Fig. 1. A typical Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) and selected segment of study for simulation

Understanding dry-out mechanism in rod bundles of boiling water reactor

끓는 물 원자로 봉 다발의 건조 메커니즘 이해

Liril D.SilviaDinesh K.ChandrakercSumanaGhoshaArup KDasb
aDepartment of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee, India
bDepartment of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee, India
cReactor Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India

Abstract

Present work reports numerical understanding of interfacial dynamics during co-flow of vapor and liquid phases of water inside a typical Boiling Water Reactor (BWR), consisting of a nuclear fuel rod bundle assembly of 7 pins in a circular array. Two representative spacings between rods in a circular array are used to carry out the simulation. In literature, flow boiling in a nuclear reactor is dealt with mechanistic models or averaged equations. Hence, in the present study using the Volume of Fluid (VOF) based multiphase model, a detailed numerical understanding of breaking and making in interfaces during flow boiling in BWR is targeted. Our work will portray near realistic vapor bubble and liquid flow dynamics in rod bundle scenario. Constant wall heat flux for fuel rod and uniform velocity of the liquid at the inlet patch is applied as a boundary condition. The saturation properties of water are taken at 30 bar pressure. Flow boiling stages involving bubble nucleation, growth, merging, local dry-out, rewetting with liquid patches, and complete dry-out are illustrated. The dry-out phenomenon with no liquid presence is numerically observed with phase fraction contours at various axial cut-sections. The quantification of the liquid phase fraction at different axial planes is plotted over time, emphasizing the progressive dry-out mechanism. A comparison of liquid-vapor distribution for inner and outer rods reveals that the inner rod’s dry-out occurs sooner than that of the outer rod. The heat transfer coefficient to identify the heat dissipation capacity of each case is also reported.

현재 작업은 원형 배열에 있는 7개의 핀으로 구성된 핵연료봉 다발 어셈블리로 구성된 일반적인 끓는 물 원자로(BWR) 내부의 물의 증기 및 액체상의 동시 흐름 동안 계면 역학에 대한 수치적 이해를 보고합니다.

원형 배열의 막대 사이에 두 개의 대표적인 간격이 시뮬레이션을 수행하는 데 사용됩니다. 문헌에서 원자로의 유동 비등은 기계론적 모델 또는 평균 방정식으로 처리됩니다.

따라서 VOF(Volume of Fluid) 기반 다상 모델을 사용하는 본 연구에서는 BWR에서 유동 비등 동안 계면의 파괴 및 생성에 대한 자세한 수치적 이해를 목표로 합니다.

우리의 작업은 막대 번들 시나리오에서 거의 사실적인 증기 기포 및 액체 흐름 역학을 묘사합니다. 연료봉에 대한 일정한 벽 열유속과 입구 패치에서 액체의 균일한 속도가 경계 조건으로 적용됩니다. 물의 포화 특성은 30bar 압력에서 취합니다.

기포 핵 생성, 성장, 병합, 국소 건조, 액체 패치로 재습윤 및 완전한 건조를 포함하는 유동 비등 단계가 설명됩니다. 액체가 존재하지 않는 건조 현상은 다양한 축 단면에서 위상 분율 윤곽으로 수치적으로 관찰됩니다.

다른 축 평면에서 액상 분율의 정량화는 점진적인 건조 메커니즘을 강조하면서 시간이 지남에 따라 표시됩니다. 내부 막대와 외부 막대의 액-증기 분포를 비교하면 내부 막대의 건조가 외부 막대보다 더 빨리 발생함을 알 수 있습니다. 각 경우의 방열 용량을 식별하기 위한 열 전달 계수도 보고됩니다.

Fig. 1. A typical Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) and selected segment of study for simulation
Fig. 1. A typical Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) and selected segment of study for simulation
Fig. 2. (a-c) dimensions and mesh configuration for G = 6 mm; (d-f) dimensions and mesh configuration for G = 0.6 mm
Fig. 2. (a-c) dimensions and mesh configuration for G = 6 mm; (d-f) dimensions and mesh configuration for G = 0.6 mm
Fig. 3. Simulating the effect of spacer (a) Spacer configuration around rod bundle (b) Mesh structure in spacer zone (c) Distribution of vapor bubbles in a rod bundle with spacer (d) Liquid phase fraction comparison for geometry with and without spacer (e,f,g) Wall temperature comparison for geometry with and without spacer; WS: With Spacer, WOS: Without Spacer; Temperature in the y-axis is in (f) and (g) is same as (e).
Fig. 3. Simulating the effect of spacer (a) Spacer configuration around rod bundle (b) Mesh structure in spacer zone (c) Distribution of vapor bubbles in a rod bundle with spacer (d) Liquid phase fraction comparison for geometry with and without spacer (e,f,g) Wall temperature comparison for geometry with and without spacer; WS: With Spacer, WOS: Without Spacer; Temperature in the y-axis is in (f) and (g) is same as (e).
Fig. 4. Validation of the present numerical model with crossflow boiling over a heated cylindrical rod [40]
Fig. 4. Validation of the present numerical model with crossflow boiling over a heated cylindrical rod [40]
Fig. 5. Grid-Independent study in terms of vapor volume in 1/4th of computational domain
Fig. 5. Grid-Independent study in terms of vapor volume in 1/4th of computational domain
Fig. 6. Interface contour for G = 6 mm; ul = 1.2 m/s; q˙ w = 396 kW/m2; they are showing nucleation, growth, merging, and pseudo-steady-state condition.
Fig. 6. Interface contour for G = 6 mm; ul = 1.2 m/s; q˙ w = 396 kW/m2; they are showing nucleation, growth, merging, and pseudo-steady-state condition.
Fig. 7. Interface contours for G = 0.6 mm; ul = 1.2 m/s; q˙ w = 396 kW/m2; It shows dry-out at pseudo-steady-state near the exit
Fig. 7. Interface contours for G = 0.6 mm; ul = 1.2 m/s; q˙ w = 396 kW/m2; It shows dry-out at pseudo-steady-state near the exit
Fig. 8. Vapor-liquid distribution across various distant cross-sections (Black color indicates liquid; Gray color indicates vapor); Magnification factor: 1 × (for a and b), 1.5 × (for c and d)
Fig. 8. Vapor-liquid distribution across various distant cross-sections (Black color indicates liquid; Gray color indicates vapor); Magnification factor: 1 × (for a and b), 1.5 × (for c and d)
Fig. 21. Two-phase flow mixture velocity (u¯z); for G = 6 mm, r = 5 means location at inner heated wall and r = 25 means location at outer adiabatic wall; for G = 0.66 mm, r = 5 means location at inner heated wall and r = 16.6 mm means location at outer adiabatic wall.
Fig. 21. Two-phase flow mixture velocity (u¯z); for G = 6 mm, r = 5 means location at inner heated wall and r = 25 means location at outer adiabatic wall; for G = 0.66 mm, r = 5 means location at inner heated wall and r = 16.6 mm means location at outer adiabatic wall.

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Figure 3 Simulation PTC pipes enhanced with copper foam and nanoparticles in FLOW-3D software.

다공성 미디어 및 나노유체에 의해 강화된 수집기로 태양광 CCHP 시스템의 최적화

Optimization of Solar CCHP Systems with Collector Enhanced by Porous Media and Nanofluid


Navid Tonekaboni,1Mahdi Feizbahr,2 Nima Tonekaboni,1Guang-Jun Jiang,3,4 and Hong-Xia Chen3,4

Abstract

태양열 집열기의 낮은 효율은 CCHP(Solar Combined Cooling, Heating, and Power) 사이클의 문제점 중 하나로 언급될 수 있습니다. 태양계를 개선하기 위해 나노유체와 다공성 매체가 태양열 집열기에 사용됩니다.

다공성 매질과 나노입자를 사용하는 장점 중 하나는 동일한 조건에서 더 많은 에너지를 흡수할 수 있다는 것입니다. 이 연구에서는 평균 일사량이 1b인 따뜻하고 건조한 지역의 600 m2 건물의 전기, 냉방 및 난방을 생성하기 위해 다공성 매질과 나노유체를 사용하여 태양열 냉난방 복합 발전(SCCHP) 시스템을 최적화했습니다.

