Schematic view of the experimental set-up

Short-time numerical simulation of ultrasonically assisted electrochemical removal of strontium from water

  • September 2023

DOI:10.30955/gnc2023.00436

  • Conference: 18th International Conference on Environmental Science and Technology CEST2023, 30 August to 2 September 2023, Athens, Greece
  • At: Athens, Greece

Authors:

Katarina Licht

  • University of Zagreb Faculty of Civil Engineering
Ivan Halkijevic at University of Zagreb

Ivan Halkijevic

Hana Posavcic at University of Zagreb

Hana Posavcic

Goran Loncar at University of Zagreb

Goran Loncar

Abstract and Figures

3D numerical simulations and measurements on an electrochemical reactor were used to analyze the efficiency of strontium removal from water, with and without simultaneous ultrasound treatment. Ultrasound was generated using 4 ultrasonic transducers with an operating frequency of 25 kHz. The reactor used 8 aluminum electrodes arranged in two blocks. Strontium ions in water are modeled as particles characterized by a charge of 3.2•10-19 C and a diameter of 1.2•10-8 m. The numerical model was created in Flow-3D software using the basic hydrodynamic module, electrostatic module, and general moving objects module. The performance of the studied reactor variants by numerical simulations is defined by the ratio of the number of model strontium particles permanently retained on the electrodes at the end of the simulation period to the initial number of particles in the water. For the laboratory reactor, the effect of strontium removal is defined by the ratio of the homogeneous strontium concentration in the water at the end and at the beginning of the experiments. The results show that the use of ultrasound increases the effect of strontium removal from 10.3% to 11.2% after 180 seconds of water treatment. The results of numerical simulations agree with the results of measurements on a reactor with the same geometrical characteristics.

Keywords:

numerical model, electrochemical reactor, strontium

1. Introduction

Strontium (Sr) is a naturally occurring element found in many sedimentary rocks and some calcite minerals. Significant anthropogenic sources include industrial activities, fertilizers, and nuclear fallout (Scott et al., 2020). Sr concentrations greater than 1.5 mg L-1 in water can cause strontium rickets and other health problems in humans, especially in children (Epa et al., n.d.; Peng et al., 2021; Scott et al., 2020). Elevated Sr concentrations have been reported in drinking water worldwide, with concentrations as high as 52 mg L-1 in groundwater in the northern USA (Luczaj and Masarik, 2015; Peng et al., 2021; Scott et al., 2020). One of the possible remediation technologies for Sr is an electrochemical process (Kamaraj and Vasudevan, 2015). These processes are based on in-situ coagulant formation through the application of electric current to metal electrodes. The process consists of dissolution of the sacrificial anode, formation of hydroxide ions and hydrogen at the cathode, electrolyte reactions at the electrode surface, adsorption of coagulants on colloidal impurities and electrodes, and removal of the resulting flocs by precipitation or flotation (Mollah et al., 2001). One of the main drawbacks of the process is the polarization and passivation of the electrodes, which can be minimized by combining it with ultrasonication (Dong et al., 2016; Ince, 2018; Moradi et al., 2021). Ultrasonic cavitation can result in solute thermolysis and the formation of reactive species such as hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide (Mohapatra and Kirpalani, 2019). It also increases the mass transfer rates of solutes and enhances the surface properties of solid particles (Fu et al., 2016; Ziylan et al., 2013). The aim of this research is to evaluate the efficiency of the electrochemical (EC) batch reactor with and without the additional use of ultrasound (US), which is intended for the purification of water mainly contaminated with an increased concentration of Sr. The results of the 3D numerical simulations are verified by measurements in the laboratory EC reactor.

References

Dong, B., Fishgold, A., Lee, P., Runge, K., Deymier, P. and Keswani, M. (2016), Sono-electrochemical recovery of metal ions from their aqueous solutions, Journal of Hazardous Materials, 318, 379–387.

https://doi.org/10.1016/J.JHAZMAT.2016.07.007

EPA. (2014), Announcement of Final Regulatory Determinations for Contaminants on the Third Drinking

Water Contaminant Candidate List. Retrieved from http://fdsys.gpo.gov/fdsys/search/home.action

Fu, F., Lu, J., Cheng, Z. and Tang, B. (2016), Removal of selenite by zero-valent iron combined with ultrasound:

Se(IV) concentration changes, Se(VI) generation, and reaction mechanism, Ultrasonics Sonochemistry, 29,

328–336. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ultsonch.2015.10.007 Ince, N.H. (2018), Ultrasound-assisted advanced oxidation processes for water decontamination, Ultrasonics Sonochemistry, 40, 97–103.

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ultsonch.2017.04.009

Kamaraj, R. and Vasudevan, S. (2015), Evaluation of electrocoagulation processfor the removal of strontium and cesium from aqueous solution, Chemical Engineering Research and Design, 93, 522–530.

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cherd.2014.03.021

Luczaj, J. and Masarik, K. (2015), Groundwater Quantity and Quality Issues in a Water-Rich Region: Examples from Wisconsin, USA, Resources, 4(2), 323–357.

https://doi.org/10.3390/resources4020323

Mohapatra, D.P. and Kirpalani, D.M. (2019), Selenium in wastewater: fast analysis method development and advanced oxidation treatment applications, Water Science and Technology: A Journal of the International Association on Water Pollution Research, 79(5), 842–849. https://doi.org/10.2166/wst.2019.010

Mollah, M.Y.A., Schennach, R., Parga, J.R. and Cocke, D.L. (2001), Electrocoagulation (EC)- Science and

applications, Journal of Hazardous Materials, 84(1), 29–41. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0304-3894(01)00176-5 Moradi, M., Vasseghian, Y., Arabzade, H. and Khaneghah, A.M. (2021), Various wastewaters treatment by sono-electrocoagulation process: A comprehensive review of operational parameters and future outlook, Chemosphere, 263, 128314.https://doi.org/10.1016/J.CHEMOSPHERE.2020.128314

Peng, H., Yao, F., Xiong, S., Wu, Z., Niu, G. and Lu, T. (2021), Strontium in public drinking water and associated public health risks in Chinese cities, Environmental Science and Pollution Research International, 28(18), 23048.

https://doi.org/10.1007/S11356-021-12378-Y

Scott, V., Juran, L., Ling, E.J., Benham, B. and Spiller, A. (2020), Assessing strontium and vulnerability to

strontium in private drinking water systems in Virginia, Water, 12(4). https://doi.org/10.3390/w12041053

Ziylan, A., Koltypin, Y., Gedanken, A. and Ince, N.H. (2013), More on sonolytic and sonocatalytic decomposition of Diclofenac using zero-valent iron, Ultrasonics Sonochemistry, 20(1), 580–586.

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ultsonch.2012.05.005

Figure 1. US bath modified as an EC reactor

물에서 초음파를 이용한 전기화학적 스트론튬 제거에 대한 단시간 수치 시뮬레이션

전기화학 반응기에 대한 3D 수치 시뮬레이션 및 측정을 사용하여 동시 초음파 처리 유무에 관계없이 물에서 스트론튬 제거 효율을 분석했습니다. 초음파는 작동 주파수가 25kHz인 4개의 초음파 변환기를 사용하여 생성되었습니다. 반응기는 2개의 블록으로 배열된 8개의 알루미늄 전극을 사용했습니다.

LICHT K.1*, LONČAR G.1, POSAVČIĆ H.1, HALKIJEVIĆ I.1
1 Department of Hydroscience and Engineering, Faculty of Civil Engineering, University of Zagreb, Andrije Kačića-Miošića 26, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia
*corresponding author:
e-mail:katarina.licht@grad.unizg.hr

물 속의 스트론튬 이온은 3.2∙10-19C의 전하와 1.2∙10-8m의 직경을 특징으로 하는 입자로 모델링됩니다. 수치 모델은 기본 유체 역학 모듈, 정전기 모듈 및 일반 이동 객체 모듈을 사용하여 Flow-3D 소프트웨어에서 생성되었습니다.

수치 시뮬레이션을 통해 연구된 원자로 변형의 성능은 시뮬레이션 기간이 끝날 때 전극에 영구적으로 유지되는 모델 스트론튬 입자 수와 물 속의 초기 입자 수의 비율로 정의됩니다. 실험실 반응기의 경우 스트론튬 제거 효과는 실험 종료 시와 시작 시 물 내 균일한 스트론튬 농도의 비율로 정의됩니다.

결과는 초음파를 사용하면 수처리 180초 후에 스트론튬 제거 효과가 10.3%에서 11.2%로 증가한다는 것을 보여줍니다. 수치 시뮬레이션 결과는 동일한 기하학적 특성을 갖는 원자로에 대한 측정 결과와 일치합니다.

3D numerical simulations and measurements on an electrochemical reactor were used to analyze the efficiency of strontium removal from water, with and without simultaneous ultrasound treatment. Ultrasound was generated using 4 ultrasonic transducers with an operating frequency of 25 kHz. The reactor used 8 aluminum electrodes arranged in two blocks. Strontium ions in water are modeled as particles characterized by a charge of 3.2∙10-19 C and a diameter of 1.2∙10-8 m. The numerical model was created in Flow-3D software using the basic hydrodynamic module, electrostatic module, and general moving objects module. The performance of the studied reactor variants by numerical simulations is defined by the ratio of the number of model strontium particles permanently retained on the electrodes at the end of the simulation period to the initial number of particles in the water. For the laboratory reactor, the effect of strontium removal is defined by the ratio of the homogeneous strontium concentration in the water at the end and at the beginning of the experiments. The results show that the use of ultrasound increases the effect of strontium removal from 10.3% to 11.2% after 180 seconds of water treatment. The results of numerical simulations agree with the results of measurements on a reactor with the same geometrical characteristics.

Keywords

numerical model, electrochemical reactor, strontium

Figure 1. US bath modified as an EC reactor
Figure 1. US bath modified as an EC reactor
Figure 2. Schematic view of the experimental set-up
Figure 2. Schematic view of the experimental set-up

References

Dong, B., Fishgold, A., Lee, P., Runge, K., Deymier, P. and Keswani, M. (2016), Sono-electrochemical recovery of metal ions from their aqueous solutions, Journal of Hazardous Materials, 318, 379–387.
https://doi.org/10.1016/J.JHAZMAT.2016.07.007
EPA. (2014), Announcement of Final Regulatory Determinations for Contaminants on the Third Drinking
Water Contaminant Candidate List. Retrieved from http://fdsys.gpo.gov/fdsys/search/home.action
Fu, F., Lu, J., Cheng, Z. and Tang, B. (2016), Removal of selenite by zero-valent iron combined with ultrasound: Se(IV) concentration changes, Se(VI) generation, and reaction mechanism, Ultrasonics Sonochemistry, 29, 328–336. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ultsonch.2015.10.007
Ince, N.H. (2018), Ultrasound-assisted advanced oxidation processes for water decontamination, Ultrasonics Sonochemistry, 40, 97–103.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ultsonch.2017.04.009
Kamaraj, R. and Vasudevan, S. (2015), Evaluation of electrocoagulation process for the removal of strontium and cesium from aqueous solution, Chemical
Engineering Research and Design, 93, 522–530.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cherd.2014.03.021
Luczaj, J. and Masarik, K. (2015), Groundwater Quantity and Quality Issues in a Water-Rich Region: Examples from Wisconsin, USA, Resources, 4(2), 323–357.
https://doi.org/10.3390/resources4020323
Mohapatra, D.P. and Kirpalani, D.M. (2019), Selenium in wastewater: fast analysis method development and advanced oxidation treatment applications, Water Science and Technology: A Journal of the International Association on Water Pollution Research, 79(5), 842–849. https://doi.org/10.2166/wst.2019.010

Mollah, M.Y.A., Schennach, R., Parga, J.R. and Cocke, D.L.(2001), Electrocoagulation (EC)- Science and
applications, Journal of Hazardous Materials, 84(1), 29–41. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0304-3894(01)00176-5

Moradi, M., Vasseghian, Y., Arabzade, H. and Khaneghah, A.M. (2021), Various wastewaters treatment by sonoelectrocoagulation process: A comprehensive review of operational parameters and future outlook, Chemosphere, 263, 128314. https://doi.org/10.1016/J.CHEMOSPHERE.2020.12831 4
Peng, H., Yao, F., Xiong, S., Wu, Z., Niu, G. and Lu, T. (2021), Strontium in public drinking water and associated public health risks in Chinese cities, Environmental Science and Pollution Research International, 28(18), 23048. https://doi.org/10.1007/S11356-021-12378-Y
Scott, V., Juran, L., Ling, E.J., Benham, B. and Spiller, A. (2020), Assessing strontium and vulnerability to strontium in private drinking water systems in Virginia, Water, 12(4). https://doi.org/10.3390/w12041053
Ziylan, A., Koltypin, Y., Gedanken, A. and Ince, N.H. (2013), More on sonolytic and sonocatalytic decomposition of Diclofenac using zero-valent iron, Ultrasonics Sonochemistry, 20(1), 580–586. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ultsonch.2012.05.00

Figure 3: Wave pattern at sea surface at 20 knots (10.29 m/s) for mesh 1

Flow-3D에서 CFD 시뮬레이션을 사용한 선박 저항 분석

Ship resistance analysis using CFD simulations in Flow-3D

Author

Deshpande, SujaySundsbø, Per-ArneDas, Subhashis

Abstract

선박의 동력 요구 사항을 설계할 때 고려해야 할 가장 중요한 요소는 선박 저항 또는 선박에 작용하는 항력입니다. 항력을 극복하는 데 필요한 동력이 추진 시스템의 ‘손실’에 기여하기 때문에 추진 시스템을 설계하는 동안 선박 저항을 추정하는 것이 중요합니다. 선박 저항을 계산하는 세 가지 주요 방법이 있습니다:

Holtrop-Mennen(HM) 방법과 같은 통계적 방법, 수치 분석 또는 CFD(전산 유체 역학) 시뮬레이션 및 모델 테스트, 즉 예인 탱크에서 축소된 모델 테스트. 설계 단계 초기에는 기본 선박 매개변수만 사용할 수 있을 때 HM 방법과 같은 통계 모델만 사용할 수 있습니다.

수치 해석/CFD 시뮬레이션 및 모델 테스트는 선박의 완전한 3D 설계가 완료된 경우에만 수행할 수 있습니다. 본 논문은 Flow-3D 소프트웨어 패키지를 사용하여 CFD 시뮬레이션을 사용하여 잔잔한 수상 선박 저항을 예측하는 것을 목표로 합니다.

롤온/롤오프 승객(RoPax) 페리에 대한 사례 연구를 조사했습니다. 선박 저항은 다양한 선박 속도에서 계산되었습니다. 메쉬는 모든 CFD 시뮬레이션의 결과에 영향을 미치기 때문에 메쉬 민감도를 확인하기 위해 여러 개의 메쉬가 사용되었습니다. 시뮬레이션의 결과를 HM 방법의 추정치와 비교했습니다.

시뮬레이션 결과는 낮은 선박 속도에 대한 HM 방법과 잘 일치했습니다. 더 높은 선속을 위한 HM 방법에 비해 결과의 차이가 상당히 컸다. 선박 저항 분석을 수행하는 Flow-3D의 기능이 시연되었습니다.

While designing the power requirements of a ship, the most important factor to be considered is the ship resistance, or the sea drag forces acting on the ship. It is important to have an estimate of the ship resistance while designing the propulsion system since the power required to overcome the sea drag forces contribute to ‘losses’ in the propulsion system. There are three main methods to calculate ship resistance: Statistical methods like the Holtrop-Mennen (HM) method, numerical analysis or CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulations, and model testing, i.e. scaled model tests in towing tanks. At the start of the design stage, when only basic ship parameters are available, only statistical models like the HM method can be used. Numerical analysis/ CFD simulations and model tests can be performed only when the complete 3D design of the ship is completed. The present paper aims at predicting the calm water ship resistance using CFD simulations, using the Flow-3D software package. A case study of a roll-on/roll-off passenger (RoPax) ferry was investigated. Ship resistance was calculated at various ship speeds. Since the mesh affects the results in any CFD simulation, multiple meshes were used to check the mesh sensitivity. The results from the simulations were compared with the estimate from the HM method. The results from simulations agreed well with the HM method for low ship speeds. The difference in the results was considerably high compared to the HM method for higher ship speeds. The capability of Flow-3D to perform ship resistance analysis was demonstrated.

Figure 1: Simplified ship geometry
Figure 1: Simplified ship geometry
Figure 3: Wave pattern at sea surface at 20 knots (10.29 m/s) for mesh 1
Figure 3: Wave pattern at sea surface at 20 knots (10.29 m/s) for mesh 1
Figure 4: Ship Resistance (kN) vs Ship Speed (knots)
Figure 4: Ship Resistance (kN) vs Ship Speed (knots)

Publisher

International Society of Multiphysics

Citation

Deshpande SR, Sundsbø P, Das S. Ship resistance analysis using CFD simulations in Flow-3D. The International Journal of Multiphysics. 2020;14(3):227-236

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Figure 5. Schematic view of flap and support structure [32]

Design Optimization of Ocean Renewable Energy Converter Using a Combined Bi-level Metaheuristic Approach

결합된 Bi-level 메타휴리스틱 접근법을 사용한 해양 재생 에너지 변환기의 설계 최적화

Erfan Amini a1, Mahdieh Nasiri b1, Navid Salami Pargoo a, Zahra Mozhgani c, Danial Golbaz d, Mehrdad Baniesmaeil e, Meysam Majidi Nezhad f, Mehdi Neshat gj, Davide Astiaso Garcia h, Georgios Sylaios i

Abstract

In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in renewable energies in view of the fact that fossil fuels are the leading cause of catastrophic environmental consequences. Ocean wave energy is a renewable energy source that is particularly prevalent in coastal areas. Since many countries have tremendous potential to extract this type of energy, a number of researchers have sought to determine certain effective factors on wave converters’ performance, with a primary emphasis on ambient factors. In this study, we used metaheuristic optimization methods to investigate the effects of geometric factors on the performance of an Oscillating Surge Wave Energy Converter (OSWEC), in addition to the effects of hydrodynamic parameters. To do so, we used CATIA software to model different geometries which were then inserted into a numerical model developed in Flow3D software. A Ribed-surface design of the converter’s flap is also introduced in this study to maximize wave-converter interaction. Besides, a Bi-level Hill Climbing Multi-Verse Optimization (HCMVO) method was also developed for this application. The results showed that the converter performs better with greater wave heights, flap freeboard heights, and shorter wave periods. Additionally, the added ribs led to more wave-converter interaction and better performance, while the distance between the flap and flume bed negatively impacted the performance. Finally, tracking the changes in the five-dimensional objective function revealed the optimum value for each parameter in all scenarios. This is achieved by the newly developed optimization algorithm, which is much faster than other existing cutting-edge metaheuristic approaches.

Keywords

Wave Energy Converter

OSWEC

Hydrodynamic Effects

Geometric Design

Metaheuristic Optimization

Multi-Verse Optimizer

1Introduction

The increase in energy demand, the limitations of fossil fuels, as well as environmental crises, such as air pollution and global warming, are the leading causes of calling more attention to harvesting renewable energy recently [1][2][3]. While still in its infancy, ocean wave energy has neither reached commercial maturity nor technological convergence. In recent decades, remarkable progress has been made in the marine energy domain, which is still in the early stage of development, to improve the technology performance level (TPL) [4][5]and technology readiness level (TRL) of wave energy converters (WECs). This has been achieved using novel modeling techniques [6][7][8][9][10][11][12][13][14] to gain the following advantages [15]: (i) As a source of sustainable energy, it contributes to the mix of energy resources that leads to greater diversity and attractiveness for coastal cities and suppliers. [16] (ii) Since wave energy can be exploited offshore and does not require any land, in-land site selection would be less expensive and undesirable visual effects would be reduced. [17] (iii) When the best layout and location of offshore site are taken into account, permanent generation of energy will be feasible (as opposed to using solar energy, for example, which is time-dependent) [18].

In general, the energy conversion process can be divided into three stages in a WEC device, including primary, secondary, and tertiary stages [19][20]. In the first stage of energy conversion, which is the subject of this study, the wave power is converted to mechanical power by wave-structure interaction (WSI) between ocean waves and structures. Moreover, the mechanical power is transferred into electricity in the second stage, in which mechanical structures are coupled with power take-off systems (PTO). At this stage, optimal control strategies are useful to tune the system dynamics to maximize power output [10][13][12]. Furthermore, the tertiary energy conversion stage revolves around transferring the non-standard AC power into direct current (DC) power for energy storage or standard AC power for grid integration [21][22]. We discuss only the first stage regardless of the secondary and tertiary stages. While Page 1 of 16 WECs include several categories and technologies such as terminators, point absorbers, and attenuators [15][23], we focus on oscillating surge wave energy converters (OSWECs) in this paper due to its high capacity for industrialization [24].

Over the past two decades, a number of studies have been conducted to understand how OSWECs’ structures and interactions between ocean waves and flaps affect converters performance. Henry et al.’s experiment on oscillating surge wave energy converters is considered as one of the most influential pieces of research [25], which demonstrated how the performance of oscillating surge wave energy converters (OSWECs) is affected by seven different factors, including wave period, wave power, flap’s relative density, water depth, free-board of the flap, the gap between the tubes, gap underneath the flap, and flap width. These parameters were assessed in their two models in order to estimate the absorbed energy from incoming waves [26][27]. In addition, Folly et al. investigated the impact of water depth on the OSWECs performance analytically, numerically, and experimentally. According to this and further similar studies, the average annual incident wave power is significantly reduced by water depth. Based on the experimental results, both the surge wave force and the power capture of OSWECs increase in shallow water [28][29]. Following this, Sarkar et al. found that under such circumstances, the device that is located near the coast performs much better than those in the open ocean [30]. On the other hand, other studies are showing that the size of the converter, including height and width, is relatively independent of the location (within similar depth) [31]. Subsequently, Schmitt et al. studied OSWECs numerically and experimentally. In fact, for the simulation of OSWEC, OpenFOAM was used to test the applicability of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solvers. Then, the experimental model reproduced the numerical results with satisfying accuracy [32]. In another influential study, Wang et al. numerically assessed the effect of OSWEC’s width on their performance. According to their findings, as converter width increases, its efficiency decreases in short wave periods while increases in long wave periods [33]. One of the main challenges in the analysis of the OSWEC is the coupled effect of hydrodynamic and geometric variables. As a result, numerous cutting-edge geometry studies have been performed in recent years in order to find the optimal structure that maximizes power output and minimizes costs. Garcia et al. reviewed hull geometry optimization studies in the literature in [19]. In addition, Guo and Ringwood surveyed geometric optimization methods to improve the hydrodynamic performance of OSWECs at the primary stage [14]. Besides, they classified the hull geometry of OSWECs based on Figure 1. Subsequently, Whittaker et al. proposed a different design of OSWEC called Oyster2. There have been three examples of different geometries of oysters with different water depths. Based on its water depth, they determined the width and height of the converter. They also found that in the constant wave period the less the converter’s width, the less power captures the converter has [34]. Afterward, O’Boyle et al. investigated a type of OSWEC called Oyster 800. They compared the experimental and numerical models with the prototype model. In order to precisely reproduce the shape, mass distribution, and buoyancy properties of the prototype, a 40th-scale experimental model has been designed. Overall, all the models were fairly accurate according to the results [35].

Inclusive analysis of recent research avenues in the area of flap geometry has revealed that the interaction-based designs of such converters are emerging as a novel approach. An initiative workflow is designed in the current study to maximizing the wave energy extrication by such systems. To begin with, a sensitivity analysis plays its role of determining the best hydrodynamic values for installing the converter’s flap. Then, all flap dimensions and characteristics come into play to finalize the primary model. Following, interactive designs is proposed to increase the influence of incident waves on the body by adding ribs on both sides of the flap as a novel design. Finally, a new bi-level metaheuristic method is proposed to consider the effects of simultaneous changes in ribs properties and other design parameters. We hope this novel approach will be utilized to make big-scale projects less costly and justifiable. The efficiency of the method is also compared with four well known metaheuristic algorithms and out weight them for this application.

This paper is organized as follows. First, the research methodology is introduced by providing details about the numerical model implementation. To that end, we first introduced the primary model’s geometry and software details. That primary model is later verified with a benchmark study with regard to the flap angle of rotation and water surface elevation. Then, governing equations and performance criteria are presented. In the third part of the paper, we discuss the model’s sensitivity to lower and upper parts width (we proposed a two cross-sectional design for the flap), bottom elevation, and freeboard. Finally, the novel optimization approach is introduced in the final part and compared with four recent metaheuristic algorithms.

