Conflict resolution in the multi-stakeholder stepped spillway design under uncertainty by machine learning techniques

기계 학습 기술에 의한 불확실성 하에서 다중 이해 관계자 계단형 배수로 설계의 충돌 해결

Conflict resolution in the multi-stakeholder stepped spillway design under uncertainty by machine learning techniques

Mehrdad GhorbaniMooseluaMohammad RezaNikoobParnian HashempourBakhtiaribNooshin BakhtiariRayanicAzizallahIzadyd
aDepartment of Engineering Sciences, University of Agder, Norway
bDepartment of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz, Iran
cSchool of Engineering, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz, IrandWater Research Center, Sultan Qaboos University, Muscat, Oman

Abstract

The optimal spillway design is of great significance since these structures can reduce erosion downstream of the dams. This study proposes a risk-based optimization framework for a stepped spillway to achieve an economical design scenario with the minimum loss in hydraulic performance. Accordingly, the stepped spillway was simulated in the FLOW-3D® model, and the validated model was repeatedly performed for various geometric states.

The results were used to form a Multilayer Perceptron artificial neural network (MLP-ANN) surrogate model. Then, a risk-based optimization model was formed by coupling the MLP-ANN and NSGA-II. The concept of conditional value at risk (CVaR) was utilized to reduce the risk of the designed spillway malfunctions in high flood flow rates, while minimizing the construction cost and the loss in hydraulic performance.

Lastly, given the conflicting objectives of stakeholders, the non-cooperative graph model for conflict resolution (GMCR) was applied to achieve a compromise on the Pareto optimal solutions. Applicability of the suggested approach in the Jarreh Dam, Iran, resulted in a practical design scenario, which simultaneously minimizes the loss in hydraulic performance and the project cost and satisfies the priorities of decision-makers.

Keywords

Stepped spillway, FLOW-3D® ,CVaR-based optimization model, GMCR-plus, NSGA-II

최적의 배수로 설계는 이러한 구조가 댐 하류의 침식을 줄일 수 있기 때문에 매우 중요합니다. 본 연구에서는 유압 성능 손실을 최소화하면서 경제적인 설계 시나리오를 달성하기 위해 계단형 여수로에 대한 위험 기반 최적화 프레임워크를 제안합니다. 따라서 FLOW-3D® 모델에서 계단식 배수로를 시뮬레이션하고 다양한 기하학적 상태에 대해 검증된 모델을 반복적으로 수행했습니다.

결과는 다층 퍼셉트론 인공 신경망(MLP-ANN) 대리 모델을 형성하는 데 사용되었습니다. 그런 다음 MLP-ANN과 NSGA-II를 결합하여 위험 기반 최적화 모델을 구성했습니다. 위험 조건부 값(CVaR)의 개념은 높은 홍수 유량에서 설계된 방수로 오작동의 위험을 줄이는 동시에 건설 비용과 수리 성능 손실을 최소화하기 위해 활용되었습니다.

마지막으로 이해관계자의 상충되는 목표를 고려하여 파레토 최적해에 대한 절충안을 달성하기 위해 갈등 해결을 위한 비협조적 그래프 모델(GMCR)을 적용하였다. 이란 Jarreh 댐에서 제안된 접근 방식의 적용 가능성은 수력 성능 손실과 프로젝트 비용을 동시에 최소화하고 의사 결정자의 우선 순위를 만족시키는 실용적인 설계 시나리오로 귀결되었습니다.

Figure 1. (a) Top view of the microfluidic-magnetophoretic device, (b) Schematic representation of the channel cross-sections studied in this work, and (c) the magnet position relative to the channel location (Sepy and Sepz are the magnet separation distances in y and z, respectively).

Continuous-Flow Separation of Magnetic Particles from Biofluids: How Does the Microdevice Geometry Determine the Separation Performance?

1Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, ETSIIT, University of Cantabria, Avda. Los Castros s/n, 39005 Santander, Spain
2William G. Lowrie Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The Ohio State University, 151 W. Woodruff Ave., Columbus, OH 43210, USA
*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sensors 202020(11), 3030; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20113030
Received: 16 April 2020 / Revised: 21 May 2020 / Accepted: 25 May 2020 / Published: 27 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lab-on-a-Chip and Microfluidic Sensors)

Abstract

The use of functionalized magnetic particles for the detection or separation of multiple chemicals and biomolecules from biofluids continues to attract significant attention. After their incubation with the targeted substances, the beads can be magnetically recovered to perform analysis or diagnostic tests. Particle recovery with permanent magnets in continuous-flow microdevices has gathered great attention in the last decade due to the multiple advantages of microfluidics. As such, great efforts have been made to determine the magnetic and fluidic conditions for achieving complete particle capture; however, less attention has been paid to the effect of the channel geometry on the system performance, although it is key for designing systems that simultaneously provide high particle recovery and flow rates. Herein, we address the optimization of Y-Y-shaped microchannels, where magnetic beads are separated from blood and collected into a buffer stream by applying an external magnetic field. The influence of several geometrical features (namely cross section shape, thickness, length, and volume) on both bead recovery and system throughput is studied. For that purpose, we employ an experimentally validated Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) numerical model that considers the dominant forces acting on the beads during separation. Our results indicate that rectangular, long devices display the best performance as they deliver high particle recovery and high throughput. Thus, this methodology could be applied to the rational design of lab-on-a-chip devices for any magnetically driven purification, enrichment or isolation.

Keywords: particle magnetophoresisCFDcross sectionchip fabrication

Korea Abstract

생체 유체에서 여러 화학 물질과 생체 분자의 검출 또는 분리를위한 기능화 된 자성 입자의 사용은 계속해서 상당한 관심을 받고 있습니다. 표적 물질과 함께 배양 한 후 비드를 자기 적으로 회수하여 분석 또는 진단 테스트를 수행 할 수 있습니다. 연속 흐름 마이크로 장치에서 영구 자석을 사용한 입자 회수는 마이크로 유체의 여러 장점으로 인해 지난 10 년 동안 큰 관심을 모았습니다. 

따라서 완전한 입자 포획을 달성하기 위한 자기 및 유체 조건을 결정하기 위해 많은 노력을 기울였습니다. 그러나 높은 입자 회수율과 유속을 동시에 제공하는 시스템을 설계하는 데있어 핵심이기는 하지만 시스템 성능에 대한 채널 형상의 영향에 대해서는 덜주의를 기울였습니다. 

여기에서 우리는 자기 비드가 혈액에서 분리되고 외부 자기장을 적용하여 버퍼 스트림으로 수집되는 YY 모양의 마이크로 채널의 최적화를 다룹니다. 비드 회수 및 시스템 처리량에 대한 여러 기하학적 특징 (즉, 단면 형상, 두께, 길이 및 부피)의 영향을 연구합니다. 

이를 위해 분리 중에 비드에 작용하는 지배적인 힘을 고려하는 실험적으로 검증 된 CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) 수치 모델을 사용합니다. 우리의 결과는 직사각형의 긴 장치가 높은 입자 회수율과 높은 처리량을 제공하기 때문에 최고의 성능을 보여줍니다. 

따라서 이 방법론은 자기 구동 정제, 농축 또는 분리를 위한 랩온어 칩 장치의 합리적인 설계에 적용될 수 있습니다.

Figure 1. (a) Top view of the microfluidic-magnetophoretic device, (b) Schematic representation of the channel cross-sections studied in this work, and (c) the magnet position relative to the channel location (Sepy and Sepz are the magnet separation distances in y and z, respectively).
Figure 1. (a) Top view of the microfluidic-magnetophoretic device, (b) Schematic representation of the channel cross-sections studied in this work, and (c) the magnet position relative to the channel location (Sepy and Sepz are the magnet separation distances in y and z, respectively).
Figure 2. (a) Channel-magnet configuration and (b–d) magnetic force distribution in the channel midplane for 2 mm, 5 mm and 10 mm long rectangular (left) and U-shaped (right) devices.
Figure 2. (a) Channel-magnet configuration and (b–d) magnetic force distribution in the channel midplane for 2 mm, 5 mm and 10 mm long rectangular (left) and U-shaped (right) devices.
Figure 3. (a) Velocity distribution in a section perpendicular to the flow for rectangular (left) and U-shaped (right) cross section channels, and (b) particle location in these cross sections.
Figure 3. (a) Velocity distribution in a section perpendicular to the flow for rectangular (left) and U-shaped (right) cross section channels, and (b) particle location in these cross sections.
Figure 4. Influence of fluid flow rate on particle recovery when the applied magnetic force is (a) different and (b) equal in U-shaped and rectangular cross section microdevices.
Figure 4. Influence of fluid flow rate on particle recovery when the applied magnetic force is (a) different and (b) equal in U-shaped and rectangular cross section microdevices.
Figure 5. Magnetic bead capture as a function of fluid flow rate for all of the studied geometries.
Figure 5. Magnetic bead capture as a function of fluid flow rate for all of the studied geometries.
Figure 6. Influence of (a) magnetic and fluidic forces (J parameter) and (b) channel geometry (θ parameter) on particle recovery. Note that U-2mm does not accurately fit a line.
Figure 6. Influence of (a) magnetic and fluidic forces (J parameter) and (b) channel geometry (θ parameter) on particle recovery. Note that U-2mm does not accurately fit a line.
Figure 7. Dependence of bead capture on the (a) functional channel volume and (b) particle residence time (tres). Note that in the curve fitting expressions V represents the functional channel volume and that U-2mm does not accurately fit a line.
Figure 7. Dependence of bead capture on the (a) functional channel volume and (b) particle residence time (tres). Note that in the curve fitting expressions V represents the functional channel volume and that U-2mm does not accurately fit a line.

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The 3D computational domain model (50–18.6) slope change, and boundary condition for (50–30 slope change) model.

Numerical investigation of flow characteristics over stepped spillways

Güven, Aytaç
Mahmood, Ahmed Hussein
Water Supply (2021) 21 (3): 1344–1355.
https://doi.org/10.2166/ws.2020.283Article history

Abstract

Spillways are constructed to evacuate flood discharge safely so that a flood wave does not overtop the dam body. There are different types of spillways, with the ogee type being the conventional one. A stepped spillway is an example of a nonconventional spillway. The turbulent flow over a stepped spillway was studied numerically by using the Flow-3D package. Different fluid flow characteristics such as longitudinal flow velocity, temperature distribution, density and chemical concentration can be well simulated by Flow-3D. In this study, the influence of slope changes on flow characteristics such as air entrainment, velocity distribution and dynamic pressures distribution over a stepped spillway was modelled by Flow-3D. The results from the numerical model were compared with an experimental study done by others in the literature. Two models of a stepped spillway with different discharge for each model were simulated. The turbulent flow in the experimental model was simulated by the Renormalized Group (RNG) turbulence scheme in the numerical model. A good agreement was achieved between the numerical results and the observed ones, which are exhibited in terms of graphics and statistical tables.