본 논문에서는 침전물이 형성되지 않는 lb = 820 w/m2(이란) 정도까지 다공성 물질에서 나노유체의 최적량을 계산하였다. 이 연구에서 태양열 집열기는 구리 다공성 매체(95% 다공성)와 CuO 및 Al2O3 나노 유체로 향상되었습니다.

나노유체의 0.1%-0.6%가 작동 유체로 물에 추가되었습니다. 나노유체의 0.5%가 태양열 집열기 및 SCCHP 시스템에서 가장 높은 에너지 및 엑서지 효율 향상으로 이어지는 것으로 밝혀졌습니다.

본 연구에서 포물선형 집열기(PTC)의 최대 에너지 및 엑서지 효율은 각각 74.19% 및 32.6%입니다. 그림 1은 태양 CCHP의 주기를 정확하게 설명하기 위한 그래픽 초록으로 언급될 수 있습니다.

The low efficiency of solar collectors can be mentioned as one of the problems in solar combined cooling, heating, and power (CCHP) cycles. For improving solar systems, nanofluid and porous media are used in solar collectors. One of the advantages of using porous media and nanoparticles is to absorb more energy under the same conditions. In this research, a solar combined cooling, heating, and power (SCCHP) system has been optimized by porous media and nanofluid for generating electricity, cooling, and heating of a 600 m2 building in a warm and dry region with average solar radiation of Ib = 820 w/m2 in Iran. In this paper, the optimal amount of nanofluid in porous materials has been calculated to the extent that no sediment is formed. In this study, solar collectors were enhanced with copper porous media (95% porosity) and CuO and Al2O3 nanofluids. 0.1%–0.6% of the nanofluids were added to water as working fluids; it is found that 0.5% of the nanofluids lead to the highest energy and exergy efficiency enhancement in solar collectors and SCCHP systems. Maximum energy and exergy efficiency of parabolic thermal collector (PTC) riches in this study are 74.19% and 32.6%, respectively. Figure 1 can be mentioned as a graphical abstract for accurately describing the cycle of solar CCHP.

1. Introduction

Due to the increase in energy consumption, the use of clean energy is one of the important goals of human societies. In the last four decades, the use of cogeneration cycles has increased significantly due to high efficiency. Among clean energy, the use of solar energy has become more popular due to its greater availability [1]. Low efficiency of energy production, transmission, and distribution system makes a new system to generate simultaneously electricity, heating, and cooling as an essential solution to be widely used. The low efficiency of the electricity generation, transmission, and distribution system makes the CCHP system a basic solution to eliminate waste of energy. CCHP system consists of a prime mover (PM), a power generator, a heat recovery system (produce extra heating/cooling/power), and thermal energy storage (TES) [2]. Solar combined cooling, heating, and power (SCCHP) has been started three decades ago. SCCHP is a system that receives its propulsive force from solar energy; in this cycle, solar collectors play the role of propulsive for generating power in this system [3].

Increasing the rate of energy consumption in the whole world because of the low efficiency of energy production, transmission, and distribution system causes a new cogeneration system to generate electricity, heating, and cooling energy as an essential solution to be widely used. Building energy utilization fundamentally includes power required for lighting, home electrical appliances, warming and cooling of building inside, and boiling water. Domestic usage contributes to an average of 35% of the world’s total energy consumption [4].

Due to the availability of solar energy in all areas, solar collectors can be used to obtain the propulsive power required for the CCHP cycle. Solar energy is the main source of energy in renewable applications. For selecting a suitable area to use solar collectors, annual sunshine hours, the number of sunny days, minus temperature and frosty days, and the windy status of the region are essentially considered [5]. Iran, with an average of more than 300 sunny days, is one of the suitable countries to use solar energy. Due to the fact that most of the solar radiation is in the southern regions of Iran, also the concentration of cities is low in these areas, and transmission lines are far apart, one of the best options is to use CCHP cycles based on solar collectors [6]. One of the major problems of solar collectors is their low efficiency [7]. Low efficiency increases the area of collectors, which increases the initial cost of solar systems and of course increases the initial payback period. To increase the efficiency of solar collectors and improve their performance, porous materials and nanofluids are used to increase their workability.

There are two ways to increase the efficiency of solar collectors and mechanical and fluid improvement. In the first method, using porous materials or helical filaments inside the collector pipes causes turbulence of the flow and increases heat transfer. In the second method, using nanofluids or salt and other materials increases the heat transfer of water. The use of porous materials has grown up immensely over the past twenty years. Porous materials, especially copper porous foam, are widely used in solar collectors. Due to the high contact surface area, porous media are appropriate candidates for solar collectors [8]. A number of researchers investigated Solar System performance in accordance with energy and exergy analyses. Zhai et al. [9] reviewed the performance of a small solar-powered system in which the energy efficiency was 44.7% and the electrical efficiency was 16.9%.

Abbasi et al. [10] proposed an innovative multiobjective optimization to optimize the design of a cogeneration system. Results showed the CCHP system based on an internal diesel combustion engine was the applicable alternative at all regions with different climates. The diesel engine can supply the electrical requirement of 31.0% and heating demand of 3.8% for building.

Jiang et al. [11] combined the experiment and simulation together to analyze the performance of a cogeneration system. Moreover, some research focused on CCHP systems using solar energy. It integrated sustainable and renewable technologies in the CCHP, like PV, Stirling engine, and parabolic trough collector (PTC) [21215].

Wang et al. [16] optimized a cogeneration solar cooling system with a Rankine cycle and ejector to reach the maximum total system efficiency of 55.9%. Jing et al. analyzed a big-scale building with the SCCHP system and auxiliary heaters to produced electrical, cooling, and heating power. The maximum energy efficiency reported in their work is 46.6% [17]. Various optimization methods have been used to improve the cogeneration system, minimum system size, and performance, such as genetic algorithm [1819].

Hirasawa et al. [20] investigated the effect of using porous media to reduce thermal waste in solar systems. They used the high-porosity metal foam on top of the flat plate solar collector and observed that thermal waste decreased by 7% due to natural heat transfer. Many researchers study the efficiency improvement of the solar collector by changing the collector’s shapes or working fluids. However, the most effective method is the use of nanofluids in the solar collector as working fluid [21]. In the experimental study done by Jouybari et al. [22], the efficiency enhancement up to 8.1% was achieved by adding nanofluid in a flat plate collector. In this research, by adding porous materials to the solar collector, collector efficiency increased up to 92% in a low flow regime. Subramani et al. [23] analyzed the thermal performance of the parabolic solar collector with Al2O3 nanofluid. They conducted their experiments with Reynolds number range 2401 to 7202 and mass flow rate 0.0083 to 0.05 kg/s. The maximum efficiency improvement in this experiment was 56% at 0.05 kg/s mass flow rate.

Shojaeizadeh et al. [24] investigated the analysis of the second law of thermodynamic on the flat plate solar collector using Al2O3/water nanofluid. Their research showed that energy efficiency rose up to 1.9% and the exergy efficiency increased by a maximum of 0.72% compared to pure water. Tiwari et al. [25] researched on the thermal performance of solar flat plate collectors for working fluid water with different nanofluids. The result showed that using 1.5% (optimum) particle volume fraction of Al2O3 nanofluid as an absorbing medium causes the thermal efficiency to enhance up to 31.64%.

The effect of porous media and nanofluids on solar collectors has already been investigated in the literature but the SCCHP system with a collector embedded by both porous media and nanofluid for enhancing the ratio of nanoparticle in nanofluid for preventing sedimentation was not discussed. In this research, the amount of energy and exergy of the solar CCHP cycles with parabolic solar collectors in both base and improved modes with a porous material (copper foam with 95% porosity) and nanofluid with different ratios of nanoparticles was calculated. In the first step, it is planned to design a CCHP system based on the required load, and, in the next step, it will analyze the energy and exergy of the system in a basic and optimize mode. In the optimize mode, enhanced solar collectors with porous material and nanofluid in different ratios (0.1%–0.7%) were used to optimize the ratio of nanofluids to prevent sedimentation.

