. 1-13, 2019. doi.org/10.1007/s40962-019-00357-6

31-19     Zihao Yuan, Zhipeng Guo, and S.M. Xiong, Skin layer of A380 aluminium alloy die castings and its blistering during solution treatment, Journal of Materials Science & Technology, Vol. 35, No. 9, pp. 1906-1916, 2019. doi.org/10.1016/j.jmst.2019.05.011

25-19     Stefano Mascetti, Raul Pirovano, and Giulio Timelli, Interazione metallo liquido/stampo: Il fenomeno della metallizzazione, La Metallurgia Italiana, No. 4, pp. 44-50, 2019. In Italian.

20-19     Fu-Yuan Hsu, Campbellology for runner system design, Shape Casting: The Minerals, Metals & Materials Series, pp. 187-199, 2019. doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-06034-3_19

19-19     Chengcheng Lyu, Michail Papanikolaou, and Mark Jolly, Numerical process modelling and simulation of Campbell running systems designs, Shape Casting: The Minerals, Metals & Materials Series, pp. 53-64, 2019. doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-06034-3_5

18-19     Adrian V. Catalina, Liping Xue, and Charles Monroe, A solidification model with application to AlSi-based alloys, Shape Casting: The Minerals, Metals & Materials Series, pp. 201-213, 2019. doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-06034-3_20

17-19     Fu-Yuan Hsu and Yu-Hung Chen, The validation of feeder modeling for ductile iron castings, Shape Casting: The Minerals, Metals & Materials Series, pp. 227-238, 2019. doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-06034-3_22

04-19   Santosh Reddy Sama, Tony Badamo, Paul Lynch and Guha Manogharan, Novel sprue designs in metal casting via 3D sand-printing, Additive Manufacturing, Vol. 25, pp. 563-578, 2019. doi.org/10.1016/j.addma.2018.12.009

02-19   Jingying Sun, Qichi Le, Li Fu, Jing Bai, Johannes Tretter, Klaus Herbold and Hongwei Huo, Gas entrainment behavior of aluminum alloy engine crankcases during the low-pressure-die-casting-process, Journal of Materials Processing Technology, Vol. 266, pp. 274-282, 2019. doi.org/10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2018.11.016

92-18   Fast, Flexible… More Versatile, Foundry Management Technology, March, 2018. 

82-18   Xu Zhao, Ping Wang, Tao Li, Bo-yu Zhang, Peng Wang, Guan-zhou Wang and Shi-qi Lu, Gating system optimization of high pressure die casting thin-wall AlSi10MnMg longitudinal loadbearing beam based on numerical simulation, China Foundry, Vol. 15, no. 6, pp. 436-442, 2018. doi: 10.1007/s41230-018-8052-z

80-18   Michail Papanikolaou, Emanuele Pagone, Konstantinos Salonitis, Mark Jolly and Charalampos Makatsoris, A computational framework towards energy efficient casting processes, Sustainable Design and Manufacturing 2018: Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Sustainable Design and Manufacturing (KES-SDM-18), Gold Coast, Australia, June 24-26 2018, SIST 130, pp. 263-276, 2019. doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-04290-5_27

64-18   Vasilios Fourlakidis, Ilia Belov and Attila Diószegi, Strength prediction for pearlitic lamellar graphite iron: Model validation, Metals, Vol. 8, No. 9, 2018. doi.org/10.3390/met8090684

51-18   Xue-feng Zhu, Bao-yi Yu, Li Zheng, Bo-ning Yu, Qiang Li, Shu-ning Lü and Hao Zhang, Influence of pouring methods on filling process, microstructure and mechanical properties of AZ91 Mg alloy pipe by horizontal centrifugal casting, China Foundry, vol. 15, no. 3, pp.196-202, 2018. doi.org/10.1007/s41230-018-7256-6

47-18   Santosh Reddy Sama, Jiayi Wang and Guha Manogharan, Non-conventional mold design for metal casting using 3D sand-printing, Journal of Manufacturing Processes, vol. 34-B, pp. 765-775, 2018. doi.org/10.1016/j.jmapro.2018.03.049

42-18   M. Koru and O. Serçe, The Effects of Thermal and Dynamical Parameters and Vacuum Application on Porosity in High-Pressure Die Casting of A383 Al-Alloy, International Journal of Metalcasting, pp. 1-17, 2018. doi.org/10.1007/s40962-018-0214-7

41-18   Abhilash Viswanath, S. Savithri, U.T.S. Pillai, Similitude analysis on flow characteristics of water, A356 and AM50 alloys during LPC process, Journal of Materials Processing Technology, vol. 257, pp. 270-277, 2018. doi.org/10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2018.02.031

29-18   Seyboldt, Christoph and Liewald, Mathias, Investigation on thixojoining to produce hybrid components with intermetallic phase, AIP Conference Proceedings, vol. 1960, no. 1, 2018. doi.org/10.1063/1.5034992

28-18   Laura Schomer, Mathias Liewald and Kim Rouven Riedmüller, Simulation of the infiltration process of a ceramic open-pore body with a metal alloy in semi-solid state to design the manufacturing of interpenetrating phase composites, AIP Conference Proceedings, vol. 1960, no. 1, 2018. doi.org/10.1063/1.5034991

41-17   Y. N. Wu et al., Numerical Simulation on Filling Optimization of Copper Rotor for High Efficient Electric Motors in Die Casting Process, Materials Science Forum, Vol. 898, pp. 1163-1170, 2017.

12-17   A.M.  Zarubin and O.A. Zarubina, Controlling the flow rate of melt in gravity die casting of aluminum alloys, Liteynoe Proizvodstvo (Casting Manufacturing), pp 16-20, 6, 2017. In Russian.

10-17   A.Y. Korotchenko, Y.V. Golenkov, M.V. Tverskoy and D.E. Khilkov, Simulation of the Flow of Metal Mixtures in the Mold, Liteynoe Proizvodstvo (Casting Manufacturing), pp 18-22, 5, 2017. In Russian.

08-17   Morteza Morakabian Esfahani, Esmaeil Hajjari, Ali Farzadi and Seyed Reza Alavi Zaree, Prediction of the contact time through modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow in compound casting process of Al/Mg light metals, Journal of Materials Research, © Materials Research Society 2017

04-17   Huihui Liu, Xiongwei He and Peng Guo, Numerical simulation on semi-solid die-casting of magnesium matrix composite based on orthogonal experiment, AIP Conference Proceedings 1829, 020037 (2017); doi.org/10.1063/1.4979769.

100-16  Robert Watson, New numerical techniques to quantify and predict the effect of entrainment defects, applied to high pressure die casting, PhD Thesis: University of Birmingham, 2016.

88-16   M.C. Carter, T. Kauffung, L. Weyenberg and C. Peters, Low Pressure Die Casting Simulation Discovery through Short Shot, Cast Expo & Metal Casting Congress, April 16-19, 2016, Minneapolis, MN, Copyright 2016 American Foundry Society.

61-16   M. Koru and O. Serçe, Experimental and numerical determination of casting mold interfacial heat transfer coefficient in the high pressure die casting of a 360 aluminum alloy, ACTA PHYSICA POLONICA A, Vol. 129 (2016)

59-16   R. Pirovano and S. Mascetti, Tracking of collapsed bubbles during a filling simulation, La Metallurgia Italiana – n. 6 2016

43-16   Kevin Lee, Understanding shell cracking during de-wax process in investment casting, Ph.D Thesis: University of Birmingham, School of Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, 2016.

35-16   Konstantinos Salonitis, Mark Jolly, Binxu Zeng, and Hamid Mehrabi, Improvements in energy consumption and environmental impact by novel single shot melting process for casting, Journal of Cleaner Production, doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2016.06.165, Open Access funded by Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, June 29, 2016

20-16   Fu-Yuan Hsu, Bifilm Defect Formation in Hydraulic Jump of Liquid Aluminum, Metallurgical and Materials Transactions B, 2016, Band: 47, Heft 3, 1634-1648.

15-16   Mingfan Qia, Yonglin Kanga, Bing Zhoua, Wanneng Liaoa, Guoming Zhua, Yangde Lib,and Weirong Li, A forced convection stirring process for Rheo-HPDC aluminum and magnesium alloys, Journal of Materials Processing Technology 234 (2016) 353–367

112-15   José Miguel Gonçalves Ledo Belo da Costa, Optimization of filling systems for low pressure by FLOW-3D, Dissertação de mestrado integrado em Engenharia Mecânica, 2015.

89-15   B.W. Zhu, L.X. Li, X. Liu, L.Q. Zhang and R. Xu, Effect of Viscosity Measurement Method to Simulate High Pressure Die Casting of Thin-Wall AlSi10MnMg Alloy Castings, Journal of Materials Engineering and Performance, Published online, November 2015, doi.org/10.1007/s11665-015-1783-8, © ASM International.

88-15   Peng Zhang, Zhenming Li, Baoliang Liu, Wenjiang Ding and Liming Peng, Improved tensile properties of a new aluminum alloy for high pressure die casting, Materials Science & Engineering A651(2016)376–390, Available online, November 2015.

83-15   Zu-Qi Hu, Xin-Jian Zhang and Shu-Sen Wu, Microstructure, Mechanical Properties and Die-Filling Behavior of High-Performance Die-Cast Al–Mg–Si–Mn Alloy, Acta Metall. Sin. (Engl. Lett.), doi.org/10.1007/s40195-015-0332-7, © The Chinese Society for Metals and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015.

82-15   J. Müller, L. Xue, M.C. Carter, C. Thoma, M. Fehlbier and M. Todte, A Die Spray Cooling Model for Thermal Die Cycling Simulations, 2015 Die Casting Congress & Exposition, Indianapolis, IN, October 2015

81-15   M. T. Murray, L.F. Hansen, L. Chilcott, E. Li and A.M. Murray, Case Studies in the Use of Simulation- Improved Yield and Reduced Time to Market, 2015 Die Casting Congress & Exposition, Indianapolis, IN, October 2015

80-15   R. Bhola, S. Chandra and D. Souders, Predicting Castability of Thin-Walled Parts for the HPDC Process Using Simulations, 2015 Die Casting Congress & Exposition, Indianapolis, IN, October 2015

76-15   Prosenjit Das, Sudip K. Samanta, Shashank Tiwari and Pradip Dutta, Die Filling Behaviour of Semi Solid A356 Al Alloy Slurry During Rheo Pressure Die Casting, Transactions of the Indian Institute of Metals, pp 1-6, October 2015

74-15   Murat KORU and Orhan SERÇE, Yüksek Basınçlı Döküm Prosesinde Enjeksiyon Parametrelerine Bağlı Olarak Döküm Simülasyon, Cumhuriyet University Faculty of Science, Science Journal (CSJ), Vol. 36, No: 5 (2015) ISSN: 1300-1949, May 2015

69-15   A. Viswanath, S. Sivaraman, U. T. S. Pillai, Computer Simulation of Low Pressure Casting Process Using FLOW-3D, Materials Science Forum, Vols. 830-831, pp. 45-48, September 2015

68-15   J. Aneesh Kumar, K. Krishnakumar and S. Savithri, Computer Simulation of Centrifugal Casting Process Using FLOW-3D, Materials Science Forum, Vols. 830-831, pp. 53-56, September 2015

59-15   F. Hosseini Yekta and S. A. Sadough Vanini, Simulation of the flow of semi-solid steel alloy using an enhanced model, Metals and Materials International, August 2015.