배수로는 홍수가 댐 몸체 위로 넘치지 않도록 안전하게 홍수를 피할 수 있도록 건설되었습니다. 다른 유형의 배수로가 있으며, ogee 유형이 기존 유형입니다. 계단식 배수로는 비 전통적인 배수로의 예입니다. 계단식 배수로 위의 난류는 Flow-3D 패키지를 사용하여 수치적으로 연구되었습니다.

세로 유속, 온도 분포, 밀도 및 화학 농도와 같은 다양한 유체 흐름 특성은 Flow-3D로 잘 시뮬레이션 할 수 있습니다. 이 연구에서는 계단식 배수로에 대한 공기 혼입, 속도 분포 및 동적 압력 분포와 같은 유동 특성에 대한 경사 변화의 영향을 Flow-3D로 모델링 했습니다.

수치 모델의 결과는 문헌에서 다른 사람들이 수행한 실험 연구와 비교되었습니다. 각 모델에 대해 서로 다른 배출이 있는 계단식 배수로의 두 모델이 시뮬레이션되었습니다. 실험 모델의 난류 흐름은 수치 모델의 Renormalized Group (RNG) 난류 계획에 의해 시뮬레이션되었습니다. 수치 결과와 관찰 된 결과 사이에 좋은 일치가 이루어졌으며, 이는 그래픽 및 통계 테이블로 표시됩니다.

HIGHLIGHTS

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  • A numerical model was developed for stepped spillways.
  • The turbulent flow was simulated by the Renormalized Group (RNG) model.
  • Both numerical and experimental results showed that flow characteristics are greatly affected by abrupt slope change on the steps.

Keyword

CFDnumerical modellingslope changestepped spillwayturbulent flow

INTRODUCTION

댐 구조는 물 보호가 생활의 핵심이기 때문에 물을 저장하거나 물을 운반하는 전 세계에서 가장 중요한 프로젝트입니다. 그리고 여수로는 댐의 가장 중요한 부분 중 하나로 분류됩니다. 홍수로 인한 파괴 나 피해로부터 댐을 보호하기 위해 여수로가 건설됩니다.

수력 발전, 항해, 레크리에이션 및 어업의 중요성을 감안할 때 댐 건설 및 홍수 통제는 전 세계적으로 매우 중요한 문제로 간주 될 수 있습니다. 많은 유형의 배수로가 있지만 가장 일반적인 유형은 다음과 같습니다 : ogee 배수로, 자유 낙하 배수로, 사이펀 배수로, 슈트 배수로, 측면 채널 배수로, 터널 배수로, 샤프트 배수로 및 계단식 배수로.

그리고 모든 여수로는 입구 채널, 제어 구조, 배출 캐리어 및 출구 채널의 네 가지 필수 구성 요소로 구성됩니다. 특히 롤러 압축 콘크리트 (RCC) 댐 건설 기술과 더 쉽고 빠르며 저렴한 건설 기술로 분류 된 계단식 배수로 건설과 관련하여 최근 수십 년 동안 많은 계단식 배수로가 건설되었습니다 (Chanson 2002; Felder & Chanson 2011).

계단식 배수로 구조는 캐비테이션 위험을 감소시키는 에너지 소산 속도를 증가시킵니다 (Boes & Hager 2003b). 계단식 배수로는 다양한 조건에서 더 매력적으로 만드는 장점이 있습니다.

계단식 배수로의 흐름 거동은 일반적으로 낮잠, 천이 및 스키밍 흐름 체제의 세 가지 다른 영역으로 분류됩니다 (Chanson 2002). 유속이 낮을 때 nappe 흐름 체제가 발생하고 자유 낙하하는 낮잠의 시퀀스로 특징 지워지는 반면, 스키밍 흐름 체제에서는 물이 외부 계단 가장자리 위의 유사 바닥에서 일관된 흐름으로 계단 위로 흐릅니다.

또한 주요 흐름에서 3 차원 재순환 소용돌이가 발생한다는 것도 분명합니다 (예 : Chanson 2002; Gonzalez & Chanson 2008). 계단 가장자리 근처의 의사 바닥에서 흐름의 방향은 가상 바닥과 가상으로 정렬됩니다. Takahashi & Ohtsu (2012)에 따르면, 스키밍 흐름 체제에서 주어진 유속에 대해 흐름은 계단 가장자리 근처의 수평 계단면에 영향을 미치고 슈트 경사가 감소하면 충돌 영역의 면적이 증가합니다. 전이 흐름 체제는 나페 흐름과 스키밍 흐름 체제 사이에서 발생합니다. 계단식 배수로를 설계 할 때 스키밍 흐름 체계를 고려해야합니다 (예 : Chanson 1994, Matos 2000, Chanson 2002, Boes & Hager 2003a).

CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics), 즉 수력 공학의 수치 모델은 일반적으로 물리적 모델에 소요되는 총 비용과 시간을 줄여줍니다. 따라서 수치 모델은 실험 모델보다 빠르고 저렴한 것으로 분류되며 동시에 하나 이상의 목적으로 사용될 수도 있습니다. 사용 가능한 많은 CFD 소프트웨어 패키지가 있지만 가장 널리 사용되는 것은 FLOW-3D입니다. 이 연구에서는 Flow 3D 소프트웨어를 사용하여 유량이 서로 다른 두 모델에 대해 계단식 배수로에서 공기 농도, 속도 분포 및 동적 압력 분포를 시뮬레이션합니다.

Roshan et al. (2010)은 서로 다른 수의 계단 및 배출을 가진 계단식 배수로의 두 가지 물리적 모델에 대한 흐름 체제 및 에너지 소산 조사를 연구했습니다. 실험 모델의 기울기는 각각 19.2 %, 12 단계와 23 단계의 수입니다. 결과는 23 단계 물리적 모델에서 관찰 된 흐름 영역이 12 단계 모델보다 더 수용 가능한 것으로 간주되었음을 보여줍니다. 그러나 12 단계 모델의 에너지 손실은 23 단계 모델보다 더 많았습니다. 그리고 실험은 스키밍 흐름 체제에서 23 단계 모델의 에너지 소산이 12 단계 모델보다 약 12 ​​% 더 적다는 것을 관찰했습니다.

Ghaderi et al. (2020a)는 계단 크기와 유속이 다른 정련 매개 변수의 영향을 조사하기 위해 계단식 배수로에 대한 실험 연구를 수행했습니다. 그 결과, 흐름 체계가 냅페 흐름 체계에서 발생하는 최소 scouring 깊이와 같은 scouring 구멍 치수에 영향을 미친다는 것을 보여주었습니다. 또한 테일 워터 깊이와 계단 크기는 최대 scouring깊이에 대한 실제 매개 변수입니다. 테일 워터의 깊이를 6.31cm에서 8.54 및 11.82cm로 늘림으로써 수세 깊이가 각각 18.56 % 및 11.42 % 증가했습니다. 또한 이 증가하는 테일 워터 깊이는 scouring 길이를 각각 31.43 % 및 16.55 % 감소 시킵니다. 또한 유속을 높이면 Froude 수가 증가하고 흐름의 운동량이 증가하면 scouring이 촉진됩니다. 또한 결과는 중간의 scouring이 횡단면의 측벽보다 적다는 것을 나타냅니다. 계단식 배수로 하류의 최대 scouring 깊이를 예측 한 후 실험 결과와 비교하기 위한 실험식이 제안 되었습니다. 그리고 비교 결과 제안 된 공식은 각각 3.86 %와 9.31 %의 상대 오차와 최대 오차 내에서 scouring 깊이를 예측할 수 있음을 보여주었습니다.

Ghaderi et al. (2020b)는 사다리꼴 미로 모양 (TLS) 단계의 수치 조사를 했습니다. 결과는 이러한 유형의 배수로가 확대 비율 LT / Wt (LT는 총 가장자리 길이, Wt는 배수로의 폭)를 증가시키기 때문에 더 나은 성능을 갖는 것으로 관찰되었습니다. 또한 사다리꼴 미로 모양의 계단식 배수로는 더 큰 마찰 계수와 더 낮은 잔류 수두를 가지고 있습니다. 마찰 계수는 다양한 배율에 대해 0.79에서 1.33까지 다르며 평평한 계단식 배수로의 경우 대략 0.66과 같습니다. 또한 TLS 계단식 배수로에서 잔류 수두의 비율 (Hres / dc)은 약 2.89이고 평평한 계단식 배수로의 경우 약 4.32와 같습니다.

Shahheydari et al. (2015)는 Flow-3D 소프트웨어, RNG k-ε 모델 및 VOF (Volume of Fluid) 방법을 사용하여 배출 계수 및 에너지 소산과 같은 자유 표면 흐름의 프로파일을 연구하여 스키밍 흐름 체제에서 계단식 배수로에 대한 흐름을 조사했습니다. 실험 결과와 비교했습니다. 결과는 에너지 소산 율과 방전 계수율의 관계가 역으로 실험 모델의 결과와 잘 일치 함을 보여 주었다.

Mohammad Rezapour Tabari & Tavakoli (2016)는 계단 높이 (h), 계단 길이 (L), 계단 수 (Ns) 및 단위 폭의 방전 (q)과 같은 다양한 매개 변수가 계단식 에너지 ​​소산에 미치는 영향을 조사했습니다. 방수로. 그들은 해석에 FLOW-3D 소프트웨어를 사용하여 계단식 배수로에서 에너지 손실과 임계 흐름 깊이 사이의 관계를 평가했습니다. 또한 유동 난류에 사용되는 방정식과 표준 k-ɛ 모델을 풀기 위해 유한 체적 방법을 적용했습니다. 결과에 따르면 스텝 수가 증가하고 유량 배출량이 증가하면 에너지 손실이 감소합니다. 얻은 결과를 다른 연구와 비교하고 경험적, 수학적 조사를 수행하여 결국 합격 가능한 결과를 얻었습니다.

METHODOLOGY

ListenReadSpeaker webReader: ListenFor all numerical models the basic principle is very similar: a set of partial differential equations (PDE) present the physical problems. The flow of fluids (gas and liquid) are governed by the conservation laws of mass, momentum and energy. For Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), the PDE system is substituted by a set of algebraic equations which can be worked out by using numerical methods (Versteeg & Malalasekera 2007). Flow-3D uses the finite volume approach to solve the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equation, by applying the technique of Fractional Area/Volume Obstacle Representation (FAVOR) to define an obstacle (Flow Science Inc. 2012). Equations (1) and (2) are RANS and continuity equations with FAVOR variables that are applied for incompressible flows.

formula

(1)

formula

(2)where  is the velocity in xi direction, t is the time,  is the fractional area open to flow in the subscript directions,  is the volume fraction of fluid in each cell, p is the hydrostatic pressure,  is the density, is the gravitational force in subscript directions and  is the Reynolds stresses.