2. Cycle Description

CCHP is one of the methods to enhance energy efficiency and reduce energy loss and costs. The SCCHP system used a solar collector as a prime mover of the cogeneration system and assisted the boiler to generate vapor for the turbine. Hot water flows from the expander to the absorption chiller in summer or to the radiator or fan coil in winter. Finally, before the hot water wants to flow back to the storage tank, it flows inside a heat exchanger for generating domestic hot water [26].

For designing of solar cogeneration system and its analysis, it is necessary to calculate the electrical, heating (heating load is the load required for the production of warm water and space heating), and cooling load required for the case study considered in a residential building with an area of 600 m2 in the warm region of Iran (Zahedan). In Table 1, the average of the required loads is shown for the different months of a year (average of electrical, heating, and cooling load calculated with CARRIER software).Table 1 The average amount of electric charges, heating load, and cooling load used in the different months of the year in the city of Zahedan for a residential building with 600 m2.

According to Table 1, the maximum magnitude of heating, cooling, and electrical loads is used to calculate the cogeneration system. The maximum electric load is 96 kW, the maximum amount of heating load is 62 kW, and the maximum cooling load is 118 kW. Since the calculated loads are average, all loads increased up to 10% for the confidence coefficient. With the obtained values, the solar collector area and other cogeneration system components are calculated. The cogeneration cycle is capable of producing 105 kW electric power, 140 kW cooling capacity, and 100 kW heating power.

2.1. System Analysis Equations

An analysis is done by considering the following assumptions:(1)The system operates under steady-state conditions(2)The system is designed for the warm region of Iran (Zahedan) with average solar radiation Ib = 820 w/m2(3)The pressure drops in heat exchangers, separators, storage tanks, and pipes are ignored(4)The pressure drop is negligible in all processes and no expectable chemical reactions occurred in the processes(5)Potential, kinetic, and chemical exergy are not considered due to their insignificance(6)Pumps have been discontinued due to insignificance throughout the process(7)All components are assumed adiabatic

Schematic shape of the cogeneration cycle is shown in Figure 1 and all data are given in Table 2.

Figure 1 Schematic shape of the cogeneration cycle.Table 2 Temperature and humidity of different points of system.

Based on the first law of thermodynamic, energy analysis is based on the following steps.

First of all, the estimated solar radiation energy on collector has been calculated:where α is the heat transfer enhancement coefficient based on porous materials added to the collector’s pipes. The coefficient α is increased by the porosity percentage, the type of porous material (in this case, copper with a porosity percentage of 95), and the flow of fluid to the collector equation.

Collector efficiency is going to be calculated by the following equation [9]:

Total energy received by the collector is given by [9]

Also, the auxiliary boiler heat load is [2]

Energy consumed from vapor to expander is calculated by [2]

The power output form by the screw expander [9]:

The efficiency of the expander is 80% in this case [11].

In this step, cooling and heating loads were calculated and then, the required heating load to reach sanitary hot water will be calculated as follows:

First step: calculating the cooling load with the following equation [9]:

Second step: calculating heating loads [9]:

Then, calculating the required loud for sanitary hot water will be [9]

According to the above-mentioned equations, efficiency is [9]

In the third step, calculated exergy analysis as follows.

First, the received exergy collector from the sun is calculated [9]:

In the previous equation, f is the constant of air dilution.

The received exergy from the collector is [9]

In the case of using natural gas in an auxiliary heater, the gas exergy is calculated from the following equation [12]:

Delivering exergy from vapor to expander is calculated with the following equation [9]:

In the fourth step, the exergy in cooling and heating is calculated by the following equation:

Cooling exergy in summer is calculated [9]:

Heating exergy in winter is calculated [9]:

In the last step based on thermodynamic second law, exergy efficiency has been calculated from the following equation and the above-mentioned calculated loads [9]:

3. Porous Media

The porous medium that filled the test section is copper foam with a porosity of 95%. The foams are determined in Figure 2 and also detailed thermophysical parameters and dimensions are shown in Table 3.

Figure 2 Copper foam with a porosity of 95%.Table 3 Thermophysical parameters and dimensions of copper foam.

In solar collectors, copper porous materials are suitable for use at low temperatures and have an easier and faster manufacturing process than ceramic porous materials. Due to the high coefficient conductivity of copper, the use of copper metallic foam to increase heat transfer is certainly more efficient in solar collectors.

Porous media and nanofluid in solar collector’s pipes were simulated in FLOW-3D software using the finite-difference method [27]. Nanoparticles Al2O3 and CUO are mostly used in solar collector enhancement. In this research, different concentrations of nanofluid are added to the parabolic solar collectors with porous materials (copper foam with porosity of 95%) to achieve maximum heat transfer in the porous materials before sedimentation. After analyzing PTC pipes with the nanofluid flow in FLOW-3D software, for energy and exergy efficiency analysis, Carrier software results were used as EES software input. Simulation PTC with porous media inside collector pipe and nanofluids sedimentation is shown in Figure 3.

Figure 3 Simulation PTC pipes enhanced with copper foam and nanoparticles in FLOW-3D software.

3.1. Nano Fluid

In this research, copper and silver nanofluids (Al2O3, CuO) have been added with percentages of 0.1%–0.7% as the working fluids. The nanoparticle properties are given in Table 4. Also, system constant parameters are presented in Table 4, which are available as default input in the EES software.Table 4 Properties of the nanoparticles [9].

System constant parameters for input in the software are shown in Table 5.Table 5 System constant parameters.

The thermal properties of the nanofluid can be obtained from equations (18)–(21). The basic fluid properties are indicated by the index (bf) and the properties of the nanoparticle silver with the index (np).

The density of the mixture is shown in the following equation [28]:where ρ is density and ϕ is the nanoparticles volume fraction.

The specific heat capacity is calculated from the following equation [29]:

The thermal conductivity of the nanofluid is calculated from the following equation [29]:

The parameter β is the ratio of the nanolayer thickness to the original particle radius and, usually, this parameter is taken equal to 0.1 for the calculated thermal conductivity of the nanofluids.

The mixture viscosity is calculated as follows [30]:

In all equations, instead of water properties, working fluids with nanofluid are used. All of the above equations and parameters are entered in the EES software for calculating the energy and exergy of solar collectors and the SCCHP cycle. All calculation repeats for both nanofluids with different concentrations of nanofluid in the solar collector’s pipe.

4. Results and Discussion

In the present study, relations were written according to Wang et al. [16] and the system analysis was performed to ensure the correctness of the code. The energy and exergy charts are plotted based on the main values of the paper and are shown in Figures 4 and 5. The error rate in this simulation is 1.07%.

Figure 4 Verification charts of energy analysis results.

Figure 5 Verification charts of exergy analysis results.

We may also investigate the application of machine learning paradigms [3141] and various hybrid, advanced optimization approaches that are enhanced in terms of exploration and intensification [4255], and intelligent model studies [5661] as well, for example, methods such as particle swarm optimizer (PSO) [6062], differential search (DS) [63], ant colony optimizer (ACO) [616465], Harris hawks optimizer (HHO) [66], grey wolf optimizer (GWO) [5367], differential evolution (DE) [6869], and other fusion and boosted systems [4146485054557071].

At the first step, the collector is modified with porous copper foam material. 14 cases have been considered for the analysis of the SCCHP system (Table 6). It should be noted that the adding of porous media causes an additional pressure drop inside the collector [922263072]. All fourteen cases use copper foam with a porosity of 95 percent. To simulate the effect of porous materials and nanofluids, the first solar PTC pipes have been simulated in the FLOW-3D software and then porous media (copper foam with porosity of 95%) and fluid flow with nanoparticles (AL2O3 and CUO) are generated in the software. After analyzing PTC pipes in FLOW-3D software, for analyzing energy and exergy efficiency, software outputs were used as EES software input for optimization ratio of sedimentation and calculating energy and exergy analyses.Table 6 Collectors with different percentages of nanofluids and porous media.