2. Numerical Methods

In this section, after a brief introduction of the numerical software, Flow3D, boundary conditions are defined. Afterwards, the numerical model implementation, along with primary model properties are described. Finally, governing equations, as part of numerical process, are discussed.

2.1Model Setup

FLOW-3D is a powerful and comprehensive CFD simulation platform for studying fluid dynamics. This software has several modules to solve many complex engineering problems. In addition, modeling complex flows is simple and effective using FLOW-3D’s robust meshing capabilities [36]. Interaction between fluid and moving objects might alter the computational range. Dynamic meshes are used in our modeling to take these changes into account. At each time step, the computational node positions change in order to adapt the meshing area to the moving object. In addition, to choose mesh dimensions, some factors are taken into account such as computational accuracy, computational time, and stability. The final grid size is selected based on the detailed procedure provided in [37]. To that end, we performed grid-independence testing on a CFD model using three different mesh grid sizes of 0.01, 0.015, and 0.02 meters. The problem geometry and boundary conditions were defined the same, and simulations were run on all three grids under the same conditions. The predicted values of the relevant variable, such as velocity, was compared between the grids. The convergence behavior of the numerical solution was analyzed by calculating the relative L2 norm error between two consecutive grids. Based on the results obtained, it was found that the grid size of 0.02 meters showed the least error, indicating that it provided the most accurate and reliable solution among the three grids. Therefore, the grid size of 0.02 meters was selected as the optimal spatial resolution for the mesh grid.

In this work, the flume dimensions are 10 meters long, 0.1 meters wide, and 2.2 meters high, which are shown in figure2. In addition, input waves with linear characteristics have a height of 0.1 meters and a period of 1.4 seconds. Among the linear wave methods included in this software, RNGk-ε and k- ε are appropriate for turbulence model. The research of Lopez et al. shows that RNGk- ε provides the most accurate simulation of turbulence in OSWECs [21]. We use CATIA software to create the flap primary model and other innovative designs for this project. The flap measures 0.1 m x 0.65 m x 0.360 m in x, y and z directions, respectively. In Figure 3, the primary model of flap and its dimensions are shown. In this simulation, five boundaries have been defined, including 1. Inlet, 2. Outlet, 3. Converter flap, 4. Bed flume, and 5. Water surface, which are shown in figure 2. Besides, to avoid wave reflection in inlet and outlet zones, Flow3D is capable of defining some areas as damping zones, the length of which has to be one to one and a half times the wavelength. Therefore, in the model, this length is considered equal to 2 meters. Furthermore, there is no slip in all the boundaries. In other words, at every single time step, the fluid velocity is zero on the bed flume, while it is equal to the flap velocity on the converter flap. According to the wave theory defined in the software, at the inlet boundary, the water velocity is called from the wave speed to be fed into the model.

2.2Verification

In the current study, we utilize the Schmitt experimental model as a benchmark for verification, which was developed at the Queen’s University of Belfast. The experiments were conducted on the flap of the converter, its rotation, and its interaction with the water surface. Thus, the details of the experiments are presented below based up on the experimental setup’s description [38]. In the experiment, the laboratory flume has a length of 20m and a width of 4.58m. Besides, in order to avoid incident wave reflection, a wave absorption source is devised at the end of the left flume. The flume bed, also, includes two parts with different slops. The flap position and dimensions of the flume can be seen in Figure4. In addition, a wave-maker with 6 paddles is installed at one end. At the opposite end, there is a beach with wire meshes. Additionally, there are 6 indicators to extract the water level elevation. In the flap model, there are three components: the fixed support structure, the hinge, and the flap. The flap measures 0.1m x 0.65m x 0.341m in x, y and z directions, respectively. In Figure5, the details are given [32]. The support structure consists of a 15 mm thick stainless steel base plate measuring 1m by 1.4m, which is screwed onto the bottom of the tank. The hinge is supported by three bearing blocks. There is a foam centerpiece on the front and back of the flap which is sandwiched between two PVC plates. Enabling changes of the flap, three metal fittings link the flap to the hinge. Moreover, in this experiment, the selected wave is generated based on sea wave data at scale 1:40. The wave height and the wave period are equal to 0.038 (m) and 2.0625 (s), respectively, which are tantamount to a wave with a period of 13 (s) and a height of 1.5 (m).

Two distinct graphs illustrate the numerical and experi-mental study results. Figure6 and Figure7 are denoting the angle of rotation of flap and surface elevation in computational and experimental models, respectively. The two figures roughly represent that the numerical and experimental models are a good match. However, for the purpose of verifying the match, we calculated the correlation coefficient (C) and root mean square error (RMSE). According to Figure6, correlation coefficient and RMSE are 0.998 and 0.003, respectively, and in Figure7 correlation coefficient and RMSE are respectively 0.999 and 0.001. Accordingly, there is a good match between the numerical and empirical models. It is worth mentioning that the small differences between the numerical and experimental outputs may be due to the error of the measuring devices and the calibration of the data collection devices.

Including continuity equation and momentum conserva- tion for incompressible fluid are given as [32][39]:(1)

where P represents the pressure, g denotes gravitational acceleration, u represents fluid velocity, and Di is damping coefficient. Likewise, the model uses the same equation. to calculate the fluid velocity in other directions as well. Considering the turbulence, we use the two-equation model of RNGK- ε. These equations are:

(3)��t(��)+����(����)=����[�eff�������]+��-��and(4)���(��)+����(����)=����[�eff�������]+�1�∗����-��2��2�Where �2� and �1� are constants. In addition, �� and �� represent the turbulent Prandtl number of � and k, respectively.

�� also denote the production of turbulent kinetic energy of k under the effect of velocity gradient, which is calculated as follows:(5)��=�eff[�����+�����]�����(6)�eff=�+��(7)�eff=�+��where � is molecular viscosity,�� represents turbulence viscosity, k denotes kinetic energy, and ∊∊ is energy dissipation rate. The values of constant coefficients in the two-equation RNGK ∊-∊ model is as shown in the Table 1 [40].Table 2.

Table 1. Constant coefficients in RNGK- model

Factors�0�1�2������
Quantity0.0124.381.421.681.391.390.084

Table 2. Flap properties

Joint height (m)0.476
Height of the center of mass (m)0.53
Weight (Kg)10.77

It is worth mentioning that the volume of fluid method is used to separate water and air phases in this software [41]. Below is the equation of this method [40].(8)����+����(���)=0where α and 1 − α are portion of water phase and air phase, respectively. As a weighting factor, each fluid phase portion is used to determine the mixture properties. Finally, using the following equations, we calculate the efficiency of converters [42][34][43]:(9)�=14|�|2�+�2+(�+�a)2(�n2-�2)2where �� represents natural frequency, I denotes the inertia of OSWEC, Ia is the added inertia, F is the complex wave force, and B denotes the hydrodynamic damping coefficient. Afterward, the capture factor of the converter is calculated by [44]:(10)��=�1/2��2����gw where �� represents the capture factor, which is the total efficiency of device per unit length of the wave crest at each time step [15], �� represent the dimensional amplitude of the incident wave, w is the flap’s width, and Cg is the group velocity of the incident wave, as below:(11)��=��0·121+2�0ℎsinh2�0ℎwhere �0 denotes the wave number, h is water depth, and H is the height of incident waves.

According to previous sections ∊,����-∊ modeling is used for all models simulated in this section. For this purpose, the empty boundary condition is used for flume walls. In order to preventing wave reflection at the inlet and outlet of the flume, the length of wave absorption is set to be at least one incident wavelength. In addition, the structured mesh is chosen, and the mesh dimensions are selected in two distinct directions. In each model, all grids have a length of 2 (cm) and a height of 1 (cm). Afterwards, as an input of the software for all of the models, we define the time step as 0.001 (s). Moreover, the run time of every simulation is 30 (s). As mentioned before, our primary model is Schmitt model, and the flap properties is given in table2. For all simulations, the flume measures 15 meters in length and 0.65 meters in width, and water depth is equal to 0.335 (m). The flap is also located 7 meters from the flume’s inlet.

Finally, in order to compare the results, the capture factor is calculated for each simulation and compared to the primary model. It is worth mentioning that capture factor refers to the ratio of absorbed wave energy to the input wave energy.

According to primary model simulation and due to the decreasing horizontal velocity with depth, the wave crest has the highest velocity. Considering the fact that the wave’s orbital velocity causes the flap to move, the contact between the upper edge of the flap and the incident wave can enhance its performance. Additionally, the numerical model shows that the dynamic pressure decreases as depth increases, and the hydrostatic pressure increases as depth increases.

To determine the OSWEC design, it is imperative to understand the correlation between the capture factor, wave period, and wave height. Therefore, as it is shown in Figure8, we plot the change in capture factor over the variations in wave period and wave height in 3D and 2D. In this diagram, the first axis features changes in wave period, the second axis displays changes in wave height, and the third axis depicts changes in capture factor. According to our wave properties in the numerical model, the wave period and wave height range from 2 to 14 seconds and 2 to 8 meters, respectively. This is due to the fact that the flap does not oscillate if the wave height is less than 2 (m), and it does not reverse if the wave height is more than 8 (m). In addition, with wave periods more than 14 (s), the wavelength would be so long that it would violate the deep-water conditions, and with wave periods less than 2 (s), the flap would not oscillate properly due to the shortness of wavelength. The results of simulation are shown in Figure 8. As it can be perceived from Figure 8, in a constant wave period, the capture factor is in direct proportion to the wave height. It is because of the fact that waves with more height have more energy to rotate the flap. Besides, in a constant wave height, the capture factor increases when the wave period increases, until a given wave period value. However, the capture factor falls after this point. These results are expected since the flap’s angular displacement is not high in lower wave periods, while the oscillating motion of that is not fast enough to activate the power take-off system in very high wave periods.

As is shown in Figure 9, we plot the change in capture factor over the variations in wave period (s) and water depth (m) in 3D. As it can be seen in this diagram, the first axis features changes in water depth (m), the second axis depicts the wave period (s), and the third axis displays OSWEC’s capture factor. The wave period ranges from 0 to 10 seconds based on our wave properties, which have been adopted from Schmitt’s model, while water depth ranges from 0 to 0.5 meters according to the flume and flap dimensions and laboratory limitations. According to Figure9, for any specific water depth, the capture factor increases in a varying rate when the wave period increases, until a given wave period value. However, the capture factor falls steadily after this point. In fact, the maximum capture factor occurs when the wave period is around 6 seconds. This trend is expected since, in a specific water depth, the flap cannot oscillate properly when the wavelength is too short. As the wave period increases, the flap can oscillate more easily, and consequently its capture factor increases. However, the capture factor drops in higher wave periods because the wavelength is too large to move the flap. Furthermore, in a constant wave period, by changing the water depth, the capture factor does not alter. In other words, the capture factor does not depend on the water depth when it is around its maximum value.

3Sensitivity Analysis

Based on previous studies, in addition to the flap design, the location of the flap relative to the water surface (freeboard) and its elevation relative to the flume bed (flap bottom elevation) play a significant role in extracting energy from the wave energy converter. This study measures the sensitivity of the model to various parameters related to the flap design including upper part width of the flap, lower part width of the flap, the freeboard, and the flap bottom elevation. Moreover, as a novel idea, we propose that the flap widths differ in the lower and upper parts. In Figure10, as an example, a flap with an upper thickness of 100 (mm) and a lower thickness of 50 (mm) and a flap with an upper thickness of 50 (mm) and a lower thickness of 100 (mm) are shown. The influence of such discrepancy between the widths of the upper and lower parts on the interaction between the wave and the flap, or in other words on the capture factor, is evaluated. To do so, other parameters are remained constant, such as the freeboard, the distance between the flap and the flume bed, and the wave properties.

In Figure11, models are simulated with distinct upper and lower widths. As it is clear in this figure, the first axis depicts the lower part width of the flap, the second axis indicates the upper part width of the flap, and the colors represent the capture factor values. Additionally, in order to consider a sufficient range of change, the flap thickness varies from half to double the value of the primary model for each part.

According to this study, the greater the discrepancy in these two parts, the lower the capture factor. It is on account of the fact that when the lower part of the flap is thicker than the upper part, and this thickness difference in these two parts is extremely conspicuous, the inertia against the motion is significant at zero degrees of rotation. Consequently, it is difficult to move the flap, which results in a low capture factor. Similarly, when the upper part of the flap is thicker than the lower part, and this thickness difference in these two parts is exceedingly noticeable, the inertia is so great that the flap can not reverse at the maximum degree of rotation. As the results indicate, the discrepancy can enhance the performance of the converter if the difference between these two parts is around 20%. As it is depicted in the Figure11, the capture factor reaches its own maximum amount, when the lower part thickness is from 5 to 6 (cm), and the upper part thickness is between 6 and 7 (cm). Consequently, as a result of this discrepancy, less material will be used, and therefore there will be less cost.

As illustrated in Figure12, this study examines the effects of freeboard (level difference between the flap top and water surface) and the flap bottom elevation (the distance between the flume bed and flap bottom) on the converter performance. In this diagram, the first axis demonstrates the freeboard and the second axis on the left side displays the flap bottom elevation, while the colors indicate the capture factor. In addition, the feasible range of freeboard is between -15 to 15 (cm) due to the limitation of the numerical model, so that we can take the wave slamming and the overtopping into consideration. Additionally, based on the Schmitt model and its scaled model of 1:40 of the base height, the flap bottom should be at least 9 (cm) high. Since the effect of surface waves is distributed over the depth of the flume, it is imperative to maintain a reasonable flap height exposed to incoming waves. Thus, the maximum flap bottom elevation is limited to 19 (cm). As the Figure12 pictures, at constant negative values of the freeboard, the capture factor is in inverse proportion with the flap bottom elevation, although slightly.

Furthermore, at constant positive values of the freeboard, the capture factor fluctuates as the flap bottom elevation decreases while it maintains an overall increasing trend. This is on account of the fact that increasing the flap bottom elevation creates turbulence flow behind the flap, which encumbers its rotation, as well as the fact that the flap surface has less interaction with the incoming waves. Furthermore, while keeping the flap bottom elevation constant, the capture factor increases by raising the freeboard. This is due to the fact that there is overtopping with adverse impacts on the converter performance when the freeboard is negative and the flap is under the water surface. Besides, increasing the freeboard makes the wave slam more vigorously, which improves the converter performance.

Adding ribs to the flap surface, as shown in Figure13, is a novel idea that is investigated in the next section. To achieve an optimized design for the proposed geometry of the flap, we determine the optimal number and dimensions of ribs based on the flap properties as our decision variables in the optimization process. As an example, Figure13 illustrates a flap with 3 ribs on each side with specific dimensions.

Figure14 shows the flow velocity field around the flap jointed to the flume bed. During the oscillation of the flap, the pressure on the upper and lower surfaces of the flap changes dynamically due to the changing angle of attack and the resulting change in the direction of fluid flow. As the flap moves upwards, the pressure on the upper surface decreases, and the pressure on the lower surface increases. Conversely, as the flap moves downwards, the pressure on the upper surface increases, and the pressure on the lower surface decreases. This results in a cyclic pressure variation around the flap. Under certain conditions, the pressure field around the flap can exhibit significant variations in magnitude and direction, forming vortices and other flow structures. These flow structures can affect the performance of the OSWEC by altering the lift and drag forces acting on the flap.

4Design Optimization

We consider optimizing the design parameters of the flap of converter using a nature-based swarm optimization method, that fall in the category of metaheuristic algorithms [45]. Accordingly, we choose four state-of-the-art algorithms to perform an optimization study. Then, based on their performances to achieve the highest capture factor, one of them will be chosen to be combined with the Hill Climb algorithm to carry out a local search. Therefore, in the remainder of this section, we discuss the search process of each algorithm and visualize their performance and convergence curve as they try to find the best values for decision variables.

4.1. Metaheuristic Approaches

As the first considered algorithm, the Gray Wolf Optimizer (GWO) algorithm simulates the natural leadership and hunting performance of gray wolves which tend to live in colonies. Hunters must obey the alpha wolf, the leader, who is responsible for hunting. Then, the beta wolf is at the second level of the gray wolf hierarchy. A subordinate of alpha wolf, beta stands under the command of the alpha. At the next level in this hierarchy, there are the delta wolves. They are subordinate to the alpha and beta wolves. This category of wolves includes scouts, sentinels, elders, hunters, and caretakers. In this ranking, omega wolves are at the bottom, having the lowest level and obeying all other wolves. They are also allowed to eat the prey just after others have eaten. Despite the fact that they seem less important than others, they are really central to the pack survival. Since, it has been shown that without omega wolves, the entire pack would experience some problems like fighting, violence, and frustration. In this simulation, there are three primary steps of hunting including searching, surrounding, and finally attacking the prey. Mathematically model of gray wolves’ hunting technique and their social hierarchy are applied in determined by optimization. this study. As mentioned before, gray wolves can locate their prey and surround them. The alpha wolf also leads the hunt. Assuming that the alpha, beta, and delta have more knowledge about prey locations, we can mathematically simulate gray wolf hunting behavior. Hence, in addition to saving the top three best solutions obtained so far, we compel the rest of the search agents (also the omegas) to adjust their positions based on the best search agent. Encircling behavior can be mathematically modeled by the following equations: [46].(12)�→=|�→·��→(�)-�→(�)|(13)�→(�+1)=��→(�)-�→·�→(14)�→=2.�2→(15)�→=2�→·�1→-�→Where �→indicates the position vector of gray wolf, ��→ defines the vector of prey, t indicates the current iteration, and �→and �→are coefficient vectors. To force the search agent to diverge from the prey, we use �→ with random values greater than 1 or less than -1. In addition, C→ contains random values in the range [0,2], and �→ 1 and �2→ are random vectors in [0,1]. The second considered technique is the Moth Flame Optimizer (MFO) algorithm. This method revolves around the moths’ navigation mechanism, which is realized by positioning themselves and maintaining a fixed angle relative to the moon while flying. This effective mechanism helps moths to fly in a straight path. However, when the source of light is artificial, maintaining an angle with the light leads to a spiral flying path towards the source that causes the moth’s death [47]. In MFO algorithm, moths and flames are both solutions. The moths are actual search agents that fly in hyper-dimensional space by changing their position vectors, and the flames are considered pins that moths drop when searching the search space [48]. The problem’s variables are the position of moths in the space. Each moth searches around a flame and updates it in case of finding a better solution. The fitness value is the return value of each moth’s fitness (objective) function. The position vector of each moth is passed to the fitness function, and the output of the fitness function is assigned to the corresponding moth. With this mechanism, a moth never loses its best solution [49]. Some attributes of this algorithm are as follows:

  • •It takes different values to converge moth in any point around the flame.
  • •Distance to the flame is lowered to be eventually minimized.
  • •When the position gets closer to the flame, the updated positions around the flame become more frequent.

As another method, the Multi-Verse Optimizer is based on a multiverse theory which proposes there are other universes besides the one in which we all live. According to this theory, there are more than one big bang in the universe, and each big bang leads to the birth of a new universe [50]. Multi-Verse Optimizer (MVO) is mainly inspired by three phenomena in cosmology: white holes, black holes, and wormholes. A white hole has never been observed in our universe, but physicists believe the big bang could be considered a white hole [51]. Black holes, which behave completely in contrast to white holes, attract everything including light beams with their extremely high gravitational force [52]. In the multiverse theory, wormholes are time and space tunnels that allow objects to move instantly between any two corners of a universe (or even simultaneously from one universe to another) [53]. Based on these three concepts, mathematical models are designed to perform exploration, exploitation, and local search, respectively. The concept of white and black holes is implied as an exploration phase, while the concept of wormholes is considered as an exploitation phase by MVO. Additionally, each solution is analogous to a universe, and each variable in the solution represents an object in that universe. Furthermore, each solution is assigned an inflation rate, and the time is used instead of iterations. Following are the universe rules in MVO:

  • •The possibility of having white hole increases with the inflation rate.
  • •The possibility of having black hole decreases with the inflation rate.
  • •Objects tend to pass through black holes more frequently in universes with lower inflation rates.
  • •Regardless of inflation rate, wormholes may cause objects in universes to move randomly towards the best universe. [54]

Modeling the white/black hole tunnels and exchanging objects of universes mathematically was accomplished by using the roulette wheel mechanism. With every iteration, the universes are sorted according to their inflation rates, then, based on the roulette wheel, the one with the white hole is selected as the local extremum solution. This is accomplished through the following steps:

Assume that

(16)���=����1<��(��)����1≥��(��)

Where ��� represents the jth parameter of the ith universe, Ui indicates the ith universe, NI(Ui) is normalized inflation rate of the ith universe, r1 is a random number in [0,1], and j xk shows the jth parameter of the kth universe selected by a roulette wheel selection mechanism [54]. It is assumed that wormhole tunnels always exist between a universe and the best universe formed so far. This mechanism is as follows:(17)���=if�2<���:��+���×((���-���)×�4+���)�3<0.5��-���×((���-���)×�4+���)�3≥0.5����:���where Xj indicates the jth parameter of the best universe formed so far, TDR and WEP are coefficients, where Xj indicates the jth parameter of the best universelbjshows the lower bound of the jth variable, ubj is the upper bound of the jth variable, and r2, r3, and r4 are random numbers in [1][54].

Finally, one of the newest optimization algorithms is WOA. The WOA algorithm simulates the movement of prey and the whale’s discipline when looking for their prey. Among several species, Humpback whales have a specific method of hunting [55]. Humpback whales can recognize the location of prey and encircle it before hunting. The optimal design position in the search space is not known a priori, and the WOA algorithm assumes that the best candidate solution is either the target prey or close to the optimum. This foraging behavior is called the bubble-net feeding method. Two maneuvers are associated with bubbles: upward spirals and double loops. A unique behavior exhibited only by humpback whales is bubble-net feeding. In fact, The WOA algorithm starts with a set of random solutions. At each iteration, search agents update their positions for either a randomly chosen search agent or the best solution obtained so far [56][55]. When the best search agent is determined, the other search agents will attempt to update their positions toward that agent. It is important to note that humpback whales swim around their prey simultaneously in a circular, shrinking circle and along a spiral-shaped path. By using a mathematical model, the spiral bubble-net feeding maneuver is optimized. The following equation represents this behavior:(18)�→(�+1)=�′→·�bl·cos(2��)+�∗→(�)

Where:(19)�′→=|�∗→(�)-�→(�)|

X→(t+ 1) indicates the distance of the it h whale to the prey (best solution obtained so far),� is a constant for defining the shape of the logarithmic spiral, l is a random number in [−1, 1], and dot (.) is an element-by-element multiplication [55].

Comparing the four above-mentioned methods, simulations are run with 10 search agents for 400 iterations. In Figure 15, there are 20 plots the optimal values of different parameters in optimization algorithms. The five parameters of this study are freeboard, bottom elevations, number of ribs on the converter, rib thickness, and rib Height. The optimal value for each was found by optimization algorithms, naming WOA, MVO, MFO, and GWO. By looking through the first row, the freeboard parameter converges to its maximum possible value in the optimization process of GWO after 300 iterations. Similarly, MFO finds the same result as GWO. In contrast, the freeboard converges to its minimum possible value in MVO optimizing process, which indicates positioning the converter under the water. Furthermore, WOA found the optimal value of freeboard as around 0.02 after almost 200 iterations. In the second row, the bottom elevation is found at almost 0.11 (m) in all algorithms; however, the curves follow different trends in each algorithm. The third row shows the number of ribs, where results immediately reveal that it should be over 4. All algorithms coincide at 5 ribs as the optimal number in this process. The fourth row displays the trends of algorithms to find optimal rib thickness. MFO finds the optimal value early and sets it to around 0.022, while others find the same value in higher iterations. Finally, regarding the rib height, MVO, MFO, and GWO state that the optimal value is 0.06 meters, but WOA did not find a higher value than 0.039.

4.2. HCMVO Bi-level Approach

Despite several strong search characteristics of MVO and its high performance in various optimization problems, it suffers from a few deficiencies in local and global search mechanisms. For instance, it is trapped in the local optimum when wormholes stochastically generate many solutions near the best universe achieved throughout iterations, especially in solving complex multimodal problems with high dimensions [57]. Furthermore, MVO needs to be modified by an escaping strategy from the local optima to enhance the global search abilities. To address these shortages, we propose a fast and effective meta-algorithm (HCMVO) to combine MVO with a Random-restart hill-climbing local search. This meta-algorithm uses MVO on the upper level to develop global tracking and provide a range of feasible and proper solutions. The hill-climbing algorithm is designed to develop a comprehensive neighborhood search around the best-found solution proposed by the upper-level (MVO) when MVO is faced with a stagnation issue or falling into a local optimum. The performance threshold is formulated as follows.(20)Δ����THD=∑�=1�����TH��-����TH��-1�where BestTHDis the best-found solution per generation, andM is related to the domain of iterations to compute the average performance of MVO. If the proposed best solution by the local search is better than the initial one, the global best of MVO will be updated. HCMVO iteratively runs hill climbing when the performance of MVO goes down, each time with an initial condition to prepare for escaping such undesirable situations. In order to get a better balance between exploration and exploitation, the search step size linearly decreases as follows:(21)��=��-����Ma�iter��+1where iter and Maxiter are the current iteration and maximum number of evaluation, respectively. �� stands for the step size of the neighborhood search. Meanwhile, this strategy can improve the convergence rate of MVO compared with other algorithms.