Turbulence modelling is one of three key elements in CFD (Gunal 1996). There are many types of turbulence models, but the most common are Zero-equation models, One-equation models, Two-equation models, Reynolds Stress/Flux models and Algebraic Stress/Flux models. In FLOW-3D software, five turbulence models are available. The formulation used in the FLOW-3D software differs slightly from other formulations that includes the influence of the fractional areas/volumes of the FAVORTM method and generalizes the turbulence production (or decay) associated with buoyancy forces. The latter generalization, for example, includes buoyancy effects associated with non-inertial accelerations.

The available turbulence models in Flow-3D software are the Prandtl Mixing Length Model, the One-Equation Turbulent Energy Model, the Two-Equation Standard  Model, the Two-Equation Renormalization-Group (RNG) Model and large Eddy Simulation Model (Flow Science Inc. 2012).In this research the RNG model was selected because this model is more commonly used than other models in dealing with particles; moreover, it is more accurate to work with air entrainment and other particles. In general, the RNG model is classified as a more widely-used application than the standard k-ɛ model. And in particular, the RNG model is more accurate in flows that have strong shear regions than the standard k-ɛ model and it is defined to describe low intensity turbulent flows. For the turbulent dissipation  it solves an additional transport equation:

formula

(3)where CDIS1, CDIS2, and CDIS3 are dimensionless parameters and the user can modify them. The diffusion of dissipation, Diff ɛ, is

formula

(4)where uv and w are the x, y and z coordinates of the fluid velocity; ⁠, ⁠,  and ⁠, are FLOW-3D’s FAVORTM defined terms;  and  are turbulence due to shearing and buoyancy effects, respectively. R and  are related to the cylindrical coordinate system. The default values of RMTKE, CDIS1 and CNU differ, being 1.39, 1.42 and 0.085 respectively. And CDIS2 is calculated from turbulent production (⁠⁠) and turbulent kinetic energy (⁠⁠).The kinematic turbulent viscosity is the same in all turbulence transport models and is calculated from

formula

(5)where ⁠: is the turbulent kinematic viscosity.  is defined as the numerical challenge between the RNG and the two-equation k-ɛ models, found in the equation below. To avoid an unphysically large result for  in Equation (3), since this equation could produce a value for  very close to zero and also because the physical value of  may approach to zero in such cases, the value of  is calculated from the following equation:

formula

(6)where ⁠: the turbulent length scale.

VOF and FAVOR are classifications of volume-fraction methods. In these two methods, firstly the area should be subdivided into a control volume grid or a small element. Each flow parameter like velocity, temperature and pressure values within the element are computed for each element containing liquids. Generally, these values represent the volumetric average of values in the elements.Numerous methods have been used recently to solve free infinite boundaries in the various numerical simulations. VOF is an easy and powerful method created based on the concept of a fractional intensity of fluid. A significant number of studies have confirmed that this method is more flexible and efficient than others dealing with the configurations of a complex free boundary. By using VOF technology the Flow-3D free surface was modelled and first declared in Hirt & Nichols (1981). In the VOF method there are three ingredients: a planner to define the surface, an algorithm for tracking the surface as a net mediator moving over a computational grid, and application of the boundary conditions to the surface. Configurations of the fluids are defined in terms of VOF function, F (x, y, z, t) (Hirt & Nichols 1981). And this VOF function shows the volume of flow per unit volume

formula

(7)

formula

(8)

formula

(9)where  is the density of the fluid, is a turbulent diffusion term,  is a mass source,  is the fractional volume open to flow. The components of velocity (u, v, w) are in the direction of coordinates (x, y, z) or (r, ⁠).  in the x-direction is the fractional area open to flow,  and  are identical area fractions for flow in the y and z directions. The R coefficient is based on the selection of the coordinate system.

The FAVOR method is a different method and uses another volume fraction technique, which is only used to define the geometry, such as the volume of liquid in each cell used to determine the position of fluid surfaces. Another fractional volume can be used to define the solid surface. Then, this information is used to determine the boundary conditions of the wall that the flow should be adapted for.

Case study

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In this study, the experimental results of Ostad Mirza (2016) was simulated. In a channel composed of two 4 m long modules, with a transparent sidewall of height 0.6 m and 0.5 m width. The upstream chute slope (i.e. pseudo-bottom angle) Ɵ1 = 50°, the downstream chute slope Ɵ2 = 30° or 18.6°, the step heights h = 0.06 m, the total number of steps along the 50° chute 41 steps, the total number of steps along the 30° chute 34 steps and the total number of steps along the 18.6° chute 20 steps.

The flume inflow tool contained a jetbox with a maximum opening set to 0.12 meters, designed for passing the maximum unit discharge of 0.48 m2/s. The measurements of the flow properties (i.e. air concentration and velocity) were computed perpendicular to the pseudo-bottom as shown in Figure 1 at the centre of twenty stream-wise cross-sections, along the stepped chute, (i.e. in five steps up on the slope change and fifteen steps down on the slope change, namely from step number −09 to +23 on 50°–30° slope change, or from −09 to +15 on 50°–18.6° slope change, respectively).

Sketch of the air concentration C and velocity V measured perpendicular to the pseudo-bottom used by Mirza (Ostad Mirza 2016).
Sketch of the air concentration C and velocity V measured perpendicular to the pseudo-bottom used by Mirza (Ostad Mirza 2016).

Sketch of the air concentration C and velocity V measured perpendicular to the pseudo-bottom used by Mirza (Ostad Mirza 2016).

Pressure sensors were arranged with the x/l values for different slope change as shown in Table 1, where x is the distance from the step edge, along the horizontal step face, and l is the length of the horizontal step face. The location of pressure sensors is shown in Table 1.Table 1

Location of pressure sensors on horizontal step faces

Θ(°)L(m)x/l (–)
50.0 0.050 0.35 0.64 – – – 
30.0 0.104 0.17 0.50 0.84 – – 
18.6 0.178 0.10 0.30 0.50 0.7 0.88 
Location of pressure sensors on horizontal step faces
Inlet boundary condition for Q = 0.235 m3/s and fluid elevation 4.21834 m.
Inlet boundary condition for Q = 0.235 m3/s and fluid elevation 4.21834 m.

Inlet boundary condition for Q = 0.235 m3/s and fluid elevation 4.21834 m.

Numerical model set-up

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A 3D numerical model of hydraulic phenomena was simulated based on an experimental study by Ostad Mirza (2016). The water surcharge and flow pressure over the stepped spillway was computed for two models of a stepped spillway with different discharge for each model. In this study, the package was used to simulate the flow parameters such as air entrainment, velocity distribution and dynamic pressures. The solver uses the finite volume technique to discretize the computational domain. In every test run, one incompressible fluid flow with a free surface flow selected at 20̊ was used for this simulation model. Table 2 shows the variables used in test runs.Table 2

Variables used in test runs

Test no.Θ1 (°)Θ2 (°)h(m)d0q (m3s1)dc/h (–)
50 18.6 0.06 0.045 0.1 2.6 
50 18.6 0.06 0.082 0.235 4.6 
50 30.0 0.06 0.045 0.1 2.6 
50 30.0 0.06 0.082 0.235 4.6 
Table 2 Variables used in test runs

For stepped spillway simulation, several parameters should be specified to get accurate simulations, which is the scope of this research. Viscosity and turbulent, gravity and non-inertial reference frame, air entrainment, density evaluation and drift-flux should be activated for these simulations. There are five different choices in the ‘viscosity and turbulent’ option, in the viscosity flow and Renormalized Group (RNG) model. Then a dynamical model is selected as the second option, the ‘gravity and non-inertial reference frame’. Only the z-component was inputted as a negative 9.81 m/s2 and this value represents gravitational acceleration but in the same option the x and y components will be zero. Air entrainment is selected. Finally, in the drift-flux model, the density of phase one is input as (water) 1,000 kg/m3 and the density of phase two (air) as 1.225 kg/m3. Minimum volume fraction of phase one is input equal to 0.1 and maximum volume fraction of phase two to 1 to allow air concentration to reach 90%, then the option allowing gas to escape at free surface is selected, to obtain closer simulation.

The flow domain is divided into small regions relatively by the mesh in Flow-3D numerical model. Cells are the smallest part of the mesh, in which flow characteristics such as air concentration, velocity and dynamic pressure are calculated. The accuracy of the results and simulation time depends directly on the mesh block size so the cell size is very important. Orthogonal mesh was used in cartesian coordinate systems. A smaller cell size provides more accuracy for results, so we reduced the number of cells whilst including enough accuracy. In this study, the size of cells in x, y and z directions was selected as 0.015 m after several trials.

Figure 3 shows the 3D computational domain model 50–18.6 slope change, that is 6.0 m length, 0.50 m width and 4.23 m height. The 3D model of the computational domain model 50–30 slope changes this to 6.0 m length, 0.50 m width and 5.068 m height and the size of meshes in x, y, and z directions are 0.015 m. For the 50–18.6 slope change model: both total number of active and passive cells = 4,009,952, total number of active cells = 3,352,307, include real cells (used for solving the flow equations) = 3,316,269, open real cells = 3,316,269, fully blocked real cells equal to zero, external boundary cells were 36,038, inter-block boundary cells = 0 (Flow-3D report). For 50–30 slope change model: both total number of active and passive cells = 4,760,002, total number of active cells equal to 4,272,109, including real cells (used for solving the flow equations) were 3,990,878, open real cells = 3,990,878 fully blocked real cells = zero, external boundary cells were 281,231, inter-block boundary cells = 0 (Flow-3D report).

The 3D computational domain model (50–18.6) slope change, and boundary condition for (50–30 slope change) model.
Figure3 The 3D computational domain model (50–18.6) slope change, and boundary condition for (50–30 slope change) model.

Figure 3VIEW LARGEDOWNLOAD SLIDE

The 3D computational domain model (50–18.6) slope change, and boundary condition for (50–30 slope change) model.

When solving the Navier-Stokes equation and continuous equations, boundary conditions should be applied. The most important work of boundary conditions is to create flow conditions similar to physical status. The Flow-3D software has many types of boundary condition; each type can be used for the specific condition of the models. The boundary conditions in Flow-3D are symmetry, continuative, specific pressure, grid overlay, wave, wall, periodic, specific velocity, outflow, and volume flow rate.

There are two options to input finite flow rate in the Flow-3D software either for inlet discharge of the system or for the outlet discharge of the domain: specified velocity and volume flow rate. In this research, the X-minimum boundary condition, volume flow rate, has been chosen. For X-maximum boundary condition, outflow was selected because there is nothing to be calculated at the end of the flume. The volume flow rate and the elevation of surface water was set for Q = 0.1 and 0.235 m3/s respectively (Figure 2).

The bottom (Z-min) is prepared as a wall boundary condition and the top (Z-max) is computed as a pressure boundary condition, and for both (Y-min) and (Y-max) as symmetry.