44-15   Ulrich E. Klotz, Tiziana Heiss and Dario Tiberto, Platinum investment casting material properties, casting simulation and optimum process parameters, Jewelry Technology Forum 2015

41-15   M. Barkhudarov and R. Pirovano, Minimizing Air Entrainment in High Pressure Die Casting Shot Sleeves, GIFA 2015, Düsseldorf, Germany

40-15   M. Todte, A. Fent, and H. Lang, Simulation in support of the development of innovative processes in the casting industry, GIFA 2015, Düsseldorf, Germany

19-15   Bruce Morey, Virtual casting improves powertrain design, Automotive Engineering, SAE International, March 2015.

15-15   K.S. Oh, J.D. Lee, S.J. Kim and J.Y. Choi, Development of a large ingot continuous caster, Metall. Res. Technol. 112, 203 (2015) © EDP Sciences, 2015, doi.org/10.1051/metal/2015006, www.metallurgical-research.org

14-15   Tiziana Heiss, Ulrich E. Klotz and Dario Tiberto, Platinum Investment Casting, Part I: Simulation and Experimental Study of the Casting Process, Johnson Matthey Technol. Rev., 2015, 59, (2), 95, doi.org/10.1595/205651315×687399

138-14 Christopher Thoma, Wolfram Volk, Ruben Heid, Klaus Dilger, Gregor Banner and Harald Eibisch, Simulation-based prediction of the fracture elongation as a failure criterion for thin-walled high-pressure die casting components, International Journal of Metalcasting, Vol. 8, No. 4, pp. 47-54, 2014. doi.org/10.1007/BF03355594

107-14  Mehran Seyed Ahmadi, Dissolution of Si in Molten Al with Gas Injection, ProQuest Dissertations And Theses; Thesis (Ph.D.), University of Toronto (Canada), 2014; Publication Number: AAT 3637106; ISBN: 9781321195231; Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 76-02(E), Section: B.; 191 p.

99-14   R. Bhola and S. Chandra, Predicting Castability for Thin-Walled HPDC Parts, Foundry Management Technology, December 2014

92-14   Warren Bishenden and Changhua Huang, Venting design and process optimization of die casting process for structural components; Part II: Venting design and process optimization, Die Casting Engineer, November 2014

90-14   Ken’ichi Kanazawa, Ken’ichi Yano, Jun’ichi Ogura, and Yasunori Nemoto, Optimum Runner Design for Die-Casting using CFD Simulations and Verification with Water-Model Experiments, Proceedings of the ASME 2014 International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE2014, November 14-20, 2014, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, IMECE2014-37419

89-14   P. Kapranos, C. Carney, A. Pola, and M. Jolly, Advanced Casting Methodologies: Investment Casting, Centrifugal Casting, Squeeze Casting, Metal Spinning, and Batch Casting, In Comprehensive Materials Processing; McGeough, J., Ed.; 2014, Elsevier Ltd., 2014; Vol. 5, pp 39–67.

77-14   Andrei Y. Korotchenko, Development of Scientific and Technological Approaches to Casting Net-Shaped Castings in Sand Molds Free of Shrinkage Defects and Hot Tears, Post-doctoral thesis: Russian State Technological University, 2014. In Russian.

69-14   L. Xue, M.C. Carter, A.V. Catalina, Z. Lin, C. Li, and C. Qiu, Predicting, Preventing Core Gas Defects in Steel Castings, Modern Casting, September 2014

68-14   L. Xue, M.C. Carter, A.V. Catalina, Z. Lin, C. Li, and C. Qiu, Numerical Simulation of Core Gas Defects in Steel Castings, Copyright 2014 American Foundry Society, 118th Metalcasting Congress, April 8 – 11, 2014, Schaumburg, IL

51-14   Jesus M. Blanco, Primitivo Carranza, Rafael Pintos, Pedro Arriaga, and Lakhdar Remaki, Identification of Defects Originated during the Filling of Cast Pieces through Particles Modelling, 11th World Congress on Computational Mechanics (WCCM XI), 5th European Conference on Computational Mechanics (ECCM V), 6th European Conference on Computational Fluid Dynamics (ECFD VI), E. Oñate, J. Oliver and A. Huerta (Eds)

47-14   B. Vijaya Ramnatha, C.Elanchezhiana, Vishal Chandrasekhar, A. Arun Kumarb, S. Mohamed Asif, G. Riyaz Mohamed, D. Vinodh Raj , C .Suresh Kumar, Analysis and Optimization of Gating System for Commutator End Bracket, Procedia Materials Science 6 ( 2014 ) 1312 – 1328, 3rd International Conference on Materials Processing and Characterisation (ICMPC 2014)

42-14  Bing Zhou, Yong-lin Kang, Guo-ming Zhu, Jun-zhen Gao, Ming-fan Qi, and Huan-huan Zhang, Forced convection rheoforming process for preparation of 7075 aluminum alloy semisolid slurry and its numerical simulation, Trans. Nonferrous Met. Soc. China 24(2014) 1109−1116

37-14    A. Karwinski, W. Lesniewski, P. Wieliczko, and M. Malysza, Casting of Titanium Alloys in Centrifugal Induction Furnaces, Archives of Metallurgy and Materials, Volume 59, Issue 1, doi.org/10.2478/amm-2014-0068, 2014.

26-14    Bing Zhou, Yonglin Kang, Mingfan Qi, Huanhuan Zhang and Guoming ZhuR-HPDC Process with Forced Convection Mixing Device for Automotive Part of A380 Aluminum Alloy, Materials 2014, 7, 3084-3105; doi.org/10.3390/ma7043084

20-14  Johannes Hartmann, Tobias Fiegl, Carolin Körner, Aluminum integral foams with tailored density profile by adapted blowing agents, Applied Physics A, doi.org/10.1007/s00339-014-8377-4, March 2014.

19-14    A.Y. Korotchenko, N.A. Nikiforova, E.D. Demjanov, N.C. Larichev, The Influence of the Filling Conditions on the Service Properties of the Part Side Frame, Russian Foundryman, 1 (January), pp 40-43, 2014. In Russian.

11-14 B. Fuchs and C. Körner, Mesh resolution consideration for the viability prediction of lost salt cores in the high pressure die casting process, Progress in Computational Fluid Dynamics, Vol. 14, No. 1, 2014, Copyright © 2014 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.

08-14 FY Hsu, SW Wang, and HJ Lin, The External and Internal Shrinkages in Aluminum Gravity Castings, Shape Casting: 5th International Symposium 2014. Available online at Google Books

103-13  B. Fuchs, H. Eibisch and C. Körner, Core Viability Simulation for Salt Core Technology in High-Pressure Die Casting, International Journal of Metalcasting, July 2013, Volume 7, Issue 3, pp 39–45

94-13    Randall S. Fielding, J. Crapps, C. Unal, and J.R.Kennedy, Metallic Fuel Casting Development and Parameter Optimization Simulations, International Conference on Fast reators and Related Fuel Cycles (FR13), 4-7 March 2013, Paris France

90-13  A. Karwińskia, M. Małyszaa, A. Tchórza, A. Gila, B. Lipowska, Integration of Computer Tomography and Simulation Analysis in Evaluation of Quality of Ceramic-Carbon Bonded Foam Filter, Archives of Foundry Engineering, doi.org/10.2478/afe-2013-0084, Published quarterly as the organ of the Foundry Commission of the Polish Academy of Sciences, ISSN, (2299-2944), Volume 13, Issue 4/2013

88-13  Litie and Metallurgia (Casting and Metallurgy), 3 (72), 2013, N.V.Sletova, I.N.Volnov, S.P.Zadrutsky, V.A.Chaikin, Modeling of the Process of Removing Non-metallic Inclusions in Aluminum Alloys Using the FLOW-3D program, pp 138-140. In Russian.

85-13    Michał Szucki,Tomasz Goraj, Janusz Lelito, Józef S. Suchy, Numerical Analysis of Solid Particles Flow in Liquid Metal, XXXVII International Scientific Conference Foundryman’ Day 2013, Krakow, 28-29 November 2013

84-13  Körner, C., Schwankl, M., Himmler, D., Aluminum-Aluminum compound castings by electroless deposited zinc layers, Journal of Materials Processing Technology (2014), doi.org/10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2013.12.01483-13.

77-13  Antonio Armillotta & Raffaello Baraggi & Simone Fasoli, SLM tooling for die casting with conformal cooling channels, The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, doi.org/10.1007/s00170-013-5523-7, December 2013.

64-13   Johannes Hartmann, Christina Blümel, Stefan Ernst, Tobias Fiegl, Karl-Ernst Wirth, Carolin Körner, Aluminum integral foam castings with microcellular cores by nano-functionalization, J Mater Sci, doi.org/10.1007/s10853-013-7668-z, September 2013.

46-13  Nicholas P. Orenstein, 3D Flow and Temperature Analysis of Filling a Plutonium Mold, LA-UR-13-25537, Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Los Alamos Annual Student Symposium 2013, 2013-07-24 (Rev.1)

42-13   Yang Yue, William D. Griffiths, and Nick R. Green, Modelling of the Effects of Entrainment Defects on Mechanical Properties in a Cast Al-Si-Mg Alloy, Materials Science Forum, 765, 225, 2013.

39-13  J. Crapps, D.S. DeCroix, J.D Galloway, D.A. Korzekwa, R. Aikin, R. Fielding, R. Kennedy, C. Unal, Separate effects identification via casting process modeling for experimental measurement of U-Pu-Zr alloys, Journal of Nuclear Materials, 15 July 2013.