Algorithm 1 shows the technical details of the proposed optimization method (HCMVO). The initial solution includes freeboard (�), bottom elevation (�), number of ribs (Nr), rib thickness (�), and rib height(�).

5. Conclusion

The high trend of diminishing worldwide energy resources has entailed a great crisis upon vulnerable societies. To withstand this effect, developing renewable energy technologies can open doors to a more reliable means, among which the wave energy converters will help the coastal residents and infrastructure. This paper set out to determine the optimized design for such devices that leads to the highest possible power output. The main goal of this research was to demonstrate the best design for an oscillating surge wave energy converter using a novel metaheuristic optimization algorithm. In this regard, the methodology was devised such that it argued the effects of influential parameters, including wave characteristics, WEC design, and interaction criteria.

To begin with, a numerical model was developed in Flow 3D software to simulate the response of the flap of a wave energy converter to incoming waves, followed by a validation study based upon a well-reputed experimental study to verify the accuracy of the model. Secondly, the hydrodynamics of the flap was investigated by incorporating the turbulence. The effect of depth, wave height, and wave period are also investigated in this part. The influence of two novel ideas on increasing the wave-converter interaction was then assessed: i) designing a flap with different widths in the upper and lower part, and ii) adding ribs on the surface of the flap. Finally, four trending single-objective metaheuristic optimization methods

Empty CellAlgorithm 1: Hill Climb Multiverse Optimization
01:procedure HCMVO
02:�=30,�=5▹���������������������������������
03:�=〈F1,B1,N,R,H1〉,…〈FN,B2,N,R,HN〉⇒lb1N⩽�⩽ubN
04:Initialize parameters�ER,�DR,�EP,Best�,���ite��▹Wormhole existence probability (WEP)
05:��=����(��)
06:��=Normalize the inflation rate��
07:for iter in[1,⋯,���iter]do
08:for�in[1,⋯,�]do
09:Update�EP,�DR,Black����Index=�
10:for���[1,⋯,�]��
11:�1=����()
12:if�1≤��(��)then
13:White HoleIndex=Roulette�heelSelection(-��)
14:�(Black HoleIndex,�)=��(White HoleIndex,�)
15:end if
16:�2=����([0,�])
17:if�2≤�EPthen
18:�3=����(),�4=����()
19:if�3<0.5then
20:�1=((��(�)-��(�))�4+��(�))
21:�(�,�)=Best�(�)+�DR�
22:else
23:�(�,�)=Best�(�)-�DR�
24:end if
25:end if
26:end for
27:end for
28:�HD=����([�1,�2,⋯,�Np])
29:Bes�TH�itr=����HD
30:ΔBestTHD=∑�=1�BestTII��-BestTII��-1�
31:ifΔBestTHD<��then▹Perform hill climbing local search
32:BestTHD=����-�lim��������THD
33:end if
34:end for
35:return�,BestTHD▹Final configuration
36:end procedure

The implementation details of the hill-climbing algorithm applied in HCMPA can be seen in Algorithm 2. One of the critical parameters isg, which denotes the resolution of the neighborhood search around the proposed global best by MVO. If we set a small step size for hill-climbing, the convergence speed will be decreased. On the other hand, a large step size reinforces the exploration ability. Still, it may reduce the exploitation ability and in return increase the act of jumping from a global optimum or surfaces with high-potential solutions. Per each decision variable, the neighborhood search evaluates two different direct searches, incremental or decremental. After assessing the generated solutions, the best candidate will be selected to iterate the search algorithm. It is noted that the hill-climbing algorithm should not be applied in the initial iteration of the optimization process due to the immense tendency for converging to local optima. Meanwhile, for optimizing largescale problems, hill-climbing is not an appropriate selection. In order to improve understanding of the proposed hybrid optimization algorithm’s steps, the flowchart of HCMVO is designed and can be seen in Figure 16.

Figure 17 shows the observed capture factor (which is the absorbed energy with respect to the available energy) by each optimization algorithm from iterations 1 to 400. The algorithms use ten search agents in their modified codes to find the optimal solutions. While GWO and MFO remain roughly constant after iterations 54 and 40, the other three algorithms keep improving the capture factor. In this case, HCMVO and MVO worked very well in the optimizing process with a capture factor obtained by the former as 0.594 and by the latter as 0.593. MFO almost found its highest value before the iteration 50, which means the exploration part of the algorithm works out well. Similarly, HCMVO does the same. However, it keeps finding the better solution during the optimization process until the last iteration, indicating the strong exploitation part of the algorithm. GWO reveals a weakness in exploration and exploitation because not only does it evoke the least capture factor value, but also the curve remains almost unchanged throughout 350 iterations.

Figure 18 illustrates complex interactions between the five optimization parameters and the capture factor for HCMVO (a), MPA (b), and MFO (c) algorithms. The first interesting observation is that there is a high level of nonlinear relationships among the setting parameters that can make a multi-modal search space. The dark blue lines represent the best-found configuration throughout the optimisation process. Based on both HCMVO (a) and MVO (b), we can infer that the dark blue lines concentrate in a specific range, showing the high convergence ability of both HCMVO and MVO. However, MFO (c) could not find the exact optimal range of the decision variables, and the best-found solutions per generation distribute mostly all around the search space.

Empty CellAlgorithm 1: Hill Climb Multiverse Optimization
01:procedure HCMVO
02:Initialization
03:Initialize the constraints��1�,��1�
04:�1�=Mi�1�+���1�/�▹Compute the step size,�is search resolution
05:So�1=〈�,�,�,�,�〉▹���������������
06:�������1=����So�1▹���������ℎ���������
07:Main loop
08:for iter≤���ita=do
09:���=���±��
10:while�≤���(Sol1)do
11:���=���+�,▹����ℎ���ℎ��������ℎ
12:fitness��iter=�������
13:t = t+1
14:end while
15:〈�����,������max〉=����������
16:���itev=���Inde�max▹�������ℎ�������������������������������ℎ�������
17:��=��-����Max��+1▹�����������������
18:end for
19:return���iter,����
20:end procedure

were utilized to illuminate the optimum values of the design parameters, and the best method was chosen to develop a new algorithm that performs both local and global search methods.

The correlation between hydrodynamic parameters and the capture factor of the converter was supported by the results. For any given water depth, the capture factor increases as the wave period increases, until a certain wave period value (6 seconds) is reached, after which the capture factor gradually decreases. It is expected since the flap cannot oscillate effectively when the wavelength is too short for a certain water depth. Conversely, when the wavelength is too long, the capture factor decreases. Furthermore, under a constant wave period, increasing the water depth does not affect the capture factor. Regarding the sensitivity analysis, the study found that increasing the flap bottom elevation causes turbulence flow behind the flap and limitation of rotation, which leads to less interaction with the incoming waves. Furthermore, while keeping the flap bottom elevation constant, increasing the freeboard improves the capture factor. Overtopping happens when the freeboard is negative and the flap is below the water surface, which has a detrimental influence on converter performance. Furthermore, raising the freeboard causes the wave impact to become more violent, which increases converter performance.

In the last part, we discussed the search process of each algorithm and visualized their performance and convergence curves as they try to find the best values for decision variables. Among the four selected metaheuristic algorithms, the Multi-verse Optimizer proved to be the most effective in achieving the best answer in terms of the WEC capture factor. However, the MVO needed modifications regarding its escape approach from the local optima in order to improve its global search capabilities. To overcome these constraints, we presented a fast and efficient meta-algorithm (HCMVO) that combines MVO with a Random-restart hill-climbing local search. On a higher level, this meta-algorithm employed MVO to generate global tracking and present a range of possible and appropriate solutions. Taken together, the results demonstrated that there is a significant degree of nonlinearity among the setup parameters that might result in a multimodal search space. Since MVO was faced with a stagnation issue or fell into a local optimum, we constructed a complete neighborhood search around the best-found solution offered by the upper level. In sum, the newly-developed algorithm proved to be highly effective for the problem compared to other similar optimization methods. The strength of the current findings may encourage future investigation on design optimization of wave energy converters using developed geometry as well as the novel approach.

CRediT authorship contribution statement

Erfan Amini: Conceptualization, Methodology, Validation, Data curation, Writing – original draft, Writing – review & editing, Visualization. Mahdieh Nasiri: Conceptualization, Methodology, Validation, Data curation, Writing – original draft, Writing – review & editing, Visualization. Navid Salami Pargoo: Writing – original draft, Writing – review & editing. Zahra Mozhgani: Conceptualization, Methodology. Danial Golbaz: Writing – original draft. Mehrdad Baniesmaeil: Writing – original draft. Meysam Majidi Nezhad: . Mehdi Neshat: Supervision, Conceptualization, Writing – original draft, Writing – review & editing, Visualization. Davide Astiaso Garcia: Supervision. Georgios Sylaios: Supervision.

Declaration of Competing Interest

The authors declare that they have no known competing financial interests or personal relationships that could have appeared to influence the work reported in this paper.

Acknowledgement

This research has been carried out within ILIAD (Inte-grated Digital Framework for Comprehensive Maritime Data and Information Services) project that received funding from the European Union’s H2020 programme.

Data availability

Data will be made available on request.

References

Figure 3. FLOW-3D results for Strathcona Dam spillway with all gates fully open at an elevated reservoir level during passage of a large flood. Note the effects of poor approach conditions and pier overtopping at the leftmost bay.

BC Hydro Assesses Spillway Hydraulics with FLOW-3D

by Faizal Yusuf, M.A.Sc., P.Eng.
Specialist Engineer in the Hydrotechnical Department at BC Hydro

BC Hydro, a public electric utility in British Columbia, uses FLOW-3D to investigate complex hydraulics issues at several existing dams and to assist in the design and optimization of proposed facilities.

Faizal Yusuf, M.A.Sc., P.Eng., Specialist Engineer in the Hydrotechnical department at BC Hydro, presents three case studies that highlight the application of FLOW-3D to different types of spillways and the importance of reliable prototype or physical hydraulic model data for numerical model calibration.

W.A.C. Bennett Dam
At W.A.C. Bennett Dam, differences in the spillway geometry between the physical hydraulic model from the 1960s and the prototype make it difficult to draw reliable conclusions on shock wave formation and chute capacity from physical model test results. The magnitude of shock waves in the concrete-lined spillway chute are strongly influenced by a 44% reduction in the chute width downstream of the three radial gates at the headworks, as well as the relative openings of the radial gates. The shock waves lead to locally higher water levels that have caused overtopping of the chute walls under certain historical operations.Prototype spill tests for discharges up to 2,865 m3/s were performed in 2012 to provide surveyed water surface profiles along chute walls, 3D laser scans of the water surface in the chute and video of flow patterns for FLOW-3D model calibration. Excellent agreement was obtained between the numerical model and field observations, particularly for the location and height of the first shock wave at the chute walls (Figure 1).

W.A.C에서 Bennett Dam, 1960년대의 물리적 수력학 모델과 프로토타입 사이의 여수로 형상의 차이로 인해 물리적 모델 테스트 결과에서 충격파 형성 및 슈트 용량에 대한 신뢰할 수 있는 결론을 도출하기 어렵습니다. 콘크리트 라이닝 방수로 낙하산의 충격파 크기는 방사형 게이트의 상대적인 개구부뿐만 아니라 헤드워크에 있는 3개의 방사형 게이트 하류의 슈트 폭이 44% 감소함에 따라 크게 영향을 받습니다. 충격파는 특정 역사적 작업에서 슈트 벽의 범람을 야기한 국부적으로 더 높은 수위로 이어집니다. 최대 2,865m3/s의 배출에 대한 프로토타입 유출 테스트가 2012년에 수행되어 슈트 벽을 따라 조사된 수면 프로필, 3D 레이저 스캔을 제공했습니다. FLOW-3D 모델 보정을 위한 슈트의 수면 및 흐름 패턴 비디오. 특히 슈트 벽에서 첫 번째 충격파의 위치와 높이에 대해 수치 모델과 현장 관찰 간에 탁월한 일치가 이루어졌습니다(그림 1).
Figure 1. Comparison between prototype observations and FLOW-3D for a spill discharge of 2,865 m^3/s at Bennett Dam spillway.
Figure 1. Comparison between prototype observations and FLOW-3D for a spill discharge of 2,865 m^3/s at Bennett Dam spillway.

The calibrated FLOW-3D model confirmed that the design flood could be safely passed without overtopping the spillway chute walls as long as all three radial gates are opened as prescribed in existing operating orders with the outer gates open more than the inner gate.

The CFD model also provided insight into the concrete damage in the spillway chute. Cavitation indices computed from FLOW-3D simulation results were compared with empirical data from the USBR and found to be consistent with the historical performance of the spillway. The numerical analysis supported field inspections, which concluded that deterioration of the concrete conditions in the chute is likely not due to cavitation.

Strathcona Dam
FLOW-3D was used to investigate poor approach conditions and uncertainties with the rating curves for Strathcona Dam spillway, which includes three vertical lift gates on the right abutment of the dam. The rating curves for Strathcona spillway were developed from a combination of empirical adjustments and limited physical hydraulic model testing in a flume that did not include geometry of the piers and abutments.

Numerical model testing and calibration was based on comparisons with prototype spill observations from 1982 when all three gates were fully open, resulting in a large depression in the water surface upstream of the leftmost bay (Figure 2). The approach flow to the leftmost bay is distorted by water flowing parallel to the dam axis and plunging over the concrete retaining wall adjacent to the upstream slope of the earthfill dam. The flow enters the other two bays much more smoothly. In addition to very similar flow patterns produced in the numerical model compared to the prototype, simulated water levels at the gate section matched 1982 field measurements to within 0.1 m.

보정된 FLOW-3D 모델은 외부 게이트가 내부 게이트보다 더 많이 열려 있는 기존 운영 명령에 규정된 대로 3개의 방사형 게이트가 모두 열리는 한 여수로 낙하산 벽을 넘지 않고 설계 홍수를 안전하게 통과할 수 있음을 확인했습니다.

CFD 모델은 방수로 낙하산의 콘크리트 손상에 대한 통찰력도 제공했습니다. FLOW-3D 시뮬레이션 결과에서 계산된 캐비테이션 지수는 USBR의 경험적 데이터와 비교되었으며 여수로의 역사적 성능과 일치하는 것으로 나타났습니다. 수치 분석은 현장 검사를 지원했으며, 슈트의 콘크리트 상태 악화는 캐비테이션 때문이 아닐 가능성이 높다고 결론지었습니다.

Strathcona 댐
FLOW-3D는 Strathcona Dam 여수로에 대한 등급 곡선을 사용하여 열악한 접근 조건과 불확실성을 조사하는 데 사용되었습니다. 여기에는 댐의 오른쪽 접합부에 3개의 수직 리프트 게이트가 포함되어 있습니다. Strathcona 여수로에 대한 등급 곡선은 경험적 조정과 교각 및 교대의 형상을 포함하지 않는 수로에서 제한된 물리적 수리 모델 테스트의 조합으로 개발되었습니다.

수치 모델 테스트 및 보정은 세 개의 수문이 모두 완전히 개방된 1982년의 프로토타입 유출 관측과의 비교를 기반으로 했으며, 그 결과 가장 왼쪽 만의 상류 수면에 큰 함몰이 발생했습니다(그림 2). 최좌단 만으로의 접근 흐름은 댐 축과 평행하게 흐르는 물과 흙채움댐의 상류 경사면에 인접한 콘크리트 옹벽 위로 떨어지는 물에 의해 왜곡됩니다. 흐름은 훨씬 더 원활하게 다른 두 베이로 들어갑니다. 프로토타입과 비교하여 수치 모델에서 생성된 매우 유사한 흐름 패턴 외에도 게이트 섹션에서 시뮬레이션된 수위는 1982년 현장 측정과 0.1m 이내로 일치했습니다.

Figure 2. Prototype observations and FLOW-3D results for a Strathcona Dam spill in 1982 with all three gates fully open.
Figure 2. Prototype observations and FLOW-3D results for a Strathcona Dam spill in 1982 with all three gates fully open.

The calibrated CFD model produces discharges within 5% of the spillway rating curve for the reservoir’s normal operating range with all gates fully open. However, at higher reservoir levels, which may occur during passage of large floods (as shown in Figure 3), the difference between simulated discharges and the rating curves are greater than 10% as the physical model testing with simplified geometry and empirical corrections did not adequately represent the complex approach flow patterns. The FLOW-3D model provided further insight into the accuracy of rating curves for individual bays, gated conditions and the transition between orifice and free surface flow.

보정된 CFD 모델은 모든 게이트가 완전히 열린 상태에서 저수지의 정상 작동 범위에 대한 여수로 등급 곡선의 5% 이내에서 배출을 생성합니다. 그러나 대규모 홍수가 통과하는 동안 발생할 수 있는 더 높은 저수지 수위에서는(그림 3 참조) 단순화된 기하학과 경험적 수정을 사용한 물리적 모델 테스트가 그렇지 않았기 때문에 모의 배출과 등급 곡선 간의 차이는 10% 이상입니다. 복잡한 접근 흐름 패턴을 적절하게 표현합니다. FLOW-3D 모델은 개별 베이, 게이트 조건 및 오리피스와 자유 표면 흐름 사이의 전환에 대한 등급 곡선의 정확도에 대한 추가 통찰력을 제공했습니다.

Figure 3. FLOW-3D results for Strathcona Dam spillway with all gates fully open at an elevated reservoir level during passage of a large flood. Note the effects of poor approach conditions and pier overtopping at the leftmost bay.
Figure 3. FLOW-3D results for Strathcona Dam spillway with all gates fully open at an elevated reservoir level during passage of a large flood. Note the effects of poor approach conditions and pier overtopping at the leftmost bay.

John Hart Dam
The John Hart concrete dam will be modified to include a new free crest spillway to be situated between an existing gated spillway and a low level outlet structure that is currently under construction. Significant improvements in the design of the proposed spillway were made through a systematic optimization process using FLOW-3D.

The preliminary design of the free crest spillway was based on engineering hydraulic design guides. Concrete apron blocks are intended to protect the rock at the toe of the dam. A new right training wall will guide the flow from the new spillway towards the tailrace pool and protect the low level outlet structure from spillway discharges.

FLOW-3D model results for the initial and optimized design of the new spillway are shown in Figure 4. CFD analysis led to a 10% increase in discharge capacity, significant decrease in roadway impingement above the spillway crest and improved flow patterns including up to a 5 m reduction in water levels along the proposed right wall. Physical hydraulic model testing will be used to confirm the proposed design.

존 하트 댐
John Hart 콘크리트 댐은 현재 건설 중인 기존 배수로와 저층 배수로 사이에 위치할 새로운 자유 마루 배수로를 포함하도록 수정될 것입니다. FLOW-3D를 사용한 체계적인 최적화 프로세스를 통해 제안된 여수로 설계의 상당한 개선이 이루어졌습니다.

자유 마루 여수로의 예비 설계는 엔지니어링 수력학 설계 가이드를 기반으로 했습니다. 콘크리트 앞치마 블록은 댐 선단부의 암석을 보호하기 위한 것입니다. 새로운 오른쪽 훈련 벽은 새 여수로에서 테일레이스 풀로 흐름을 안내하고 여수로 배출로부터 낮은 수준의 배출구 구조를 보호합니다.

새 여수로의 초기 및 최적화된 설계에 대한 FLOW-3D 모델 결과는 그림 4에 나와 있습니다. CFD 분석을 통해 방류 용량이 10% 증가하고 여수로 마루 위의 도로 충돌이 크게 감소했으며 최대 제안된 오른쪽 벽을 따라 수위가 5m 감소합니다. 제안된 설계를 확인하기 위해 물리적 수압 모델 테스트가 사용됩니다.

Figure 4. FLOW-3D model results for the preliminary and optimized layout of the proposed spillway at John Hart Dam.
Figure 4. FLOW-3D model results for the preliminary and optimized layout of the proposed spillway at John Hart Dam.

Conclusion

BC Hydro has been using FLOW-3D to investigate a wide range of challenging hydraulics problems for different types of spillways and water conveyance structures leading to a greatly improved understanding of flow patterns and performance. Prototype data and reliable physical hydraulic model testing are used whenever possible to improve confidence in the numerical model results.

다양한 유형의 여수로 및 물 수송 구조로 인해 흐름 패턴 및 성능에 대한 이해가 크게 향상되었습니다. 프로토타입 데이터와 신뢰할 수 있는 물리적 유압 모델 테스트는 수치 모델 결과의 신뢰도를 향상시키기 위해 가능할 때마다 사용됩니다.

About Flow Science, Inc.
Based in Santa Fe, New Mexico USA, Flow Science was founded in 1980 by Dr. C. W. (Tony) Hirt, who was one of the principals in pioneering the “Volume-of-Fluid” or VOF method while working at the Los Alamos National Lab. FLOW-3D is a direct descendant of this work, and in the subsequent years, we have increased its sophistication with TruVOF, boasting pioneering improvements in the speed and accuracy of tracking distinct liquid/gas interfaces. Today, Flow Science products offer complete multiphysics simulation with diverse modeling capabilities including fluid-structure interaction, 6-DoF moving objects, and multiphase flows. From inception, our vision has been to provide our customers with excellence in flow modeling software and services.

유압 헤드 계산에서는 유선이 평행하다고 가정

FLOW-3D Output variables(출력 변수)

Output variables(출력 변수)

FLOW-3D에서 주어진 시뮬레이션의 정확한 출력은 어떤 물리적 모델, 출력 위젯에 정의된 추가 출력 및 특정 구성 요소별 출력에 따라 달라집니다. 이 문서는 FLOW-3D의 출력에 대해 좀 더 복잡한 출력 변수 중 일부를 참조하는 역할을 합니다.

FLOW-3D Additional output
FLOW-3D Additional output

Distance Traveled by Fluid(유체로 이동 한 거리)

때로는 유체 입자가 이동한 거리가 중요한 경우도 있습니다. FLOW-3D에서 사용자는 모델 설정 ‣ 출력 위젯에서 유체가 이동한 거리에 대한 출력을 요청할 수 있습니다. 이 기능은 유체가 흐름 영역(경계 또는 질량 소스를 통해)에 들어간 시간 또는 유체가 도메인을 통해 이동한 거리를 계산합니다. 이 기능은 모든 시뮬레이션에도 사용할 수 있으며, 특별한 모델을 사용할 필요가 없으며, 흐름에도 영향을 미치지 않습니다. 이 모델을 사용하려면 출력 위젯으로 이동하고 추가 출력 섹션에서 “Distance traveled by fluid” 옆의 체크상자를 선택하십시오.

 노트

추가 출력 섹션은 출력 위젯의 모든 탭에서 사용할 수 있습니다.

유체 도착 시간

유체 도착 시간을 아는 것은 종종 유용합니다. 예를 들어 주조 시뮬레이션에서 주입 시간을 결정하는 데 사용할 수 있습니다. 제어 볼륨은 충전 프로세스 동안 여러 번 채워지고 비워지기 때문에 계산 셀이 채워지는 처음과 마지막 시간 모두 기록되고, 후 처리를 위해 저장될 수 있습니다. 이 작업은 출력 위젯과 추가 출력 섹션 내에서 유체 도착 시간 확인란을 선택하여 수행됩니다.

 노트

이 출력 옵션은 1 유체 자유 표면 흐름에만 사용할 수 있습니다.

유체 체류 시간

때로는 유체가 계산 영역 내에서 보내는 시간인 체류시간을 아는 것이 유용합니다. 이는 출력 ‣ Output ‣ Additional Output ‣ Fluid residence time 확인란을 선택하여 수행합니다. 여기서 S로 지정된 이 변수에 대한 전송 방정식은 단위 소스 항과 함께 Solve됩니다.

유체 체류 시간(Fluid residence time)
유체 체류 시간(Fluid residence time)

여기에서 t는 시간이며 u는 유체 속도입니다.

S의 단위는 시간이다. 계산 도메인에 들어가는 모든 유체에 대한 S의 초기값은 0입니다.

의 값은 항상 second order체계를 가진 데이터로부터 근사치를 구합니다.

이 출력 옵션은 1 유체 및 2 유체 유량 모두에 사용할 수 있습니다.