In this research, an enhanced solar collector with both porous media and Nanofluid is investigated. In the present study, 0.1–0.5% CuO and Al2O3 concentration were added to the collector fully filled by porous media to achieve maximum energy and exergy efficiencies of solar CCHP systems. All steps of the investigation are shown in Table 6.

Energy and exergy analyses of parabolic solar collectors and SCCHP systems are shown in Figures 6 and 7.

Figure 6 Energy and exergy efficiencies of the PTC with porous media and nanofluid.

Figure 7 Energy and exergy efficiency of the SCCHP.

Results show that the highest energy and exergy efficiencies are 74.19% and 32.6%, respectively, that is achieved in Step 12 (parabolic collectors with filled porous media and 0.5% Al2O3). In the second step, the maximum energy efficiency of SCCHP systems with fourteen steps of simulation are shown in Figure 7.

In the second step, where 0.1, −0.6% of the nanofluids were added, it is found that 0.5% leads to the highest energy and exergy efficiency enhancement in solar collectors and SCCHP systems. Using concentrations more than 0.5% leads to sediment in the solar collector’s pipe and a decrease of porosity in the pipe [73]. According to Figure 7, maximum energy and exergy efficiencies of SCCHP are achieved in Step 12. In this step energy efficiency is 54.49% and exergy efficiency is 18.29%. In steps 13 and 14, with increasing concentration of CUO and Al2O3 nanofluid solution in porous materials, decreasing of energy and exergy efficiency of PTC and SCCHP system at the same time happened. This decrease in efficiency is due to the formation of sediment in the porous material. Calculations and simulations have shown that porous materials more than 0.5% nanofluids inside the collector pipe cause sediment and disturb the porosity of porous materials and pressure drop and reduce the coefficient of performance of the cogeneration system. Most experience showed that CUO and AL2O3 nanofluids with less than 0.6% percent solution are used in the investigation on the solar collectors at low temperatures and discharges [74]. One of the important points of this research is that the best ratio of nanofluids in the solar collector with a low temperature is 0.5% (AL2O3 and CUO); with this replacement, the cost of solar collectors and SCCHP cycle is reduced.

5. Conclusion and Future Directions

In the present study, ways for increasing the efficiency of solar collectors in order to enhance the efficiency of the SCCHP cycle are examined. The research is aimed at adding both porous materials and nanofluids for estimating the best ratio of nanofluid for enhanced solar collector and protecting sedimentation in porous media. By adding porous materials (copper foam with porosity of 95%) and 0.5% nanofluids together, high efficiency in solar parabolic collectors can be achieved. The novelty in this research is the addition of both nanofluids and porous materials and calculating the best ratio for preventing sedimentation and pressure drop in solar collector’s pipe. In this study, it was observed that, by adding 0.5% of AL2O3 nanofluid in working fluids, the energy efficiency of PTC rises to 74.19% and exergy efficiency is grown up to 32.6%. In SCCHP cycle, energy efficiency is 54.49% and exergy efficiency is 18.29%.

In this research, parabolic solar collectors fully filled by porous media (copper foam with a porosity of 95) are investigated. In the next step, parabolic solar collectors in the SCCHP cycle were simultaneously filled by porous media and different percentages of Al2O3 and CuO nanofluid. At this step, values of 0.1% to 0.6% of each nanofluid were added to the working fluid, and the efficiency of the energy and exergy of the collectors and the SCCHP cycle were determined. In this case, nanofluid and the porous media were used together in the solar collector and maximum efficiency achieved. 0.5% of both nanofluids were used to achieve the biggest efficiency enhancement.

In the present study, as expected, the highest efficiency is for the parabolic solar collector fully filled by porous material (copper foam with a porosity of 95%) and 0.5% Al2O3. Results of the present study are as follows:(1)The average enhancement of collectors’ efficiency using porous media and nanofluids is 28%.(2)Solutions with 0.1 to 0.5% of nanofluids (CuO and Al2O3) are used to prevent collectors from sediment occurrence in porous media.(3)Collector of solar cogeneration cycles that is enhanced by both porous media and nanofluid has higher efficiency, and the stability of output temperature is more as well.(4)By using 0.6% of the nanofluids in the enhanced parabolic solar collectors with copper porous materials, sedimentation occurs and makes a high-pressure drop in the solar collector’s pipe which causes decrease in energy efficiency.(5)Average enhancement of SCCHP cycle efficiency is enhanced by both porous media and nanofluid 13%.

Nomenclature

:Solar radiation
a:Heat transfer augmentation coefficient
A:Solar collector area
Bf:Basic fluid
:Specific heat capacity of the nanofluid
F:Constant of air dilution
:Thermal conductivity of the nanofluid
:Thermal conductivity of the basic fluid
:Viscosity of the nanofluid
:Viscosity of the basic fluid
:Collector efficiency
:Collector energy receives
:Auxiliary boiler heat
:Expander energy
:Gas energy
:Screw expander work
:Cooling load, in kilowatts
:Heating load, in kilowatts
:Solar radiation energy on collector, in Joule
:Sanitary hot water load
Np:Nanoparticle
:Energy efficiency
:Heat exchanger efficiency
:Sun exergy
:Collector exergy
:Natural gas exergy
:Expander exergy
:Cooling exergy
:Heating exergy
:Exergy efficiency
:Steam mass flow rate
:Hot water mass flow rate
:Specific heat capacity of water
:Power output form by the screw expander
Tam:Average ambient temperature
:Density of the mixture.

Greek symbols

ρ:Density
ϕ:Nanoparticles volume fraction
β:Ratio of the nanolayer thickness.

Abbreviations

CCHP:Combined cooling, heating, and power
EES:Engineering equation solver.

Data Availability

For this study, data were generated by CARRIER software for the average electrical, heating, and cooling load of a residential building with 600 m2 in the city of Zahedan, Iran.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest.

Acknowledgments

This work was partially supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Contract no. 71761030 and Natural Science Foundation of Inner Mongolia under Contract no. 2019LH07003.

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Energy and exergy analysis of an enhanced solar CCHP system with a collector embedded by porous media and nano fluid

Energy and exergy analysis of an enhanced solar CCHP system with a collector embedded by porous media and nano fluid

Year 2021, Volume 7, Issue 6, 1489 – 1505, 02.09.2021

N. TONEKABONI  H. SALARIAN  M. Eshagh NIMVARI  J. KHALEGHINIA https://doi.org/10.18186/thermal.990897

Abstract

The low efficiency of Collectors that absorb energy can be mentioned as one of the drawbacks in solar cogeneration cycles. In the present study, solar systems have been improved by adding porous media and Nanofluid to collectors. One advantage of using porous media and nanomaterials is to absorb more energy while the surface area is reduced. In this study, first, solar collectors are enhanced using 90% porosity copper in solar combined cooling, heating and power systems (SCCHP). Second, different percentages of CuO and Al2O3 nano-fluids are added to a flat plate and parabolic collectors to enhance thermal properties. Simulations are performed in different modes (simple parabolic collectors, simple flat plate collectors, improved flat plate collectors, parabolic collectors with porous media, and flat plate and parabolic collectors with different density of CuO and Al2O3 nanofluids). A case study is investigated for warm and dry regions with mean solar radiation Ib = 820 w / m2 in Iran. The maximum energy and exergy efficiencies are 60.12% and 18.84%, respectively, that is related to enhanced parabolic solar collectors with porous media and nanofluids. Adding porous media and nano-fluids increases an average 14.4% collector energy efficiency and 8.08% collector exergy efficiency.