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

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The air concentration distribution profiles in two models of stepped spillway were obtained at an acquisition time equal to 25 seconds in skimming flow for both upstream and downstream of a slope change 50°–18.6° and 50°–30° for different discharge as in Table 2, and as shown in Figure 4 for 50°–18.6° slope change and Figure 5 for 50°–30° slope change configuration for dc/h = 4.6. The simulation results of the air concentration are very close to the experimental results in all curves and fairly close to that predicted by the advection-diffusion model for the air bubbles suggested by Chanson (1997) on a constant sloping chute.

Figure 4 Experimental and simulated air concentration distribution for steps number −5, +1, +5, +8, +11 and +15 along the 50°–18.6° slope change for dc/h = 4.6. VIEW LARGEDOWNLOAD SLIDE Experimental and simulated air concentration distribution for steps number −5, +1, +5, +8, +11 and +15 along the 50°–18.6° slope change for dc/h = 4.6.
Figure 4 Experimental and simulated air concentration distribution for steps number −5, +1, +5, +8, +11 and +15 along the 50°–18.6° slope change for dc/h = 4.6. VIEW LARGEDOWNLOAD SLIDE Experimental and simulated air concentration distribution for steps number −5, +1, +5, +8, +11 and +15 along the 50°–18.6° slope change for dc/h = 4.6.

Figure 4VIEW LARGEDOWNLOAD SLIDE

Experimental and simulated air concentration distribution for steps number −5, +1, +5, +8, +11 and +15 along the 50°–18.6° slope change for dc/h = 4.6.

Figure5 Experimental and simulated air concentration distribution for steps number −5, +1, +5, +11, +19 and +22 along the 50°–30° slope change, for dc/h = 4.6.
Figure5 Experimental and simulated air concentration distribution for steps number −5, +1, +5, +11, +19 and +22 along the 50°–30° slope change, for dc/h = 4.6.

Figure 5VIEW LARGEDOWNLOAD SLIDE

Experimental and simulated air concentration distribution for steps number −5, +1, +5, +11, +19 and +22 along the 50°–30° slope change, for dc/h = 4.6.

Figure 6VIEW LARGEDOWNLOAD SLIDE

Figure 6 Experimental and simulated dimensionless velocity distribution for steps number −5, −1, +1, +5, +8, +11 and +15 along the 50°–18.6° slope change for dc/h = 2.6.
Figure 6 Experimental and simulated dimensionless velocity distribution for steps number −5, −1, +1, +5, +8, +11 and +15 along the 50°–18.6° slope change for dc/h = 2.6.

Experimental and simulated dimensionless velocity distribution for steps number −5, −1, +1, +5, +8, +11 and +15 along the 50°–18.6° slope change for dc/h = 2.6.

Figure 7 Experimental and simulated dimensionless velocity distribution for steps number −5, −1, +1, +5. +11, +15 and +22 along the 50°–30° slope change for dc/h = 2.6.
Figure 7 Experimental and simulated dimensionless velocity distribution for steps number −5, −1, +1, +5. +11, +15 and +22 along the 50°–30° slope change for dc/h = 2.6.

Figure 7VIEW LARGEDOWNLOAD SLIDE

Experimental and simulated dimensionless velocity distribution for steps number −5, −1, +1, +5. +11, +15 and +22 along the 50°–30° slope change for dc/h = 2.6.

But as is shown in all above mentioned figures it is clear that at the pseudo-bottom the CFD results of air concentration are less than experimental ones until the depth of water reaches a quarter of the total depth of water. Also the direction of the curves are parallel to each other when going up towards the surface water and are incorporated approximately near the surface water. For all curves, the cross-section is separate between upstream and downstream steps. Therefore the (-) sign for steps represents a step upstream of the slope change cross-section and the (+) sign represents a step downstream of the slope change cross-section.

The dimensionless velocity distribution (V/V90) profile was acquired at an acquisition time equal to 25 seconds in skimming flow of the upstream and downstream slope change for both 50°–18.6° and 50°–30° slope change. The simulation results are compared with the experimental ones showing that for all curves there is close similarity for each point between the observed and experimental results. The curves increase parallel to each other and they merge near at the surface water as shown in Figure 6 for slope change 50°–18.6° configuration and Figure 7 for slope change 50°–30° configuration. However, at step numbers +1 and +5 in Figure 7 there are few differences between the simulated and observed results, namely the simulation curves ascend regularly meaning the velocity increases regularly from the pseudo-bottom up to the surface water.

Figure 8 (50°–18.6° slope change) and Figure 9 (50°–30° slope change) compare the simulation results and the experimental results for the presented dimensionless dynamic pressure distribution for different points on the stepped spillway. The results show a good agreement with the experimental and numerical simulations in all curves. For some points, few discrepancies can be noted in pressure magnitudes between the simulated and the observed ones, but they are in the acceptable range. Although the experimental data do not completely agree with the simulated results, there is an overall agreement.

Figure 8 Comparison between simulated and experimental results for the dimensionless pressure for steps number  −1, −2, −3 and +1, +2 +3 and +20 on the horizontal step faces of 50°–18.6° slope change configuration, for dc/h = 4.6, x is the distance from the step edge.
Figure 8 Comparison between simulated and experimental results for the dimensionless pressure for steps number −1, −2, −3 and +1, +2 +3 and +20 on the horizontal step faces of 50°–18.6° slope change configuration, for dc/h = 4.6, x is the distance from the step edge.

Figure 8VIEW LARGEDOWNLOAD SLIDE

Comparison between simulated and experimental results for the dimensionless pressure for steps number −1, −2, −3 and +1, +2 +3 and +20 on the horizontal step faces of 50°–18.6° slope change configuration, for dc/h = 4.6, x is the distance from the step edge.

Figure 9 Comparison between simulated and experimental results for the dimensionless pressure for steps number  −1, −2, −3 and +1, +2 and +30, +31 on the horizontal step face of 50°–30° slope change configuration, for dc/h = 4.6, x is the distance from the step edge.
Figure 9 Comparison between simulated and experimental results for the dimensionless pressure for steps number −1, −2, −3 and +1, +2 and +30, +31 on the horizontal step face of 50°–30° slope change configuration, for dc/h = 4.6, x is the distance from the step edge.

Figure 9VIEW LARGEDOWNLOAD SLIDE

Comparison between simulated and experimental results for the dimensionless pressure for steps number −1, −2, −3 and +1, +2 and +30, +31 on the horizontal step face of 50°–30° slope change configuration, for dc/h = 4.6, x is the distance from the step edge.

The pressure profiles were acquired at an acquisition time equal to 70 seconds in skimming flow on 50°–18.6°, where p is the measured dynamic pressure, h is step height and ϒ is water specific weight. A negative sign for steps represents a step upstream of the slope change cross-section and a positive sign represents a step downstream of the slope change cross-section.

Figure 10 shows the experimental streamwise development of dimensionless pressure on the 50°–18.6° slope change for dc/h = 4.6, x/l = 0.35 on 50° sloping chute and x/l = 0.3 on 18.6° sloping chute compared with the numerical simulation. It is obvious from Figure 10 that the streamwise development of dimensionless pressure before slope change (steps number −1, −2 and −3) both of the experimental and simulated results are close to each other. However, it is clear that there is a little difference between the results of the streamwise development of dimensionless pressure at step numbers +1, +2 and +3. Moreover, from step number +3 to the end, the curves get close to each other.

Figure 10 Comparison between experimental and simulated results for the streamwise development of the dimensionless pressure on the 50°–18.6° slope change, for dc/h = 4.6, and x/l = 0.35 on 50° sloping chute and x/l = 0.3 on 18.6° sloping chute.
Figure 10 Comparison between experimental and simulated results for the streamwise development of the dimensionless pressure on the 50°–18.6° slope change, for dc/h = 4.6, and x/l = 0.35 on 50° sloping chute and x/l = 0.3 on 18.6° sloping chute.

Figure 10VIEW LARGEDOWNLOAD SLIDE

Comparison between experimental and simulated results for the streamwise development of the dimensionless pressure on the 50°–18.6° slope change, for dc/h = 4.6, and x/l = 0.35 on 50° sloping chute and x/l = 0.3 on 18.6° sloping chute.

Figure 11 compares the experimental and the numerical results for the streamwise development of the dimensionless pressure on the 50°–30° slope change, for dc/h = 4.6, and x/l = 0.35 on 50° sloping chute and x/l = 0.17 on 30° sloping chute. It is apparent that the outcomes of the experimental work are close to the numerical results, however, the results of the simulation are above the experimental ones before the slope change, but the results of the simulation descend below the experimental ones after the slope change till the end.

Figure 11 Comparison between experimental and simulated results for the streamwise development of the dimensionless pressure on the 50°–30° slope change, for dc/h = 4.6, and x/l = 0.35 on 50° sloping chute and x/l = 0.17 on 30° sloping chute.
Figure 11 Comparison between experimental and simulated results for the streamwise development of the dimensionless pressure on the 50°–30° slope change, for dc/h = 4.6, and x/l = 0.35 on 50° sloping chute and x/l = 0.17 on 30° sloping chute.

Figure 11VIEW LARGEDOWNLOAD SLIDE

Comparison between experimental and simulated results for the streamwise development of the dimensionless pressure on the 50°–30° slope change, for dc/h = 4.6, and x/l = 0.35 on 50° sloping chute and x/l = 0.17 on 30° sloping chute.

CONCLUSION

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In this research, numerical modelling was attempted to investigate the effect of abrupt slope change on the flow properties (air entrainment, velocity distribution and dynamic pressure) over a stepped spillway with two different models and various flow rates in a skimming flow regime by using the CFD technique. The numerical model was verified and compared with the experimental results of Ostad Mirza (2016). The same domain of the numerical model was inputted as in experimental models to reduce errors as much as possible.

Flow-3D is a well modelled tool that deals with particles. In this research, the model deals well with air entrainment particles by observing their results with experimental results. And the reason for the small difference between the numerical and the experimental results is that the program deals with particles more accurately than the laboratory. In general, both numerical and experimental results showed that near to the slope change the flow bulking, air entrainment, velocity distribution and dynamic pressure are greatly affected by abrupt slope change on the steps. Although the extent of the slope change was relatively small, the influence of the slope change was major on flow characteristics.

The Renormalized Group (RNG) model was selected as a turbulence solver. For 3D modelling, orthogonal mesh was used as a computational domain and the mesh grid size used for X, Y, and Z direction was equal to 0.015 m. In CFD modelling, air concentration and velocity distribution were recorded for a period of 25 seconds, but dynamic pressure was recorded for a period of 70 seconds. The results showed that there is a good agreement between the numerical and the physical models. So, it can be concluded that the proposed CFD model is very suitable for use in simulating and analysing the design of hydraulic structures.