 노트

경계 조건 또는 소스에서 도메인으로 유입되는 유체가 이미 도메인에 있는 유체와 혼합될 때 체류가 감소하는 것처럼 보일 수 있습니다.

Wall Contact Time

벽면 접촉 시간 출력은 (1)개별 유체 요소가 특정 구성 요소와 접촉하는 시간 및 (2)특정 구성 요소가 유체와 접촉하는 시간을 추적합니다. 이 모델은 액체 금속이 모래 오염물과 접촉했을 때 오염과 상관 관계가 있는 proxy 변수를 제공하기 위한 것입니다. 이 출력은 최종 주조물에서 오염된 유체가 어디에 있는지 확인하는 데 사용될 수 있습니다. 접촉 시간 모델의 또 다른 해석은, 예를 들어, 용해를 통해 다소 일정한 비율로 화학물질을 방출하는 물에 잠긴 물체에 의한 강의 물의 오염입니다.

모델은 Model Setup ‣ Output ‣ Wall contact time 박스를 확인하여 활성화됩니다. 또한 Model Setup ‣ Output ‣ Geometry Data section의 각 구성요소에 대해 해당 구성요소를 계산에 포함하기 위해 반드시 설정해야 하는 Contact time flag가 있습니다.

 추가 정보

Wall Contact Time with Fluid and Component Properties: Contact Time with Fluid for more information on the input variables를 참조하십시오.

 노트

이 모델은 실제 구성 요소, 즉 고체, 다공성 매체, 코어 가스 및 충전 퇴적물 구성 요소로 제한됩니다. 접촉 시간은 유체 # 1과 관련해서만 계산됩니다.

2. 형상 데이터
2. 형상 데이터

Component wetted are

Fluid 1과 접촉하는 구성 요소의 표면 영역은 관심 구성 요소에 대한 Model Setup ‣ Output ‣ Geometry Data ‣ Wetted area 옵션을 활성화하여 History Data로 출력 될 수 있습니다.

구성 요소의 힘과 토크

Forces

Model Setup ‣ Output ‣ Geometry Data ‣ Forces 옵션을 활성화하면 부품에 대한 압력, 전단력, 탄성 및 벽 접착력을 History Data에 출력할 수 있습니다.

압력을 가지지 않은 셀(즉, 도메인 외부에 있거나 다른 구성 요소 안에 있는 셀)이 구성 요소 주변의 각 셀에 대한 압력 영역 제품을 합산하는 동안 어떻게 처리되는지를 제어하는 압력 계산에 대한 몇 가지 추가 옵션이 있습니다. 기본 동작은 이러한 셀에서 사용자 정의 기준 압력을 사용하는 것입니다. 지정되지 않은 경우 기준 압력은 초기 무효 압력인 PVOID로 기본 설정됩니다. 또는, 코드는 Reference pressure is code calculated 옵션을 선택하여 구성요소의 노출된 표면에 대한 평균 압력을 사용할 수 있습니다.

마지막으로, 일반 이동 물체의 경우, 규정된/제약을 받는 대로 물체를 이동시키는 힘을 나타내는 잔류 힘의 추가 출력이 있습니다.

Torques

Model Setup ‣ Output ‣ Force 옵션이 활성화되면 구성 요소의 토크가 계산되고 History Data에 출력됩니다. 토크는 힘-모멘트에 대한 기준점 X, 힘-모멘트에 대한 기준점 Y, 정지 구성 요소에 대한 힘-모멘트 입력에 대한 기준점 Z에 의해 지정된 지점에 대해 보고됩니다. 참조점의 기본 위치는 원점입니다.

General Moving Objects에는 몇 가지 추가 참고 사항이 있습니다. 첫째, 토크는 (1) 6-DOF 동작의 질량 위치 중심 또는 (2)고정축 및 고정점 회전의 회전 축/점에 대해 보고됩니다. 힘에서 행해지는 것과 마찬가지로, 규정된/제한된 바와 같이 물체를 이동시키는 토크를 나타내는 잔류 토크의 출력도 있습니다.

 노트

힘 및 토크 출력은 각 지오메트리 구성 요소의 일반 히스토리 데이터에 기록됩니다. 출력은 개별 힘/토크 기여 (예: 압력, 전단, 탄성, 벽 접착) 및 개별 기여도의 합으로 계산된 총 결합력/토크로 제공됩니다.

Buoyancy center and metacentric height (부력 중심 및 메타 중심 높이)

일반 이동 객체의 부력과 안정성에 대한 정보는 각 구성 요소에 대해 모델 설정 Setup 출력 ‣ 기하학적 데이터 ‣ 부력 중심 및 도량형 높이 옵션을 활성화하여 History Data에서 출력할 수 있습니다. 이렇게 하면 구성 요소의 중심 위치와 중심 높이가 출력됩니다.

  1. Advanced

FLOW-3D Advanced Output Option
FLOW-3D Advanced Output Option

Fluid vorticity & Q-criterion(유체 와동 및 Q 기준)

와동구성 요소뿐만 아니라 와동 구조를 위한 Q-criterion을 계산하고 내보내려면 Model Setup ‣ Output ‣ Advanced 탭에서 해당 확인란을 클릭하여 유체 와동 & Q-criterion을 활성화하십시오.

여기에서:

:  소용돌이 벡터의 다른 구성 요소

 Q-criterion은 속도 구배 텐서의 2차 불변성을 갖는 연결된 유체 영역으로 소용돌이를 정의합니다. 이는 전단 변형률과 와류 크기 사이의 국부적 균형을 나타내며, 와류 크기가 변형률의 크기보다 큰 영역으로 와류를 정의합니다.

Hydraulic Data and Total Hydraulic Head 3D

Hydraulic Data

깊이 기준 유압 데이터를 요청하려면 출력 ‣ 고급으로 이동한 후 유압 데이터 옆의 확인란을 선택하십시오(심층 평균 값과 중력을 -Z 방향으로 가정).

이 옵션은 FLOW-3D가 유압 시뮬레이션에 유용할 수 있는 추가 깊이 평균 데이터를 출력하도록 합니다.

  • Flow depth
  • Maximum flow depth
  • Free surface elevation
  • Velocity
  • Offset velocity
  • Froude number
  • Specific hydraulic head
  • Total hydraulic head

이 수량 각각에 대해 하나의 값 이 메쉬의 모든 (x, y) 위치에서 계산되고 수직 열의 모든 셀에 저장됩니다 (이 수량이 깊이 평균이기 때문에 z 방향으로 데이터의 변화가 없습니다). 변수는 정확도를 보장하기 위해주기마다 계산됩니다. 모든 경우에,  깊이 평균 속도, z- 방향  의 중력 가속도, 유체 깊이, 및 컬럼 내 유체의 최소 z- 좌표입니다.

  • 자유 표면 고도는 수직 기둥의 맨 위 유체 요소에 있는 자유 표면의 z-좌표로 계산됩니다.
  • The Froude number 은   

식으로 계산됩니다.

  • 유체 깊이는 깊이 평균 메쉬 열의 모든 유체의 합으로 계산됩니다.

특정 유압 헤드 

및 총 유압 헤드

변수는 다음에서 계산됩니다.  

 노트

  • 깊이 기준 유압 출력 옵션은 예리한 인터페이스가 있고 중력이 음의 z 방향으로 향할 때에만 유체 1에 유효합니다.
  • 유압 헤드 계산은 스트림 라인이 평행하다고 가정한다는 점을 유념해야 합니다. 예를 들어 플럭스 표면이 재순환 흐름 영역에 배치되는 경우 이 문제가 발생할 수 있습니다. 이 경우, 유량 표면에서 보고된 유량 평균 유압 헤드는 헤드의 계산에서 흐름 방향이 무시되기 때문에 예상보다 클 수 있습니다.

Total Hydraulic Head 3D(총 유압 헤드 3D)

또한 총 유압 헤드 3D 옵션을 확인하여 국부적(3D) 속도 필드, 플럭스 표면에서의 유압 에너지(배플 참조) 및 플럭스 기반 유압 헤드를 사용하여 유체 1의 총 헤드를 계산할 수 있다. 3D 계산은 국부 압력을 사용하여 수행되며(즉, 압력이 유체 깊이와 관련이 있다고 가정하지 않음) 원통 좌표와 호환됩니다.

 노트

  • 유압 헤드 계산은 스트림 라인이 평행하다고 가정한다는 점을 유념해야 한다. 예를 들어 플럭스 표면이 재순환 흐름 영역에 배치되는 경우 문제가 발생할 수 있습니다. 이 경우, 플럭스 표면에서 보고된 유량 평균 유압 헤드는 헤드의 계산 시 흐름 방향이 무시되기 때문에 예상보다 클 수 있습니다.
  • 3D 유압 헤드 계산은 입력 파일에 중력이 정의되지 않은 경우 중력 벡터의 크기를 1로 가정합니다.

Flux-averaged hydraulic head

특정 위치 (즉, 배플)의 플럭스 평균 유압 헤드는 다음과 같이 계산됩니다.

Flux-averaged hydraulic head
Flux-averaged hydraulic head

유압 헤드 계산에서는 유선이 평행하다고 가정합니다. 예를 들어 플럭스 표면이 재순환 흐름 영역에 배치된 경우 (예: 아래에 표시된 것과 같이) 문제가 될 수 있습니다.

유압 헤드 계산에서는 유선이 평행하다고 가정




유압 헤드 계산에서는 유선이 평행하다고 가정

이 경우 플럭스 표면에 보고된 플럭스 평균 유압 헤드는 헤드 계산 시 흐름 방향이 무시되므로 예상보다 클 수 있습니다.

FLOW-3D에는 History Probes, Flux surface, Sampling Volumes의 세 가지 주요 측정 장치가 있습니다. 이러한 장치를 시뮬레이션에 추가하는 방법은 모델 설정 섹션에 설명되어 있습니다(측정 장치 참조). 이들의 출력은 기록 데이터 편집 시간 간격으로 flsgrf 파일의 일반 기록 데이터 카탈로그에 저장됩니다. 이러한 결과는 Analyze ‣ Probe 탭에서 Probe Plots을 생성하여 액세스할 수 있습니다.

히스토리 프로브 출력

히스토리 프로브를 생성하는 단계는 모델 설정 섹션에 설명되어 있습니다(기록 프로브 참조). 시뮬레이션에 사용된 물리 모델에 따라 각각의 History Probe에서 서로 다른 출력을 사용할 수 있습니다. 프로브를 FSI/TSE로 지정하면 유한 요소 메시 안에 들어가야 하는 위치에서 응력/스트레인 데이터만 제공한다. 유체 프로브가 솔리드 형상 구성 요소에 의해 차단된 영역 내에 위치하는 경우, 기하학적 구조와 관련된 수량(예: 벽 온도)만 계산된다. 일반적으로 프로브 좌표에 의해 정의된 위치에서 이러한 양을 계산하려면 보간이 필요하다.

플럭스 표면 출력

플럭스 표면은 이를 통과하는 수량의 흐름을 측정하는데 사용되는 특별한 물체입니다. 플럭스 표면을 만드는 단계는 모델 설정 섹션에 설명되어 있습니다(플럭스 표면 참조). 각 플럭스 표면에 대해 계산된 수량은 다음과 같습니다.

  • Volume flow rate for fluid #1
  • Volume flow rate for fluid #2 (for two-fluid problems only)
  • Combined volume flow rate (for two-fluid problems only)
  • Total mass flow rate
  • Flux surface area wetted by fluid #1
  • Flux-averaged hydraulic head when 3D Hydraulic Head is requested from additional output options
  • Hydraulic energy flow when hydraulic data output is requested
  • Total number of particles of each defined species in each particle class crossing flux surface when the particle model is active
  • Flow rate for all active and passive scalars this includes scalar quantities associated with active physical models (eg. suspended sediment, air entrainment, ect.)

 노트

  • 유속과 입자수의 기호는 유동 표면을 설명하는 함수의 기호에 의해 정의된 대로 흐름이나 입자가 플럭스 표면의 음에서 양으로 교차할 때 양의 부호가 됩니다.
  • 플럭스 표면은 각 표면의 유량과 입자 수가 정확하도록 그들 사이에 적어도 두 개의 메쉬 셀이 있어야 합니다.
  • 유압 데이터 및 총 유압 헤드 3D 옵션을 사용할 때는 유압 헤드 계산이 스트림 라인이 평행하다고 가정한다는 점을 유념해야 한다. 예를 들어 플럭스 표면이 재순환 흐름 영역에 배치되는 경우 이 문제가 발생할 수 있습니다. 이 경우, 유량 표면에서 보고된 유량 평균 유압 헤드는 헤드의 계산에서 흐름 방향이 무시되기 때문에 예상보다 클 수 있습니다.

샘플링 볼륨 출력

샘플링 볼륨은 해당 범위 내에서 볼륨을 측정하는 3 차원 데이터 수집 영역입니다. 샘플링 볼륨을 만드는 단계는 모델 설정 섹션에 설명되어 있습니다(샘플링 볼륨 참조). 각 샘플링 볼륨의 계산 수량은 다음과 같습니다.

  • 시료채취량 내에서 #1 유체 총량
  • 시료채취량 내 #1 유체질량 중심
  • 샘플링 용적 가장자리에 위치한 솔리드 표면을 포함하여 샘플링 용적 내의 모든 벽 경계에 작용하는 좌표계의 원점에 상대적인 유압력 및 모멘트.
  • 샘플링 용적 내 총 스칼라 종량: 이것은 부피 적분으로 계산되므로 스칼라 양이 질량 농도를 나타내면 샘플링 용적 내의 총 질량이 계산된다. 거주 시간과 같은 일부 종의 경우, 평균 값이 대신 계산됩니다.
  • 샘플링 볼륨 내의 입자 수: 각 샘플링 볼륨 내에 있는 각 입자 등급의 정의된 각 종별 입자 수(입자 모델이 활성화된 경우)
  • 운동 에너지, 난류 에너지, 난류 소실율 및 와류에 대한 질량 평균
  • 표본 체적의 6개 경계 각각에서 열 유속: 유체 대류, 유체 및 고체 성분의 전도 및 유체/구성 요소 열 전달이 포함됩니다. 각 플럭스의 기호는 좌표 방향에 의해 결정되는데, 예를 들어, 양방향의 열 플럭스도 양수입니다. 출력에서 확장 또는 최대 디버그 수준을 선택하지 않는 한 이러한 디버그 수준은 fsplt에 자동으로 표시되지 않습니다.

FLOW-3D 및TruVOF는 미국 및 기타 국가에서 등록 상표입니다.

FLOW-3D HYDRO Conveyance Infrastructure

FLOW-3D & computational fluid dynamics for civil engineering

Conveyance systems

  • Tunnels
  • Overflows
  • Hydraulic controls
    • Gates
    • Weirs
    • Orifice
  • Drop structures
  • Flow splitting
  • Open channel conveyance
  • Pumps
  • Flap gates (moving objects)
  • Air flow / air supply
  • Entrained air (entrainment, evolution, drift flux, buoyancy, bulking, de-aeration)

Baffle dropshaft

Tangential dropshaft

Sample GUI packaged conveyance examples

Conveyance systems: simulation outputs

해석 결과로 얻을 수 있는 Simulation outputs

  • Pressure, velocity field
  • Water elevation profiles
  • 3D transient behaviors
  • Surges & sloshing
  • Pump approach flow
  • Pump discharge & operations
  • Air phase
  • Entrained air
  • Forces & coupled motion for moving objects

Coating Application/코팅분야 응용

해석 조건

  • Viscosity(점도) = 0.204 Pa-s
  • Density(밀도) = 965 kg/m^3
  • Surface tension(표면 장력) = 0.035N/m
  • Roll coating

물리 모델

  • Surface tension(표면 장력) 모델
  • Viscosity(점도)
  • Moving Objects(운동)

Classic Inlet Flooded Regime

Revers Operating Regime

Inlet Starved Operating Regime

  • 2D 시뮬레이션은 작동 코팅 윈도우의 빠른 평가를 제공
  • 계단식, 공기 유입, 기아 및 런백을 식별
  • 리빙(Ribbing)은 3D 분석이 필요

해석 결과

Laser Welding and Additive Manufacturing

Application

  • Shallow penetration weld (Shallow 침투 용접)
  • Deep penetration weld (Deep 침투 용접)
  • Laser-arc hybrid welding(레이저-아크 하이브리드 용접)
  • Laser repair technology
  • Laser cladding(레이저 클레딩)
  • Laser powder bed fusion process

관련 물리 모델

  • Viscous Flows and Turbulence(점성 유체 및 난류 모델)
  • Surface Tension(표면장력)
  • General Moving Objects(GMO)
  • Heat Transfer(열전달)
  • Visco-elasto-plasticity(점탄성)
  • Solidification(응고)
  • Thermal Stresses(열응력)

Laser/Heat source(레이저/열원)

  • 레이저 출력 및 용접 속도 향상
    – 더 큰 키홀(Keyhole) 개방 및 깊이 변동이 적음
    – 후면 용융 풀 (Moltan Pool)의 난기류가 최소화된 키홀(Keyhole) 앞부분 벽(Wall)에 레이저 빔(Laser beam)이 노출
    – 다공성 형성(Porosity formation) 최소화

Laser beam motion(레이저 빔 모션)

  • 레이저 빔(Laser beam) 기울기 증가
    – 큰 각도에서 유사한 방향을 따라 작용하는 중력 및 반동 압력으로 인해 후면 용융 풀(Moltan pool)에서 층류(Laminar flow)가 관찰
    – 다공성 발생(Porosity occurrence) 최소화

해석 사례

  • Laser metal deposition(레이저 금속 증착) -Single layer
  • 40마이크론 유체 입자 주입 (500,000/sec)
  • 레이저 출력 : 100W
  • 스캔속도 : 1cm/sec
  • 레이저 빔 직경 : 2mm
  • 재질 : IN-718 meterail alloy
  • Laser metal deposition(레이저 금속 증착) – Multilayer
  • Laser powder bed fusion process
  • FLOW-3D DEM 및 FLOW-3D WELD 고려
    – 용융 영역(Melt region)
    – 용융 풀(Melt pool)의 속도 및 온도
    – 고체 영역(Solid fraction)
  • 레이저 방사(Laser irradiation) 조건
    – 출력 : 200W
    – 스캔속도 : 3m/s
    – Spot radius : 0.1mm

FLOW-3D 교육 안내

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FLOW-3D 분야별 교육 과정 안내


  • 교육 과정명 : 수리 분야

댐, 하천의 여수로, 수문 등 구조물 설계 및 방류, 월류 등 흐름 검토를 하기 위한 유동 해석 방법을 소개하는 교육 과정입니다. 유입 조건(수위, 유량 등)과 유출 조건에 따른 방류량 및 유속, 압력 분포 등 유체의 흐름을 검토를 할 수 있도록 관련 예제를 통해 적절한 기능을 습득하실 수 있습니다.

  • 교육 과정명 : 수처리 분야

정수처리 및 하수처리 공정에서 각 시설물들의 특성에 맞는 최적 운영조건 검토 및 설계 검토을 위한 유동해석 방법을 소개하는 교육 과정입니다. 취수부터 시작하여 혼화지, 분배수로, 응집지, 침전지, 여과지, 정수지, 협기조, 호기조, 소독조 등 각 공정별 유동 특성을 검토하기 위한 해석 모델을 설정하는 방법에 대해 알려드립니다.

  • 교육 과정명 : 주조 분야

주조 분야 사용자들이 쉽게 접근할 수 있도록 각 공정별로 해석 절차 및 해석 방법을 소개하는 교육 과정입니다. 고압다이캐스팅, 저압다이캐스팅, 경동주조, 중력주조, 원심주조, 정밀주조 등 주조 공법 별 관련 예제를 통해 적절한 기능들을 습득할 수 있도록 도와 드립니다.

  • 교육 과정명 : Micro/Bio/Nano Fluidics 분야

점성력 및 모세관력 같은 유체 표면에 작용하는 힘이 지배적인 미세 유동의 특성을 정확하게 표현할 수 있는 해석 방법에 대해 소개하는 교육 과정입니다. 열적, 전기적 물리 현상을 구현할 수 있도록 관련 예제와 함께 해석 방법을 알려드립니다.

  • 교육 과정명 : 코팅 분야 과정

코팅 공정에 따른 코팅액의 두께, 균일도, 유동 특성 분석을 위한 해석 방법을 소개하는 교육 과정입니다. Slide coating, Dip coating, Spin coating, Curtain coating, Slot coating, Roll coating, Gravure coating 등 각 공정별 예제와 함께 적절한 기능을 습득하실 수 있도록 도와 드립니다.

  • 교육 과정명 : 레이저 용접 분야

레이저 용접 해석을 하기 위한 물리 모델과 용접 조건들을 설정하는 방법에 대해 소개하는 교육 과정입니다. 해석을 통해 용접 공정을 최적화할 수 있도록 관련 예제와 함께 적절한 기능들을 습득할 수 있도록 도와 드립니다.

  • 교육 과정명 : 3D프린팅 분야 과정

Powder Bed Fusion(PBF)와 Directed Energy Deposition(DED) 공정에 대한 해석 방법을 소개하는 교육 과정입니다. 파우더 적층 및 레이저 빔을 조사하면서 동시에 금속 파우더 용융지가 적층되는 공정을 해석하는 방법을 관련 예제와 함께 습득하실 수 있습니다.

  • 교육 과정명 : 해양/항만 분야

해안, 항만, 해양 구조물에 대한 파랑의 영향 및 유체의 수위, 유속, 압력의 영향을 예측할 수 있는 해석 방법을 소개하는 과정입니다. 항주파, 슬로싱, 계류 등 해안, 해양, 에너지, 플랜트 분야 구조물 설계 및 검토에 필요한 유동해석을 하실 수 있는 방법을 알려드립니다. 각 현상에 대한 적절한 예제를 통해 기능을 습득하실 수 있습니다.

  • 교육 과정명 : 우주/항공 분야

항공기 및 우주선의 연료 탱크와 추진체 관리장치의 내부 유동, 엔진 및 터빈 노즐 내부의 유동해석을 하실 수 있도록 관련 메뉴에 대한 설명, 설정 방법을 소개하는 과정입니다. 경계조건 설정, Mesh 방법 등 유동해석을 위한 기본적인 내용과 함께 관련 예제를 통해 기능들을 습득하실 수 있습니다.

고객 맞춤형 과정


상기 과정 이외의 경우 고객의 사업 업무 환경에 적합한 사례를 중심으로 맞춤형 교육을 실시합니다. 필요하신 부분이 있으시면 언제든지 교육 담당자에게 연락하여 협의해 주시기 바랍니다.

고객센터 및 교육 담당자

  • 전화 : 02)2026-0450, 02)2026-0455
  • 이메일 : flow3d@stikorea.co.kr

교육 일정 안내


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교육은 매월 정해진 일정에 시행되는 정기 교육과 고객의 요청에 의해 시행되는 비정기 교육이 있습니다. 비정기 교육은 별도문의 바랍니다.

1. 연간교육 일정


2. 교육 내용 : FLOW-3D Basic

  1. FLOW-3D 소개 및 이론
    • FLOW-3D 소개  – 연혁, 특징 등
    • FLOW-3D 기본 개념
      • VOF
      • FAVOR
    • 해석사례 리뷰
  2. GUI 소개 및 사용법
    • 해석 모델 작성법  – 물리 모델 설정
      • 모델 형상 정의
      • 격자 분할
      • 초기 유체 지정
      • 경계 조건 설정
    • 해석 결과 분석 방법  – 해석 모델 설명
  3. 해석 모델 작성 실습
    • 해석 모델 작성 실습  – 격자 분할
      • 물리 모델 설정
      • 모델 형상 및 초기 조건 정의
      • 경계 조건 설정
      • 해석 과정 모니터링
      • 해석 결과 분석
    • 질의 응답 및 토의

3. 교육 과정 : FLOW-3D Advanced

  1. Physics Ⅰ
    • Density evaluation
    • Drift flux
    • Scalars
    • Sediment scour
    • Shallow water
  2. Physics Ⅱ
    • Gravity and non-inertial reference frame
    • Heat transfer
    • Moving objects
    • Solidification
  3. FLOW-3D POST (Post-processor)
    • FLOW-3D POST 소개
    • Interface Basics
    • 예제 실습

FLOW-3D 교육 신청 방법 안내


  • 교육 신청은 홈페이지의 교육 신청 창에서 최소 3일 전에 신청합니다.
  • 모든 교육과정은 신청 인원이 2인 이상일때 개설되며, 선착순 마감입니다.
  • 교육 신청을 완료하시면, 신청시 입력하신 메일주소로 교육 담당자가 확인 메일을 보내드립니다.
  • 교육 시간은 Basic : 오전10시~오후5시, Advanced : 오후1시30분~오후5시30분까지입니다.
  • 교육비 안내
    • FLOW-3D, FLOW-3D CAST, FLOW-3D HYDRO Basic (2일) : 기업 66만원, 학생 55만원
    • FLOW-3D WELD/AM Basic 레이저용접, 3D 프린팅(2일) : 기업 88만원, 학생 66만원
    • FLOW-3D Advanced (1일) : 기업 33만원, 학생 25만원
    • 상기 가격은 부가세 포함 가격입니다.
  • 교육비는 현금(계좌이체)로 납부 가능하며, 교재 및 중식이 제공됩니다.
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오시는 길

Landslide-Induced Wave Hazard

Landslide-Induced Wave Hazard 

Figure 1. The outskirts of Chungtangh village

인도 Sikkim에 위치한 The Teesta III Hydropower Project는 가파르고 좁은 히말라야 계곡에 위치한 60m의 Concrete Face Rockfill Dam (CFRD)이 포함되어 있습니다. 이 계곡은 지진 활동이 활발하며 가파른 경사면은 산사태를 발생시킬 수 있습니다. 댐 상류 저수지의 산사태로 CFRD를 범람할 수 있다는 우려가 있었습니다. 몇 초 이상 과도하게 지속되면 오버플로우로 인해 CFRD가 잘못될 수 있습니다. 비록 댐이 무너지지 않았지만, 여전히 Chungtangh에 있는 상류쪽 작은 마을은 홍수가 날 것이라는 우려가 있었습니다.