35-13   A. Pari, Real Life Problem Solving through Simulations in the Die Casting Industry – Case Studies, © Die Casting Engineer, July 2013.

34-13  Martin Lagler, Use of Simulation to Predict the Viability of Salt Cores in the HPDC Process – Shot Curve as a Decisive Criterion, © Die Casting Engineer, July 2013.

24-13    I.N.Volnov, Optimizatsia Liteynoi Tekhnologii, (Casting Technology Optimization), Liteyshik Rossii (Russian Foundryman), 3, 2013, 27-29. In Russian

23-13  M.R. Barkhudarov, I.N. Volnov, Minimizatsia Zakhvata Vozdukha v Kamere Pressovania pri Litie pod Davleniem, (Minimization of Air Entrainment in the Shot Sleeve During High Pressure Die Casting), Liteyshik Rossii (Russian Foundryman), 3, 2013, 30-34. In Russian

09-13  M.C. Carter and L. Xue, Simulating the Parameters that Affect Core Gas Defects in Metal Castings, Copyright 2012 American Foundry Society, Presented at the 2013 CastExpo, St. Louis, Missouri, April 2013

08-13  C. Reilly, N.R. Green, M.R. Jolly, J.-C. Gebelin, The Modelling Of Oxide Film Entrainment In Casting Systems Using Computational Modelling, Applied Mathematical Modelling, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apm.2013.03.061, April 2013.

03-13  Alexandre Reikher and Krishna M. Pillai, A fast simulation of transient metal flow and solidification in a narrow channel. Part II. Model validation and parametric study, Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer (2013), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2012.12.061.

02-13  Alexandre Reikher and Krishna M. Pillai, A fast simulation of transient metal flow and solidification in a narrow channel. Part I: Model development using lubrication approximation, Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer (2013), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2012.12.060.

116-12  Jufu Jianga, Ying Wang, Gang Chena, Jun Liua, Yuanfa Li and Shoujing Luo, “Comparison of mechanical properties and microstructure of AZ91D alloy motorcycle wheels formed by die casting and double control forming, Materials & Design, Volume 40, September 2012, Pages 541-549.

107-12  F.K. Arslan, A.H. Hatman, S.Ö. Ertürk, E. Güner, B. Güner, An Evaluation for Fundamentals of Die Casting Materials Selection and Design, IMMC’16 International Metallurgy & Materials Congress, Istanbul, Turkey, 2012.

103-12 WU Shu-sen, ZHONG Gu, AN Ping, WAN Li, H. NAKAE, Microstructural characteristics of Al−20Si−2Cu−0.4Mg−1Ni alloy formed by rheo-squeeze casting after ultrasonic vibration treatment, Transactions of Nonferrous Metals Society of China, 22 (2012) 2863-2870, November 2012. Full paper available online.

109-12 Alexandre Reikher, Numerical Analysis of Die-Casting Process in Thin Cavities Using Lubrication Approximation, Ph.D. Thesis: The University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, Engineering Department (2012) Theses and Dissertations. Paper 65.

97-12 Hong Zhou and Li Heng Luo, Filling Pattern of Step Gating System in Lost Foam Casting Process and its Application, Advanced Materials Research, Volumes 602-604, Progress in Materials and Processes, 1916-1921, December 2012.

93-12  Liangchi Zhang, Chunliang Zhang, Jeng-Haur Horng and Zichen Chen, Functions of Step Gating System in the Lost Foam Casting Process, Advanced Materials Research, 591-593, 940, DOI: 10.4028/www.scientific.net/AMR.591-593.940, November 2012.

91-12  Hong Yan, Jian Bin Zhu, Ping Shan, Numerical Simulation on Rheo-Diecasting of Magnesium Matrix Composites, 10.4028/www.scientific.net/SSP.192-193.287, Solid State Phenomena, 192-193, 287.

89-12  Alexandre Reikher and Krishna M. Pillai, A Fast Numerical Simulation for Modeling Simultaneous Metal Flow and Solidification in Thin Cavities Using the Lubrication Approximation, Numerical Heat Transfer, Part A: Applications: An International Journal of Computation and Methodology, 63:2, 75-100, November 2012.

82-12  Jufu Jiang, Gang Chen, Ying Wang, Zhiming Du, Weiwei Shan, and Yuanfa Li, Microstructure and mechanical properties of thin-wall and high-rib parts of AM60B Mg alloy formed by double control forming and die casting under the optimal conditions, Journal of Alloys and Compounds, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jallcom.2012.10.086, October 2012.

78-12   A. Pari, Real Life Problem Solving through Simulations in the Die Casting Industry – Case Studies, 2012 Die Casting Congress & Exposition, © NADCA, October 8-10, 2012, Indianapolis, IN.

77-12  Y. Wang, K. Kabiri-Bamoradian and R.A. Miller, Rheological behavior models of metal matrix alloys in semi-solid casting process, 2012 Die Casting Congress & Exposition, © NADCA, October 8-10, 2012, Indianapolis, IN.

76-12  A. Reikher and H. Gerber, Analysis of Solidification Parameters During the Die Cast Process, 2012 Die Casting Congress & Exposition, © NADCA, October 8-10, 2012, Indianapolis, IN.

75-12 R.A. Miller, Y. Wang and K. Kabiri-Bamoradian, Estimating Cavity Fill Time, 2012 Die Casting Congress & Exposition, © NADCA, October 8-10, 2012Indianapolis, IN.

65-12  X.H. Yang, T.J. Lu, T. Kim, Influence of non-conducting pore inclusions on phase change behavior of porous media with constant heat flux boundaryInternational Journal of Thermal Sciences, Available online 10 October 2012. Available online at SciVerse.

55-12  Hejun Li, Pengyun Wang, Lehua Qi, Hansong Zuo, Songyi Zhong, Xianghui Hou, 3D numerical simulation of successive deposition of uniform molten Al droplets on a moving substrate and experimental validation, Computational Materials Science, Volume 65, December 2012, Pages 291–301.

52-12 Hongbing Ji, Yixin Chen and Shengzhou Chen, Numerical Simulation of Inner-Outer Couple Cooling Slab Continuous Casting in the Filling Process, Advanced Materials Research (Volumes 557-559), Advanced Materials and Processes II, pp. 2257-2260, July 2012.

47-12    Petri Väyrynen, Lauri Holappa, and Seppo Louhenkilpi, Simulation of Melting of Alloying Materials in Steel Ladle, SCANMET IV – 4th International Conference on Process Development in Iron and Steelmaking, Lulea, Sweden, June 10-13, 2012.

46-12  Bin Zhang and Dave Salee, Metal Flow and Heat Transfer in Billet DC Casting Using Wagstaff® Optifill™ Metal Distribution Systems, 5th International Metal Quality Workshop, United Arab Emirates Dubai, March 18-22, 2012.

45-12 D.R. Gunasegaram, M. Givord, R.G. O’Donnell and B.R. Finnin, Improvements engineered in UTS and elongation of aluminum alloy high pressure die castings through the alteration of runner geometry and plunger velocity, Materials Science & Engineering.

44-12    Antoni Drys and Stefano Mascetti, Aluminum Casting Simulations, Desktop Engineering, September 2012

42-12   Huizhen Duan, Jiangnan Shen and Yanping Li, Comparative analysis of HPDC process of an auto part with ProCAST and FLOW-3D, Applied Mechanics and Materials Vols. 184-185 (2012) pp 90-94, Online available since 2012/Jun/14 at www.scientific.net, © (2012) Trans Tech Publications, Switzerland, doi:10.4028/www.scientific.net/AMM.184-185.90.

41-12    Deniece R. Korzekwa, Cameron M. Knapp, David A. Korzekwa, and John W. Gibbs, Co-Design – Fabrication of Unalloyed Plutonium, LA-UR-12-23441, MDI Summer Research Group Workshop Advanced Manufacturing, 2012-07-25/2012-07-26 (Los Alamos, New Mexico, United States)

29-12  Dario Tiberto and Ulrich E. Klotz, Computer simulation applied to jewellery casting: challenges, results and future possibilities, IOP Conf. Ser.: Mater. Sci. Eng.33 012008. Full paper available at IOP.

28-12  Y Yue and N R Green, Modelling of different entrainment mechanisms and their influences on the mechanical reliability of Al-Si castings, 2012 IOP Conf. Ser.: Mater. Sci. Eng. 33,012072.Full paper available at IOP.

27-12  E Kaschnitz, Numerical simulation of centrifugal casting of pipes, 2012 IOP Conf. Ser.: Mater. Sci. Eng. 33 012031, Issue 1. Full paper available at IOP.

15-12  C. Reilly, N.R Green, M.R. Jolly, The Present State Of Modeling Entrainment Defects In The Shape Casting Process, Applied Mathematical Modelling, Available online 27 April 2012, ISSN 0307-904X, 10.1016/j.apm.2012.04.032.

12-12   Andrei Starobin, Tony Hirt, Hubert Lang, and Matthias Todte, Core drying simulation and validation, International Foundry Research, GIESSEREIFORSCHUNG 64 (2012) No. 1, ISSN 0046-5933, pp 2-5

10-12  H. Vladimir Martínez and Marco F. Valencia (2012). Semisolid Processing of Al/β-SiC Composites by Mechanical Stirring Casting and High Pressure Die Casting, Recent Researches in Metallurgical Engineering – From Extraction to Forming, Dr Mohammad Nusheh (Ed.), ISBN: 978-953-51-0356-1, InTech

07-12     Amir H. G. Isfahani and James M. Brethour, Simulating Thermal Stresses and Cooling Deformations, Die Casting Engineer, March 2012

06-12   Shuisheng Xie, Youfeng He and Xujun Mi, Study on Semi-solid Magnesium Alloys Slurry Preparation and Continuous Roll-casting Process, Magnesium Alloys – Design, Processing and Properties, ISBN: 978-953-307-520-4, InTech.

04-12 J. Spangenberg, N. Roussel, J.H. Hattel, H. Stang, J. Skocek, M.R. Geiker, Flow induced particle migration in fresh concrete: Theoretical frame, numerical simulations and experimental results on model fluids, Cement and Concrete Research, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cemconres.2012.01.007, February 2012.

01-12   Lee, B., Baek, U., and Han, J., Optimization of Gating System Design for Die Casting of Thin Magnesium Alloy-Based Multi-Cavity LCD Housings, Journal of Materials Engineering and Performance, Springer New York, Issn: 1059-9495, 10.1007/s11665-011-0111-1, Volume 1 / 1992 – Volume 21 / 2012. Available online at Springer Link.