Keywords

Exergy analysisSolar cogeneration systemPorous mediaNanofluid

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Details

Primary LanguageEnglish
SubjectsEngineering
Journal SectionArticles
AuthorsN. TONEKABONI  This is me
Islamic Azad University Nour Branch
0000-0002-1563-4407
IranH. SALARIAN  This is me (Primary Author)
Islamic Azad University Nour Branch
0000-0002-2161-0276
IranM. Eshagh NIMVARI  This is me
Amol University of Special Modern Technologies
0000-0002-7401-315X
IranJ. KHALEGHINIA  This is me
Islamic Azad University Nour Branch
0000-0001-5357-193X
Iran
Publication DateSeptember 2, 2021
Application DateDecember 28, 2020
Acceptance DateMay 9, 2020
Published in IssueYear 2021, Volume 7, Issue 6
Heat and Mass Transfer in a Cryogenic Tank in Case of Active-Pressurization

능동 가압의 경우 극저온 탱크의 열 및 물질 전달

Heat and Mass Transfer in a Cryogenic Tank in Case of Active-Pressurization

하이라이트

헤닝 슈플러 옌스 게르스트만DLR 독일 항공 우주 센터, 우주 시스템 연구소, 28359 Bremen, Germany

상변화 및 공액 열전달을 포함하는 압축성 2상 솔버 개발.

분석 솔루션으로 솔버를 성공적으로 검증.

극저온 탱크의 압력 및 온도 변화에 대한 정확한 시뮬레이션.

자유 표면에서의 물질 전달 분석.

Abstract

압력 요구 사항을 예측하는 것은 극저온 추진 시스템의 주요 과제 중 하나입니다. 이러한 맥락에서 증발 및 응축 현상을 고려한 탱크 여압을 시뮬레이션하기 위한 수치 모델을 개발하여 적용하였습니다. 

새로운 솔버는 PISO(splitting of operator) 알고리즘이 있는 압력 암시적 방법을 기반으로 하는 OpenFOAM의 약한 압축성 다상 솔버와 기울기 기반 위상 변화 모델을 결합합니다. 날카로운 인터페이스를 유지하기 위해 인터페이스에 인접한 셀에 질량 소스 용어가 적용됩니다. 

첫째, 모델은 1차원 상 변화 문제와 중력이 없는 상태에서 과열된 액체에서 증기 기포의 성장이라는 두 가지 분석 솔루션에 대해 검증되었습니다. 

두 번째 단계에서는 검증된 모델을 극저온 가압 실험에 적용했습니다. 측정된 압력 거동은 수치 모델이 양호한 근사값으로 확인될 수 있습니다. 

수치 모델을 사용하면 물리적 거동에 대한 추가 통찰력을 얻을 수 있습니다. 응축 및 증발 효과는 가압 중 및 가압 후의 압력 발생에 상당한 영향을 미칩니다. 기액 계면에서 일어나는 상변화로 인한 질량유동은 계면의 위치와 시간에 따라 달라진다. 벽에서 직접적으로 증발이 지배적이며 액체 표면의 중앙 영역에서 응결이 발생합니다. 

응축 및 증발 효과는 가압 중 및 가압 후의 압력 발생에 상당한 영향을 미칩니다. 기액 계면에서 일어나는 상변화로 인한 질량유동은 계면의 위치와 시간에 따라 달라진다. 벽에서 직접적으로 증발이 지배적이며 액체 표면의 중앙 영역에서 응결이 발생합니다. 

응축 및 증발 효과는 가압 중 및 가압 후의 압력 발생에 상당한 영향을 미칩니다. 기액 계면에서 일어나는 상변화로 인한 질량유동은 계면의 위치와 시간에 따라 달라진다. 벽에서 직접적으로 증발이 지배적이며 액체 표면의 중앙 영역에서 응결이 발생합니다.

Predicting the pressurant requirements is one of the key challenges for cryogenic propulsion systems. In this context, a numerical model to simulate the tank pressurization that considers evaporation and condensation phenomena was developed and applied. The novel solver combines the a gradient-based phase change model with a weakly compressible multiphase solver of OpenFOAM based on the pressure implicit method with splitting of operator (PISO) algorithm. To maintain a sharp interface the mass source terms are applied to the cells adjacent to the interface. First, the model is validated against two analytical solutions: the one-dimensional phase change problem and secondly, the growth of a vapor bubble in a superheated liquid in the absence of gravity. In a second step, the validated model was applied to a cryogenic pressurization experiment. The measured pressure behavior could be confirmed with the numerical model being in a good approximation. With the numerical model further insights into the physical behavior could be achieved. The condensation and evaporation effects have a significant impact on the pressure development during and after the pressurization. The mass flows due to phase change occurring at the vapor-liquid interface depend on interface location and time. Directly at the wall, evaporation becomes dominant while condensation occurs at the center area of the liquid surface.

  1. Fig. 1. Calculation of the gradient at the interface: On the left side the interface…
  2. Fig. 2. Mass source term distribution: First the sharp mass source term ρ0, which is…
  3. Fig. 3. a) Layout of the Stefan-Problem: a vapor is located between a liquid and a…
  4. Fig. 4. Bubble in a superheated liquid: The left side depicts the calculated and…
  5. Fig. 5. Modified drawing of the dewar (as documented in [5] [6]; dimensions in mm) and…
  6. Fig. 6. Schematic presentation of the pressure evoluation in the dewar: Initial…
  7. Fig. 7. Simulation of the pressurization phase: The diagram shows the pressure…
  8. Fig. 8. Turbulent thermal diffusivity in pressurization and relaxation phase
  9. Fig. 9. Comparison of the pressure evolution in the relaxation phase of the solver with…
  10. Fig. 10. On the left side the temperature evolution in the bulk of the gas phase is shown
  11. Fig. 11. Heat Flux profile over the interface caused by evaporation with details of the…
  12. Fig. 12. Temperatures field with velocity vectors at 420 seconds after the start of the…
  13. Fig. 13. Heat transfer to the liquid from the wall and the freesurface with and without…

Hide figures

키워드

Pressurization, Phase Change, CFD, Propellant Management, 가압, 상 변화, 추진제 관리

Figure 10.—Temperature contour time sequence for an EDS scale propellant tank at a jet mixing velocity of 0.06 m/s.

Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Simulations of Jet Mixing in Tanks of Different Scales

NASA/TM—2010-216749

Kevin Breisacher and Jeffrey Moder
Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio

Prepared for the57th Joint Army-Navy-NASA-Air Force (JANNAF) Propulsion Meetingsponsored by the JANNAF Interagency Propulsion CommitteeColorado Springs, Colorado, May 3–7, 2010

Abstract

극저온 추진제의 장기 공간 저장을 위해 축류 제트 믹서는 탱크 압력을 제어하고 열 층화를 줄이기위한 하나의 개념입니다. 1960 년대부터 현재까지 10 피트 이하의 탱크 직경에 대한 광범위한 지상 테스트 데이터가 존재합니다.

Ares V EDS (Earth Departure Stage) LH2 탱크 용으로 계획된 것과 같이 직경이 30 피트 정도 인 탱크 용 축류 제트 믹서를 설계하려면 훨씬 더 작은 탱크에서 사용 가능한 실험 데이터를 확장하고 미세 중력을 설계해야 합니다.

이 연구는 10 배 차이가 나는 2 개의 탱크 크기에서 기존의 지상 기반 축류 제트 혼합 실험의 시뮬레이션을 수행하여 이러한 규모의 변화를 처리하는 전산 유체 역학 (CFD)의 능력을 평가합니다. 저궤도 (LEO) 해안 동안 Ares V 스케일 EDS LH2 탱크에 대한 여러 축 제트 구성의 시뮬레이션이 평가되고 선택된 결과도 제공됩니다.

두 가지 탱크 크기 (직경 1 및 10 피트)의 물을 사용하여 General Dynamics에서 1960 년대에 수행한 제트 혼합 실험 데이터를 사용하여 CFD 정확도를 평가합니다. 제트 노즐 직경은 직경 1 피트 탱크 실험의 경우 0.032 ~ 0.25 인치, 직경 10 피트 탱크 실험의 경우 0.625 ~ 0.875 인치였습니다.