이 연구에서 수치 모델링은 두 가지 다른 모델과 다양한 유속을 사용하여 스키밍 흐름 영역에서 계단식 배수로에 대한 유동 특성 (공기 혼입, 속도 분포 및 동적 압력)에 대한 급격한 경사 변화의 영향을 조사하기 위해 시도되었습니다. CFD 기술. 수치 모델을 검증하여 Ostad Mirza (2016)의 실험 결과와 비교 하였다. 오차를 최대한 줄이기 위해 실험 모형과 동일한 수치 모형을 입력 하였다.

Flow-3D는 파티클을 다루는 잘 모델링 된 도구입니다. 이 연구에서 모델은 실험 결과를 통해 결과를 관찰하여 공기 혼입 입자를 잘 처리합니다. 그리고 수치와 실험 결과의 차이가 작은 이유는 프로그램이 실험실보다 입자를 더 정확하게 다루기 때문입니다. 일반적으로 수치 및 실험 결과는 경사에 가까워지면 유동 벌킹, 공기 혼입, 속도 분포 및 동적 압력이 계단의 급격한 경사 변화에 크게 영향을받는 것으로 나타났습니다. 사면 변화의 정도는 상대적으로 작았지만 사면 변화의 영향은 유동 특성에 큰 영향을 미쳤다.

Renormalized Group (RNG) 모델이 난류 솔버로 선택되었습니다. 3D 모델링의 경우 계산 영역으로 직교 메쉬가 사용되었으며 X, Y, Z 방향에 사용 된 메쉬 그리드 크기는 0.015m입니다. CFD 모델링에서 공기 농도와 속도 분포는 25 초 동안 기록되었지만 동적 압력은 70 초 동안 기록되었습니다. 결과는 수치 모델과 물리적 모델간에 좋은 일치가 있음을 보여줍니다. 따라서 제안 된 CFD 모델은 수력 구조물의 설계 시뮬레이션 및 해석에 매우 적합하다는 결론을 내릴 수 있습니다.

DATA AVAILABILITY STATEMENT

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All relevant data are included in the paper or its Supplementary Information.

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© 2021 The Authors
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Modeling of contactless bubble–bubble interactions in microchannels with integrated inertial pumps

Modeling of contactless bubble–bubble interactions in microchannels with integrated inertial pumps

통합 관성 펌프를 사용하여 마이크로 채널에서 비접촉식 기포-기포 상호 작용 모델링

Physics of Fluids 33, 042002 (2021); https://doi.org/10.1063/5.0041924 B. Hayesa) G. L. Whitingb), and  R. MacCurdyc)

ABSTRACT

In this study, the nonlinear effect of contactless bubble–bubble interactions in inertial micropumps is characterized via reduced parameter one-dimensional and three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (3D CFD) modeling. A one-dimensional pump model is developed to account for contactless bubble-bubble interactions, and the accuracy of the developed one-dimensional model is assessed via the commercial volume of fluid CFD software, FLOW-3D. The FLOW-3D CFD model is validated against experimental bubble dynamics images as well as experimental pump data. Precollapse and postcollapse bubble and flow dynamics for two resistors in a channel have been successfully explained by the modified one-dimensional model. The net pumping effect design space is characterized as a function of resistor placement and firing time delay. The one-dimensional model accurately predicts cumulative flow for simultaneous resistor firing with inner-channel resistor placements (0.2L < x < 0.8L where L is the channel length) as well as delayed resistor firing with inner-channel resistor placements when the time delay is greater than the time required for the vapor bubble to fill the channel cross section. In general, one-dimensional model accuracy suffers at near-reservoir resistor placements and short time delays which we propose is a result of 3D bubble-reservoir interactions and transverse bubble growth interactions, respectively, that are not captured by the one-dimensional model. We find that the one-dimensional model accuracy improves for smaller channel heights. We envision the developed one-dimensional model as a first-order rapid design tool for inertial pump-based microfluidic systems operating in the contactless bubble–bubble interaction nonlinear regime

이 연구에서 관성 마이크로 펌프에서 비접촉 기포-기포 상호 작용의 비선형 효과는 감소 된 매개 변수 1 차원 및 3 차원 전산 유체 역학 (3D CFD) 모델링을 통해 특성화됩니다. 비접촉식 기포-버블 상호 작용을 설명하기 위해 1 차원 펌프 모델이 개발되었으며, 개발 된 1 차원 모델의 정확도는 유체 CFD 소프트웨어 인 FLOW-3D의 상용 볼륨을 통해 평가됩니다.

FLOW-3D CFD 모델은 실험적인 거품 역학 이미지와 실험적인 펌프 데이터에 대해 검증되었습니다. 채널에 있는 두 저항기의 붕괴 전 및 붕괴 후 기포 및 유동 역학은 수정 된 1 차원 모델에 의해 성공적으로 설명되었습니다. 순 펌핑 효과 설계 공간은 저항 배치 및 발사 시간 지연의 기능으로 특징 지어집니다.

1 차원 모델은 내부 채널 저항 배치 (0.2L <x <0.8L, 여기서 L은 채널 길이)로 동시 저항 발생에 대한 누적 흐름과 시간 지연시 내부 채널 저항 배치로 지연된 저항 발생을 정확하게 예측합니다. 증기 방울이 채널 단면을 채우는 데 필요한 시간보다 큽니다.

일반적으로 1 차원 모델 정확도는 저수지 근처의 저항 배치와 1 차원 모델에 의해 포착되지 않는 3D 기포-저수지 상호 작용 및 가로 기포 성장 상호 작용의 결과 인 짧은 시간 지연에서 어려움을 겪습니다. 채널 높이가 작을수록 1 차원 모델 정확도가 향상됩니다. 우리는 개발 된 1 차원 모델을 비접촉 기포-기포 상호 작용 비선형 영역에서 작동하는 관성 펌프 기반 미세 유체 시스템을 위한 1 차 빠른 설계 도구로 생각합니다.

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Figure 3. (a) Velocity distribution in a section perpendicular to the flow for rectangular (left) and Ushaped (right) cross section channels, and (b) particle location in these cross sections.

Continuous-Flow Separation of Magnetic Particles from Biofluids: How Does the Microdevice Geometry Determine the Separation Performance?

Cristina González Fernández,1 Jenifer Gómez Pastora,2 Arantza Basauri,1 Marcos Fallanza,1 Eugenio Bringas,1 Jeffrey J. Chalmers,2 and Inmaculada Ortiz1,*
Author information Article notes Copyright and License information Disclaimer

생체 유체에서 자성 입자의 연속 흐름 분리 : 마이크로 장치 형상이 분리 성능을 어떻게 결정합니까?

Abstract

The use of functionalized magnetic particles for the detection or separation of multiple chemicals and biomolecules from biofluids continues to attract significant attention. After their incubation with the targeted substances, the beads can be magnetically recovered to perform analysis or diagnostic tests. Particle recovery with permanent magnets in continuous-flow microdevices has gathered great attention in the last decade due to the multiple advantages of microfluidics. As such, great efforts have been made to determine the magnetic and fluidic conditions for achieving complete particle capture; however, less attention has been paid to the effect of the channel geometry on the system performance, although it is key for designing systems that simultaneously provide high particle recovery and flow rates. Herein, we address the optimization of Y-Y-shaped microchannels, where magnetic beads are separated from blood and collected into a buffer stream by applying an external magnetic field. The influence of several geometrical features (namely cross section shape, thickness, length, and volume) on both bead recovery and system throughput is studied. For that purpose, we employ an experimentally validated Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) numerical model that considers the dominant forces acting on the beads during separation. Our results indicate that rectangular, long devices display the best performance as they deliver high particle recovery and high throughput. Thus, this methodology could be applied to the rational design of lab-on-a-chip devices for any magnetically driven purification, enrichment or isolation.

생체 유체에서 여러 화학 물질과 생체 분자의 검출 또는 분리를 위한 기능화된 자성 입자의 사용은 계속해서 상당한 관심을 받고 있습니다. 표적 물질과 함께 배양 한 후 비드는 자기적으로 회수되어 분석 또는 진단 테스트를 수행 할 수 있습니다.

연속 흐름 마이크로 장치에서 영구 자석을 사용한 입자 회수는 마이크로 유체의 여러 장점으로 인해 지난 10 년 동안 큰 관심을 모았습니다. 따라서 완전한 입자 포획을 달성하기 위한 자기 및 유체 조건을 결정하기 위해 많은 노력을 기울였습니다.

그러나 높은 입자 회수율과 유속을 동시에 제공하는 시스템을 설계하는데 있어 핵심이기는 하지만 시스템 성능에 대한 채널 형상의 영향에 대해서는 덜 주의를 기울였습니다.

여기에서 우리는 자기 비드가 혈액에서 분리되어 외부 자기장을 적용하여 버퍼 스트림으로 수집되는 Y-Y 모양의 마이크로 채널의 최적화를 다룹니다. 비드 회수 및 시스템 처리량에 대한 여러 기하학적 특징 (즉, 단면 형상, 두께, 길이 및 부피)의 영향을 연구합니다.

이를 위해 분리 중에 비드에 작용하는 지배적인 힘을 고려하는 실험적으로 검증된 CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) 수치 모델을 사용합니다.

우리의 결과는 직사각형의 긴 장치가 높은 입자 회수율과 높은 처리량을 제공하기 때문에 최고의 성능을 보여줍니다. 따라서 이 방법론은 자기 구동 정제, 농축 또는 분리를 위한 랩 온어 칩 장치의 합리적인 설계에 적용될 수 있습니다.

Keywords: particle magnetophoresis, CFD, cross section, chip fabrication

Figure 1 (a) Top view of the microfluidic-magnetophoretic device, (b) Schematic representation of the channel cross-sections studied in this work, and (c) the magnet position relative to the channel location (Sepy and Sepz are the magnet separation distances in y and z, respectively).
Figure 1 (a) Top view of the microfluidic-magnetophoretic device, (b) Schematic representation of the channel cross-sections studied in this work, and (c) the magnet position relative to the channel location (Sepy and Sepz are the magnet separation distances in y and z, respectively).
Figure 2. (a) Channel-magnet configuration and (b–d) magnetic force distribution in the channel midplane for 2 mm, 5 mm and 10 mm long rectangular (left) and U-shaped (right) devices.
Figure 2. (a) Channel-magnet configuration and (b–d) magnetic force distribution in the channel midplane for 2 mm, 5 mm and 10 mm long rectangular (left) and U-shaped (right) devices.
Figure 3. (a) Velocity distribution in a section perpendicular to the flow for rectangular (left) and Ushaped (right) cross section channels, and (b) particle location in these cross sections.
Figure 3. (a) Velocity distribution in a section perpendicular to the flow for rectangular (left) and Ushaped (right) cross section channels, and (b) particle location in these cross sections.
Figure 4. Influence of fluid flow rate on particle recovery when the applied magnetic force is (a) different and (b) equal in U-shaped and rectangular cross section microdevices.
Figure 4. Influence of fluid flow rate on particle recovery when the applied magnetic force is (a) different and (b) equal in U-shaped and rectangular cross section microdevices.
Figure 5. Magnetic bead capture as a function of fluid flow rate for all of the studied geometries.
Figure 5. Magnetic bead capture as a function of fluid flow rate for all of the studied geometries.
Figure 6. Influence of (a) magnetic and fluidic forces (J parameter) and (b) channel geometry (θ parameter) on particle recovery. Note that U-2mm does not accurately fit a line.
Figure 6. Influence of (a) magnetic and fluidic forces (J parameter) and (b) channel geometry (θ parameter) on particle recovery. Note that U-2mm does not accurately fit a line.
Figure 7. Dependence of bead capture on the (a) functional channel volume, and (b) particle residence time (tres). Note that in the curve fitting expressions V represents the functional channel volume and that U-2mm does not accurately fit a line.
Figure 7. Dependence of bead capture on the (a) functional channel volume, and (b) particle residence time (tres). Note that in the curve fitting expressions V represents the functional channel volume and that U-2mm does not accurately fit a line.