104-11  Fu-Yuan Hsu and Huey Jiuan Lin, Foam Filters Used in Gravity Casting, Metall and Materi Trans B (2011) 42: 1110. doi:10.1007/s11663-011-9548-8.

99-11    Eduardo Trejo, Centrifugal Casting of an Aluminium Alloy, thesis: Doctor of Philosophy, Metallurgy and Materials School of Engineering University of Birmingham, October 2011. Full paper available upon request.

93-11  Olga Kononova, Andrejs Krasnikovs ,Videvuds Lapsa,Jurijs Kalinka and Angelina Galushchak, Internal Structure Formation in High Strength Fiber Concrete during Casting, World Academy of Science, Engineering and Technology 59 2011

76-11  J. Hartmann, A. Trepper, and C. Körner, Aluminum Integral Foams with Near-Microcellular Structure, Advanced Engineering Materials 2011, Volume 13 (2011) No. 11, © Wiley-VCH

71-11  Fu-Yuan Hsu and Yao-Ming Yang Confluence Weld in an Aluminum Gravity Casting, Journal of Materials Processing Technology, Available online 23 November 2011, ISSN 0924-0136, 10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2011.11.006.

65-11     V.A. Chaikin, A.V. Chaikin, I.N.Volnov, A Study of the Process of Late Modification Using Simulation, in Zagotovitelnye Proizvodstva v Mashinostroenii, 10, 2011, 8-12. In Russian.

54-11  Ngadia Taha Niane and Jean-Pierre Michalet, Validation of Foundry Process for Aluminum Parts with FLOW-3D Software, Proceedings of the 2011 International Symposium on Liquid Metal Processing and Casting, 2011.

51-11    A. Reikher and H. Gerber, Calculation of the Die Cast parameters of the Thin Wall Aluminum Cast Part, 2011 Die Casting Congress & Tabletop, Columbus, OH, September 19-21, 2011

50-11   Y. Wang, K. Kabiri-Bamoradian, and R.A. Miller, Runner design optimization based on CFD simulation for a die with multiple cavities, 2011 Die Casting Congress & Tabletop, Columbus, OH, September 19-21, 2011

48-11 A. Karwiński, W. Leśniewski, S. Pysz, P. Wieliczko, The technology of precision casting of titanium alloys by centrifugal process, Archives of Foundry Engineering, ISSN: 1897-3310), Volume 11, Issue 3/2011, 73-80, 2011.

46-11  Daniel Einsiedler, Entwicklung einer Simulationsmethodik zur Simulation von Strömungs- und Trocknungsvorgängen bei Kernfertigungsprozessen mittels CFD (Development of a simulation methodology for simulating flow and drying operations in core production processes using CFD), MSc thesis at Technical University of Aalen in Germany (Hochschule Aalen), 2011.

44-11  Bin Zhang and Craig Shaber, Aluminum Ingot Thermal Stress Development Modeling of the Wagstaff® EpsilonTM Rolling Ingot DC Casting System during the Start-up Phase, Materials Science Forum Vol. 693 (2011) pp 196-207, © 2011 Trans Tech Publications, July, 2011.

43-11 Vu Nguyen, Patrick Rohan, John Grandfield, Alex Levin, Kevin Naidoo, Kurt Oswald, Guillaume Girard, Ben Harker, and Joe Rea, Implementation of CASTfill low-dross pouring system for ingot casting, Materials Science Forum Vol. 693 (2011) pp 227-234, © 2011 Trans Tech Publications, July, 2011.

40-11  A. Starobin, D. Goettsch, M. Walker, D. Burch, Gas Pressure in Aluminum Block Water Jacket Cores, © 2011 American Foundry Society, International Journal of Metalcasting/Summer 2011

37-11 Ferencz Peti, Lucian Grama, Analyze of the Possible Causes of Porosity Type Defects in Aluminum High Pressure Diecast Parts, Scientific Bulletin of the Petru Maior University of Targu Mures, Vol. 8 (XXV) no. 1, 2011, ISSN 1841-9267

31-11  Johannes Hartmann, André Trepper, Carolin Körner, Aluminum Integral Foams with Near-Microcellular Structure, Advanced Engineering Materials, 13: n/a. doi: 10.1002/adem.201100035, June 2011.

27-11  A. Pari, Optimization of HPDC Process using Flow Simulation Case Studies, Die Casting Engineer, July 2011

26-11    A. Reikher, H. Gerber, Calculation of the Die Cast Parameters of the Thin Wall Aluminum Die Casting Part, Die Casting Engineer, July 2011

21-11 Thang Nguyen, Vu Nguyen, Morris Murray, Gary Savage, John Carrig, Modelling Die Filling in Ultra-Thin Aluminium Castings, Materials Science Forum (Volume 690), Light Metals Technology V, pp 107-111, 10.4028/www.scientific.net/MSF.690.107, June 2011.

19-11 Jon Spangenberg, Cem Celal Tutum, Jesper Henri Hattel, Nicolas Roussel, Metter Rica Geiker, Optimization of Casting Process Parameters for Homogeneous Aggregate Distribution in Self-Compacting Concrete: A Feasibility Study, © IEEE Congress on Evolutionary Computation, 2011, New Orleans, USA

16-11  A. Starobin, C.W. Hirt, H. Lang, and M. Todte, Core Drying Simulation and Validations, AFS Proceedings 2011, © American Foundry Society, Presented at the 115th Metalcasting Congress, Schaumburg, Illinois, April 2011.

15-11  J. J. Hernández-Ortega, R. Zamora, J. López, and F. Faura, Numerical Analysis of Air Pressure Effects on the Flow Pattern during the Filling of a Vertical Die Cavity, AIP Conf. Proc., Volume 1353, pp. 1238-1243, The 14th International Esaform Conference on Material Forming: Esaform 2011; doi:10.1063/1.3589686, May 2011. Available online.

10-11 Abbas A. Khalaf and Sumanth Shankar, Favorable Environment for Nondentric Morphology in Controlled Diffusion Solidification, DOI: 10.1007/s11661-011-0641-z, © The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society and ASM International 2011, Metallurgical and Materials Transactions A, March 11, 2011.

08-11 Hai Peng Li, Chun Yong Liang, Li Hui Wang, Hong Shui Wang, Numerical Simulation of Casting Process for Gray Iron Butterfly Valve, Advanced Materials Research, 189-193, 260, February 2011.

04-11  C.W. Hirt, Predicting Core Shooting, Drying and Defect Development, Foundry Management & Technology, January 2011.

76-10  Zhizhong Sun, Henry Hu, Alfred Yu, Numerical Simulation and Experimental Study of Squeeze Casting Magnesium Alloy AM50, Magnesium Technology 2010, 2010 TMS Annual Meeting & ExhibitionFebruary 14-18, 2010, Seattle, WA.

68-10  A. Reikher, H. Gerber, K.M. Pillai, T.-C. Jen, Natural Convection—An Overlooked Phenomenon of the Solidification Process, Die Casting Engineer, January 2010

54-10    Andrea Bernardoni, Andrea Borsi, Stefano Mascetti, Alessandro Incognito and Matteo Corrado, Fonderia Leonardo aveva ragione! L’enorme cavallo dedicato a Francesco Sforza era materialmente realizzabile, A&C – Analisis e Calcolo, Giugno 2010. In  Italian.

48-10  J. J. Hernández-Ortega, R. Zamora, J. Palacios, J. López and F. Faura, An Experimental and Numerical Study of Flow Patterns and Air Entrapment Phenomena During the Filling of a Vertical Die Cavity, J. Manuf. Sci. Eng., October 2010, Volume 132, Issue 5, 05101, doi:10.1115/1.4002535.

47-10  A.V. Chaikin, I.N. Volnov, and V.A. Chaikin, Development of Dispersible Mixed Inoculant Compositions Using the FLOW-3D Program, Liteinoe Proizvodstvo, October, 2010, in Russian.

42-10  H. Lakshmi, M.C. Vinay Kumar, Raghunath, P. Kumar, V. Ramanarayanan, K.S.S. Murthy, P. Dutta, Induction reheating of A356.2 aluminum alloy and thixocasting as automobile component, Transactions of Nonferrous Metals Society of China 20(20101) s961-s967.

41-10  Pamela J. Waterman, Understanding Core-Gas Defects, Desktop Engineering, October 2010. Available online at Desktop Engineering. Also published in the Foundry Trade Journal, November 2010.

39-10  Liu Zheng, Jia Yingying, Mao Pingli, Li Yang, Wang Feng, Wang Hong, Zhou Le, Visualization of Die Casting Magnesium Alloy Steering Bracket, Special Casting & Nonferrous Alloys, ISSN: 1001-2249, CN: 42-1148/TG, 2010-04. In Chinese.

37-10  Morris Murray, Lars Feldager Hansen, and Carl Reinhardt, I Have Defects – Now What, Die Casting Engineer, September 2010

36-10  Stefano Mascetti, Using Flow Analysis Software to Optimize Piston Velocity for an HPDC Process, Die Casting Engineer, September 2010. Also available in Italian: Ottimizzare la velocita del pistone in pressofusione.  A & C, Analisi e Calcolo, Anno XII, n. 42, Gennaio 2011, ISSN 1128-3874.

32-10  Guan Hai Yan, Sheng Dun Zhao, Zheng Hui Sha, Parameters Optimization of Semisolid Diecasting Process for Air-Conditioner’s Triple Valve in HPb59-1 Alloy, Advanced Materials Research (Volumes 129 – 131), Vol. Material and Manufacturing Technology, pp. 936-941, DOI: 10.4028/www.scientific.net/AMR.129-131.936, August 2010.

29-10 Zheng Peng, Xu Jun, Zhang Zhifeng, Bai Yuelong, and Shi Likai, Numerical Simulation of Filling of Rheo-diecasting A357 Aluminum Alloy, Special Casting & Nonferrous Alloys, DOI: CNKI:SUN:TZZZ.0.2010-01-024, 2010.

27-10 For an Aerospace Diecasting, Littler Uses Simulation to Reveal Defects, and Win a New Order, Foundry Management & Technology, July 2010

23-10 Michael R. Barkhudarov, Minimizing Air Entrainment, The Canadian Die Caster, June 2010

15-10 David H. Kirkwood, Michel Suery, Plato Kapranos, Helen V. Atkinson, and Kenneth P. Young, Semi-solid Processing of Alloys, 2010, XII, 172 p. 103 illus., 19 in color., Hardcover ISBN: 978-3-642-00705-7.