제트 믹서를 켜기 전에 두 탱크에서 열 층화 층이 생성되었습니다. 제트 믹서 효율은 층화 층이 섞일 때까지 탱크의 열전대 레이크의 온도를 모니터링하여 결정되었습니다. 염료는 층화된 탱크에 자주 주입되었고 침투가 기록되었습니다. 실험 데이터에서 사용 가능한 속도나 난류량은 없었습니다.

제시된 시뮬레이션에는 자유 표면 추적 (Flow Science, Inc.의 FLOW-3D)이 포함된 시판되고 시간 정확도가 높은 다차원 CFD 코드가 사용됩니다. 서로 다른 시간에 탱크의 다양한 축 위치에서 계산 된 온도와 실험적으로 관찰된 온도를 비교합니다. 획득한 합의에 대한 다양한 모델링 매개 변수의 영향을 평가합니다.

Introduction

Constellation 프로그램의 일부인 Ares V는 우주 비행사를 달로 돌려 보내도록 설계된 무거운 리프트 발사기입니다. Ares V 스택의 일부인 EDS (Earth Departure Stage)는 지구의 중력에서 벗어나 승무원 차량과 달 착륙선을 달로 보내는데 필요합니다.

이러한 차량의 질량과 달로 보내는 데 필요한 에너지 때문에 EDS의 액체 수소(LH2)와 액체 산소(LO2) 추진제 탱크는 매우 클 것입니다(직경 10m). 탱크 내부로의 환경적 열 누출로 인해 혼합 장치를 포함한 열역학적 환기 시스템(TV)은 설계 한계 내에서 탱크 압력을 유지하고 엔진 시동에 필요한 한도 내에서 액체 온도를 유지하기 위해 며칠의 순서에 따라 공간 내 저장 기간 동안 필요할 수 있습니다.

이러한 혼합 장치 중 하나는 그림 1과 2와 같이 탱크 바닥 근처에 있는 (순가속과 관련하여) 탱크 축을 따라 중심에 있는 축 제트입니다. 축방향 제트 혼합기와 TVS에 통합된 것은 1960년대 중반부터 연구되어 왔으며(참조 1~5), 광범위한 축방향 제트 접지 테스트 데이터(비사이로젠(참조 1~9), 극저온(참조 10~16) 유체 사용), 에탄올을 사용한 일부 드롭 타워 테스트 데이터(참조 17 및 18)가 있습니다. 극저온 추진제를 사용하는 축방향 제트에 대한 기존 접지 테스트 데이터는 3m(10ft) 이하의 탱크 직경으로 제한됩니다.

저자가 알고 있는 바와 같이, 현재 임계 미달의 극저온 추진체를 사용하는 폐쇄형 탱크에 축방향 제트가 포함된 낙하탑, 항공기 또는 우주 비행 시험 데이터는 없습니다.

축방향 제트(Axial jet)는 지구 저궤도(LEO) 연안의 며칠 동안 EDS LH2 탱크에서 작동하는 혼합 장치의 후보 중 하나입니다. 제안된 EDS 탱크 척도의 극저온 저장 탱크에서 작동하는 축 제트 실험 데이터가 존재하지 않기 때문에, EDS 탱크를 위한 축 제트 TV의 초기 설계는 기존 데이터에 대해 고정된 상관 관계 및 CFD 분석에 의존할 필요가 있습니다.

이 연구는 두 개의 탱크 척도에서 크기 순서로 다른 축방향 제트 열분해 성능을 예측하기 위한 CFD 정확도 평가의 현재 진행 상황을 보고합니다. CFD 시뮬레이션은 물을 작동 유체로 사용하는 접지 테스트 축 제트 데이터(참조 1 – 4)와 비교됩니다. 이 평가를 위해 선택된 CFD 코드는 Flow Science(참조 21)의 상용 코드 FLOW-3D로, 극저온 저장 탱크 및 축방향 제트(참조 22~24)의 이전 분석에서 사용되었습니다.

LEO의 대표적인 EDS LH2 탱크에 대한 예비 축 제트 시뮬레이션도 여러 축 제트 구성에 대해 수행됩니다. 이러한 축방향 제트 구성의 열분해 성능을 평가하고 선택된 결과를 제시합니다.

이러한 예비 축방향 제트 EDS 시뮬레이션은 비교적 짧은 시간 동안 혼합기 성능만 평가합니다. 탱크 열 누출, 위상 변화 및 일반적인 자기 압력(제트 오프)/압력 붕괴(제트 온) 사이클을 포함한 보다 상세한 시뮬레이션이 향후 작업에서 추진될 수 있습니다.

Figure 1.—Schematic of the small water tank / Figure 2.—Schematic of the large water tank
Figure 1.—Schematic of the small water tank / Figure 2.—Schematic of the large water tank
Figure 5.—Temperature contours for large tank jet mixing simulation. (Temperature contour range 294 to 302 K)
Figure 5.—Temperature contours for large tank jet mixing simulation. (Temperature contour range 294 to 302 K)

상세 내용은 원문을 참조하시기 바랍니다.


Figure 9.—Schematic of a representative EDS scale propellant tank.
Figure 9.—Schematic of a representative EDS scale propellant tank.
Figure 10.—Temperature contour time sequence for an EDS scale propellant tank at a jet mixing velocity of 0.06 m/s.
Figure 10.—Temperature contour time sequence for an EDS scale propellant tank at a jet mixing velocity of 0.06 m/s.
Figure 14.—Temperature contour at t = 1000 s for the five jet mixer with a 0.06 m/s jet velocity
Figure 14.—Temperature contour at t = 1000 s for the five jet mixer with a 0.06 m/s jet velocity

Summary and Conclusions

사용 가능한 유사성 상관 관계를 사용하는 스케일링 전략은 EDS 클래스 제트 믹서에 대한 적절한 제트 크기 및 작동 조건을 결정하기 위해 개발되었습니다. 물 탱크 시뮬레이션에서 결정된 모델링 매개 변수를 사용하여 열 층화를 제어하기 위해 제트 믹서를 사용하여 EDS 등급 추진제 탱크의 혼합 이력에 대한 CFD 시뮬레이션을 수행했습니다.

시뮬레이션 결과는 다양한 믹싱 동작을 보여 주며 유사성 매개 변수의 사용에서 예상되는 것과 일치했습니다. 이러한 결과는 하위 규모 테스트 및 유사성 상관 관계와 함께 CFD 시뮬레이션이 EDS 등급 탱크를위한 효율적인 제트 믹서 설계를 허용 할 것이라는 확신을 제공합니다.

CFD 시뮬레이션은 다양한 크기의 직경과 제트를 가진 탱크의 제트 믹서에서 수행되었습니다. 1 피트 직경의 물 탱크에서 제트 혼합에 대해 사용 가능한 실험 데이터와 합리적으로 일치하는 모델링 매개 변수가 결정되었습니다. 동일한 모델링 매개 변수를 사용하여 대략 10 배 정도 떨어져있는 스케일로 워터 제트 혼합 실험에서 혼합을 시뮬레이션했습니다. 시뮬레이션 결과는 실험 온도 데이터와 잘 일치하는 것으로 나타났습니다.