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Figure 2.6 ESI apparatus for offline analysis with microscope imaging.

MODELING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF MICROFABRICATED EMITTERS: IN PURSUIT OF IMPROVED ESI-MS PERFORMANCE

미세 가공 방사체의 모델링 및 특성화 : 개선된 ESI-MS 성능 추구

by XINYUN WU

A thesis submitted to the Department of Chemistry in conformity with the requirements for the degree of Master of Science Queen’s University Kingston, Ontario, Canada December, 2011 Copyright © Xinyun Wu, 2011

Abstract

ESI (Electrospray ionization)는 특히 탁월한 감도, 견고성 및 단순성으로 대형 생체 분자를 분석하는 데있어 질량 분석 (MS)에 매우 귀중한 기술이었습니다. ESI 기술 개발에 많은 노력을 기울였습니다. 그 형태와 기하학적 구조가 전기 분무 성능과 추가 MS 감지에 중추적 인 것으로 입증 되었기 때문입니다.

막힘 및 낮은 처리량을 포함하여 전통적인 단일 홀 이미터의 본질적인 문제는 기술의 적용 가능성을 제한합니다. 이 문제를 해결하기 위해 현재 프로젝트는 향상된 ESI-MS 분석을위한 다중 전자 분무(MES) 방출기를 개발하는데 초점을 맞추고 있습니다.

이 논문에서는 스프레이 전류 측정을 위한 전기 분무와 오프라인 전기 분무 실험을 위한 전산 유체 역학 (CFD) 시뮬레이션의 공동 작업이 수행되었습니다. 전기 분무 성능에 대한 다양한 이미터 설계의 영향을 테스트하기 위해 수치 시뮬레이션이 사용되었으며 실험실 결과는 가이드 및 검증으로 사용되었습니다.

CFD 코드는 Taylor-Melcher 누설 유전체 모델(LDM)을 기반으로 하며 과도 전기 분무 공정이 성공적으로 시뮬레이션되었습니다.

이 방법은 750 μm 내경 (i.d.) 이미 터를 통해 먼저 검증되었으며 20 μm i.d.에 추가로 적용되었습니다. 모델. 전기 분무 공정의 여러 단계가 시각적으로 시연되었으며 다양한 적용 전기장 및 유속에서 분무 전류의 변화에 ​​대한 정량적 조사는 이전 시뮬레이션 및 측정과 잘 일치합니다.

단일 조리개 프로토 타입을 기반으로 2 홀 및 3 홀 이미터로 MES 시뮬레이션을 수행했습니다. 시뮬레이션 예측은 실험 결과와 유사하게 비교되었습니다. 이 작업의 증거는 CFD 시뮬레이션이 MES의 이미 터 설계를 테스트하는 효과적인 수치 도구로 사용될 수 있음을 입증했습니다.

이 작업에서 달성 된 마이크로 스케일 에미 터 전기 분무의 성공적인 시뮬레이션에 대한 벤치마킹 결과는 현재까지 발표 된 전기 분무에 대한 동적 시뮬레이션의 가장 작은 규모로 여겨집니다.

Co-Authorship

공동 저자: 이 논문에 대한 모든 연구는 Natalie M. Cann 박사와 Richard D. Oleschuk 박사의 지도하에 완료되었습니다. 다중 전자 분무에 관한 4 장에서 제시된 연구 작업의 일부는 Ramin Wright가 공동 저술했으며, 이 작업은 press에서 다음 논문에서 인용되었습니다.

ibson,G.T.T.; Wright, R.D.; Oleschuk, R.D. Multiple electrosprays generated from a single poly carbonate microstructured fibre. Journal of Mass Spectrometry, 2011, in press.

Chapter 1 Introduction

소프트 이온화 방법으로 ESI (electrospray ionization)의 도입은 질량 분석법 (MS)의 적용 가능성에 혁명을 일으켰습니다. 이 기술의 부드러운 특징은 상대적으로 높은 전하를 가진 이온을 생성하는 고유한 이점으로 인해 액상에서 직접 펩티드 및 단백질과 같은 큰 생체 분자를 분석 할 수 있게했습니다 [1].

지난 10 년 동안 ESI-MS는 놀라운 성장을 보였으며 현재는 단백질 체학, 대사 체학, 글리코 믹스, 합성 화학자를 위한 식별 도구 등 다양한 생화학 분야에서 광범위하게 채택되고 있습니다 [2-3].

ESI-MS는 겔 전기 영동과 같은 생물학적 분자에 대한 기존의 질량 측정 기술보다 훨씬 빠르고 민감하며 정확합니다. 또한, 액체상에서 직접 분석 할 수 있는 큰 비 휘발성 분자의 능력은 고성능 액체 크로마토 그래피 (HPLC) 및 모세관 전기 영동 (CE)과 같은 업스트림 분리 기술과의 결합을 가능하게합니다 [4].

일반적인 ESI 공정은 일반적으로 액적 형성, 액적 수축 및 기상 이온의 최종 형성을 포함합니다. 일렉트로 스프레이의 성능에 영향을 미치는 많은 요소 중에서 스프레이를 위한 이미터의 구조 (즉, 기하학, 모양 등)가 중요한 요소입니다.

전통적인 전기 분무 이미터는 일반적으로 풀링 또는 에칭 기술로 제작 된 단일 채널 테이퍼 형 또는 비 테이퍼 형입니다. 그러나 이러한 이미터는 종종 막힘, 부적절한 처리량 등과 같은 문제로 어려움을 겪습니다. [5]

향상된 감도 및 샘플 활용을 위해 다중 스프레이를 생성하는 새로운 이미터 설계 개발로 분명한 발전이 있었습니다. 새로운 ESI 이미터 설계에 대한 연구는 실험적으로나 이론적으로 큰 관심을 불러 일으켰습니다 [3]. 그러나 ESI의 복잡한 물리적 과정은 팁 형상 외에도 많은 다른 변수에 의존하기 때문에 연구간 직접 비교의 어려움은 장애물이 됩니다.

또한 새로운 나노 이미터 제조 및 테스트 비용이 상당히 높을 수 있습니다. 이 논문은 CFD 시뮬레이션 도구를 활용하여 가상 랩을 설정함으로써 이러한 문제를 해결합니다. 다른 매개 변수로 인해 상호 연결된 변경 없이 다양한 이미터 설계를 비교할 수 있도록 이상적으로 균일한 물리적 조건을 제공합니다.

맞춤 제작된 프로토 타입의 실험 측정 값도 수집되어 더 나은 계산 체계를 형성하는 데 도움이 되는 지침과 검증을 모두 제공합니다. 특히 이 분야의 주요 미래 플랫폼으로 여겨지는 다중 노즐 이미 터 설계에 중점을 둘 것입니다.

전기 분무 거동에 영향을 미치는 요인에 대한 추가 기본 연구는 다양한 기하학적 및 작동 매개 변수와 관련하여 수행됩니다. 이는 보다 효율적이고 견고한 이미터의 개발을 가능하게 할 뿐만 아니라 더 넓은 영역에서 ESI의 적용을 향상시킬 수 있습니다.

Figure 1.1Schematic setup for ESI-MS technique
Figure 1.1Schematic setup for ESI-MS technique
Figure 1.2 Schematic of major processes occurring in electrospray [5].
Figure 1.2 Schematic of major processes occurring in electrospray [5].
Figure 1.3 Illustration of detailed geometric parameters of a spraying Taylor cone wherera is the radius of curvature of the best fitting circle at the tip of the cone; re is the radius of the emission region for droplets at the tip of a Taylor cone;is the liquid cone angle.
Figure 1.3 Illustration of detailed geometric parameters of a spraying Taylor cone wherera is the radius of curvature of the best fitting circle at the tip of the cone; re is the radius of the emission region for droplets at the tip of a Taylor cone;is the liquid cone angle.
Figure 1.4 (A)Externally tapered emitter  (B) Optical image of a clogged tapered emitter with normal use [46].
Figure 1.4 (A)Externally tapered emitter (B) Optical image of a clogged tapered emitter with normal use [46].
Figure 1.5 (A)Three by three configuration of an emitter array made with polycarbonate using laser ablation; (B) Photomicrograph of nine stable electrosprays generated from the nine-emitter array [52]
Figure 1.5 (A)Three by three configuration of an emitter array made with polycarbonate using laser ablation; (B) Photomicrograph of nine stable electrosprays generated from the nine-emitter array [52]
Figure 1.6 SEM images of the distal ends of four multichannel nanoelectrospray emitters and a tapered emitter: (A) 30 orifice emitter; (B) 54 orifice emitter; (C) 84 orifice emitter; (D) 168 orifice emitter; Scale bars in A, B, and C represent 50 μm, and 100 μm in D[54]
Figure 1.6 SEM images of the distal ends of four multichannel nanoelectrospray emitters and a tapered emitter: (A) 30 orifice emitter; (B) 54 orifice emitter; (C) 84 orifice emitter; (D) 168 orifice emitter; Scale bars in A, B, and C represent 50 μm, and 100 μm in D[54]
Figure 1.7 Photomicrographs of electrospray from of a 168-hole MCN emitter at different flow rates. (A) A traditional integrated Taylor cone observed from offline electrospray of water with 0.1% formic acid at 300 nL/min; (B) A mist of coalesced Taylor cones observed from offline electrospray at 25 nL/min[54]
Figure 1.7 Photomicrographs of electrospray from of a 168-hole MCN emitter at different flow rates. (A) A traditional integrated Taylor cone observed from offline electrospray of water with 0.1% formic acid at 300 nL/min; (B) A mist of coalesced Taylor cones observed from offline electrospray at 25 nL/min[54]
Figure 1.8 Circular arrays of etched emitters for better electric field homogeneity [53].
Figure 1.8 Circular arrays of etched emitters for better electric field homogeneity [53].
Figure 2.6 ESI apparatus for offline analysis with microscope imaging.
Figure 2.6 ESI apparatus for offline analysis with microscope imaging.
Figure 3.9 Typical panel for displaying instant simulation result during simulation process.
Figure 3.9 Typical panel for displaying instant simulation result during simulation process.
Figure 5.3 Generation of a Taylor cone-jet mode (simulation) plotted with iso-potential lines at times    (Top to bottom panels correspond to 0.002 s, 0.012 s, 0.018 s, 0.08 s respectively).
Figure 5.3 Generation of a Taylor cone-jet mode (simulation) plotted with iso-potential lines at times (Top to bottom panels correspond to 0.002 s, 0.012 s, 0.018 s, 0.08 s respectively).
Figure 5.8 (A) Taylor cone-jet profiles with different contact angle of 30 degrees and 20 degrees (B) under the same physical conditions of 6 kV and 0.04 m/s. (C) Cone-jet profile generated from a tapered tip with a 20 degree contact angle at 6 kV and 0.04 m/s (as a comparison with (B)).
Figure 5.8 (A) Taylor cone-jet profiles with different contact angle of 30 degrees and 20 degrees (B) under the same physical conditions of 6 kV and 0.04 m/s. (C) Cone-jet profile generated from a tapered tip with a 20 degree contact angle at 6 kV and 0.04 m/s (as a comparison with (B)).