09-10  Shannon Wetzel, Fullfilling Da Vinci’s Dream, Modern Casting, April 2010.

08-10 B.I. Semenov, K.M. Kushtarov, Semi-solid Manufacturing of Castings, New Industrial Technologies, Publication of Moscow State Technical University n.a. N.E. Bauman, 2009 (in Russian)

07-10 Carl Reilly, Development Of Quantitative Casting Quality Assessment Criteria Using Process Modelling, thesis: The University of Birmingham, March 2010 (Available upon request)

06-10 A. Pari, Optimization of HPDC Process using Flow Simulation – Case Studies, CastExpo ’10, NADCA, Orlando, Florida, March 2010

05-10 M.C. Carter, S. Palit, and M. Littler, Characterizing Flow Losses Occurring in Air Vents and Ejector Pins in High Pressure Die Castings, CastExpo ’10, NADCA, Orlando, Florida, March 2010

04-10 Pamela Waterman, Simulating Porosity Factors, Foundry Management Technology, March 2010, Article available at Foundry Management Technology

03-10 C. Reilly, M.R. Jolly, N.R. Green, JC Gebelin, Assessment of Casting Filling by Modeling Surface Entrainment Events Using CFD, 2010 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition (Jim Evans Honorary Symposium), Seattle, Washington, USA, February 14-18, 2010

02-10 P. Väyrynen, S. Wang, J. Laine and S.Louhenkilpi, Control of Fluid Flow, Heat Transfer and Inclusions in Continuous Casting – CFD and Neural Network Studies, 2010 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition (Jim Evans Honorary Symposium), Seattle, Washington, USA, February 14-18, 2010

60-09   Somlak Wannarumon, and Marco Actis Grande, Comparisons of Computer Fluid Dynamic Software Programs applied to Jewelry Investment Casting Process, World Academy of Science, Engineering and Technology 55 2009.

59-09   Marco Actis Grande and Somlak Wannarumon, Numerical Simulation of Investment Casting of Gold Jewelry: Experiments and Validations, World Academy of Science, Engineering and Technology, Vol:3 2009-07-24

56-09  Jozef Kasala, Ondrej Híreš, Rudolf Pernis, Start-up Phase Modeling of Semi Continuous Casting Process of Brass Billets, Metal 2009, 19.-21.5.2009

51-09  In-Ting Hong, Huan-Chien Tung, Chun-Hao Chiu and Hung-Shang Huang, Effect of Casting Parameters on Microstructure and Casting Quality of Si-Al Alloy for Vacuum Sputtering, China Steel Technical Report, No. 22, pp. 33-40, 2009.

42-09  P. Väyrynen, S. Wang, S. Louhenkilpi and L. Holappa, Modeling and Removal of Inclusions in Continuous Casting, Materials Science & Technology 2009 Conference & Exhibition, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, October 25-29, 2009

41-09 O.Smirnov, P.Väyrynen, A.Kravchenko and S.Louhenkilpi, Modern Methods of Modeling Fluid Flow and Inclusions Motion in Tundish Bath – General View, Proceedings of Steelsim 2009 – 3rd International Conference on Simulation and Modelling of Metallurgical Processes in Steelmaking, Leoben, Austria, September 8-10, 2009

21-09 A. Pari, Case Studies – Optimization of HPDC Process Using Flow Simulation, Die Casting Engineer, July 2009

20-09 M. Sirvio, M. Wos, Casting directly from a computer model by using advanced simulation software, FLOW-3D Cast, Archives of Foundry Engineering Volume 9, Issue 1/2009, 79-82

19-09 Andrei Starobin, C.W. Hirt, D. Goettsch, A Model for Binder Gas Generation and Transport in Sand Cores and Molds, Modeling of Casting, Welding, and Solidification Processes XII, TMS (The Minerals, Metals & Minerals Society), June 2009

11-09 Michael Barkhudarov, Minimizing Air Entrainment in a Shot Sleeve during Slow-Shot Stage, Die Casting Engineer (The North American Die Casting Association ISSN 0012-253X), May 2009

10-09 A. Reikher, H. Gerber, Application of One-Dimensional Numerical Simulation to Optimize Process Parameters of a Thin-Wall Casting in High Pressure Die Casting, Die Casting Engineer (The North American Die Casting Association ISSN 0012-253X), May 2009

7-09 Andrei Starobin, Simulation of Core Gas Evolution and Flow, presented at the North American Die Casting Association – 113th Metalcasting Congress, April 7-10, 2009, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA

6-09 A.Pari, Optimization of HPDC PROCESS: Case Studies, North American Die Casting Association – 113th Metalcasting Congress, April 7-10, 2009, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA

2-09 C. Reilly, N.R. Green and M.R. Jolly, Oxide Entrainment Structures in Horizontal Running Systems, TMS 2009, San Francisco, California, February 2009

30-08 I.N.Volnov, Computer Modeling of Casting of Pipe Fittings, © 2008, Pipe Fittings, 5 (38), 2008. Russian version

28-08 A.V.Chaikin, I.N.Volnov, V.A.Chaikin, Y.A.Ukhanov, N.R.Petrov, Analysis of the Efficiency of Alloy Modifiers Using Statistics and Modeling, © 2008, Liteyshik Rossii (Russian Foundryman), October, 2008

27-08 P. Scarber, Jr., H. Littleton, Simulating Macro-Porosity in Aluminum Lost Foam Castings, American Foundry Society, © 2008, AFS Lost Foam Conference, Asheville, North Carolina, October, 2008

25-08 FMT Staff, Forecasting Core Gas Pressures with Computer Simulation, Foundry Management and Technology, October 28, 2008 © 2008 Penton Media, Inc. Online article

24-08 Core and Mold Gas Evolution, Foundry Management and Technology, January 24, 2008 (excerpted from the FM&T May 2007 issue) © 2008 Penton Media, Inc.

22-08 Mark Littler, Simulation Eliminates Die Casting Scrap, Modern Casting/September 2008

21-08 X. Chen, D. Penumadu, Permeability Measurement and Numerical Modeling for Refractory Porous Materials, AFS Transactions © 2008 American Foundry Society, CastExpo ’08, Atlanta, Georgia, May 2008

20-08 Rolf Krack, Using Solidification Simulations for Optimising Die Cooling Systems, FTJ July/August 2008

19-08 Mark Littler, Simulation Software Eliminates Die Casting Scrap, ECS Casting Innovations, July/August 2008

13-08 T. Yoshimura, K. Yano, T. Fukui, S. Yamamoto, S. Nishido, M. Watanabe and Y. Nemoto, Optimum Design of Die Casting Plunger Tip Considering Air Entrainment, Proceedings of 10th Asian Foundry Congress (AFC10), Nagoya, Japan, May 2008

08-08 Stephen Instone, Andreas Buchholz and Gerd-Ulrich Gruen, Inclusion Transport Phenomena in Casting Furnaces, Light Metals 2008, TMS (The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society), 2008

07-08 P. Scarber, Jr., H. Littleton, Simulating Macro-Porosity in Aluminum Lost Foam Casting, AFS Transactions 2008 © American Foundry Society, CastExpo ’08, Atlanta, Georgia, May 2008

06-08 A. Reikher, H. Gerber and A. Starobin, Multi-Stage Plunger Deceleration System, CastExpo ’08, NADCA, Atlanta, Georgia, May 2008

05-08 Amol Palekar, Andrei Starobin, Alexander Reikher, Die-casting end-of-fill and drop forge viscometer flow transients examined with a coupled-motion numerical model, 68th World Foundry Congress, Chennai, India, February 2008

03-08 Petri J. Väyrynen, Sami K. Vapalahti and Seppo J. Louhenkilpi, On Validation of Mathematical Fluid Flow Models for Simulation of Tundish Water Models and Industrial Examples, AISTech 2008, May 2008

53-07   A. Kermanpur, Sh. Mahmoudi and A. Hajipour, Three-dimensional Numerical Simulation of Metal Flow and Solidification in the Multi-cavity Casting Moulds of Automotive Components, International Journal of Iron & Steel Society of Iran, Article 2, Volume 4, Issue 1, Summer and Autumn 2007, pages 8-15.

36-07 Duque Mesa A. F., Herrera J., Cruz L.J., Fernández G.P. y Martínez H.V., Caracterización Defectológica de Piezas Fundida por Lost Foam Casting Mediante Simulación Numérica, 8° Congreso Iberoamericano de Ingenieria Mecanica, Cusco, Peru, 23 al 25 de Octubre de 2007 (in Spanish)

27-07 A.Y. Korotchenko, A.M. Zarubin, I.A.Korotchenko, Modeling of High Pressure Die Casting Filling, Russian Foundryman, December 2007, pp 15-19. (in Russian)

26-07 I.N. Volnov, Modeling of Casting Processes with Variable Geometry, Russian Foundryman, November 2007, pp 27-30. (in Russian)

16-07 P. Väyrynen, S. Vapalahti, S. Louhenkilpi, L. Chatburn, M. Clark, T. Wagner, Tundish Flow Model Tuning and Validation – Steady State and Transient Casting Situations, STEELSIM 2007, Graz/Seggau, Austria, September 12-14 2007

11-07 Marco Actis Grande, Computer Simulation of the Investment Casting Process – Widening of the Filling Step, Santa Fe Symposium on Jewelry Manufacturing Technology, May 2007

09-07 Alexandre Reikher and Michael Barkhudarov, Casting: An Analytical Approach, Springer, 1st edition, August 2007, Hardcover ISBN: 978-1-84628-849-4. U.S. Order FormEurope Order Form.