References 1.Poth, L.J., Van Hook, J.R., Wheeler, D.M. and Kee, C.R., “A Study of Cryogenic Propellant Mixing Techniques. Volume 1 – Mixer design and experimental investigations,” NASA CR-73908, Nov 1968. 2.Poth, L.J., Van Hook, J.R., Wheeler, D.M. and Kee, C.R., “A Study of Cryogenic Propellant Mixing Techniques. Volume 2 – Experimental data Final report,” NASA CR-73909, Nov 1968. 3.Scale Experimental Mixing Investigations and Liquid-Oxygen Mixer Design,” NASA CR-113897, Sep 1970. 4.Van Hook, J.R. and Poth, L.J., “Study of Cryogenic Fluid Mixing Techniques. Volume 1 – Large-Van Hook, J.R., “Study of Cryogenic Fluid Mixing Techniques. Volume 2 – Large-Scale Mixing Data,” NASA CR-113914, Sep 1970. 5.Poth, L.J. and Van Hook, J.R., “Control of the Thermodynamic State of Space-Stored Cryogens by Jet Mixing,” J. Spacecraft, Vol. 9, No. 5, 1972. 6.Lovrich, T.N. and Schwartz, S.H., “Development of Thermal Stratification and Destratification Scaling Concepts – Volume II. Stratification Experimental Data,” NASA CR-143945, 1975. 7.Dominick, S.M., “Mixing Induced Condensation Inside Propellant Tanks,” AIAA–1984–0514. 8.Meserole, J.S., Jones, O.S., Brennan, S.M. and Fortini, A., “Mixing-Induced Ullage Condensation and Fluid Destratification,” AIAA–1987–2018. 9.Barsi, S., Kassemi, M., Panzarella, C.H. and Alexander, J.I., “A Tank Self-Pressurization Experiment Using a Model Fluid in Normal Gravity,” AIAA–2005–1143. 10.Stark, J.A. and Blatt, M.H., “Cryogenic Zero-Gravity Prototype Vent System,” NAS8-20146, Convair Report GDC-DDB67-006, Oct 1967. 11.Bullard, B.R., “Liquid Propellant Thermal Conditioning System Test Program,” NAS3-12033, Lockheed Missiles & Space Co., NASA CR-72971, July 1972. 12.Erickson, R.C., “Space LOX Vent System,” NAS8-26972, General Dynamics Convair Report CASD-NAS 75-021, April 1975.

13.Lin, C.S., Hasan, M.M. and Nyland, T.W., “Mixing and Transient Interface Condensation of a Liquid Hydrogen Tank,” NASA TM-106201 (or AIAA–1993–1968), 1993. 14.Lin, C.S., Hasan, M.M. and Van Dresar, N.T., “Experimental Investigation of Jet-Induced Mixing of a Large Liquid Hydrogen Storage Tank,” NASA TM-106629 (or AIAA–1994–2079), 1994. 15.Olsen, A.D., Cady, E.C., Jenkins, D.S. and Hastings, L., “Solar Thermal Upper Stage Cryogenic System Engineering Checkout Test,” AIAA–1999–2604. 16.Van Overbeke, T.J., “Thermodynamic Vent System Test in a Low Earth Orbit Simulation,” NASA/TM—2004-213193 (or AIAA–2004–3838), Oct 2004. 17.Aydelott, J.C., “Axial Jet Mixing of Ethanol in Cylindrical Containers During Weightlessness,” NASA-TP-1487, July 1979. 18.Aydelott, J.C., “Axial Modeling of Space Vehicle Propellant Mixing,” NASA-TP-2107, Jan 1983. 19.Bentz, M.D., “Tank Pressure Control in Low Gravity by Jet Mixing,” NASA CR–191012, Mar. 1993. 20.Hasan, M.M., Lin, C.S., Knoll, R.H. and Bentz, M.D., “Tank Pressure Control Experiment: Thermal Phenomena in Microgravity,” NASA-TP-3564, 1996. 21.FLOW-3D User’s Manual, version 9.4, Flow Science, Inc., Santa Fe, NM 2009. 22.Grayson, G.D., Lopez, A., Chandler, F.O., Hastings, L.J. and Tucker, S.P., “Cryogenic Tank Modeling for the Saturn AS-203 Experiment,” AIAA–2006–5258. 23.Lopez, A., Grayson, G.D., Chandler, F.O., Hastings, L.J., and Hedayat, A., “Cryogenic Pressure Control Modeling for Ellipsoidal Space Tanks,” AIAA–2007–5552. 24.Lopez, A., Grayson, G.D., Chandler, F.O., Hastings, L.J. and Hedayat, A., “Cryogenic Pressure Control Modeling for Ellipsoidal Space Tanks in Reduced Gravity,” AIAA–2008–5104. 25.Thomas, R.M., “Condensation of Steam on Water in Turbulent Motion,” Int. J. Multiphase Flow, Vol. 5, No. 1, pp. 1–15, 1979. 26.Zimmerli, G.A., Asipauskas, M., Chen, Y. and Weislogel, M.M., “A Study of Fluid Interface Configurations in Exploration Vehicle Propellant Tanks,” AIAA–2010–1294.

Figure 1.1: A water droplet with a radius of 1 mm resting on a glass substrate. The surface of the droplet takes on a spherical cap shape. The contact angle θ is defined by the balance of the interfacial forces.

Effect of substrate cooling and droplet shape and composition on the droplet evaporation and the deposition of particles

기판 냉각 및 액적 모양 및 조성이 액적 증발 및 입자 증착에 미치는 영향

by Vahid Bazargan
M.A.Sc., Mechanical Engineering, The University of British Columbia, 2008
B.Sc., Mechanical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, 2006
B.Sc., Chemical & Petroleum Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, 2006

고착 방울은 평평한 기판에 놓인 액체 방울입니다. 작은 고정 액적이 증발하는 동안 액적의 접촉선은 고정된 접촉 영역이 있는 고정된 단계와 고정된 접촉각이 있는 고정 해제된 단계의 두 가지 단계를 거칩니다. 고정된 접촉 라인이 있는 증발은 액적 내부에서 접촉 라인을 향한 흐름을 생성합니다.

이 흐름은 입자를 운반하고 접촉 선 근처에 침전시킵니다. 이로 인해 일반적으로 관찰되는 “커피 링”현상이 발생합니다. 이 논문은 증발 과정과 고착성 액적의 증발 유도 흐름에 대한 연구를 제공하고 콜로이드 현탁액에서 입자의 침착에 대한 통찰력을 제공합니다. 여기서 우리는 먼저 작은 고착 방울의 증발을 연구하고 증발 과정에서 기판의 열전도도의 중요성에 대해 논의합니다.

현재 증발 모델이 500µm 미만의 액적 크기에 대해 심각한 오류를 생성하는 방법을 보여줍니다. 우리의 모델에는 열 효과가 포함되어 있으며, 특히 증발 잠열의 균형을 맞추기 위해 액적에 열을 제공하는 기판의 열전도도를 포함합니다. 실험 결과를 바탕으로 접촉각의 진화와 관련된 접촉 선의 가상 움직임을 정의하여 고정 및 고정 해제 단계의 전체 증발 시간을 고려합니다.

우리의 모델은 2 % 미만의 오차로 500 µm보다 작은 물방울에 대한 실험 결과와 일치합니다. 또한 유한한 크기의 라인 액적의 증발을 연구하고 증발 중 접촉 라인의 복잡한 동작에 대해 논의합니다. 에너지 공식을 적용하고 접촉 선이 구형 방울의 후퇴 접촉각보다 높은 접촉각을 가진 선 방울의 두 끝에서 후퇴하기 시작 함을 보여줍니다. 그리고 라인 방울 내부의 증발 유도 흐름을 보여줍니다.

마지막으로, 계면 활성제 존재 하에서 접촉 라인의 거동을 논의하고 입자 증착에 대한 Marangoni 흐름 효과에 대해 논의합니다. 열 Marangoni 효과는 접촉 선 근처에 증착 된 입자의 양에 영향을 미치며, 기판 온도가 낮을수록 접촉 선 근처에 증착되는 입자의 양이 많다는 것을 알 수 있습니다.