Teesta강 계곡의 가장 가파른 경사면은 댐의 바로 상류에 위치해 있는데, 댐의 산사태가 가장 일어날 가능성이 높은 지역입니다. 이 분석의 목적은 저수지에 대한 산사태를 시뮬레이션하고 그 결과로 발생하는 파도가 댐에 넘치는지 여부를 결정하는 것이었습니다.

Moving Objects Model Used to Simulate Landslide                                      

Tecsult는 저수지의 침전물과 퇴적물을 모델링하는데 성공적이었기 때문에 FLOW-3D를 선택하여 이를 시뮬레이션하였습니다. 저수지의 시뮬레이션은 시작점으로 사용되었습니다. FLOW-3D의 Moving Objects모델은 산사태를 시뮬레이션하는데 사용되었으며 VOF모델은 웨이브 생성을 시뮬레이션하는 데 사용되었습니다.

저수지의 산사태를 추정하기 위해서는 여러가지 방법이 고려되었습니다. 경험적 방법은 흔히 산사태가 발생한 파도를 평가하는데 사용되지만, 이러한 방법은 여러가지 면에서 부족합니다. 이러한 방법은 근접 필드 또는 스플래시 영역에 대한 정보를 제공하지 않습니다. 댐은 슬라이드 면과 매우 가깝기 때문에 스플래시 영역을 아는 것이 중요했습니다. CFRD는 몇 초 이상 overflow를 견딜 수 없었습니다. FLOW-3D는 미끄러운 지형 질량과 물 사이의 완전 결합된 상호 작용을 계산하여 시나리오를 3 차원에서 시뮬레이션하는 방법을 제공합니다.

이 문제를 시뮬레이션하기 위해 간단하고 작은 크기의 자유 낙하 블록으로 구성된 실험과 비교하였습니다. 이 경우는 아래 동영상에 나와 있습니다. 그 결과로 생긴 파도 높이는 그 실험과 잘 맞았습니다.

이 모델의 STL파일은 FLOW-3D로 직접 가져옵니다. 예상 산사태 지역의 크기는 지질 정보와 주변 산사태 관측치를 바탕으로 결정되었습니다. 30,000m³, 100m높이의 산사태가 310만 셀의 메쉬로 시뮬레이션 되었습니다. 높이가 1m인 측면 3m의 균일한 셀을 사용했습니다. 최대 슬라이딩 속도는 진입 지점에서 23m/s에 도달했습니다. 파도는 높이 8m, 속도 10m/s로 댐에 도달하여 몇 초 동안 범람했습니다. 그 결과로 상류 마을에서는 홍수가 나타나지 않았습니다.

Figure 3. Prediction of wave height in the splash zone and near field in a small reservoir, with refraction.

Figure 4. Wave heights plotted against each other

Figure 5. Downstream view of TEEST III dam and water intake CATIA model

Conclusions

이 작업의 주된 관심사는 댐의 범람으로 인해 댐과 Chungtangh 마을이 파괴될 수 있었다는 것입니다. 그러나 시뮬레이션에 따르면 댐은 잠시 동안만 범람했고 파도는 마을에 닿지 않았습니다. Chungtangh마을은 강 위에 충분히 높기 때문에, 그것을 범람시키기 위해서는 상당한 파도의 높이가 필요할 것입니다.

 

조선/해양 분야

Coastal & Maritime

FLOW-3D 는 선박설계, 슬로싱 동역학, 파도에 미치는 영향 및 환기를 포함하여 해안 및 해양 관련 분야에 사용할 수 있는 이상적인 소프트웨어입니다.

자유 표면 유체 역학, 파동 생성, 움직이는 물체, 계선 및 용접 공정과 관련한 FLOW-3D 의 기능은 해양 및 해양 산업에서 CFD 공정을 모델링하는 데 매우 적합한 도구입니다. 해안 응용 분야의 경우  FLOW-3D  해안 응용 분야의 경우 FLOW-3D  는 해안 구조물에 대한 심한 폭풍 및 쓰나미 파동의 세부 사항을 정확하게 예측하고 돌발 홍수 및 중요 구조물 홍수 및 피해 분석에 사용됩니다. 기능은 다음과 같습니다.

  • 자유 표면 – 파동 유체 역학 및 오버 토핑 : 규칙 및 불규칙파 및 파동 스펙트럼 (Pierson Moskowitz, JONSWAP)
  • Seakeeping – slamming, planing, porpoising 및 선체 선체 변위 : 완전히 결합된 선박 및 수중 차량 유체 역학
  • 선체 – Resistance, stability and dynamics: surging, heaving, pitching and rolling motion (response amplitude operators or RAOs)
  • 슬로싱 – LNG / 밸러스트 탱크
  • 해양 공학 – 파동 에너지 변환기
 

해안 응용 분야의 경우, FLOW-3D 는 강력한 폭풍과 쓰나미 현상에 의한 해안 구조물이 받는 영향에 대한 세부 사항 예측, 돌발 홍수에 의한 중요한 시설물에 대한 정확한 피해 분석 등을 위해 사용됩니다.

Mooring Lines, Springs and Ropes

FLOW-3D (계류선 및 스프링 등)의 특수 물체를 다른 움직이는 물체에 부착하면 엔지니어가 선박 런칭, 부유 장애물 역학, 부표, 파도에너지 변환기 등을 정확하게 포착할 수 있습니다.

Welding

FLOW-3D 용접 모듈이 추가되면서 조선업계의 용접분야에서는 다공성 등 용접 결함을 최소화할 수 있어 선체의 품질을 크게 높이는 동시에 생산 시간을 최적화할 수 있습니다.

Coastal & Maritime Case Studies

FLOW-3D 사용자들은 연약한 해안선 보호, 구조물에 대한 파장 시뮬레이션, 선체 설계 최적화, 선박 내 환기 연구 등 해안 및 해양 애플리케이션에 FLOW-3D를 사용합니다.

우리는 보트가 세계 항해를 하면서 마주칠 것 같은 다양한 조건에서 항해를 할 수 있는지를 볼 수 있었습니다. 그리고 속도뿐만 아니라 연료 효율과 안전도 고려하도록 설계를 수정할 수 있었습니다.
– Pete Bethune, skipper of Earthrace

Lateral wave impact in waterWave resultsEarthrace vessel
Validation of Sloshing Simulations in Narrow Tanks / Aerial Landslide Generated Wave Simulations / Earthrace: Speed, Fuel Efficiency and Safety
Wave impact vertical displacementEmerged breakwater accropodeStokes theory horizontal velocity
Wave Impact on Offshore StructuresInteraction Between Waves and BreakwatersWave Forces on Coastal Bridges

기타

Bibliography

Models

  • Hybrid Shallow Water/3D Flow
  • Moving Objects
  • Sediment Scour
  • More Modeling Capabilities

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스퀴즈(압착) 핀 / Squeeze Pins

스퀴즈(압착) 핀 / Squeeze Pins

주조의 복잡성이 증가함에 따라, 게이팅 및 피딩 시스템 및 적절한 다이 온도 관리가 최적화되어 있음에도 불구하고, 대부분의 경우 절삭유 부족으로 인한 다공성 수축이 불가피합니다. 고압 및 영구 몰드 주조에서 수축 다공성을 감소시키기 위해 국부적으로 금속을 압착하는 데 압착 핀이 자주 사용됩니다. 그러나 스퀴즈 핀의 효과는 압착의 타이밍과 위치에 따라 크게 좌우됩니다. 이러한 실제 시나리오를 예측하기 위해 스퀴즈 핀 모델이 FLOW-3D 버전 11.1 및 FLOW-3D Cast v4.1에서 개발되어 스퀴즈 핀 프로세스 매개 변수를 설계하고 최적화하는 데 도움을 줍니다.

주조물의 복잡성이 증가함에 따라 최적화된 탕구계 및 공급 시스템과 적절한 다이 온도 관리에도 불구하고, 많은 부품에서 불량한 공급으로 인한 수축 다공성이 불가피한 경우가 많습니다.

고압 및 영구 금형 주물에서는 squeeze 핀을 사용하여 금속을 국부적으로 눌러 수축 다공성을 낮추는 경우가 많습니다. 단, squeeze 핀의 효과는 그 배치와 가압 시기에 따라 크게 달라집니다. 이러한 실제 시나리오를 예측하기 위해 FLOW-3D에서 스퀴즈 핀 프로세스 매개 변수를 설계하고 최적화하는데 도움이 되는 스퀴즈 핀 모델이 개발되었습니다 .

Squeeze Pin Model in FLOW-3D

스퀴즈 핀 모델은 규정 된 moving objects model 을 기반으로하며 열 전달 및 응고 역학 고려 사항을 기반으로하는 단순 수축 모델과 함께 작동합니다. 활성화되면 스퀴즈 핀이 인접한 액체 금속의 수축량을 감지하고 해당 부피를 정확하게 보정하기 위해 이동합니다. 스퀴즈 핀은 최대 허용 거리를 벗어나거나 표면에 너무 많은 굳은 금속을 만나면 멈 춥니 다. 핀에 대한 힘을 정의 할 수 있으며 금속 압력으로 변환됩니다. 그 압력은  thermal stress evolution 및 미세 다공성 모델과 함께 사용할 수 있습니다 .

스퀴즈 핀의 활성화 타이밍은 모델의 구성 요소입니다. 이 모델은 몇 가지 유연한 활성화 제어를 제공합니다. 스퀴즈 핀은 Active Simulation Control 이벤트에 의해 사용자가 지정한 시간에 활성화되거나 자동으로 활성화되도록 설정할 수 있습니다. 후자의 경우 다음 조건이 충족되면 스퀴즈 핀이 활성화됩니다.

  1. 핀은 액체 영역에 인접 해 있습니다.
  2. 핀 사이의 경쟁을 피하기 위해 핀이 인접한 액체 경로를 통해 다른 핀에 연결되어 있지 않습니다.
  3. 인접한 액체 영역에는 게이트가 응고 된 금속으로 밀봉되기 전에 금속이 캐비티 밖으로 밀려 나올 수있는 자유 표면이 없습니다.

자동 활성화 제어는 핀의 정확한 타이밍을 알 수없는 설계 단계에서 유용합니다. 이 경우 핀 활성화 시간은 모델 출력의 일부입니다.

버전 11.1의 새로운 기능인 Active Simulation Control을 사용하여 다이캐스팅 기계에서 실제 스퀴즈 핀 제어 시스템을 모방 할 수 있습니다. 이를 통해 사용자는 주조의 다른 부분에있는 솔루션을 기반으로 핀 타이밍에 더 많은 제어 및 개선을 추가 할 수 있습니다.

Squeeze Pin Model Applications

  • 주물에서 공급이 어려운 부분의 다공성을 줄이거 나 제거하는 스퀴즈 핀의 효과 시뮬레이션
  • 숏 슬리브 피스톤은 응고 수축을 보상하고 강화 압력을 적용하기 위해 응고 중에 스퀴즈 핀으로 정의 할 수 있습니다.
  • 기존 스퀴즈 핀 설계 검증
  • 스퀴즈 핀 배치 최적화
  • 스퀴즈 핀 활성화 타이밍 최적화
  • 실제 다이캐스팅 기계에서 스퀴즈 핀 제어 검증 및 최적화

Sample Results

Squeeze pin configuration

2-캐비티 고압 다이 캐스트에 대한 사례 연구가 수행되었습니다.  두 세트의 시뮬레이션이 실행되었습니다. 하나는 스퀴즈 핀이없는 것이고 다른 하나는 스퀴즈 핀이있는 것입니다. 스퀴즈 핀의 구성은 그림 1에 나와 있습니다. 스퀴즈 핀은 두 개의 주조 부품 각각의 중앙에 배치됩니다. 이 스퀴즈 핀은 자동으로 활성화되도록 설정됩니다. 플런저는 충전 완료 즉시 활성화되도록 설정되는 압착 핀으로도 정의됩니다. 결과 수축 분포는 그림 2에 나와 있습니다. 스퀴즈 핀에 의한 수축 감소는 주물 중앙과 비스킷 중앙에서 분명합니다. 두 시뮬레이션의 총 매크로 수축도 비교되고 그림 3에 그려져 있는데, 이는 스퀴즈 핀에 의한 극적인 수축 감소를 정량적으로 보여줍니다.

Shrinkage distribution squeeze pin model

핀 활성화 시간은 그림 4와 같이 화면, HD3MSG, HD3OUT 및 REPORT 파일에 기록됩니다. 시간 정보는 고압 다이캐스팅 기계에서 스퀴즈 핀 제어 매개 변수로 직접 사용할 수 있습니다. 또한 각 스퀴즈 핀의 이동 거리와 변위량도 일반 이력 데이터에 기록되어 각 스퀴즈 핀의 효과를 확인하는 데 사용할 수 있습니다. 그림 5와 같이 각 스퀴즈 핀의 이동 거리가 표시됩니다. 플런저는 미리 정해진대로 시뮬레이션 시작시 즉시 움직이고, 플런저 근처가 마지막 응고 영역이고 가장 큰 수축을 생성한다는 사실로 인해 가장 멀리 그리고 가장 길게 움직이는 것을 볼 수 있습니다. 두 개의 주조 부품 각각의 중앙에 정의 된 두 개의 스퀴즈 핀이 동시에 활성화됩니다.주조 및 압착 핀 구성의 대칭으로 인해 거의 동일한 거리를 이동했습니다.

Macro-shrinkage volume comparison with and without squeeze pins
Figure 3. Macro-shrinkage volume comparison with and without squeeze pins.
Pin activation output
Figure 4. The output of the pin’s activation in HD3MSG file.
The traveled distance of each squeeze pin
Figure 5. The traveled distance of each squeeze pin.

주조의 복잡성이 증가함에 따라 최적화된 게이팅 및 공급 시스템과 적절한 다이 온도 관리에도 불구하고 공급 불량으로 인한 수축 다공성은 종종 큰 부품 섹션에서 불가피합니다. 고압 및 영구 주형 주조에서 수축 공극률을 줄이기 위해 금속을 국부적으로 누르는데 스퀴즈 핀이 자주 사용됩니다. 그러나 스퀴즈 핀의 효과는 위치와 가압 타이밍에 따라 크게 달라집니다. 이러한 실제 시나리오를 예측하기 위해 FLOW-3D  에서 스퀴즈핀 프로세스 매개 변수를 설계하고 최적화하는 데 도움 이되는 스퀴즈핀 모델이 개발되었습니다 .

움직이는 물체 / Moving Objects

움직이는 물체 / Moving Objects


FLOW-3D 시뮬레이션에서 일반적인 움직이는 물체 (GMO)는 사용자가 규정하거나 유체 흐름과 동적으로 결합되는 모든 종류의 모션을 가진 강체입니다. 고정된 축 / 포인트와 같은 6 자유도 또는 모션 구속 조건을 가질 수 있습니다. 규정된 힘과 토크는 결합된 동작 하에서 GMO에 적용될 수 있습니다. GMO 모델은 충돌 및 연속 접촉을 포함하여 강체 상호 작용뿐만 아니라 독립적인 동작 유형에서 여러 개의 강체를 허용합니다. 이 모델은 견고하고 효율적이며 강력하고 상업용 전산 유체 역학 소프트웨어에서 FLOW-3D가 유일합니다.

FLOW-3D 자동차 차동 부분의 3D 시뮬레이션

 

모델링 기능

6 개의 DOF를 소유 할 수있는 최대 500 개의 움직이는 물체를 허용하거나 고정된 축 또는 고정된 점을 중심으로 회전 할 수 있습니다. 다른 모션 제약 패턴도 가능합니다.
물체는 유체 흐름과 완벽하게 결합되거나 사용자가 모션을 처리할 수 있습니다.
물체는 밀도로 특징 지어지는 여러 가지 재료로 만들 수 있습니다.
객체의 기하학 및 동작의 복잡성에 대한 제한이 없습니다.
지정된 시간에 따른 힘과 토크를 대상에 적용 할 수 있습니다.
모델 충돌 및 움직이는 물체와 움직이지 않는 물체 사이의 지속적인 접촉
스프링과 로프는 물체에 닿을 수 있습니다.
개체에서 다공성 허용
열전도 및 대류가 허용됩니다.
유압식, 중력 식, 비 관성식, 스프링 식, 사용자 정의 제어력 및 토크는 결합 된 모션이있는 물체에 대해 고려됩니다.
시각 및 수치 출력을 포함한 완벽한 후 처리 기능

움직이는 물체 시뮬레이션

FLOW-3D 고객은 처음 사용하는 방법보다 더욱 효율적으로 움직이는 물체 모델의 적용을 사용했습니다. waterwheels에서 shot sleeve, 에너지 디바이스 파동에 이르기까지 우리는 복잡한 메쉬 및 집중적인 컴퓨팅 리소스에 의존하지 않고도 엔지니어링 문제를 해결하는데 모델을 사용하는 방법에 깊은 인상을 받았습니다. 이 모델을 사용하는 진지하고 상상력이 좋은 예를 모두 검토하려면 YouTube 재생 목록 을 방문하십시오.





AN IMPLICIT METHOD TO SOLVE PROBLEMS OF RIGID BODY MOTION COUPLED WITH FLUID FLOW

For general moving object (GMO) problems, when mass density of the moving object(s) under coupled motion is less than that of fluid, the existing explicit GMO method in FLOW-3D® often fails due to stability difficulties. In this work, an implicit GMO method was developed and incorporated into FLOW-3D®. The main difference between the implicit and the explicit GMO methods is that in each computational cycle, or time step, the former calculates the object motion and the fluid flow iteratively while the later calculates them separately. Unlike the explicit method, the implicit approach imposes no limitations on mass density of the moving objects. Tests show it possesses good stability for density of moving objects as low as 0.1% of that of fluid. Close matches between the computational and experimental results were obtained for simulations of a light boat under coupled motion in water stream.

THREE-DIMENSIONAL COLLISION MODELING FOR RIGID BODIES AND ITS COUPLING WITH FLUID FLOW COMPUTATION

A computational algorithm for 3-D rigid-body collision and its coupling with fluid flow was developed and implemented in FLOW-3D® as an addition to the existing General Moving Object (GMO) model. It is assumed that all the bodies have negligible deformation during collision and instantaneously change velocities when they collide. A set of existing equations of motion for collision under six degrees of freedom were adopted. Modifications were made for collisions of bodies with fixed axis, fixed point and prescribed motion. Numerical methods for collision detection and collision integration were developed. Stronge’s energetic coefficient of restitution was employed to determine completion of collision calculation. The model allows for simultaneous collisions of multiple bodies. Collisions can be perfectly elastic, partially plastic or completely plastic. Surfaces of bodies can be smooth or rough, allowing existence of impulse of friction during collision. Continuous contact between moving objects is modeled through a series of micro-collisions. Several applications of the model with and without presence of fluid flow were made. Good agreements of the computational results with analytical and experimental results were obtained and are presented at the end of the report.

A FIXED-MESH METHOD FOR GENERAL MOVING OBJECTS

A fixed-mesh method for general moving objects in fluid flow was developed and implemented into FLOW-3D®. A general moving object (GMO) is a rigid body with any type of six-degrees-of freedom, fixed-point and fixed-axis motion which can be either user-prescribed or dynamically coupled with fluid flow. The method allows for multiple independently general moving objects.

Equations of motion for rigid body are solved for coupled motion. Area and volume fractions are used to represent the objects in the fixed-grid at every time step to describe time-variation of object locations and orientations. Continuity and momentum equations for fluid and scalar transport equations are modified to account for the effects of object motion. Good agreement was achieved between computational and theoretical/experimental results in several application cases.

물리 모델 소개

FLOW-3D 는 고도의 정확성이 필요한 항공, 자동차,  수자원 및 환경, 금속 산업분야의 세계적인 선진 기업에서 사용됩니다.

FLOW-3D의 광범위한 다중 물리 기능(multiphysics )은 자유 표면 흐름, 표면 장력, 열전달, 난류, 움직이는 물체, 단순 변형 고체, 전기 기계, 캐비테이션, 탄/소성, 점성, 가소성, 입자, 고체 연료, 연소 및 위상 변화를 포함합니다.
이러한 모델은 FLOW-3D를 사용하는 사용자들이 기술 및 과학의 광범위한 문제를 해결하도록 설계를 최적화하고 복잡한 프로세스 흐름에 대한 통찰력을 얻을 수 있도록 합니다.

flow-3d-multiphysics-model
Physics Models
Flow/Fluid Modes
  • Incompressible and Compressible Flows
  • Constant/Varying Density
  • Fluid Sources
  • Non-Inertial Frame Reference
  • Laminar/Turbulent Flow
  • Elastic Stresses
  • Electro-Mechanics
  • Heat Transfer
  • Particle Tracking
  • Surface Tension
  • Wall Contact Time
  • Phase Change

Materials Databases

  • Fluids Database
  • Solids Database

매우 정확한
시뮬레이션 결과

FAVOR, 으로 알려진 특별한 메쉬 프로세스는 데카르트 구조의 단순함을 유지하면서 복잡한 형상을 효율적으로 구현합니다.

Optimized Setup
and Workflow

TruVOF 표면 추적 방법은 유동시뮬레이션을 위해 알려진 유체 체적을 사용하는 동안 가장 높은 정확도를 제공합니다.

FlowSight
Postprocessing

산업계에서 최고의 시각화 postprocessor인 FlowSight 는 사용자에게 2차원 및 3차원에 대한 심층 분석 기능을 제공합니다.

 

General Applications Bibliography

다음은 일반 응용 분야의 기술 문서 모음입니다.
이 모든 논문은 FLOW-3D  결과를 포함하고 있습니다. 복잡한 다중 물리와 관련된 문제를 성공적으로 시뮬레이션하기 위해 FLOW-3D를 사용 하는 방법에 대해 자세히 알아보십시오.

Below is a collection of technical papers in our General Applications Bibliography. All of these papers feature FLOW-3D results. Learn more about how FLOW-3D can be used to successfully simulate problems that involve complex multiphysics.

2024년 3월 20일 Upate

204-23   Togo Shinonaga, Hibiki Tajima, Yasuhiro Okamoto, Akira Okada, Application of large-area electron beam irradiation to micro-edge filleting, Journal of Manufacturing Processes, 107; pp. 65-73, 2023. doi.org/10.1016/j.jmapro.2023.10.039

167-23   Xiaoyong Cheng, Zhixian Cao, Ji Li, Alistair Borthwick, A numerical study of the settling of non-spherical particles in quiescent water, Physics of Fluids, 35.9; 2023. doi.org/10.1063/5.0165555

109-23 Dileep Karnam, Yu-Lung Lo, Chia-Hua Yang, Simulation study and parameter optimization of laser TSV using artificial neural networks, Journal of Materials Research and Technology, 25; pp. 3712-3727, 2023. doi.org/10.1016/j.jmrt.2023.06.199

66-23   Erik Holmen Olofsson, Michael Roland, Jon Spangenberg, Ninna Halberg Jokil, Jesper Henri Hattel, A CFD model with free surface tracking: predicting fill level and residence time in a starve-fed single-screw extruder, The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, 126; pp. 3579-3591, 2023. doi.org/10.1007/s00170-023-11329-w

20-23   Giampiero Sciortino, Valentina Lombardi, Pietro Prestininzi, Modelling of cantilever-based flow energy harvesters featuring C-shaped vibration inducers: The role of the fluid/beam interaction, Applied Sciences, 13.1; 416, 2023. doi.org/10.3390/app13010416

134-22   Guozheng Ma, Shuying Chen, Haidou Wang, Impact spread behavior of flying droplets and properties of splats, Micro Process and Quality Control of Plasma Spraying, pp. 87-202, 2022. doi.org/10.1007/978-981-19-2742-3_3

111-22   Chia-Lin Chiu, Chia-Ming Fan, Chia-Ren Chu, Numerical analysis of two spheres falling side by side, Physics of Fluids, 34; 072112, 2022. doi.org/10.1063/5.0096534

58-21   Ruizhe Liu, Haidong Zhao, Experimental study and numerical simulation of infiltration of AlSi12 alloys into Si porous preforms with micro-computed tomography inspection characteristics, Journal of the Ceramic Society of Japan, 129.6; pp. 315-322, 2021. doi.org/10.2109/jcersj2.21018

56-20   Nils Steinau, CFD modeling of ascending Strombolian gas slugs through a constricted volcanic conduit considering a non-linear rheology, Thesis, Universität Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany, 2020.