07-07 I.N. Volnov, Casting Modeling Systems – Current State, Problems and Perspectives, (in Russian), Liteyshik Rossii (Russian Foundryman), June 2007

05-07 A.N. Turchin, D.G. Eskin, and L. Katgerman, Solidification under Forced-Flow Conditions in a Shallow Cavity, DOI: 10.1007/s1161-007-9183-9, © The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society and ASM International 2007

04-07 A.N. Turchin, M. Zuijderwijk, J. Pool, D.G. Eskin, and L. Katgerman, Feathery grain growth during solidification under forced flow conditions, © Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. DOI: 10.1016/j.actamat.2007.02.030, April 2007

03-07 S. Kuyucak, Sponsored Research – Clean Steel Casting Production—Evaluation of Laboratory Castings, Transactions of the American Foundry Society, Volume 115, 111th Metalcasting Congress, May 2007

02-07 Fu-Yuan Hsu, Mark R. Jolly and John Campbell, The Design of L-Shaped Runners for Gravity Casting, Shape Casting: 2nd International Symposium, Edited by Paul N. Crepeau, Murat Tiryakioðlu and John Campbell, TMS (The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society), Orlando, FL, Feb 2007

30-06 X.J. Liu, S.H. Bhavnani, R.A. Overfelt, Simulation of EPS foam decomposition in the lost foam casting process, Journal of Materials Processing Technology 182 (2007) 333–342, © 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

25-06 Michael Barkhudarov and Gengsheng Wei, Modeling Casting on the Move, Modern Casting, August 2006; Modeling of Casting Processes with Variable Geometry, Russian Foundryman, December 2007, pp 10-15. (in Russian)

24-06 P. Scarber, Jr. and C.E. Bates, Simulation of Core Gas Production During Mold Fill, © 2006 American Foundry Society

7-06 M.Y.Smirnov, Y.V.Golenkov, Manufacturing of Cast Iron Bath Tubs Castings using Vacuum-Process in Russia, Russia’s Foundryman, July 2006. In Russian.

6-06 M. Barkhudarov, and G. Wei, Modeling of the Coupled Motion of Rigid Bodies in Liquid Metal, Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes – XI, May 28 – June 2, 2006, Opio, France, eds. Ch.-A. Gandin and M. Bellet, pp 71-78, 2006.

2-06 J.-C. Gebelin, M.R. Jolly and F.-Y. Hsu, ‘Designing-in’ Controlled Filling Using Numerical Simulation for Gravity Sand Casting of Aluminium Alloys, Int. J. Cast Met. Res., 2006, Vol.19 No.1

1-06 Michael Barkhudarov, Using Simulation to Control Microporosity Reduces Die Iterations, Die Casting Engineer, January 2006, pp. 52-54

30-05 H. Xue, K. Kabiri-Bamoradian, R.A. Miller, Modeling Dynamic Cavity Pressure and Impact Spike in Die Casting, Cast Expo ’05, April 16-19, 2005

22-05 Blas Melissari & Stavros A. Argyropoulous, Measurement of Magnitude and Direction of Velocity in High-Temperature Liquid Metals; Part I, Mathematical Modeling, Metallurgical and Materials Transactions B, Volume 36B, October 2005, pp. 691-700

21-05 M.R. Jolly, State of the Art Review of Use of Modeling Software for Casting, TMS Annual Meeting, Shape Casting: The John Campbell Symposium, Eds, M. Tiryakioglu & P.N Crepeau, TMS, Warrendale, PA, ISBN 0-87339-583-2, Feb 2005, pp 337-346

20-05 J-C Gebelin, M.R. Jolly & F-Y Hsu, ‘Designing-in’ Controlled Filling Using Numerical Simulation for Gravity Sand Casting of Aluminium Alloys, TMS Annual Meeting, Shape Casting: The John Campbell Symposium, Eds, M. Tiryakioglu & P.N Crepeau, TMS, Warrendale, PA, ISBN 0-87339-583-2, Feb 2005, pp 355-364

19-05 F-Y Hsu, M.R. Jolly & J Campbell, Vortex Gate Design for Gravity Castings, TMS Annual Meeting, Shape Casting: The John Campbell Symposium, Eds, M. Tiryakioglu & P.N Crepeau, TMS, Warrendale, PA, ISBN 0-87339-583-2, Feb 2005, pp 73-82

18-05 M.R. Jolly, Modelling the Investment Casting Process: Problems and Successes, Japanese Foundry Society, JFS, Tokyo, Sept. 2005

13-05 Xiaogang Yang, Xiaobing Huang, Xiaojun Dai, John Campbell and Joe Tatler, Numerical Modelling of the Entrainment of Oxide Film Defects in Filling of Aluminium Alloy Castings, International Journal of Cast Metals Research, 17 (6), 2004, 321-331

10-05 Carlos Evaristo Esparza, Martha P. Guerro-Mata, Roger Z. Ríos-Mercado, Optimal Design of Gating Systems by Gradient Search Methods, Computational Materials Science, October 2005

6-05 Birgit Hummler-Schaufler, Fritz Hirning, Jurgen Schaufler, A World First for Hatz Diesel and Schaufler Tooling, Die Casting Engineer, May 2005, pp. 18-21

4-05 Rolf Krack, The W35 Topic—A World First, Die Casting World, March 2005, pp. 16-17

3-05 Joerg Frei, Casting Simulations Speed Up Development, Die Casting World, March 2005, p. 14

2-05 David Goettsch and Michael Barkhudarov, Analysis and Optimization of the Transient Stage of Stopper-Rod Pour, Shape Casting: The John Campbell Symposium, The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society, 2005

36-04  Ik Min Park, Il Dong Choi, Yong Ho Park, Development of Light-Weight Al Scroll Compressor for Car Air Conditioner, Materials Science Forum, Designing, Processing and Properties of Advanced Engineering Materials, 449-452, 149, March 2004.

32-04 D.H. Kirkwood and P.J Ward, Numerical Modelling of Semi-Solid Flow under Processing Conditions, steel research int. 75 (2004), No. 8/9

30-04 Haijing Mao, A Numerical Study of Externally Solidified Products in the Cold Chamber Die Casting Process, thesis: The Ohio State University, 2004 (Available upon request)

28-04 Z. Cao, Z. Yang, and X.L. Chen, Three-Dimensional Simulation of Transient GMA Weld Pool with Free Surface, Supplement to the Welding Journal, June 2004.

23-04 State of the Art Use of Computational Modelling in the Foundry Industry, 3rd International Conference Computational Modelling of Materials III, Sicily, Italy, June 2004, Advances in Science and Technology,  Eds P. Vincenzini & A Lami, Techna Group Srl, Italy, ISBN: 88-86538-46-4, Part B, pp 479-490

22-04 Jerry Fireman, Computer Simulation Helps Reduce Scrap, Die Casting Engineer, May 2004, pp. 46-49

21-04 Joerg Frei, Simulation—A Safe and Quick Way to Good Components, Aluminium World, Volume 3, Issue 2, pp. 42-43

20-04 J.-C. Gebelin, M.R. Jolly, A. M. Cendrowicz, J. Cirre and S. Blackburn, Simulation of Die Filling for the Wax Injection Process – Part II Numerical Simulation, Metallurgical and Materials Transactions, Volume 35B, August 2004

14-04 Sayavur I. Bakhtiyarov, Charles H. Sherwin, and Ruel A. Overfelt, Hot Distortion Studies In Phenolic Urethane Cold Box System, American Foundry Society, 108th Casting Congress, June 12-15, 2004, Rosemont, IL, USA

13-04 Sayavur I. Bakhtiyarov and Ruel A. Overfelt, First V-Process Casting of Magnesium, American Foundry Society, 108th Casting Congress, June 12-15, 2004, Rosemont, IL, USA

5-04 C. Schlumpberger & B. Hummler-Schaufler, Produktentwicklung auf hohem Niveau (Product Development on a High Level), Druckguss Praxis, January 2004, pp 39-42 (in German).

3-04 Charles Bates, Dealing with Defects, Foundry Management and Technology, February 2004, pp 23-25

1-04 Laihua Wang, Thang Nguyen, Gary Savage and Cameron Davidson, Thermal and Flow Modeling of Ladling and Injection in High Pressure Die Casting Process, International Journal of Cast Metals Research, vol. 16 No 4 2003, pp 409-417

2-03 J-C Gebelin, AM Cendrowicz, MR Jolly, Modeling of the Wax Injection Process for the Investment Casting Process – Prediction of Defects, presented at the Third International Conference on Computational Fluid Dynamics in the Minerals and Process Industries, December 10-12, 2003, Melbourne, Australia, pp. 415-420

29-03 C. W. Hirt, Modeling Shrinkage Induced Micro-porosity, Flow Science Technical Note (FSI-03-TN66)

28-03 Thixoforming at the University of Sheffield, Diecasting World, September 2003, pp 11-12

26-03 William Walkington, Gas Porosity-A Guide to Correcting the Problems, NADCA Publication: 516

22-03 G F Yao, C W Hirt, and M Barkhudarov, Development of a Numerical Approach for Simulation of Sand Blowing and Core Formation, in Modeling of Casting, Welding, and Advanced Solidification Process-X”, Ed. By Stefanescu et al pp. 633-639, 2003

21-03 E F Brush Jr, S P Midson, W G Walkington, D T Peters, J G Cowie, Porosity Control in Copper Rotor Die Castings, NADCA Indianapolis Convention Center, Indianapolis, IN September 15-18, 2003, T03-046

12-03 J-C Gebelin & M.R. Jolly, Modeling Filters in Light Alloy Casting Processes,  Trans AFS, 2002, 110, pp. 109-120

11-03 M.R. Jolly, Casting Simulation – How Well Do Reality and Virtual Casting Match – A State of the Art Review, Intl. J. Cast Metals Research, 2002, 14, pp. 303-313

10-03 Gebelin., J-C and Jolly, M.R., Modeling of the Investment Casting Process, Journal of  Materials Processing Tech., Vol. 135/2-3, pp. 291 – 300

9-03 Cox, M, Harding, R.A. and Campbell, J., Optimised Running System Design for Bottom Filled Aluminium Alloy 2L99 Investment Castings, J. Mat. Sci. Tech., May 2003, Vol. 19, pp. 613-625

8-03 Von Alexander Schrey and Regina Reek, Numerische Simulation der Kernherstellung, (Numerical Simulation of Core Blowing), Giesserei, June 2003, pp. 64-68 (in German)

7-03 J. Zuidema Jr., L Katgerman, Cyclone separation of particles in aluminum DC Casting, Proceedings from the Tenth International Conference on Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes, Destin, FL, May 2003, pp. 607-614

6-03 Jean-Christophe Gebelin and Mark Jolly, Numerical Modeling of Metal Flow Through Filters, Proceedings from the Tenth International Conference on Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes, Destin, FL, May 2003, pp. 431-438

5-03 N.W. Lai, W.D. Griffiths and J. Campbell, Modelling of the Potential for Oxide Film Entrainment in Light Metal Alloy Castings, Proceedings from the Tenth International Conference on Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes, Destin, FL, May 2003, pp. 415-422

21-02 Boris Lukezic, Case History: Process Modeling Solves Die Design Problems, Modern Casting, February 2003, P 59

20-02 C.W. Hirt and M.R. Barkhudarov, Predicting Defects in Lost Foam Castings, Modern Casting, December 2002, pp 31-33