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Bibliography

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34. Wampler, F.M., A.T. Blades, and P. Kebarle, Negative-Ion Electrospray Mass-Spectrometry of Nucleotides – Ionization from Water Solution with Sf6 Discharge Suppression. Journal of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry, 1993. 4(4): p. 289-295. 35. Marginean, I., P. Nemes, and A. Vertes, Order-chaos-order transitions in electrosprays: The electrified dripping faucet. Physical Review Letters, 2006. 97(6): p. -. 36. Marginean, I., P. Nemes, and A. Vertes, Astable regime in electrosprays. Physical Review E, 2007. 76(2): p. -. 37. Nemes, P., I. Marginean, and A. Vertes, Spraying mode effect on droplet formation and ion chemistry in electrosprays. Analytical Chemistry, 2007. 79(8): p. 3105-3116. 38. Marginean, I., et al., Electrospray characteristic curves: In pursuit of improved performance in the nanoflow regime. Analytical Chemistry, 2007. 79(21): p. 8030-8036. 39. Page, J.S., et al., Subambient pressure ionization with nanoelectrospray source and interface for improved sensitivity in mass spectrometry. Analytical Chemistry, 2008. 80(5): p. 1800-1805. 40. Delamora, J.F. and I.G. Loscertales, The Current Emitted by Highly Conducting Taylor Cones. Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 1994. 260: p. 155-184. 41. Ganan-Calvo, A.M., On the general scaling theory for electrospraying. Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 2004. 507: p. 203-212. 42. Smith, D.R., G. Sagerman, and T.D. Wood, Design and development of an interchangeable nanomicroelectrospray source for a quadrupole mass spectrometer.Review of Scientific Instruments, 2003. 74(10): p. 4474-4477. 43. Barnidge, D.R., S. Nilsson, and K.E. Markides, A design for low-flow sheathless electrospray emitters. Analytical Chemistry, 1999. 71(19): p. 4115-4118. 44. Guzzetta, A.W., R.A. Thakur, and I.C. Mylchreest, A robust micro-electrospray ionization technique for high-throughput liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry proteomics using a sanded metal needle as an emitter. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry, 2002. 16(21): p. 2067-2072. 45. Wilm, M. and M. Mann, Analytical properties of the nanoelectrospray ion source.Analytical Chemistry, 1996. 68(1): p. 1-8. 46. Covey, T.R. and D. Pinto, Practical Spectroscopy. Vol. 32. 2002. 47. Kelly, R.T., et al., Nanoelectrospray emitter arrays providing interemitter electric field uniformity. Analytical Chemistry, 2008. 80(14): p. 5660-5665. 48. Choi, Y.S. and T.D. Wood, Polyaniline-coated nanoelectrospray emitters treated with hydrophobic polymers at the tip. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry, 2007. 21(13): p. 2101-2108. 49. Tojo, H., Properties of an electrospray emitter coated with material of low surface energy. Journal of Chromatography A, 2004. 1056(1-2): p. 223-228.

50. Liu, J., et al., Electrospray ionization with a pointed carbon fiber emitter. Analytical Chemistry, 2004. 76(13): p. 3599-3606. 51. Sen, A.K., et al., Modeling and characterization of a carbon fiber emitter for electrospray ionization. Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering, 2006. 16(3): p. 620-630. 52. Tang, K.Q., et al., Generation of multiple electrosprays using microfabricated emitter arrays for improved mass spectrometric sensitivity. Analytical Chemistry, 2001. 73(8): p. 1658-1663. 53. Deng, W. and A. Gomez, Influence of space charge on the scale-up of multiplexed electrosprays. Journal of Aerosol Science, 2007. 38(10): p. 1062-1078. 54. Su, S.Q., et al., Microstructured Photonic Fibers as Multichannel Electrospray Emitters.Analytical Chemistry, 2009. 81(17): p. 7281-7287. 55. Sen, A.K., J. Darabi, and D.R. Knapp, Simulation and parametric study of a novel multi-spray emitter for ESI-MS applications. Microfluidics and Nanofluidics, 2007. 3(3): p. 283-298. 56. Hayati, I., A. Bailey, and T.F. Tadros, Investigations into the Mechanism of Electrohydrodynamic Spraying of Liquids .2. Mechanism of Stable Jet Formation and Electrical Forces Acting on a Liquid Cone. Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, 1987. 117(1): p. 222-230. 57. Glonti, G.A., On the Theory of the Stability of Liquid Jets in an Electric Field. Soviet Physics Jetp-Ussr, 1958. 7(5): p. 917-918. 58. Nayyar, N.K. and G.S. Murty, The Stability of a Dielectric Liquid Jet in the Presence of a Longitudinal Electric Field. Proceedings of the Physical Society of London, 1960. 75(483): p. 369-373. 59. Allan, R.S. and S.G. Mason, Particle Behaviour in Shear and Electric Fields .1. Deformation and Burst of Fluid Drops. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Series a-Mathematical and Physical Sciences, 1962. 267(1328): p. 45-&. 60. Melcher, J.R. and G.I. Taylor, Electrohydrodynamics – a Review of Role of Interfacial Shear Stresses. Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics, 1969. 1: p. 111-&. 61. Saville, D.A., Electrohydrodynamics: The Taylor-Melcher leaky dielectric model. Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics, 1997. 29: p. 27-64. 62. Carretero Benignos, J.A. and Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Mechanical Engineering., Numerical simulation of a single emitter colloid thruster in pure droplet cone-jet mode. 2005. p. 117 leaves. 63. Hartman, R.P.A., et al., The evolution of electrohydrodynamic sprays produced in the cone-jet mode, a physical model. Journal of Electrostatics, 1999. 47(3): p. 143-170. 64. Hartman, R.P.A., et al., Electrohydrodynamic atomization in the cone-jet mode physical modeling of the liquid cone and jet. Journal of Aerosol Science, 1999. 30(7): p. 823-849.

65. Yoon, S.S., et al., Modeling multi-jet mode electrostatic atomization using boundary element methods. Journal of Electrostatics, 2001. 50(2): p. 91-108. 66. Zeng, J., D. Sobek, and T. Korsmeyer, Electro-hydrodynamic modeling of electrospray ionization: Cad for a mu fluidic device – Mass spectrometer interface. Boston Transducers’03: Digest of Technical Papers, Vols 1 and 2, 2003: p. 1275-1278, 1938. 67. Lastow, O. and W. Balachandran, Numerical simulation of electrohydrodynamic (EHD) atomization. Journal of Electrostatics, 2006. 64(12): p. 850-859. 68. http://www.flow3d.com. 69. Valaskovic, G.A., et al., Attomole-Sensitivity Electrospray Source for Large-Molecule Mass-Spectrometry. Analytical Chemistry, 1995. 67(20): p. 3802-3805. 70. Kriger, M.S., K.D. Cook, and R.S. Ramsey, Durable Gold-Coated Fused-Silica Capillaries for Use in Electrospray Mass-Spectrometry. Analytical Chemistry, 1995. 67(2): p. 385-389. 71. Fang, L.L., et al., Online Time-of-Flight Mass-Spectrometric Analysis of Peptides Separated by Capillary Electrophoresis. Analytical Chemistry, 1994. 66(21): p. 3696-3701. 72. Cao, P. and M. Moini, A novel sheathless interface for capillary electrophoresis/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry using an in-capillary electrode. Journal of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry, 1997. 8(5): p. 561-564. 73. Fong, K.W.Y. and T.W.D. Chan, A novel nonmetallized tip for electrospray mass spectrometry at nanoliter flow rate. Journal of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry, 1999. 10(1): p. 72-75. 74. Emmett, M.R. and R.M. Caprioli, Micro-Electrospray Mass-Spectrometry – Ultra-High-Sensitivity Analysis of Peptides and Proteins. Journal of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry, 1994. 5(7): p. 605-613. 75. Gatlin, C.L., et al., Protein identification at the low femtomole level from silver-stained gels using a new fritless electrospray interface for liquid chromatography microspray and nanospray mass spectrometry. Analytical Biochemistry, 1998. 263(1): p. 93-101. 76. Aturki, Z., et al., On-line CE-MS using pressurized liquid junction nanoflow electrospray interface and surface-coated capillaries. Electrophoresis, 2006. 27(23): p. 4666-4673. 77. Edwards, J.L., et al., Negative mode sheathless capillary electrophoresis electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry for metabolite analysis of prokaryotes. Journal of Chromatography A, 2006. 1106(1-2): p. 80-88. 78. http://www.kiriama.com/kiriama%20single-mode%20polymer%20fibers_009.htm. 79. Wilm, M.S. and M. Mann, Electrospray and Taylor-Cone Theory, Doles Beam of Macromolecules at Last. International Journal of Mass Spectrometry, 1994. 136(2-3): p. 167-180.

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Sturgeon Navigate Fish Ladder

Sturgeon Navigate Fish Ladder

 

This material was provided by Jean-François Mercier, ing., Manager, hydraulics and hydrology at AECOM Tecsult inc.

AECOM Tecsult inc.은 FLOW-3D를 이용하여 물리적 모델링을 사용하지 않고 철갑상어가 Fish ladder를 탐색할 수 있는 물고기 사다리 설계를 개선했습니다. 실험은 현장구현의 제한과 비용때문에 배제되었고 FLOW-3D의 수치 모델링 결과로 정확한 정보를 제공하는 것이 중요했습니다.