30-20   Bita Bayatsarmadi, Mike Horne, Theo Rodopoulos and Dayalan Gunasegaram, Intensifying diffusion-limited reactions by using static mixer electrodes in a novel electrochemical flow cell, Journal of The Electrochemical Society, 167.6, 2020. doi.org/10.1149/1945-7111/ab7e8f

75-19   Raphaël Comminal, Marcin Piotr Serdeczny, Navid Ranjbar, Mehdi Mehrali, David Bue Pedersen, Henrik Stang, Jon Spangenberg, Modelling of material deposition in big area additive manufacturing and 3D concrete printing, Proceedings, Advancing Precision in Additive Manufacturing, Nantes, France, September 16-18, 2019.

35-19     Sung-Won Ha, Tae-Won Kim, Joo-Hwan Choi, and Young-Jin Park, Study for flow phenomenon in the circulation water pump chamber using the Flow-3D model, Journal of the Korea Academia-Industrial Cooperation Society, Vol. 20, No. 4, pp. 580-589, 2019. doi: 10.5762/KAIS.2019.20.4.580

27-19     Rolands Cepuritis, Elisabeth L. Skare, Evgeny Ramenskiy, Ernst Mørtsell, Sverre Smeplass, Shizhao Li, Stefan Jacobsen, and Jon Spangeberg, Analysing limitations of the FlowCyl as a one-point viscometer test for cement paste, Construction and Building Materials, Vol. 218, pp. 333-340, 2019. doi: 10.1016.j.conbuildmat.2019.05.127

26-19     Shanshan Hu, Lunliang Duan, Qianbing Wan, and Jian Wang, Evaluation of needle movement effect on root canal irrigation using a computational fluid dynamics model, BioMedical Engineering OnLine, Vol. 18, No. 52, 2019. doi: 10.1186/s12938-019-0679-5

83-18   Elisabeth Leite Skare, Stefan Jacobsen, Rolands Cepuritis, Sverre Smeplass and Jon Spangenberg, Decreasing the magnitude of shear rates in the FlowCyl, Proceedings of the 12th fib International PhD Symposium in Civil Engineering, Prague, Czech Republic, August 29-31, 2018.

71-18   Marc Bascompta, Jordi Vives, Lluís Sanmiqeul and José Juan de Felipe, CFD friction factors verification in an underground mine, Proceedings of the 4th World Congress on Mechanical, Chemical, and Material Engineering, August 16 – 18, 2018, Madrid, Spain, Paper No. MMME 105, 2018. doi.org/10.11159/mmme18.105

56-18   J. Spangenberg, A. Uzala, M.W. Nielsen and J.H. Hattel, A robustness analysis of the bonding process of joints in wind turbine blades, International Journal of Adhesion and Adhesives, vol. 85, pp. 281-285, 2018. doi.org/10.1016/j.ijadhadh.2018.06.009

21-18   Zhang Weikang and Gong Hongwei, Numerical Simulation Study on Characteristics of Airtight Water Film with Flow Deflectors, IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science vol. 153, no. 3, pp. 032025, 2018. doi.org/10.1088/1755-1315/153/3/032025

59-17  Han Eol Park and In Cheol Bang, Design study on mixing performance of rotational vanes in subchannel with fuel rod bundles, Transactions of the Korean Nuclear Society Autumn Meeting, Gyeongju, Korea, October 26-27, 2017.

58-17  Jian Zhou, Claudia Cenedese, Tim Williams and Megan Ball, On the propagation of gravity currents over and through a submerged array of circular cylinders, Journal of Fluid Mechanics, Vol. 831, pp. 394-417, 2017. doi.org/10.1017/jfm.2017.604

24-17   Zhiyuan Ge, Wojciech Nemec, Rob L. Gawthorpe, Atle Rotevatn and Ernst W.M. Hansen, Response of unconfined turbidity current to relay-ramp topography: insights from process-based numerical modelling, doi: 10.1111/bre.12255 This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

06-17   Masoud Hosseinpoor, Kamal H. Khayat, Ammar Yahia, Numerical simulation of self-consolidating concrete flow as a heterogeneous material in L-Box set-up: coupled effect of reinforcing bars and aggregate content on flow characteristics, A. Mater Struct (2017) 50: 163. doi:10.1617/s11527-017-1032-8

94-16   Mehran Seyed Ahmadi, Markus Bussmann and Stavros A. Argyropoulos, Mass transfer correlations for dissolution of cylindrical additions in liquid metals with gas agitation, International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, Volume 97, June 2016, Pages 767-778

83-16   Masoud Hosseinpoor, Numerical simulation of fresh SCC flow in wall and beam elements using flow dynamics models, Ph.D. Thesis: University of Sherbrooke, September 2016.

51-16   Aditi Verma, Application of computational transport analysis – Oil spill dynamics, Master Thesis: State University of New York at Buffalo, 2016, 56 pages; 1012775

37-16   Hannah Dietterich, Einat Lev, and Jiangzhi Chen, Benchmarking computational fluid dynamics models for lava flow simulation, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 18, EGU2016-2202, 2016, EGU General Assembly 2016, © Author(s) 2016. CC Attribution 3.0 License.

 19-16   A.J. Vellinga, M.J.B. Cartigny, E.W.M. Hansen, P.J. Tallinga, M.A. Clare, E.J. Sumner and J.T. Eggenhuisen, Process-based Modelling of Turbidity Currents – From Computational Fluid-dynamics to Depositional Signature, Second Conference on Forward Modelling of Sedimentary Systems, 25 April 2016, DOI: 10.3997/2214-4609.201600374

106-15    Hidetaka Oguma, Koji Tsukimoto, Saneyuki Goya, Yoshifumi Okajima, Kouichi Ishizaka, and Eisaku Ito, Development of Advanced Materials and Manufacturing Technologies for High-efficiency Gas Turbines, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Technical Review Vol. 52 No. 4, December 2015

93-15   James M. Brethour, Modelling of Cavitation within Highly Transient Flows with the Volume of Fluid Method, 1st Pan-American Congress on Computational Mechanics, April 27-29, 2015

90-15   Troy Shinbrot, Matthew Rutala, Andrea Montessori, Pietro Prestininzi and Sauro Succi, Paradoxical ratcheting in cornstarch, Phys. Fluids 27, 103101 (2015); http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4934709

84-15   Nicolas Roussel, Annika Gram, Massimiliano Cremonesi, Liberato Ferrara, Knut Krenzer, Viktor Mechtcherine, Sergiy Shyshko, Jan Skocec, Jon Spangenberg, Oldrich Svec, Lars Nyholm Thrane and Ksenija Vasilic, Numerical simulations of concrete flow: A benchmark comparison, Cem. Concr. Res. (2015), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cemconres.2015.09.022

02-15   David Souders, FLOW-3D Version 11 Enhances CFD Simulation, Desktop Engineering, January 2015

125-14   Herbert Obame Mve, Romuald Rullière, Rémi Goulet and Phillippe Haberschill, Numerical Analysis of Heat Transfer of a Flow Confined by Wire Screen in Lithium Bromide Absorption Process, Defect and Diffusion Forum, ISSN: 1662-9507, Vol. 348, pp 40-50, doi:10.4028/www.scientific.net/DDF.348.40, © 2014 Trans Tech Publications, Switzerland

55-14   Agni Arumugam Selvi, Effect of Linear Direction Oscillation on Grain Refinement, Master’s Thesis: The Ohio State University, Graduate Program in Mechanical Engineering, Copyright by Agni Arumugam Selvi, 2014

99-13   R. C. Givler and M. J. Martinez, Computational Model of Miniature Pulsating Heat Pipes, SANDIA REPORT, SAND2012-4750, Unlimited Release, Printed January 2013.

82-13    Shizhao Li, Jon Spangenberg, Jesper Hattel, A CFD Approach for Prediction of Unintended Porosities in Aluminum Syntactic Foam A Preliminary Study, 8th International Conference on Porous Metals and Metallic Foams (METFOAM 2013), Raleigh, NC, June 2013

81-13   S. Li, J. Spangenberg, J. H. Hattel, A CFD Model for Prediction of Unintended Porosities in Metal Matrix Composites A Preliminary Study, 19th International Conference on Composite Materials (ICCM 2013), Montreal, Canada, July 2013

78-13   Haitham A. Hussein, Rozi Abdullah, Sobri, Harun and Mohammed Abdulkhaleq, Numerical Model of Baffle Location Effect on Flow Pattern in Oil and Water Gravity Separator Tanks, World Applied Sciences Journal 26 (10): 1351-1356, 2013, ISSN 1818-4952, DOI: 10.5829/idosi.wasj.2013.26.10.1239, © IDOSI Publications, 2013

74-13  Laetitia Martinie, Jean-Francois Lataste, and Nicolas Roussel, Fiber orientation during casting of UHPFRC: electrical resistivity measurements, image analysis and numerical simulations, Materials and Structures, DOI 10.1617/s11527-013-0205-3, November 2013. Available for purchase online at SpringerLink.

67-13 Stefan Jacobsen, Rolands Cepuritis, Ya Peng, Mette R. Geiker, and Jon Spangenberg, Visualizing and simulating flow conditions in concrete form filling using Pigments, Construction and Building Materials 49 (2013) 328–342, © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Available for purchase at ScienceDirect.

60-13 Huey-Jiuan Lin, Fu-Yuan Hsu, Chun-Yu Chiu, Chien-Kuo Liu, Ruey-Yi Lee, Simulation of Glass Molding Process for Planar Type SOFC Sealing Devices, Key Engineering Materials, 573, 131, September 2013. Available for purchase at Scientific.net.

32-13 M A Rashid, I Abustan and M O Hamzah, Numerical simulation of a 3-D flow within a storage area hexagonal modular pavement systems, 4th International Conference on Energy and Environment 2013 (ICEE 2013), IOP Conf. Series: Earth and Environmental Science 16 (2013) 012056 doi:10.1088/1755-1315/16/1/012056. Full paper available at IOP.

105-12 Jon Spangenberg, Numerisk modellering af formfyldning ved støbning i selvkompakterende beton, Ph.D. Thesis: Technical University of Denmark, ID: 0eeede98-fb07-4800-86e2-0a6baeb1e7a3, 2012.

100-12 Nurul Hasan, Validation of CFD models using FLOW-3D for a Submerged Liquid Jet, Ninth International Conference on CFD in the Minerals and Process Industries, CSIRO, Melbourne, Australia, 10-12 December 2012.

87-12  Abustan, Ismail, Hamzah, Meor Othman and Rashid, Mohd Aminur, A 3-Dimensional Numerical Study of a Flow within a Permeable Pavement, OIDA International Journal of Sustainable Development, Vol. 04, No. 02, pp. 37-44, April 2012.

86-12 Abustan, Ismail, Hamzah, Meor Othman and Rashid, Mohd Aminur, Review of Permeable Pavement Systems in Malaysia Conditions, OIDA International Journal of Sustainable Development, Vol. 04, No. 02, pp. 27-36, April 2012.

85-12  Mohd Aminur Rashid, Ismail Abustan, Meor Othman Hamzah, Infiltration Characteristic Modeling Using FLOW-3D within a Modular Pavement, Procedia Engineering, Volume 50, 2012, Pages 658-667, ISSN 1877-7058, 10.1016/j.proeng.2012.10.072.

73-12  Mohd Aminur Rashid, Ismail Abustan, Meor Othman Hamzah, Infiltration Characteristic Modeling Using FLOW-3D within a Modular Pavement, Procedia Engineering, Volume 50, 2012, Pages 658-667, ISSN 1877-7058, 10.1016/j.proeng.2012.10.072.

65-12  X.H. Yang, T.J. Lu, T. Kim, Influence of non-conducting pore inclusions on phase change behavior of porous media with constant heat flux boundaryInternational Journal of Thermal Sciences, Available online 10 October 2012. Available online at SciVerse.

56-12  Giancarlo Alfonsi, Agostino Lauria, Leonardo Primavera, Flow structures around large-diameter circular cylinder, Journal of Flow Visualization and Image Processing, DOI: 10.1615/JFlowVisImageProc.2012005088, 2012. Available for purchase online at Begell Digital Library.

49-12  M. Janocko, M.B.J. Cartigny, W. Nemec, E.W.M. Hansen, Turbidity current hydraulics and sediment deposition in erodible sinuous channels: laboratory experiments and numerical simulations, Marine and Petroleum Geology, Available online 17 September 2012. Available for purchase online at SciVerse.

32-12  Fatih Karadagli, Bruce E. Rittmann, Drew C. McAvoy, and John E. Richardson, Effect of Turbulence on the Disintegration Rate of Flushable Consumer Products, Water Environment Research, Volume 84, Number 5, May 2012

31-12    D. Valero Huerta and R. García-Bartual, Optimization of Air Conditioning Diffusers Location in Large Agricultural Warehouses Using CFD Techniques, International Conference of Agricultural Engineering (CIGR-AgEng2012) Valencia, Spain, July 8-12, 2012

16-12 Yi Fan Fu, Wei Dong, Ying Li, Yi Tan, Ming Hui Yi, Akira Kawasaki, Simulation of the Effects of the Physical Properties on Particle Formation of Pulsated Orifice Ejection Method (POEM), 2012, Advanced Materials Research, 509, 161. Available for purchase online at Scientific.Net.

92-11  Giancarlo Alfonsi, Agostino Lauria, Leonardo Primavera, The lower vertical structure past the Ahmed car model, International Conference on Computational Science, ICCS 2011. Available for purchase online at Begell Digital Library.

80-11  Ismail Abustan, Meor Othman Hamzah, Mohd Aminur Rashid, A 3-Dimensional Numerical Study of a Flow within a Permeable Pavement, OIDA International Conference on Sustainable Development, ISSN 1923-6670, Putrajaya, Malaysia, 5-7th December 2011

66-11   H. Kondo, T. Furukawa, Y. Hirakawa, K. Nakamura, M. Ida, K.Watanabe, T. Kanemura, E. Wakai, H. Horiike, N. Yamaoka, H. Sugiura, T. Terai, A. Suzuki, J. Yagi, S. Fukada, H. Nakamura, I. Matsushita, F. Groeschel, K. Fujishiro, P. Garin and H. Kimura, IFMIF-EVEDA lithium test loop design and fabrication technology of target assembly as a key componentNuclear Fusion Volume 51 Number 12, doi:10.1088/0029-5515/51/12/123008

49-11     N.I. Vatin, A.A. Girgidov, K.I. Strelets, Numerical modelling the three-dimensional velocity field in the cyclone, Inzhenerno-Stroitel’nyi Zhurnal, No. 4, 2011. In Russian.

41-11    Maiko Hosoda, Taichi Hirano, and Keiji Sakai, Low-Viscosity Measurement by Capillary Electromagnetically Spinning Technique, © 2011 The Japan Society of Applied Physics, Japanese Journal of Applied Physics, July 20, 2011.

18-11  Ortloff, C.R., Vogel, M., Spray cooling heat transfer — Test and CFD analysis, Semiconductor Thermal Measurement and Management Symposium (SEMI-THERM), 2011 27th Annual IEEE, 20-24 March 2011, pp 245 – 252, San Jose, CA, 10.1109/STHERM.2011.5767208.

82-10   Dr. John Abbott, Two problems on the flow of viscous sheets of molten glass, 26th Annual Workshop on Mathematical Problems in Industry, Rensselear Polytechnic Institute, June 14-18, 2010

57-10  Chouet, B. A., Dawson, P. B., James, M. R. and Lane, S. J., Seismic source mechanism of degassing bursts at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii: Results from waveform inversion in the 10–50 s band, J. Geophys. Res., 115, B09311, doi:10.1029/2009JB006661, September 2010. Available online at JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH.

55-10 Pamela Waterman, FEA and CFD: Getting Better All the Time, Desktop Engineering, December 2010.

53-10  Nicolas Fries, Capillary transport processes in porous materials – experiment and model, Cuvillier Verlag Göttingen; 2010; ISBN 978-3-86955-507-2. Available at www.cuvillier.de  and www.amazon.de.

45-10  Meiring Beyers, Thomas Harms, and Johan Stander, Mitigating snowdrift at the elevated SANAE IV research station in Antarctica CFD simulation and field application, The Fifth International Symposium on Computational Wind Engineering (CWE2010), Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, May 23-27, 2010.

31-10 J. Spangenberg, N. Roussel, J.H. Hattel, J. Thorborg, M.R. Geiker, H. Stang and J. Skocek, Prediction of the Impact of Flow-Induced Inhomogeneities in Self-Compacting Concrete (SCC), Ch. 25 of “Design, Production and Placement of Self-Consolidating Concrete,” RILEM Bookseries, 2010, Volume 1, Part 5, 209-215, DOI: 10.1007/978-90-481-9664-7_18. Available online at Springer Link.

28-10 Sirisha Burra, Daniel P. Nicolella, W. Loren Francis, Christopher J. Freitas, Nicholas J. Mueschke, Kristin Poole, and Jean X. Jiang, Dendritic processes of osteocytes are mechanotransducers that induce the opening of hemichannels, Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2010 Jul 19. [Epub ahead of print], Available for purchase at PNAS.

19-10 Michael T. Tolley, Michael Kalontarov, Jonas Neubert, David Erickson and Hod Lipson, Stochastic Modular Robotic Systems A Study of Fluidic Assembly Strategies, IEEE Transactions on Robotics, Vol. 26, NO. 3, June 2010

59-17   Han Eol Park and In Cheol Bang, Design study on mixing performance of rotational vanes in subchannel with fuel rod bundles, Transactions of the Korean Nuclear Society Autumn Meeting, Gyeongju, Korea, October 26-27, 2017.

44-09 Micah Fuller, Fabian Bombardelli, Deb Niemeier, Particulate Matter Modeling in Near-Road Vegetation Environments, Contract AQ-04-01: Developing Effective and Quantifiable Air Quality Mitigation Measures, UC Davis, Caltrans, September 2009

28-09 D. C. Lo, Dong-Taur Su and Jan-Ming Chen (2009), Application of Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations to the Analysis of Bank Effects in Restricted Waters, Journal of Navigation, 62, pp 477-491, doi:10.1017/S037346330900527X; Purchase the article online (clicking on this link will take you to the Cambridge Journals website).

24-09 Richard C. Givler and Mario J. Martinez, Modeling of Pulsating Heat Pipes, Sandia Report, SAND2009-4520, Sandia National Laboratories, August 2009.

45-08  J. Saeki, Seikei Kakou, Three-Dimensional Flow Analysis of a Thermosetting Compound in a Motor Stator, 20, 750-754 (2008) [in Japanese] (Zipped file contains paper and appendices)

38-08 Yoshifumi Kuriyama, Ken’ichi Yano and Masafumi Hamaguchi, Trajectory Planning for Meal Assist Robot Considering Spilling Avoidance, 17th IEEE International Conference on Control Applications, Part of 2008 1EEE Multi-conference on Systems and Control, San Antonio, Texas, September 3-5, 2008

29-08 Ernst W.M. Hansen, Wojciech Nemec and Snorre Heimsund, Numerical CFD simulations — a new tool for the modelling of turbidity currents and sand dispersal in deep-water basins, Production Geoscience 2008 in Stavanger, Norway, © 2008

17-08 James, M. R., Lane, S. J. & Corder, S. B., Modelling the rapid near-surface expansion of gas slugs in low-viscosity magmas, In Lane S. J., Gilbert J. S. (eds) Fluid Motion in Volcanic Conduits: A Source of Seismic and Acoustic Signals. Geol. Soc., London, Spec. Pub., 307, 147-167, doi: 10.1144/SP307.9. 2008

16-08 Stefano Malavasi, Nicola Trabucchi, Numerical Investigation of the Flow Around a Rectangular Cylinder Near a Solid Wall, BBAA VI International Colloquium on: Bluff Bodies Aerodynamics & Applications, Milano, Italy, July 2008

41-07 Nicolas Roussel, Mette R. Geiker, Frederic Dufour, Lars N. Thrane and Peter Szabo, Computational modeling of concrete flow General Overview, Cement and Concrete Research 37 (2007) 1298-1307, © 2007 Elsevier Ltd.

40-07 Nemec, W., Heimsund, S., Xu, J. & Hansen, E.W.M., Numerical CFD simulation of turbidity currents, British Sedimentological Research Group (BSRG) Annual Meeting, Birmingham, 17-18 December 2007

39-07 Heimsund, S, Xu, J. & Nemec, W., Numerical Simulation of Recent Turbidity Currents in the Monterey Canyon System, Offshore California, American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, 10-14 December 2007

32-07 James, M. R., Lane, S. J. & Corder, S. B., Modeling the near-surface expansion of gas slugs in basaltic magmaEos Trans. A.G.U., 88(52), Fall Meet. Suppl.. Abs. V12B-03. 2007

31-07 James, M. R., Lane, S. J. and Corder, S. B., Degassing low-viscosity magma: Quantifying the transition between passive bubble-burst and explosive activityE.G.U. Geophys. Res. Abstr., 905336, SRef-ID: 1607-7962/gra/EGU2007-A-05336. 2007

35-06  S. Green and C. Manepally, Software Validation Report for FLOW-3D Version 9.0, Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses, August 2006

33-06 N. Roussel, Correlation between yield stress and slump: Comparison between numerical simulations and concrete rheometers results, © RILEM 2006, Materials and Structures (2006) 39:501-509, Purchase online at Springer Link.

32-06 Heimsund, S., Möller, N. and Guargena, C., FLOW-3D simulation of the Ormen Lange field, mid-Norway, In: Hoyanagi, K., Takano, O. and Kano, K. (Ed.), Abstracts, International Association of Sedimentologists 17th International Sedimentological Congress, Fukuoka, Vol. B, p. 107, 2006

10-06 Gengsheng Wei, An Implicit Method to Solve Problems of Rigid Body Motion Coupled with Fluid Flow, Flow Science Technical Note #76, FSI-05-TN76.

8-06 Gengsheng Wei, Three-Dimensional Collision Modeling for Rigid Bodies and its Coupling with Fluid Flow Computation, Flow Science Technical Note #75, FSI-06-TN75.

34-05  Young Bae Kim, Kyung Do Kim, Sang Eui Hong, Jong Goo Kim, Man Ho Park, and Ju Hyun Kim, and Jae Keun Kweon, 3D Simulation of PU Foaming Flow in a Refrigerator Cabinet, Appliance Magazine.com, January 2005.