19-02 Mark Jolly, Mike Cox, Ric Harding, Bill Griffiths and John Campbell, Quiescent Filling Applied to Investment Castings, Modern Casting, December 2002 pp. 36-38

18-02 Simulation Helps Overcome Challenges of Thin Wall Magnesium Diecasting, Foundry Management and Technology, October 2002, pp 13-15

17-02 G Messmer, Simulation of a Thixoforging Process of Aluminum Alloys with FLOW-3D, Institute for Metal Forming Technology, University of Stuttgart

16-02 Barkhudarov, Michael, Computer Simulation of Lost Foam Process, Casting Simulation Background and Examples from Europe and the USA, World Foundrymen Organization, 2002, pp 319-324

15-02 Barkhudarov, Michael, Computer Simulation of Inclusion Tracking, Casting Simulation Background and Examples from Europe and the USA, World Foundrymen Organization, 2002, pp 341-346

14-02 Barkhudarov, Michael, Advanced Simulation of the Flow and Heat Transfer of an Alternator Housing, Casting Simulation Background and Examples from Europe and the USA, World Foundrymen Organization, 2002, pp 219-228

8-02 Sayavur I. Bakhtiyarov, and Ruel A. Overfelt, Experimental and Numerical Study of Bonded Sand-Air Two-Phase Flow in PUA Process, Auburn University, 2002 American Foundry Society, AFS Transactions 02-091, Kansas City, MO

7-02 A Habibollah Zadeh, and J Campbell, Metal Flow Through a Filter System, University of Birmingham, 2002 American Foundry Society, AFS Transactions 02-020, Kansas City, MO

6-02 Phil Ward, and Helen Atkinson, Final Report for EPSRC Project: Modeling of Thixotropic Flow of Metal Alloys into a Die, GR/M17334/01, March 2002, University of Sheffield

5-02 S. I. Bakhtiyarov and R. A. Overfelt, Numerical and Experimental Study of Aluminum Casting in Vacuum-sealed Step Molding, Auburn University, 2002 American Foundry Society, AFS Transactions 02-050, Kansas City, MO

4-02 J. C. Gebelin and M. R. Jolly, Modelling Filters in Light Alloy Casting Processes, University of Birmingham, 2002 American Foundry Society AFS Transactions 02-079, Kansas City, MO

3-02 Mark Jolly, Mike Cox, Jean-Christophe Gebelin, Sam Jones, and Alex Cendrowicz, Fundamentals of Investment Casting (FOCAST), Modelling the Investment Casting Process, Some preliminary results from the UK Research Programme, IRC in Materials, University of Birmingham, UK, AFS2001

49-01   Hua Bai and Brian G. Thomas, Bubble formation during horizontal gas injection into downward-flowing liquid, Metallurgical and Materials Transactions B, Vol. 32, No. 6, pp. 1143-1159, 2001. doi.org/10.1007/s11663-001-0102-y

45-01 Jan Zuidema; Laurens Katgerman; Ivo J. Opstelten;Jan M. Rabenberg, Secondary Cooling in DC Casting: Modelling and Experimental Results, TMS 2001, New Orleans, Louisianna, February 11-15, 2001

43-01 James Andrew Yurko, Fluid Flow Behavior of Semi-Solid Aluminum at High Shear Rates,Ph.D. thesis; Massachusetts Institute of Technology, June 2001. Abstract only; full thesis available at http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/8451 (for a fee).

33-01 Juang, S.H., CAE Application on Design of Die Casting Dies, 2001 Conference on CAE Technology and Application, Hsin-Chu, Taiwan, November 2001, (article in Chinese with English-language abstract)

32-01 Juang, S.H. and C. M. Wang, Effect of Feeding Geometry on Flow Characteristics of Magnesium Die Casting by Numerical Analysis, The Preceedings of 6th FADMA Conference, Taipei, Taiwan, July 2001, Chinese language with English abstract

26-01 C. W. Hirt., Predicting Defects in Lost Foam Castings, December 13, 2001

21-01 P. Scarber Jr., Using Liquid Free Surface Areas as a Predictor of Reoxidation Tendency in Metal Alloy Castings, presented at the Steel Founders’ Society of American, Technical and Operating Conference, October 2001

20-01 P. Scarber Jr., J. Griffin, and C. E. Bates, The Effect of Gating and Pouring Practice on Reoxidation of Steel Castings, presented at the Steel Founders’ Society of American, Technical and Operating Conference, October 2001

19-01 L. Wang, T. Nguyen, M. Murray, Simulation of Flow Pattern and Temperature Profile in the Shot Sleeve of a High Pressure Die Casting Process, CSIRO Manufacturing Science and Technology, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, Presented by North American Die Casting Association, Oct 29-Nov 1, 2001, Cincinnati, To1-014

18-01 Rajiv Shivpuri, Venkatesh Sankararaman, Kaustubh Kulkarni, An Approach at Optimizing the Ingate Design for Reducing Filling and Shrinkage Defects, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, Presented by North American Die Casting Association, Oct 29-Nov 1, 2001, Cincinnati, TO1-052

5-01 Michael Barkhudarov, Simulation Helps Overcome Challenges of Thin Wall Magnesium Diecasting, Diecasting World, March 2001, pp. 5-6

2-01 J. Grindling, Customized CFD Codes to Simulate Casting of Thermosets in Full 3D, Electrical Manufacturing and Coil Winding 2000 Conference, October 31-November 2, 20

20-00 Richard Schuhmann, John Carrig, Thang Nguyen, Arne Dahle, Comparison of Water Analogue Modelling and Numerical Simulation Using Real-Time X-Ray Flow Data in Gravity Die Casting, Australian Die Casting Association Die Casting 2000 Conference, September 3-6, 2000, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

15-00 M. Sirvio, Vainola, J. Vartianinen, M. Vuorinen, J. Orkas, and S. Devenyi, Fluid Flow Analysis for Designing Gating of Aluminum Castings, Proc. NADCA Conf., Rosemont, IL, Nov 6-8, 1999

14-00 X. Yang, M. Jolly, and J. Campbell, Reduction of Surface Turbulence during Filling of Sand Castings Using a Vortex-flow Runner, Conference for Modeling of Casting, Welding, and Advanced Solidification Processes IX, Aachen, Germany, August 2000

13-00 H. S. H. Lo and J. Campbell, The Modeling of Ceramic Foam Filters, Conference for Modeling of Casting, Welding, and Advanced Solidification Processes IX, Aachen, Germany, August 2000

12-00 M. R. Jolly, H. S. H. Lo, M. Turan and J. Campbell, Use of Simulation Tools in the Practical Development of a Method for Manufacture of Cast Iron Camshafts,” Conference for Modeling of Casting, Welding, and Advanced Solidification Processes IX, Aachen, Germany, August, 2000

14-99 J Koke, and M Modigell, Time-Dependent Rheological Properties of Semi-solid Metal Alloys, Institute of Chemical Engineering, Aachen University of Technology, Mechanics of Time-Dependent Materials 3: 15-30, 1999

12-99 Grun, Gerd-Ulrich, Schneider, Wolfgang, Ray, Steven, Marthinusen, Jan-Olaf, Recent Improvements in Ceramic Foam Filter Design by Coupled Heat and Fluid Flow Modeling, Proc TMS Annual Meeting, 1999, pp. 1041-1047

10-99 Bongcheol Park and Jerald R. Brevick, Computer Flow Modeling of Cavity Pre-fill Effects in High Pressure Die Casting, NADCA Proceedings, Cleveland T99-011, November, 1999

8-99 Brad Guthrie, Simulation Reduces Aluminum Die Casting Cost by Reducing Volume, Die Casting Engineer Magazine, September/October 1999, pp. 78-81

7-99 Fred L. Church, Virtual Reality Predicts Cast Metal Flow, Modern Metals, September, 1999, pp. 67F-J

19-98 Grun, Gerd-Ulrich, & Schneider, Wolfgang, Numerical Modeling of Fluid Flow Phenomena in the Launder-integrated Tool Within Casting Unit Development, Proc TMS Annual Meeting, 1998, pp. 1175-1182

18-98 X. Yang & J. Campbell, Liquid Metal Flow in a Pouring Basin, Int. J. Cast Metals Res, 1998, 10, pp. 239-253

15-98 R. Van Tol, Mould Filling of Horizontal Thin-Wall Castings, Delft University Press, The Netherlands, 1998

14-98 J. Daughtery and K. A. Williams, Thermal Modeling of Mold Material Candidates for Copper Pressure Die Casting of the Induction Motor Rotor Structure, Proc. Int’l Workshop on Permanent Mold Casting of Copper-Based Alloys, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, Oct. 15-16, 1998

10-98 C. W. Hirt, and M.R. Barkhudarov, Lost Foam Casting Simulation with Defect Prediction, Flow Science Inc, presented at Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes VIII Conference, June 7-12, 1998, Catamaran Hotel, San Diego, California

9-98 M. R. Barkhudarov and C. W. Hirt, Tracking Defects, Flow Science Inc, presented at the 1st International Aluminum Casting Technology Symposium, 12-14 October 1998, Rosemont, IL

5-98 J. Righi, Computer Simulation Helps Eliminate Porosity, Die Casting Management Magazine, pp. 36-38, January 1998

3-98 P. Kapranos, M. R. Barkhudarov, D. H. Kirkwood, Modeling of Structural Breakdown during Rapid Compression of Semi-Solid Alloy Slugs, Dept. Engineering Materials, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD, U.K. and Flow Science Inc, USA, Presented at the 5th International Conference Semi-Solid Processing of Alloys and Composites, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO, 23-25 June 1998

1-98 U. Jerichow, T. Altan, and P. R. Sahm, Semi Solid Metal Forming of Aluminum Alloys-The Effect of Process Variables Upon Material Flow, Cavity Fill and Mechanical Properties, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, published in Die Casting Engineer, p. 26, Jan/Feb 1998

8-97 Michael Barkhudarov, High Pressure Die Casting Simulation Using FLOW-3D, Die Casting Engineer, 1997

15-97 M. R. Barkhudarov, Advanced Simulation of the Flow and Heat Transfer Process in Simultaneous Engineering, Flow Science report, presented at the Casting 1997 – International ADI and Simulation Conference, Helsinki, Finland, May 28-30, 1997

14-97 M. Ranganathan and R. Shivpuri, Reducing Scrap and Increasing Die Life in Low Pressure Die Casting through Flow Simulation and Accelerated Testing, Dept. Welding and Systems Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, presented at 19th International Die Casting Congress & Exposition, November 3-6, 1997

13-97 J. Koke, Modellierung und Simulation der Fließeigenschaften teilerstarrter Metallegierungen, Livt Information, Institut für Verfahrenstechnik, RWTH Aachen, October 1997

10-97 J. P. Greene and J. O. Wilkes, Numerical Analysis of Injection Molding of Glass Fiber Reinforced Thermoplastics – Part 2 Fiber Orientation, Body-in-White Center, General Motors Corp. and Dept. Chemical Engineering, University of Michigan, Polymer Engineering and Science, Vol. 37, No. 6, June 1997

9-97 J. P. Greene and J. O. Wilkes, Numerical Analysis of Injection Molding of Glass Fiber Reinforced Thermoplastics. Part 1 – Injection Pressures and Flow, Manufacturing Center, General Motors Corp. and Dept. Chemical Engineering, University of Michigan, Polymer Engineering and Science, Vol. 37, No. 3, March 1997

8-97 H. Grazzini and D. Nesa, Thermophysical Properties, Casting Simulation and Experiments for a Stainless Steel, AT Systemes (Renault) report, presented at the Solidification Processing ’97 Conference, July 7-10, 1997, Sheffield, U.K.