Fish ladder는 James Bay, Quebec, Canada의 이스트 메인 강에 2005~2006년사이에 지어졌습니다. 2006년과 2007년에 실시된 후속 연구는, 다른 종의 물고기들이 이 사다리를 오를 수 있었던 반면, 철갑상어는 실패한 경우를 보여주었습니다. 기존의 Fish ladder에서 두 가지의 문제가 발견되었습니다. AECOM Tecsult inc에서의 물고기의 낮은 어획과 물의 빠른 속도가 문제가 되었습니다. 엔지니어들은 이러한 문제에 대한 해결책을 찾기 위해 FLOW-3D로 수치 모델링 연구를 수행하기로 결정했습니다.

 

Redesigning the fish ladder                          

AECOMTecsultinc. 엔지니어들은 물고기 사다리에 대한 최적의 설계 변경을 결정하기 위해 세가지 모델을 실행했습니다.

  • 유인을 극대화할 수 있는 강과 물고기 통로 사이의 흐름 분포를 평가하는 지역모델. 산란기 동안의 정상적인 조건에서 물고기 통로는 22m3/s의 유량흐름이 나타난다.
  • 슬롯 및 디플렉터의 개조를 위한 로컬 모델
  • 전체 길이에 걸쳐 수위 균형 유지를 위한 통로모델

Fish ladder specifications (before renovation)

Flow in fish passage before design optimization work

  • Length = 150 m
  • 17 basins
  • Drop = 3 m
  • Peak velocities of 2.6 m/s

Figure 1 – 45% of flow in fish passage shows velocities that are too high for the sturgeon to navigate

Figure 2 – 10% of flow in fish passage shows below the 1.8 m/s criteria required for sturgeon to navigate

Figure 3 – Tests were made with different additions of blocks (pink) and deflector plates (black) to find an optimum configuration

 

Validation of the numeric model

CFD모델을 실행한 후 엔지니어는 실험 데이터에 대해 숫자 결과를 검증했습니다. Flow-3D결과는 표면 높이를 비교하는 수문 기록과 비교되었습니다. 124개 중 80%가 유속이 일치했습니다.  동일한 위치 점에서 일치하지 않는 곳은 난류 영역이었습니다.

Velocity comparisons of measured data and FLOW-3D at specific locations

 

Meeting the criteria — modifications to flow rates

엔지니어들은 물고기가 곧장 바다로 가지 않도록 흐름을 15~20%로 줄이기 위해 Fish ladder를 개조하기로 결정했습니다. 그림 2는 그림과 비교하여 물고기 통로의 10% 유량으로 현저한 속도 감소를 보여 줍니다. 물고기 통로에 흐름의 45%를 가진 1. 그림 3은 흐름 속도를 늦추기 위한 블록 및 디플렉터를 보여 줍니다. 설정된 기준의 최대 속도는 1.8m/s 였습니다. 전체 흐름 조건은 그림 1과 2에서와 같이 모델로 잘 표현됩니다.

 

Conclusion

AECOM Tecsult inc 엔지니어들은 그들의 숫자 모델의 정확성을 검증할 수 있었고 FLOW-3D로부터 얻은 정보를 사용하였고 물고기 통로를 재설계하여 테스트와 관련된 높은 비용을 피할 수 있었습니다. 2008년 여름에 있었던 후속 연구에 따르면 철갑 상어가 높은 유량에도 불구하고 성공적으로 물고기 통로를 통과하고 있다는 것을 보여 주었습니다.

 

 

Sturgeon Navigate Fish Ladder

Sturgeon Navigate Fish Ladder

 

This material was provided by Jean-François Mercier, ing., Manager, hydraulics and hydrology at AECOM Tecsult inc.

AECOM Tecsult inc.은 FLOW-3D를 이용하여 물리적 모델링을 사용하지 않고 철갑상어가 Fish ladder를 탐색할 수 있는 물고기 사다리 설계를 개선했습니다. 실험은 현장구현의 제한과 비용때문에 배제되었고 FLOW-3D의 수치 모델링 결과로 정확한 정보를 제공하는 것이 중요했습니다.

Fish ladder는 James Bay, Quebec, Canada의 이스트 메인 강에 2005~2006년사이에 지어졌습니다. 2006년과 2007년에 실시된 후속 연구는, 다른 종의 물고기들이 이 사다리를 오를 수 있었던 반면, 철갑상어는 실패한 경우를 보여주었습니다. 기존의 Fish ladder에서 두 가지의 문제가 발견되었습니다. AECOM Tecsult inc에서의 물고기의 낮은 어획과 물의 빠른 속도가 문제가 되었습니다. 엔지니어들은 이러한 문제에 대한 해결책을 찾기 위해 FLOW-3D로 수치 모델링 연구를 수행하기로 결정했습니다.

 

Redesigning the fish ladder                          

AECOMTecsultinc. 엔지니어들은 물고기 사다리에 대한 최적의 설계 변경을 결정하기 위해 세가지 모델을 실행했습니다.

  • 유인을 극대화할 수 있는 강과 물고기 통로 사이의 흐름 분포를 평가하는 지역모델. 산란기 동안의 정상적인 조건에서 물고기 통로는 22m3/s의 유량흐름이 나타난다.
  • 슬롯 및 디플렉터의 개조를 위한 로컬 모델
  • 전체 길이에 걸쳐 수위 균형 유지를 위한 통로모델

Fish ladder specifications (before renovation)

Flow in fish passage before design optimization work

  • Length = 150 m
  • 17 basins
  • Drop = 3 m
  • Peak velocities of 2.6 m/s

Figure 1 – 45% of flow in fish passage shows velocities that are too high for the sturgeon to navigate

Figure 2 – 10% of flow in fish passage shows below the 1.8 m/s criteria required for sturgeon to navigate

Figure 3 – Tests were made with different additions of blocks (pink) and deflector plates (black) to find an optimum configuration

 

Validation of the numeric model

CFD모델을 실행한 후 엔지니어는 실험 데이터에 대해 숫자 결과를 검증했습니다. Flow-3D결과는 표면 높이를 비교하는 수문 기록과 비교되었습니다. 124개 중 80%가 유속이 일치했습니다.  동일한 위치 점에서 일치하지 않는 곳은 난류 영역이었습니다.

Velocity comparisons of measured data and FLOW-3D at specific locations

 

Meeting the criteria — modifications to flow rates

엔지니어들은 물고기가 곧장 바다로 가지 않도록 흐름을 15~20%로 줄이기 위해 Fish ladder를 개조하기로 결정했습니다. 그림 2는 그림과 비교하여 물고기 통로의 10% 유량으로 현저한 속도 감소를 보여 줍니다. 물고기 통로에 흐름의 45%를 가진 1. 그림 3은 흐름 속도를 늦추기 위한 블록 및 디플렉터를 보여 줍니다. 설정된 기준의 최대 속도는 1.8m/s 였습니다. 전체 흐름 조건은 그림 1과 2에서와 같이 모델로 잘 표현됩니다.

 

Conclusion

AECOM Tecsult inc 엔지니어들은 그들의 숫자 모델의 정확성을 검증할 수 있었고 FLOW-3D로부터 얻은 정보를 사용하였고 물고기 통로를 재설계하여 테스트와 관련된 높은 비용을 피할 수 있었습니다. 2008년 여름에 있었던 후속 연구에 따르면 철갑 상어가 높은 유량에도 불구하고 성공적으로 물고기 통로를 통과하고 있다는 것을 보여 주었습니다.

 

 

FSR-05-14_moisture drying model [수분/습기 건조 모델]

Introduction
In the manufacture of paper it is necessary to remove all water from the paper before it is rolled up. The majority of water is typically removed by squeezing the paper between large rollers. The remaining moisture can be removed by forcing hot air through the paper to accelerate its evaporation.
Using heated air can be an expensive process so there is interest in investigating optimum arrangements for achieving the fastest and least expensive means of removing the residual water from paper. A prototype arrangement using heated air is shown in the following figure: (그림은 첨부파일 참조)

Both the paper and the fabric backing are porous materials. The support blocks may not be porous. It is expected that the permeability of the fabric and paper will be a function of their water content.
This report describes a software development that allows for a realistic treatment of the drying process in porous media such as that shown in Fig. 1. A description is given of the new model, which has been validated with available data. This data does not cover the entire range of moisture content or airflow rates that are typically encountered in practice. Consequently, it may be found necessary to make some small model adjustments. It is hoped that the formulation of the model, which is based on simple physical principles, will be easy to adjust to fit a larger range of observations.
Before describing the new model, a better perspective of its capabilities can be appreciated by noting some of the ways that it differs from previous work on paper drying. Most importantly, the new model considers the paper as having finite thickness and properties such as moisture content, temperature and vapor concentration that vary through the thickness. Thus, the paper may have dried on the upstream side, but still be completely wet on the opposite side. Another difference is that air and water vapor constitute a two-component gas that is compressible. Compressibility means, for
example, that the gas velocity in the paper must increase in the direction of flow because of the decrease in pressure through the paper (i.e., density and/or temperature must decrease by expansion to give a pressure decrease). Since flow velocity has an important effect on drying rate, compressibility can influence local drying conditions in the paper.

Finally, by computing transient conditions throughout the paper, this model could be used to investigate arbitrary non-uniform initial conditions or paper with a non-uniform thickness and/or porosity distribution.

 

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FSR-05-14_moisture drying model

Water Rivers Bridge Piers

Bridge Piers

FLOW-3DSediment Scour Model 은 강이나 하천에서 수리학적으로 복잡한 교각과 지형에 따라 여러가지 퇴적물들의 높이 변화를 해석할 수 있습니다. 세굴 모델은 FLOW-3D 난류 모델들로 적분하여 3차원 분석이 가능합니다. FLOW-3D의 Shallow Water Model로 더 넓은 범위의 세굴 분석이 가능합니다.

Bridge piers scour simulation using FLOW-3D

교각 주위의 세굴 해석

세굴 모델은 deposition, packing, entrainment and drift-flux 메커니즘으로 되어있습니다. FLOW-3D v11 에서는 퇴적층의 형상을 FAVOR 하여 좀 더 정확하게 bed net 높이 변화를 시각화 할 수 있습니다. 시공간적으로 침전물의 변화뿐 아니라 유체의 부유물들, 바닥/유체 계면에서의 전단응력들을 분석할 수 있습니다.

Modeling Hydraulic Control Structures

In addition to the flow rates and detail of hydraulic behaviors associated with the control gate structures and powerhouse operation, FLOW-3D‘s sediment and scour model allows users to identify regions of high scour both near the control structure and further downstream in the vicinity of the bridge piers.

Bridge Pier Simulations

The first video shows a FLOW-3D simulation of the erosion that occurs around a group of three 2.4 m diameter piers as river water flows past at 1.5 m/s. The river depth is 15.8 m and the mean sediment size was presumed to be 0.35 mm.