33-05 N. Roussel, Fifty-cent rheo-meter for yield stress measurements From slump to spreading flow, @2005 by The Society of Rheolgoy, Inc., J. Rheol. 49(3), 705-718 May/June (2005)

32-05 Heimsund, S., Möller, N., Guargena, C. and Thompson, L., Field-scale modeling of turbidity currents by FLOW-3D simulations, In: Workshop Abstracts, Modeling of Turbidity Currents and Related Gravity Currents, University of California, Santa Barbara, 2 p., (2005)

15-05 Gengsheng Wei, A Fixed-Mesh Method for General Moving Objects, Flow Science Technical Note #73, FSI-05-TN73

14-05 James M. Brethour, Incremental Thermoelastic Stress Model, Flow Science Technical Note #72, FSI-05-TN72

9-05 Gengsheng Wei, A Fixed-Mesh Method for General Moving Objects in Fluid Flow, Modern Physics Letters B, Vol. 19, Nos. 28-29 (2005) 1719-1722

1-05 C.W. Hirt, Electro-Hydrodynamics of Semi-Conductive Fluids: With Application to Electro-Spraying Flow Science Technical Note #70, FSI-05-TN70

35-04  J. Saeki, T. Kono and T. Teramae, Seikei Kakou, Formulation of Mathematical Models for Estimating Residual Stress and Strain Components Correlated with 3-D Flow of Thermosetting Compounds, 16, 5, 309-316 (2004) [in Japanese]. (Zipped file contains paper and appendices)

31-04 Heimsund, S., Möller, N., Guargena, C. and Thompson, L., The control of seafloor topography on turbidite sand dispersal in the Ormen Lange field: a large-scale application of FLOW-3D simulations, In: Martinsen, O.J. (Ed.), Abstracts and Proceedings of the Geological Society of Norway (NGF), Deep Water Sedimentary Systems of Arctic and North Atlantic Margins, Stavanger, 3, p. 25, (2004)

26-04 Beyers, J.H.M., Harms, T.M. and Sundsbø, P.A., 2004, Numerical simulation of three dimensional, transient snow drifting around a cube, Journal of wind engineering and industrial aerodynamics, vol. 92, pp. 725-747, ISSN 0167-6105

25-04 Beyers, J.H.M, Harms, T.M. and Sundsbø, P.A., 2004, Numerical simulation of snow drifting around an elevated obstacle, Proceedings of the 5th conference on snow engineering, Davos, Switzerland, pp.185-191

17-04 Michael Barkhudarov, Multi-Block Gridding Technique for FLOW-3D (Revised), Flow Science Technical Note #59-R2, FSI-00-TN59-R2

36-03 Heimsund, S., Hansen, E.W.M. and Nemec, W., Numerical CFD simulation of turbidity currents and comparison with laboratory data, In: Hodgetts, D., Hodgson, D. and Smith, R. (Ed.), Slope Modelling Workshop Abstracts, Experimental, Reservoir and Forward Modelling of Turbidity Currents and Deep-Water Sedimentary Systems, Liverpool Univ., p. 13., (2003b)

35-03 Heimsund, S., Hansen, E.W.M. and Nemec, W. Computational 3-D fluid-dynamics model for sediment transport, erosion and deposition by turbidity currents, In: Nakrem, H.A. (Ed.), Abstracts and Proceedings of the Geological Society of Norway (NGF), Den 18. Vinterkonferansen, Oslo, 1, p. 39., (2003a)

33-03 Beyers, J.H.M., Sundsbø, P.A. and Harms, T.M., 2003, Numerical simulation and verification of drifting snow around a cube, Proceedings of the 11th international conference on wind engineering, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas, USA, pp. 1886-1893

27-03 Jun Zeng, Daniel Sobek and Tom Korsmeyer, Electro-Hydrodynamic Modeling of Electrospray Ionization CAD for a µFluidic Device-Mass Spectrometer Interface, Agilent Technologies Inc, paper presented at Transducers 2003, June 03 Boston (note: Reference #10 is to FLOW-3D)

25-03 J. M Brethour, Moving Boundaries an Eularian Approach, Moving Boundaries VII, Computational Modelling of Free and Moving Boundary Problems, A. A. Mammoli & C.A. Brebbia, WIT Press

19-03 James Brethour, Incremental Elastic Stress Model, Flow Science Technical Note (FSI-03-TN64)

18-03 Michael Barkhudarov, Semi-Lagrangian VOF Advection Method for FLOW-3D, Flow Science Technical Note (FSI-03-TN63)

11-02 Junichi Saeki and Tsutomu Kono, Three-Dimensional Flow Analysis of a Thermosetting Compound during Mold Filling, Polymer Processing Society 18th Annual Meeting, June 2002, Guimares, Portugal.

46-01 Yasunori Iwai, Takumi Hayashi, Toshihiko Yamanishi, Kazuhiro Kobayashi and Masataka Nishi, Simulation of Tritium Behavior after Intended Tritium Release in Ventilated Room, Journal of Nuclear Science and Technology, Vol. 38, No. 1, p. 63-75, January 2001

23-01 Borre Bang, Dag Lukkassen, Application of Homogenization Theory Related to Stokes Flow in Porous Media, Applications of Mathematics, Narvik, Norway, No 4, pp. 309-319.

15-01 Ernst Hansen, SINTEF Energy Research, Trondheim, Norway, Computer Simulation Helps Increase Flow Rate in Three-Phase Separator, Drilling Marketplace, Vol 55, No 10, May 15, 2001, pp.14

10-01 Ernst Hansen, SINTEF Energy Research, Phenomeological Modeling and Simulation of Fluid Flow and Separation Behaviour in Offshore Gravity Separators, PVP-Col 431, Emerging Technologies for Fluids, Structures and Fluids, Structures and Fluid Structure Interaction — 2001, ASME 2001, pp. 23-29

7-01 C. Bohm, D. A. Weiss, and C. Tropea, Multi-droplet Impact onto Solid Walls Droplet-droplet Interaction and Collision of Kinemeatic Discontinuities, DaimlerChrysler Research and Technology, ILASS-Europe 2000, September 11-13, 2000

6-01 Ernst Hansen, Simulation Raises Separator Flow RateEngineering Talk, March 21, 2001

3-01 M. Sick, H. Keck, G. Vullioud, and E. Parkinson, New Challenges in Pelton Research

1-01 Y. Darsht, K. Kuvanov, A. Puzanov, I. Kholkin, FLOW-3D in Designing Hydraulic Systems for Heavy Machinery  (in Russian), SAPR I Grafika (CAD and Graphics), August 2000, pp. 50-55.

22-00 A. K. Temu, O. K. Sønju and E. W. M. Hansen, Criteria for Minimum Particle Deposition onto a Cylinder in Crossflow, International Symposium on Multiphase Flow and Transport Phenomena, November 2000, Tekirova, Antalya, Turkey

21-00 Claus Maier, Stefan aus der Wiesche and Eberhard P. Hofer, Impact of Microdrops on Solid Surfaces for DNA-Synthesis, Department of Measurement, Control and Microtechnology, University of Ulm, Technical Proceedings of the 2000 International Conference on Modeling and Simulation of Microsystems, pp. 586-589

11-00 Thomas K. Thiis, A Comparison of Numerical Simulations and Full-scale Measurements of Snowdrifts around Buildings, Wind and Structures – ISSN: 1226-6116,Vol. 3, nr. 2 (2000), pp. 73-81

10-00 P.A. Sundsbo and B. Bang, Snow drift control in residential areas-Field measurements and numerical simulations, Fourth International Conference on Snow Engineering, pp. 377-382

9-00 Thomas K. Thiis and Christian Jaedicke, The Snowdrift Pattern Around Two Cubical Obstacles with Varying Distance—Measurement and Numerical Simulations, Snow Engineering, edited by Hjorth-Hansen, et al, Balkema, Rotterdam, 2000, pp.369-375.

8-00 Thomas K. Thiis and Christian Jaedicke, Changes in the Snowdrift Pattern Caused by a Building Extension—Investigations Through Scale Modeling and Numerical Simulations, Snow Engineering, edited by Hjorth-Hansen, et al, Balkema, Rotterdam, 2000, pp. 363-368

7-00 Bruce Letellier, Louis Restrepo, and Clinton Shaffer, Near-Field Dispersion of Fission Products in Complex Terrain Using a 3-D Turbulent Fluid-Flow Model, CCPS International Conference, San Francisco, CA, September 28-October 1, 1999

6-00 Bruce Letellier, Patrick McClure, and Louis Restrepo, Source-Term and Building-Wake Consequence Modeling for the GODIVA IV Reactor at Los Alamos National Laboratory, 1999 Safety Analysis Workshop, Portland, Oregon, June 13-18, 1999

11-99 Thomas K. Thiis and Yngvar Gjessing, Large-scale Measurements of Snowdrifts Around Flat-roofed and Single-pitch-roofed Buildings, Cold Regions Science and Technology 30, Narvik, Norway, May 17, 1999, pp. 175-181

3-99 A. A. Gubaidullin, Jr., T. N. Dinh, and B. R. Sehgal, Analysis of Natural Convection Heat Transfer and Flows in Internally Heated Stratified Liquid, accepted for publication 33rd Natl. Heat Transfer Conf. CD proceedings, Albuquerque, NM, August 15-17, 1999

20-98 Mark W. Silva, A Computational Study of Highly Viscous Impinging Jets, published by the Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, ANRCP-1998-18, November 1998

17-98 P. A. Sundsbo and B. Bang, 1998, Calculation of Snowdrift Around Roadside Safety Barriers, Proc of the International Snow Science Workshop, Sept. 1998, Sunriver, Oregon, USA 279-283

11-98 P-A Sundsbo, Numerical simulations of wind deflection fins to control snow accumulation in building steps, Journal of Wind Engineering and Industrial Aerodynamics 74-76 (1998) 543-552

23-97  P.E. O’Donoghue, M.F. Kanninen, C.P. Leung, G. Demofonti, and S. Venzi, The development and validation of a dynamic propagation model for gas transmission pipelines, Intl J. Pres. Ves. & Piping 70 (1997) 11-25, P11 : S0308 – 0161 (96) 00012 – 9.

22-97  Christopher J. Matice, Simulation of High Speed Filling, Presented at High Speed Processing & Filling of Plastic Containers, SME, Chicago, Illinois, November 11, 1997.

12-97 B. Entezam and W. K. Van Moorhem, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT and J. Majdalani, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI, Modeling of a Rijke-Tube Pulse Combustor Using Computational Fluid Dynamics, presented at 33rd AIAA/ASME/SAE/ASEE Joint Propulsion Conference & Exhibit, Seattle, WA, July 6-9, 1997.

11-97 B. Entezam, Computational and Experimental Investigation of Unsteady Flowfield Inside the Rijke Tube, doctoral thesis submitted to University of Utah, Dept. Mechanical Engineering, Salt Lake City, UT, June 1997

2-97 K. Fujisaki, T. Ueyama, and K. Okazawa, Magnetohydrodynamic Calculation of In-Mold Electromagnetic Stirring, Nippon Steel Corp., IEEE Transactions on Magnetics, Vol. 33, No. 2, March 1997

1-97 P. A. Sundsbo, Four Layer Modelling and Numerical Simulations of Snow Drift, to be submitted to the Journal of Glaciology, 1997

23-96 Andy K Palmer, Computational Fluid Dynamic Software Comparison and Electrostatic Precipitator Modeling, Presented to the Faculty of California State University, Summer 1996

21-96 P. A. Sundsbo, Computer Simulation of Snow-Drift around Structures, Proceedings of the 4th Symposium on Building Physics in the Nordic Countries, Vol. 2, 533-539, Finland, 9-10 Sep. 1996

20-96 P. A. Sundsbo and E.W.M. Hansen, Modelling and Numerical Simulation of Snow-Drift around Snow Fences, Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Snow Engineering, Sendai, Japan, 26-31 May 1996

19-96 P. A. Sundsbo, Numerical Modelling and Simulation of Snow Accumulations around Porous FencesProceedings of the International Snow Science Workshop, Banff, Alberta, Canada, 6-10 Oct. 1996

18-96 T. Iverson, Editor, Applied Modelling and Simulation, Proceedings of the 38th SIMS Simulation Conference, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway, June 11-13, 1996

17-96 C. L. Parish, Modeling Compressible Flow Through an Orifice Stack Using Numerical Methods, thesis submitted for M.S. Mech. Engineering, NM State University, Las Cruces, NM, December 1996

15-96 T. Wiik and R. K. Calay, A Study of Balcony on Flow-Field and Wind Loads for Low-Rise Buildings, Fourth Symposium on Building Physics in the Nordic Countries, Dipoli, Espoo, Finland, September 1996

14-96 T. Wiik, E.W.M. Hansen, The Assessment of Wind Loads on Roof Overhang of Low-Rise Buildings, Second International Symposium Wind Engineering, Fort Collins, CO, September 1996

13-96 T. Wiik, R. K. Calay, and A. Holdo, A Study of Effects of Eaves on Flow-Field and Wind Loads for Low-Rise Houses, Third International Colloquium on Bluff Body Aerodynamics and Applications, Blacksburg, Virginia, August 1996

11-96 Y. Miyamoto and M. Harada, A Flow Analysis accompanied by Formation of the Liquid Droplets shown with an Animation Display Technique, SEA Corporation, presented at Visualization Information Conference, Tokyo, Japan, July 17, 1996

8-96 J. Bakken, E. Naess, T. Engebretsen, and E. W. M. Hansen, Fluid Flow in Porous Media, proceedings of the 38th SIMS Simulations Conference, Norwegian Univ. of Science & Technology, Trondheim, Norway, June 11-13, 1996

7-96E. W. M. Hansen, Performance of Oil/Water Gravity Separators Imposed to Motion, proceedings of the 38th SIMS Simulations Conference, Norwegian Univ. of Science & Technology, Trondheim, Norway, June 11-13, 1996

8-95 J. J. Francis, Computational Hydrodynamic Study of Flow through a Vertical Slurry Heat Exchanger, NSF Summer Research Program, Dept. Mech. Engineering, Univ. of Nevada Las Vegas, August 9, 1995

4-94 J. L. Ditter and C. W. Hirt, A Scalable Model for Mixing Vessels, Flow Science report, FSI-94-00-1, presented at the 1994 ASME Fluids Engineering Summer Meeting, Incline Village, NV, June 1994

3-94 A. Nielsen, B. Bang, P. A. Sundsbo and T. Wiik, Computer Simulation of Windspeed, Windpressure and Snow Accumulation around Buildings (SNOW-SIM), 1st International Conference on HVAC in Cold Climate, Rovaniemi, Finland, from Narvik Institute of Technology, Narvik, Norway, March 1994

2-94 J. M. Sicilian, Addition of an Extended Bubble Model to FLOW-3D, Flow Science report, FSI-94-58-1, March 1994

1-94 T. Hong, C. Zhu, P. Cal and L-S Fan, Numerical Modeling of Basic Modes of Formation and Interactions of Bubbles in Liquids, Dept. Chem. Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, March 1994

14-93 J. L. Ditter and C. W. Hirt, A Scalable Model for Stir Tanks, Flow Science Technical Note #38, December 1993 (FSI-93-TN38)

13-93 J. Partinen, N. Saluja and J. K. Kirtley, Jr., Experimental and Computational Investigation of Rotary Electromagnetic Stirring in a Woods Metal System, Dept. of Math, Science and Engr. and Dept. of Electrical Engr. and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307

12-93 J. Partinen, N. Saluja and J. K. Kirtley, Jr., Modeling of Surface Deformation in an Electromagnetically Stirred Metallic Melt, Dept. of Math, Science, and Engr. and Dept. of Electrical Engr. and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307

10-93 C. Philippe, Summary Report on Test Calculations with FLOW-3D/CAST93, (coupled-rigid-body dynamics model), ESTEC, Noordwijk, The Netherlands, September 17, 1993

5-93 J. M. Sicilian, J. L. Ditter and C. L. Bronisz, FLOW-3D Analyses of CFD Triathlon Benchmark, Flow Science report, presented at the ASME Fluids Engineering Conference, Washington DC, June 20-24, 1993

4-93 T. Wiik, Ventilation of the Attic due to Wind Loads on Low-Rise Buildings, paper for 3rd Symposium of Building Physics in Nordic Countries, Narvik Institute of Technology, Narvik, Norway, summer 1993

3-93 E. W. M. Hansen, Modelling and Simulation of Separation Effects and Fluid Flow Behaviour in Process-Units, SIMS’93 – 35th Simulation Conference, Kongsberg, Norway, June 9-11, 1993

2-93 M. A. Briones, R. S. Brodsky and J. J. Chalmers, Computer Simulation of the Rupture of a Gas Bubble at a Gas-Liquid Interface and its Implications in Animal Cell Damage, Dept. Chemical Engineering, Ohio State University, Manuscript No. RB68, April 1993

11-92 G. Trapaga, E. F. Matthys, J. J. Valencia and J. Szekely, Fluid Flow, Heat Transfer, and Solidification of Molten Metal Droplets Impinging on Substrates: Comparison of Numerical and Experimental Results, Metallurgical Transactions B, Vol. 23B, pp. 701-718, December 1992

10-92 J. B. Dalin, J. M. Le Guilly, P. Le Roy and E. Maas, Numerical Simulations Applied to the Production of Automotive Foundry Components, Numerical Methods in Industrial Forming Processes, Wood & Zienkiewicz (eds), Balkema, Rotterdam, 1992

5-92 C. W. Hirt, Volume-Fraction Techniques: Powerful Tools for Flow Modeling, Flow Science report (FSI-92-00-02), presented at the Computational Wind Engineering Conference, University of Tokyo, August 1992

3-92 C. L. Bronisz and C.W. Hirt, Lubricant Flow in a Rotary Lip Seal, Flow Science Technical Note #33, February 1992 (FSI-92-TN33)

16-91 A. Nielsen, SNOW-SIM – Computer Model for Simulation of Wind and Snow Loads on Buildings and Structures, Building Science, Narvik Institute of Technology, Narvik, Norway, (not dated)

15-91 E. W. M. Hansen, H. Heitmann, B. Laska, A. Ellingsen, O. Ostby, T. B. Morrow and F. T. Dodge, Fluid Flow Modelling of Gravity Separators, SINTEF, Norway and Southwest Research Institute, Texas, Elsevier Science Publishers, 1991

14-91 E. W. M. Hansen, H. Heitmann, B. Laska and M. Loes, Numerical Simulation of Fluid Flow Behaviour Inside, and Redesign of a Field Separator, SINTEF, Norway and STATOIL, Norway (not dated)

13-91 G. Trapaga and J. Szekely, Mathematical Modeling of the Isothermal Impingement of Liquid Droplets in Spraying Processes, Metallurgical Transactions, Vol. 22B, pp. 901-914, December 1991

11-91 N. Saluja and J. Szekely, Velocity Fields and Free Surface Phenomena in an Inductively Stirred Mercury Pool, European Journal of Mechanics, B/Fluids, Vol. 10, No. 5, pp. 563-572, Oct. 1991

4-90 J. M. Sicilian, A Note on Implementing Specified Velocities and Momentum Sources, Flow Science report, September 1990 (FSI-90-00-5)

13-90 P. Jonsson, N. Saluja, O. J. Ilegbusi, and J. Szekely, Fluid Flow Phenomena in the Filling of Cylindrical Molds Using Newtonian (Turbulent) and Non-Newtonian (Power Law) Fluids, submitted to Trans. of the American Foundrymen’s Soc., June 1990

12-90 N. Saluja, O. J. Ilegbusi, and J. Szekely, On the Computation of the Velocity Fields and the Dynamic Free Surface Generated in a Liquid Metal Column by a Rotating Magnetic Field, submitted to J. Fluid Mech., July 1990

7-90 C. L. Bronisz and C. W. Hirt, Modeling Unsaturated Flow in Porous Media: A FLOW-3D Extension, Flow Science report, July 1990 (FSI-90-48-2)

5-90 C. L. Bronisz and C. W. Hirt, Hydrodynamic Ram Simulations Using FLOW-3D, Flow Science report, May 1990 (FSI-90-49-1)

3-90 C. W. Hirt, Turbojet Plume Flow Analysis, Flow Science report, February 1990 (FSI-90-45-1)

5-89 K. S. Eckhoff and E. W. M. Hansen, Mathematical Modelling and Numerical Investigation of Separation in Two-Phase Rotating Flow, SINTEF-Foundation for Scientific and Industrial Research at the Norwegian Institute of Technology, Trondheim, Norway, Report No. OR 22 1907.00.01.89, 29 April 1989

2-89 J. M. Sicilian and J. R. Tegart, Comparisons of FLOW-3D Calculations with Very Large Amplitude Slosh Data, presented at the Symposium on Computational Experiments, PVP ASME Conference, Honolulu, HI, July 22-27, 1989

2-88 J. M. Sicilian and C. W. Hirt, AFT Field Joint: CFD Analysis Using the FLOW-3D Program, in Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor Circumferential Flow Technical Interchange Meeting Final Report, NASA-TWR-17788, February 1988

14-87 C. J. Freitas, S. T. Green, and T. B. Morrow, Fluid Dynamics Associated with Ductile Pipeline Fracture, Southwest Research Institute report presented at ASME Winter Annual Meeting, Boston, MA, December 1987

13-87 J. Sicilian, The FLOW-3D Model for Thermal Conduction in Solids, Flow Science report, Dec. 1987 (FSI-87-00-4)

7-87 C.W. Hirt, Vectored Nozzle Flow with Turbulence Modeling, Flow Science report, Sept. 1987 (FSI-87-29-1)

4-87 J.M. Sicilian, C.W. Hirt, and R. P. Harper, FLOW-3D: Computational Modeling Power for Scientists and Engineers, Flow Science report, 1987 (FSI-87-00-1)

3-86 J. M. Sicilian, Natural-Convection Heat-Transfer Analysis, Flow Science Technical Note #4, June 1986 (FSI-86-00-TN4)

2-86 J. Navickas and C. R. Cross, Air Circulation Characteristics and Convective Losses in a 5-MW Molten Salt Cavity Solar Receiver, ASME 8th Annual Conference on Solar Engineering, Anaheim, California, April 13-16, 1986

5-85 C. W. Hirt and R. P. Harper, Calculations of Vent Clearing in a Chemical Process Tank, Flow Science report, December 1985 (FSI-85-28-1)

2-84 Applications of SOLA-3D/FSI to Fluid Slosh, Flow Science report, May 1984

Microdispensers

Microdispensers

Retracting Fluid Dispenser

이 예는 retracting fluid dispenser의 시뮬레이션을 보여줍니다. 여기에서의 주요 관심사는 정확하게 분배되는 유체의 볼륨과 얼마나 다시 dispenser로 다시 돌아오는지이다. 노즐의 직경은 단지 1mm이며, 모세관 유동과 동일한 기판 상에 증착 된 유체의 양을 지시하기 때문에 이 스케일 표면 장력에 중요하다. 수지와 같은 유체 분배기 노즐과 기판 사이에 소정의 접촉 각도 좌표 모델은 이러한 효과를 설명 할 수있다. 또한, 이동 객체 모델(Moving Objects Model)은 디스펜서 움직임을 시뮬레이션하기 위해 사용되었다. Modeling the complexities of small, transient, free-surface flows along with moving objects can be easily accomplished using FLOW-3D. 작고 일시적인 움직이는 물체와 함께 흐르는 자유표면 모델 복잡성은 FLOW-3D를 사용하여 쉽게 구현할 수 있습니다.

Fluid dispenser: 3-D view of the computational domain

2-D animation of the retracting fluid dispenser in action, colored by pressure distribution

Fuel Tanks

Fuel Tanks

차량의 연료 탱크는 안전하게 연료를 저장하기 위한 필수적인 장치입니다. 또한 운행 중 차량에 들어오는 다양한 형태의 외력에 대해 일정하고도 적당한 연료 공급을 보장해 주는 장치입니다. 연료탱크는 차량 섀시 디자인과 바디 패널과 소형화의 목적을 위해 모양이 복잡 할 수 있습니다. 차량이 가속 할 때, 연료는 연료 레벨 게이지, 압력 및 전달 시스템에 문제를 유발할 수 있는 탱크 내에서 슬러싱하게 됩니다. 연료 충전은 특히 펌프류에서 중요한 부분인데, 탱크 안에서 증기 압축성은 충전 노즐의 초기 닫힘(Shutoff)을 일으키는 원인이 됩니다. 또한, 정전기는 연료 시스템 내에서 전위의 상승에 기인하여 연료 탱크 내로 이송 될 수 있습니다. FLOW-3D는 연료 시스템 설계 및 개선을 돕기 위해 이러한 복잡한 다상(multi-phase), 다물리(multi-physical), 과도(transient) 해석을 할 수 있는 도구 입니다.

Simulation of gas filling of a tank, modeling air entrainment.

Other analysis capabilities:

  • An electrostatic model that can capture a charge distribution with time
  • Fuel level indication using the Moving Objects model with 6 degrees of freedom to capture float variations
  • Fuel line pressurization
  • Optimal location of vents

Wave Energy Devices

Modeling Wave Energy Devices

최근에, 웨이브 에너지와 같은 재생 자원을 사용하여 낮은 환경 부하로 에너지를 생성하는 새로운 기술 개발에 대한 관심이 전 세계적으로 기하 급수적으로 증가하고 있다. 바다에서 (조류, 파도 등) 전기를 생성할 수 있는 파력 에너지 장치는 특히 중요한데 FLOW-3D 를 이용하여 정확하게 모델링 할 수 있습니다.

Multi-Flap, Bottom-Hinged Wave Energy Converter

Oscillating flap은 바다의 파도에서 에너지를 추출하고 기계적 에너지로 변환합니다. Arm oscillates는 피봇 조인트에 장착되어 물결에 진자처럼 동요합니다.  Flaps은 멀티 Flap 파력 에너지 변환기를 생성하는 배열로 구성될 수 있습니다. 아래 왼쪽은 3개의 flap 배열로 구성된 CFD 시뮬레이션 입니다. 모든 flap은 15m(폭) x 10m(높이) x 2m(두께)로 하단부가 경첩형태로 고정되어 있습니다.