7-97 R. Van Tol, L. Katgerman and H. E. A. Van den Akker, Horizontal Mould Filling of a Thin Wall Aluminum Casting, Laboratory of Materials report, Delft University, presented at the Solidification Processing ’97 Conference, July 7-10, 1997, Sheffield, U.K.

6-97 M. R. Barkhudarov, Is Fluid Flow Important for Predicting Solidification, Flow Science report, presented at the Solidification Processing ’97 Conference, July 7-10, 1997, Sheffield, U.K.

22-96 Grun, Gerd-Ulrich & Schneider, Wolfgang, 3-D Modeling of the Start-up Phase of DC Casting of Sheet Ingots, Proc TMS Annual Meeting, 1996, pp. 971-981

9-96 M. R. Barkhudarov and C. W. Hirt, Thixotropic Flow Effects under Conditions of Strong Shear, Flow Science report FSI96-00-2, to be presented at the “Materials Week ’96” TMS Conference, Cincinnati, OH, 7-10 October 1996

4-96 C. W. Hirt, A Computational Model for the Lost Foam Process, Flow Science final report, February 1996 (FSI-96-57-R2)

3-96 M. R. Barkhudarov, C. L. Bronisz, C. W. Hirt, Three-Dimensional Thixotropic Flow Model, Flow Science report, FSI-96-00-1, published in the proceedings of (pp. 110- 114) and presented at the 4th International Conference on Semi-Solid Processing of Alloys and Composites, The University of Sheffield, 19-21 June 1996

1-96 M. R. Barkhudarov, J. Beech, K. Chang, and S. B. Chin, Numerical Simulation of Metal/Mould Interfacial Heat Transfer in Casting, Dept. Mech. & Process Engineering, Dept. Engineering Materials, University of Sheffield and Flow Science Inc, 9th Int. Symposium on Transport Phenomena in Thermal-Fluid Engineering, June 25-28, 1996, Singapore

11-95 Barkhudarov, M. R., Hirt, C.W., Casting Simulation Mold Filling and Solidification-Benchmark Calculations Using FLOW-3D, Modeling of Casting, Welding, and Advanced Solidification Processes VII, pp 935-946

10-95 Grun, Gerd-Ulrich, & Schneider, Wolfgang, Optimal Design of a Distribution Pan for Level Pour Casting, Proc TMS Annual Meeting, 1995, pp. 1061-1070

9-95 E. Masuda, I. Itoh, K. Haraguchi, Application of Mold Filling Simulation to Die Casting Processes, Honda Engineering Co., Ltd., Tochigi, Japan, presented at the Modelling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes VII, The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society, 1995

6-95 K. Venkatesan, Experimental and Numerical Investigation of the Effect of Process Parameters on the Erosive Wear of Die Casting Dies, presented for Ph.D. degree at Ohio State University, 1995

5-95 J. Righi, A. F. LaCamera, S. A. Jones, W. G. Truckner, T. N. Rouns, Integration of Experience and Simulation Based Understanding in the Die Design Process, Alcoa Technical Center, Alcoa Center, PA 15069, presented by the North American Die Casting Association, 1995

2-95 K. Venkatesan and R. Shivpuri, Numerical Simulation and Comparison with Water Modeling Studies of the Inertia Dominated Cavity Filling in Die Casting, NUMIFORM, 1995

1-95 K. Venkatesan and R. Shivpuri, Numerical Investigation of the Effect of Gate Velocity and Gate Size on the Quality of Die Casting Parts, NAMRC, 1995.

15-94 D. Liang, Y. Bayraktar, S. A. Moir, M. Barkhudarov, and H. Jones, Primary Silicon Segregation During Isothermal Holding of Hypereutectic AI-18.3%Si Alloy in the Freezing Range, Dept. of Engr. Materials, U. of Sheffield, Metals and Materials, February 1994

13-94 Deniece Korzekwa and Paul Dunn, A Combined Experimental and Modeling Approach to Uranium Casting, Materials Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, presented at the Symposium on Liquid Metal Processing and Casting, El Dorado Hotel, Santa Fe, New Mexico, 1994

12-94 R. van Tol, H. E. A. van den Akker and L. Katgerman, CFD Study of the Mould Filling of a Horizontal Thin Wall Aluminum Casting, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands, HTD-Vol. 284/AMD-Vol. 182, Transport Phenomena in Solidification, ASME 1994

11-94 M. R. Barkhudarov and K. A. Williams, Simulation of ‘Surface Turbulence’ Fluid Phenomena During the Mold Filling Phase of Gravity Castings, Flow Science Technical Note #41, November 1994 (FSI-94-TN41)

10-94 M. R. Barkhudarov and S. B. Chin, Stability of a Numerical Algorithm for Gas Bubble Modelling, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, U.K., International Journal for Numerical Methods in Fluids, Vol. 19, 415-437 (1994)

16-93 K. Venkatesan and R. Shivpuri, Numerical Simulation of Die Cavity Filling in Die Castings and an Evaluation of Process Parameters on Die Wear, Dept. of Industrial Systems Engineering, Presented by: N.A. Die Casting Association, Cleveland, Ohio, October 18-21, 1993

15-93 K. Venkatesen and R. Shivpuri, Numerical Modeling of Filling and Solidification for Improved Quality of Die Casting: A Literature Survey (Chapters II and III), Engineering Research Center for Net Shape Manufacturing, Report C-93-07, August 1993, Ohio State University

1-93 P-E Persson, Computer Simulation of the Solidification of a Hub Carrier for the Volvo 800 Series, AB Volvo Technological Development, Metals Laboratory, Technical Report No. LM 500014E, Jan. 1993

13-92 D. R. Korzekwa, M. A. K. Lewis, Experimentation and Simulation of Gravity Fed Lead Castings, in proceedings of a TMS Symposium on Concurrent Engineering Approach to Materials Processing, S. N. Dwivedi, A. J. Paul and F. R. Dax, eds., TMS-AIME Warrendale, p. 155 (1992)

12-92 M. A. K. Lewis, Near-Net-Shaiconpe Casting Simulation and Experimentation, MST 1992 Review, Los Alamos National Laboratory

2-92 M. R. Barkhudarov, H. You, J. Beech, S. B. Chin, D. H. Kirkwood, Validation and Development of FLOW-3D for Casting, School of Materials, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK, presented at the TMS/AIME Annual Meeting, San Diego, CA, March 3, 1992

1-92 D. R. Korzekwa and L. A. Jacobson, Los Alamos National Laboratory and C.W. Hirt, Flow Science Inc, Modeling Planar Flow Casting with FLOW-3D, presented at the TMS/AIME Annual Meeting, San Diego, CA, March 3, 1992

12-91 R. Shivpuri, M. Kuthirakulathu, and M. Mittal, Nonisothermal 3-D Finite Difference Simulation of Cavity Filling during the Die Casting Process, Dept. Industrial and Systems Engineering, Ohio State University, presented at the 1991 Winter Annual ASME Meeting, Atlanta, GA, Dec. 1-6, 1991

3-91 C. W. Hirt, FLOW-3D Study of the Importance of Fluid Momentum in Mold Filling, presented at the 18th Annual Automotive Materials Symposium, Michigan State University, Lansing, MI, May 1-2, 1991 (FSI-91-00-2)

11-90 N. Saluja, O.J. Ilegbusi, and J. Szekely, On the Calculation of the Electromagnetic Force Field in the Circular Stirring of Metallic Melts, accepted in J. Appl. Physics, 1990

10-90 N. Saluja, O. J. Ilegbusi, and J. Szekely, On the Calculation of the Electromagnetic Force Field in the Circular Stirring of Metallic Molds in Continuous Castings, presented at the 6th Iron and Steel Congress of the Iron and Steel Institute of Japan, Nagoya, Japan, October 1990

9-90 N. Saluja, O. J. Ilegbusi, and J. Szekely, Fluid Flow in Phenomena in the Electromagnetic Stirring of Continuous Casting Systems, Part I. The Behavior of a Cylindrically Shaped, Laboratory Scale Installation, accepted for publication in Steel Research, 1990

8-89 C. W. Hirt, Gravity-Fed Casting, Flow Science Technical Note #20, July 1989 (FSI-89-TN20)

6-89 E. W. M. Hansen and F. Syvertsen, Numerical Simulation of Flow Behaviour in Moldfilling for Casting Analysis, SINTEF-Foundation for Scientific and Industrial Research at the Norwegian Institute of Technology, Trondheim, Norway, Report No. STS20 A89001, June 1989

1-88 C. W. Hirt and R. P. Harper, Modeling Tests for Casting Processes, Flow Science report, Jan. 1988 (FSI-88-38-01)

2-87 C. W. Hirt, Addition of a Solidification/Melting Model to FLOW-3D, Flow Science report, April 1987 (FSI-87-33-1)

Coating field – Gravure Coating/Printing (그라비어 코팅/인쇄)

Gravure Coating/Printing (그라비어 코팅/인쇄)

  • 금속 실린더에 새겨진 요점에 액체가 묻어나고 금속 실린더가 회전하면서 필름 표면에 액체가 묻어나도록 하는 기법
  • 새겨진 패턴 안에서 유체가 놓임
  • 작동 속도를 증가할 수 있음
  • 상세 패턴 및 이미지 인쇄에도 사용

FLOW-3D를 이용한 깊이별 그라비어 코팅