Array는 30m 깊이에서 10초의 주파수와 4m 진폭파에서 동작합니다. 시뮬레이션은 하나의 flap이 다른 flap에 중요한 영향을 주는 복잡한 유속 iso-surface를 보여줍니다. 3개의 flap이  비슷한 동적 움직임을 시작하는 동안   flap의 상호 작용 효과 단계에서 그들의 모션을 렌더링 합니다. 유사한 flap 에너지 변환기는 오른쪽에 표시 됩니다.

이 시뮬레이션에서, 플랩은 가장 낮은 지점에서 물에 완전히 잠깁니다. 이러한 에너지 변환기는 Surface Piercing flap energy converters 라고 합니다. 이러한 시뮬레이션의 예제 모두는 Minerva Dynamics에 의해 제공되었습니다.

Oscillating Water Column

Oscillating water column은 부분적으로 물이 차고, 빠지는 것이 반복되는 구조를 가집니다. 이것은 수면(water line) 아래 바다쪽으로 열리고, 파열의 꼭대기의 공기 column에 닫혀진 구조입니다. 파도가 순차적으로 air column을 압축과 해제를 하는 중 상승 및 하강하는 water column을 발생합니다. 이 갇혀진 공기는 일반적으로 공기 흐름 방향에 상관없이 회전 할 수 있는 터빈을 경유해 대기로부터 유동을 만들게 됩니다. 이러한 터빈의 회전은 전기를 생성하는 데 사용됩니다.

상단의 CFD simulation은 진동하는 water column을 보여줍니다. water column 의 상승과 하강구조가 발생하는hollow구조가 물리적인 부분을 강조하기 위하여 FLOW-3D로 모델링 되었습니다. 이 시뮬레이션은 파형 생성에 대한 다른 선택을 제외하고는 유사한 결과를 보여줍니다. 왼쪽의 시뮬레이션은 wave type 경계 조건을 사용하는 반면, 오른쪽 경계조건은 순차적인 파형을 생산하기 위해 Moving Objects model을 이용하였습니다. Hollow 구조에서의 압력 그래프는 각각의 시뮬레이션에서 보여집니다. 결국 터빈은 회전 운동으로 설정되는 압력에 기초하기 때문에, 챔버 내에 생성되는 압력 얼마나 아는 것이 중요합니다.

Wave Energy Animations

Water Catastrophic Events Avalanches

Avalanches

산사태와 눈사태는 파편들이나 육지의 영향으로 인해 저수지에 엄청난 홍수파를 일으킬 가능성이 있습니다. FLOW-3D 는 산사태 현상 자체와 홍수파의 전파 모두 모델링 할 수 있습니다. Moving Objects Model 은 지형위의 물체 처럼 강체 방식으로 미끄러지는 지평면으로 고려한다. Granular flow 모델은 산사태 현상을 좀 더 상세하게 시뮬레이션 할 수 있다. 두 경우 모두, 관련된 홍수파와 함께 질량의 지표면 전파와 영향을 볼 수 있습니다. 산사태는 수역 전체에 걸쳐 일어나지 않습니다. 예를 들어 tailings 같은 경우에 FLOW-3D의 non-newtonian fluid 모델을 이용하여 개개인의 요구에 맞춘 구조적 관계를 쉽게 구현할 수 있습니다.

 

Results of a simulation with FLOW-3D (including added original stl-geometry) of a stopped and restarted avalanche model before it reaches the reservoir – colored by the depth-averaged velocities in [ms-1]. Results taken from R. Gabl, J. Seibl, B. Gems, and M. Aufleger, 3-D-numerical approach to simulate an avalanche impact into a reservoir, Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss., 3, 4121–4157, 2015, www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci-discuss.net/3/4121/2015/, doi:10.5194/nhessd-3-4121-2015, © Author(s) 2015. CC Attribution 3.0 License.

More Avalanche Simulation Examples

FLOW-3D/MP Features List

FLOW-3D/MP Features

FLOW-3D/MP v6.1 은 FLOW-3D v11.1 솔버에 기초하여 물리 모델, 특징 및 그래픽 사용자 인터페이스가 동일합니다. FLOW-3D v11.1의 새로운 기능은 아래 파란색으로 표시되어 있으며 FLOW-3D/MP v6.1 에서 사용할 수 있습니다. 새로운 개발 기능에 대한 자세한 설명은 FLOW-3D v11.1에서 새로운 기능을 참조하십시오.

Meshing & Geometry

  • Structured finite difference/control volume meshes for fluid and thermal solutions
  • Finite element meshes in Cartesian and cylindrical coordinates for structural analysis
  • Multi-Block gridding with nested, linked, partially overlapping and conforming mesh blocks
  • Fractional areas/volumes (FAVOR™) for efficient & accurate geometry definition
  • Mesh quality checking
  • Basic Solids Modeler
  • Import CAD data
  • Import/export finite element meshes via Exodus-II file format
  • Grid & geometry independence
  • Cartesian or cylindrical coordinates
Flow Type Options
  • Internal, external & free-surface flows
  • 3D, 2D & 1D problems
  • Transient flows
  • Inviscid, viscous laminar & turbulent flows
  • Hybrid shallow water/3D flows
  • Non-inertial reference frame motion
  • Multiple scalar species
  • Two-phase flows
  • Heat transfer with phase change
  • Saturated & unsaturated porous media
Physical Modeling Options
  • Fluid structure interaction
  • Thermally-induced stresses
  • Plastic deformation of solids
  • Granular flow
  • Moisture drying
  • Solid solute dissolution
  • Sediment transport and scour
  • Cavitation (potential, passive tracking, active tracking)
  • Phase change (liquid-vapor, liquid-solid)
  • Surface tension
  • Thermocapillary effects
  • Wall adhesion
  • Wall roughness
  • Vapor & gas bubbles
  • Solidification & melting
  • Mass/momentum/energy sources
  • Shear, density & temperature-dependent viscosity
  • Thixotropic viscosity
  • Visco-elastic-plastic fluids
  • Elastic membranes & walls
  • Evaporation residue
  • Electro-mechanical effects
  • Dielectric phenomena
  • Electro-osmosis
  • Electrostatic particles
  • Joule heating
  • Air entrainment
  • Molecular & turbulent diffusion
  • Temperature-dependent material properties
  • Spray cooling
Flow Definition Options
  • General boundary conditions
    • Symmetry
    • Rigid and flexible walls
    • Continuative
    • Periodic
    • Specified pressure
    • Specified velocity
    • Outflow
    • Grid overlay
    • Hydrostatic pressure
    • Volume flow rate
    • Non-linear periodic and solitary surface waves
    • Rating curve and natural hydraulics
    • Wave absorbing layer
  • Restart from previous simulation
  • Continuation of a simulation
  • Overlay boundary conditions
  • Change mesh and modeling options
  • Change model parameters
Thermal Modeling Options
  • Natural convection
  • Forced convection
  • Conduction in fluid & solid
  • Fluid-solid heat transfer
  • Distributed energy sources/sinks in fluids and solids
  • Radiation
  • Viscous heating
  • Orthotropic thermal conductivity
  • Thermally-induced stresses
Turbulence Models
  • RNG model
  • Two-equation k-epsilon model
  • Two-equation k-omega model
  • Large eddy simulation
Metal Casting Models
  • Thermal stress & deformations
  • Iron solidification
  • Sand core blowing
  • Sand core drying
  • Permeable molds
  • Solidification & melting
  • Solidification shrinkage with interdendritic feeding
  • Micro & macro porosity
  • Binary alloy segregation
  • Thermal die cycling
  • Surface oxide defects
  • Cavitation potential
  • Lost-foam casting
  • Semi-solid material
  • Core gas generation
  • Back pressure & vents
  • Shot sleeves
  • PQ2 diagram
  • Squeeze pins
  • Filters
  • Air entrainment
  • Temperature-dependent material properties
  • Cooling channels
  • Fluid/wall contact time
Numerical Modeling Options
  • TruVOF Volume-of-Fluid (VOF) method for fluid interfaces
  • First and second order advection
  • Sharp and diffuse interface tracking
  • Implicit & explicit numerical methods
  • GMRES, point and line relaxation pressure solvers
  • User-defined variables, subroutines & output
  • Utilities for runtime interaction during execution
Fluid Modeling Options
  • One incompressible fluid – confined or with free surfaces
  • Two incompressible fluids – miscible or with sharp interfaces
  • Compressible fluid – subsonic, transonic, supersonic
  • Stratified fluid
  • Acoustic phenomena
  • Mass particles with variable density or diameter
Shallow Flow Models
  • General topography
  • Raster data interface
  • Subcomponent-specific surface roughness
  • Wind shear
  • Ground roughness effects
  • Laminar & turbulent flow
  • Sediment transport and scour
  • Surface tension
  • Heat transfer
  • Wetting & drying
Advanced Physical Models
  • General Moving Object model with 6 DOF–prescribed and fully-coupled motion
  • Rotating/spinning objects
  • Collision model
  • Tethered moving objects (springs, ropes, mooring lines)
  • Flexing membranes and walls
  • Porosity
  • Finite element based elastic-plastic deformation
  • Finite element based thermal stress evolution due to thermal changes in a solidifying fluid
  • Combusting solid components
Chemistry Models
  • Stiff equation solver for chemical rate equations
  • Stationary or advected species
Porous Media Models
  • Saturated and unsaturated flow
  • Variable porosity
  • Directional porosity
  • General flow losses (linear & quadratic)
  • Capillary pressure
  • Heat transfer in porous media
  • Van Genunchten model for unsaturated flow
Discrete Particle Models
  • Massless marker particles
  • Mass particles of variable size/mass
  • Linear & quadratic fluid-dynamic drag
  • Monte-Carlo diffusion
  • Particle-Fluid momentum coupling
  • Coefficient of restitution or sticky particles
  • Point or volumetric particle sources
  • Charged particles
  • Probe particles
Two-Phase & Two-Component Models
  • Liquid/liquid & gas/liquid interfaces
  • Variable density mixtures
  • Compressible fluid with a dispersed incompressible component
  • Drift flux
  • Two-component, vapor/non-condensable gases
  • Phase transformations for gas-liquid & liquid-solid
  • Adiabatic bubbles
  • Bubbles with phase change
  • Continuum fluid with discrete particles
  • Scalar transport
  • Homogeneous bubbles
  • Super-cooling
Coupling with Other Programs
  • Geometry input from Stereolithography (STL) files – binary or ASCII
  • Direct interfaces with EnSight®, FieldView® & Tecplot® visualization software
  • Finite element solution import/export via Exodus-II file format
  • PLOT3D output
  • Neutral file output
  • Extensive customization possibilities
  • Solid Properties Materials Database
Data Processing Options
  • State-of-the-art post-processing tool, FlowSight™
  • Batch post-processing
  • Report generation
  • Automatic or custom results analysis
  • High-quality OpenGL-based graphics
  • Color or B/W vector, contour, 3D surface & particle plots
  • Moving and stationary probes
  • Measurement baffles
  • Arbitrary sampling volumes
  • Force & moment output
  • Animation output
  • PostScript, JPEG & Bitmap output
  • Streamlines
  • Flow tracers
User Conveniences
  • Active simulation control (based on measurement of probes)
  • Mesh generators
  • Mesh quality checking
  • Tabular time-dependent input using external files
  • Automatic time-step control for accuracy & stability
  • Automatic convergence control
  • Mentor help to optimize efficiency
  • Change simulation parameters while solver runs
  • Launch and manage multiple simulations
  • Automatic simulation termination based on user-defined criteria
  • Run simulation on remote servers using remote solving
Multi-Processor Computing

FLOW-3D Features

The features in blue are newly-released in FLOW-3D v12.0.

Meshing & Geometry

  • Structured finite difference/control volume meshes for fluid and thermal solutions
  • Finite element meshes in Cartesian and cylindrical coordinates for structural analysis
  • Multi-Block gridding with nested, linked, partially overlapping and conforming mesh blocks
  • Conforming meshes extended to arbitrary shapes
  • Fractional areas/volumes (FAVOR™) for efficient & accurate geometry definition
  • Closing gaps in geometry
  • Mesh quality checking
  • Basic Solids Modeler
  • Import CAD data
  • Import/export finite element meshes via Exodus-II file format
  • Grid & geometry independence
  • Cartesian or cylindrical coordinates

Flow Type Options

  • Internal, external & free-surface flows
  • 3D, 2D & 1D problems
  • Transient flows
  • Inviscid, viscous laminar & turbulent flows
  • Hybrid shallow water/3D flows
  • Non-inertial reference frame motion
  • Multiple scalar species
  • Two-phase flows
  • Heat transfer with phase change
  • Saturated & unsaturated porous media

Physical Modeling Options

  • Fluid structure interaction
  • Thermally-induced stresses
  • Plastic deformation of solids
  • Granular flow
  • Moisture drying
  • Solid solute dissolution
  • Sediment transport and scour
  • Sludge settling
  • Cavitation (potential, passive tracking, active tracking)
  • Phase change (liquid-vapor, liquid-solid)
  • Surface tension
  • Thermocapillary effects
  • Wall adhesion
  • Wall roughness
  • Vapor & gas bubbles
  • Solidification & melting
  • Mass/momentum/energy sources
  • Shear, density & temperature-dependent viscosity
  • Thixotropic viscosity
  • Visco-elastic-plastic fluids
  • Elastic membranes & walls
  • Evaporation residue
  • Electro-mechanical effects
  • Dielectric phenomena
  • Electro-osmosis
  • Electrostatic particles
  • Joule heating
  • Air entrainment
  • Molecular & turbulent diffusion
  • Temperature-dependent material properties
  • Spray cooling

Flow Definition Options

  • General boundary conditions
    • Symmetry
    • Rigid and flexible walls
    • Continuative
    • Periodic
    • Specified pressure
    • Specified velocity
    • Outflow
    • Outflow pressure
    • Outflow boundaries with wave absorbing layers
    • Grid overlay
    • Hydrostatic pressure
    • Volume flow rate
    • Non-linear periodic and solitary surface waves
    • Rating curve and natural hydraulics
    • Wave absorbing layer
  • Restart from previous simulation
  • Continuation of a simulation
  • Overlay boundary conditions
  • Change mesh and modeling options
  • Change model parameters

Thermal Modeling Options

  • Natural convection
  • Forced convection
  • Conduction in fluid & solid
  • Fluid-solid heat transfer
  • Distributed energy sources/sinks in fluids and solids
  • Radiation
  • Viscous heating
  • Orthotropic thermal conductivity
  • Thermally-induced stresses

Numerical Modeling Options

  • TruVOF Volume-of-Fluid (VOF) method for fluid interfaces
  • Steady state accelerator for free-surface flows
  • First and second order advection
  • Sharp and diffuse interface tracking
  • Implicit & explicit numerical methods
  • Immersed boundary method
  • GMRES, point and line relaxation pressure solvers
  • User-defined variables, subroutines & output
  • Utilities for runtime interaction during execution

Fluid Modeling Options

  • One incompressible fluid – confined or with free surfaces
  • Two incompressible fluids – miscible or with sharp interfaces
  • Compressible fluid – subsonic, transonic, supersonic
  • Stratified fluid
  • Acoustic phenomena
  • Mass particles with variable density or diameter

Shallow Flow Models

  • General topography
  • Raster data interface
  • Subcomponent-specific surface roughness
  • Wind shear
  • Ground roughness effects
  • Manning’s roughness
  • Laminar & turbulent flow
  • Sediment transport and scour
  • Surface tension
  • Heat transfer
  • Wetting & drying

Turbulence Models

  • RNG model
  • Two-equation k-epsilon model
  • Two-equation k-omega model
  • Large eddy simulation

Advanced Physical Models

  • General Moving Object model with 6 DOF–prescribed and fully-coupled motion
  • Rotating/spinning objects
  • Collision model
  • Tethered moving objects (springs, ropes, breaking mooring lines)
  • Flexing membranes and walls
  • Porosity
  • Finite element based elastic-plastic deformation
  • Finite element based thermal stress evolution due to thermal changes in a solidifying fluid
  • Combusting solid components

Chemistry Models

  • Stiff equation solver for chemical rate equations
  • Stationary or advected species

Porous Media Models

  • Saturated and unsaturated flow
  • Variable porosity
  • Directional porosity
  • General flow losses (linear & quadratic)
  • Capillary pressure
  • Heat transfer in porous media
  • Van Genunchten model for unsaturated flow

Discrete Particle Models

  • Massless marker particles
  • Multi-species material particles of variable size and mass
  • Solid, fluid, gas particles
  • Void particles tracking collapsed void regions
  • Non-linear fluid-dynamic drag
  • Added mass effects
  • Monte-Carlo diffusion
  • Particle-fluid momentum coupling
  • Coefficient of restitution or sticky particles
  • Point or volumetric particle sources
  • Initial particle blocks
  • Heat transfer with fluid
  • Evaporation and condensation
  • Solidification and melting
  • Coulomb and dielectric forces
  • Probe particles

Two-Phase & Two-Component Models

  • Liquid/liquid & gas/liquid interfaces
  • Variable density mixtures
  • Compressible fluid with a dispersed incompressible component
  • Drift flux with dynamic droplet size
  • Two-component, vapor/non-condensable gases
  • Phase transformations for gas-liquid & liquid-solid
  • Adiabatic bubbles
  • Bubbles with phase change
  • Continuum fluid with discrete particles
  • Scalar transport
  • Homogeneous bubbles
  • Super-cooling
  • Two-field temperature

Coupling with Other Programs

  • Geometry input from Stereolithography (STL) files – binary or ASCII
  • Direct interfaces with EnSight®, FieldView® & Tecplot® visualization software
  • Finite element solution import/export via Exodus-II file format
  • PLOT3D output
  • Neutral file output
  • Extensive customization possibilities
  • Solid Properties Materials Database

Data Processing Options

  • State-of-the-art post-processing tool, FlowSight™
  • Batch post-processing
  • Report generation
  • Automatic or custom results analysis
  • High-quality OpenGL-based graphics
  • Color or B/W vector, contour, 3D surface & particle plots
  • Moving and stationary probes
  • Visualization of non-inertial reference frame motion
  • Measurement baffles
  • Arbitrary sampling volumes
  • Force & moment output
  • Animation output
  • PostScript, JPEG & Bitmap output
  • Streamlines
  • Flow tracers

User Conveniences

  • Active simulation control (based on measurement of probes)
  • Mesh generators
  • Mesh quality checking
  • Tabular time-dependent input using external files
  • Automatic time-step control for accuracy & stability
  • Automatic convergence control
  • Mentor help to optimize efficiency
  • Units on all variables
  • Custom units
  • Component transformations
  • Moving particle sources
  • Change simulation parameters while solver runs
  • Launch and manage multiple simulations
  • Automatic simulation termination based on user-defined criteria
  • Run simulation on remote servers using remote solving
  • Copy boundary conditions to other mesh blocks

Multi-Processor Computing

  • Shared memory computers
  • Distributed memory clusters

FlowSight

  • Particle visualization
  • Velocity vector fields
  • Streamlines & pathlines
  • Iso-surfaces
  • 2D, 3D and arbitrary clips
  • Volume render
  • Probe data
  • History data
  • Vortex cores
  • Link multiple results
  • Multiple data views
  • Non-inertial reference frame
  • Spline clip

자동차 분야

Automotive

Nozzle filling simulation. Courtesy Reutter Group

FLOW-3D는 자동차 산업에서 직면할 수 있는 많은 문제에 대한 해법을 제공하는 포괄적인 CFD 소프트웨어입니다. FLOW-3D는 과도적인 흐름 동역학(자유 표면과 한정된 유체 모두), 유체와 고체 간의 열전달, 상 변화, 고체의 6자유도 운동, 기계적 및 열로 유도된 응력에 대한 결합된 유한 요소 해석 등을 할 수 있습니다. 자세한 내용은 FLOW-3D의 모델링 기능의 전체 목록을 살펴보십시오.

자동차 분야의 시뮬레이션 대상 분야로는 연료 탱크 슬로 싱, 언더 후드 열 관리, 분사 제어, 조기 연료 차단, 자동차 부품의 도장, 용기의 가스 제거, 파워 트레인 부품의 유체 저항, 자동차 부품 주조 등의 주조품 및 주조 공정의 더 나은 설계를 위해 도움을 줄 수 있는 몇 가지 영역들이 있습니다.

자동차분야 해석 사례


관련 기술자료

그림 2.1 가공 후 부품 보기

1 m/s보다 빠른 속도에서 액체 금속의 움직임 연구

ESTUDIO MOVIMIENTO DE METAL LIQUIDO A VELOCIDADES MAYORES DE 1 M/S Author: Primitivo Carranza TormeSupervised by :Dr. Jesus Mª Blanco ...
Figure 14. Defects: (a) Unmelt defects(Scheme NO.4);(b) Pores defects(Scheme NO.1); (c); Spattering defect (Scheme NO.3); (d) Low overlapping rate defects(Scheme NO.5).

Molten pool structure, temperature and velocity
flow in selective laser melting AlCu5MnCdVA alloy

용융 풀 구조, 선택적 온도 및 속도 흐름 레이저 용융 AlCu5MnCdVA 합금 Pan Lu1 , Zhang Cheng-Lin2,6,Wang Liang3, Liu Tong4 ...
Figure 4.24 - Model with virtual valves in the extremities of the geometries to simulate the permeability of the mold promoting a more uniformed filling

Optimization of filling systems for low pressure by Flow-3D

Dissertação de MestradoCiclo de Estudos Integrados Conducentes aoGrau de Mestre em Engenharia MecânicaTrabalho efectuado sob a orientação doDoutor Hélder de ...
Figure 1: Mold drawings

3D Flow and Temperature Analysis of Filling a Plutonium Mold

플루토늄 주형 충전의 3D 유동 및 온도 분석 Authors: Orenstein, Nicholas P. [1] Publication Date:2013-07-24Research Org.: Los Alamos National Lab ...
Figure 5: 3D & 2D views of simulated fill sequence of a hollow cylinder at 1000 rpm and 1500 rpm at various time intervals during filling.

Computer Simulation of Centrifugal Casting Process using FLOW-3D

Aneesh Kumar J1, a, K. Krishnakumar1, b and S. Savithri2, c 1 Department of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering, Thiruvananthapuram, ...
Fig. 1. (a) Dimensions of the casting with runners (unit: mm), (b) a melt flow simulation using Flow-3D software together with Reilly's model[44], predicted that a large amount of bifilms (denoted by the black particles) would be contained in the final casting. (c) A solidification simulation using Pro-cast software showed that no shrinkage defect was contained in the final casting.

AZ91 합금 주물 내 연행 결함에 대한 캐리어 가스의 영향

TianLiabJ.M.T.DaviesaXiangzhenZhucaUniversity of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, United KingdombGrainger and Worrall Ltd, Bridgnorth WV15 5HP, United KingdomcBrunel Centre for Advanced Solidification ...
Gating System Design Based on Numerical Simulation and Production Experiment Verification of Aluminum Alloy Bracket Fabricated by Semi-solid Rheo-Die Casting Process

Gating System Design Based on Numerical Simulation and Production Experiment Verification of Aluminum Alloy Bracket Fabricated by Semi-solid Rheo-Die Casting Process

반고체 레오 다이 캐스팅 공정으로 제작된 알루미늄 합금 브래킷의 수치 시뮬레이션 및 생산 실험 검증을 기반으로 한 게이팅 시스템 설계 ...
Fig. 1. Modified Timelli mold design.

Characterization of properties of Vanadium, Boron and Strontium addition on HPDC of A360 alloy

A360 합금의 HPDC에 대한 바나듐, 붕소 및 스트론튬 첨가 특성 특성 OzenGursoyaMuratColakbKazimTurcDeryaDispinarde aUniversity of Padova, Department of Management and Engineering, ...
図3 He ガスストリッパー装置の図と全景.

RIKEN RIBF의 He-Gas 스트리퍼 및 회전 디스크 스트리퍼

He Gas Stripper and Rotating Disk Stripper at the RIKEN RIBF 理研 RI ビームファクトリーにおける He ガスと回転ディスクストリッパー 今尾 浩士 *・長谷部 裕雄 ...
그림 3. 수중 4차 횡파 영향

Validation of Sloshing Simulations in Narrow Tanks

This case study was contributed by Peter Arnold, Minerva Dynamics. 이 작업의 목적은 FLOW-3D  를 검증하는 것입니다. 밀폐된 좁은 스팬 직사각형 탱크의 출렁거림 문제에 ...