Figure 1.1: A water droplet with a radius of 1 mm resting on a glass substrate. The surface of the droplet takes on a spherical cap shape. The contact angle θ is defined by the balance of the interfacial forces.
Figure 1.1: A water droplet with a radius of 1 mm resting on a glass substrate. The surface of the droplet takes on a spherical cap shape. The contact angle θ is defined by the balance of the interfacial forces.
Figure 2.1: Evaporation modes of sessile droplets on a substrate: (a) evaporation at constant contact angle (de-pinned stage) and (b) evaporation at constant contact area (pinned stage)
Figure 2.1: Evaporation modes of sessile droplets on a substrate: (a) evaporation at constant contact angle (de-pinned stage) and (b) evaporation at constant contact area (pinned stage)
Figure 2.2: A sessil droplet with its image can be profiled as the equiconvex lens formed by two intersecting spheres with radius of a.
Figure 2.2: A sessil droplet with its image can be profiled as the equiconvex lens formed by two intersecting spheres with radius of a.
Figure 2.3: The droplet life time for both evaporation modes derived from Equation 2.2.
Figure 2.3: The droplet life time for both evaporation modes derived from Equation 2.2.
Figure 2.4: A probability of escape for vapor molecules at two different sites of the surface of the droplet for diffusion controlled evaporation. The random walk path initiated from a vapor molecule is more likely to result in a return to the surface if the starting point is further away from the edge of the droplet.
Figure 2.4: A probability of escape for vapor molecules at two different sites of the surface of the droplet for diffusion controlled evaporation. The random walk path initiated from a vapor molecule is more likely to result in a return to the surface if the starting point is further away from the edge of the droplet.
Figure 2.5: Schematic of the sessile droplet on a substrate
Figure 2.5: Schematic of the sessile droplet on a substrate. The evaporation rate at the surface of the droplet is enhanced toward the edge of the droplet.
Figure 2.6: The domain mesh (a) and the solution of the Laplace equation for diffusion of the water vapor molecule with the concentration of Cv = 1.9×10−8 g/mm3 at the surface of the droplet into the ambient air with the relative humidity of 55%, i.e. φ = 0.55 (b).
Figure 2.6: The domain mesh (a) and the solution of the Laplace equation for diffusion of the water vapor molecule with the concentration of Cv = 1.9×10−8 g/mm3 at the surface of the droplet into the ambient air with the relative humidity of 55%, i.e. φ = 0.55 (b).
Figure 3.1: The portable micro printing setup. A motorized linear stage from Zaber Technologies Inc. was used to control the place and speed of the micro nozzle.
Figure 3.1: The portable micro printing setup. A motorized linear stage from Zaber Technologies Inc. was used to control the place and speed of the micro nozzle.
Figure 4.6: Temperature contours inside the substrate adjacent to the droplet
Figure 4.6: Temperature contours inside the substrate adjacent to the droplet
Figure 4.7: The effect of substrate cooling on the evaporation rate, the basic model shows the same value for all substrates.
Figure 4.7: The effect of substrate cooling on the evaporation rate, the basic model shows the same value for all substrates.

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[FLOW-3D 물리모델]Condensation, Evaporation at Free Surfaces / 자유표면에서의 응축, 기화

Condensation/Evaporation at Free Surfaces자유표면에서의 응축/기화

1. Vaporization at Free Surfaces 자유표면에서의 기화

자유표면에서 발생하는 기화효과는 공간에서 정의된 일정 포화상태의 견지에서 모델링 될 수 있다. 이 모델을 활성화하기 위해 Physics>Bubble and phase change models>Constant pressure bubble with vaporization 를 선택한다. Fluids>Properties>Phase Change 에서의 Saturation Temperature 는 공간내의 기포의 포화상태를 정의한다. 기화 잠열은 Fluids>Phase change>Latent Heat of Vapor 에서 지정된다.

유체 에너지 방정식(열전달)은 이 모델(Physics>Heat Transfer)과 함께 해석되어야 한다. Fluids> Properties>Phase Change 에있는 Accommodation coefficient 에 양의 값을 정의한다. 자유 표면상의 액체의 온도가 포화 온도보다 높다면 액체는 다음과 같은 율로 증발할 것이다.

  • α 는 기화율을 조절하는 Accommodation coefficient이다. 이 값은 일반적으로 0.01에서0.1사이이며 1.0을 넘지 말아야 한다.
  • Hv 는 기화 잠열이다.
  • Asur 는 상변화를 위한 유효표면적이다.
  • kf 는 액체의 열전도도이다.
  • Tl 는 표면상 액체 온도이며
  • Tv1는일정한 기포 포화 온도이다
  • h 는 Prandtl 수로 정의된 표면에 있는 액체의 열전도에 대한 특정 길이이다.

여기서

  • xmin 는 (임의의 방향으로)계산 격자의 최소 셀 크기
  • Cv 는 일정 체적시의 기포 비열이며
  • µ1는 유체 #1의 점도이다.

각 표면 셀에서 기화하는 질량 유량은 후처리를 위해 저장되고 Analyze 에서 가시화될 수 있다.

기화는 자유 표면을 포함하는 셀들에서만 발생될 수 있다. 기포 포화온도는 일정 또는 변동압력을 갖는 모든 공간에 대해 일정하며 같다.

2. One Fluid with Thermal Bubbles 열기포를 갖는 하나의 유체

액체-증기 상변화에 의한 질량 전달은 열기포와 주위 액체 사이에 발생할 수 있다. 기포는 유체 #1 이 증기로 차 있다고 가정하고(즉, 기체 성분은 하나다.) 기포는 일정 압력, 온도, 그리고 밀도를 갖는다. 많은 기포 방울들이 있을 수 있고, 각 기포에서의 증기는 체적 변화와 열 및 질량 전달 때문에 고유한 시간에 따라 변하는 상을 갖는다. 유체 분율이0인 지정 압력의 격자 경계와 접하는 기포는 그 경계에서 정의된 기화 상태를 가질 것이다. 기화/응축모델은 Physics>Bubble and phase change models>Thermal bubbles with phase change 에서 활성화된다.

증기의 상태방정식은 이상 기체 방정식이며 절대 압력 P P = (γ − 1) · ρvapCvT 로부터 계산되는데 여기서

  • γ 는 1.285 ≤ γ ≤ 1.667값을 갖는 비열의 비율
  • T 는 절대온도
  • Cv 는 일정 체적에서의 증기의 비열
  • Cp 는 일정 압력에서의 증기의 비열
  • ρvap 는 기포 내의 증기 밀도

기포는 절대 단위로 이들의 초기 압력과 온도를 지정함으로써 초기화된다. 증기는 또한 Cavitation and Bubble Formation (Nucleation)에서 기술된 바와 같이 공동 또는 비등 과정을 통해 유체 내에서 생성될 수 있다. 증기 물성과 포화 곡선은 Fluids>Properties>Phase change 하위 메뉴에서 정의된다. 증기 압력은 사용자가 정의한 포화 곡선을 이용하여 그 지역의 유체 온도의 함수로써 계산된다. 디폴트 포화 곡선은 압력 P 와 온도 T 간의 Clausius-Clapeyron 관련식이다.

여기서

  • PV 1 TV 1(위의 물성치 목록에서 Saturation Pressure Saturation Temperature라고 쓰여있는) 는 포화곡선상의 한 점에서의 압력과 온도이다.
  • TEXPExponent for T-P Curve 로써 입력된다; 이의 값은 일반적으로
  • γ 는 증기의 비열 Gamma
  • Cv 는 일정 체적시의 기체 비열
  • Hv 는 기체의 잠열

형상 요소와 기포 내 증기간의 열전달은 Meshing & Geometry>Geometry>Component>Surface properties 의 component-void간의 열전달 계수에 의해 지정된다. 액체와 기포 내 증기와의 열전달도 마찬가지로 유체-void간의 열전달 계수에 의해 지정되어야 한다. 새로 생성된 증기기포는 heat transfer void type 1로 지정되는 것에 주목한다. Physics>Heat transfer>Fluid to solid heat transfer 가 증기 기포와 고체 요소간의 열전달을 가능하게 하기 위해 활성화되어야 한다.

상 변화는 계산 셀 내의 평균 유체 물성(밀도, 열에너지 그리고 액체분율)에 의존한다. 특히 액체와 증기의 온도는 한 요소에서 같으며, 표면의 얇은 유체막에서의 온도가 아니다. 이런 의미에서 상변화 모델은 현상학적이고 상변화율을 조절하기 위해 accommodation coefficient 의 조정이 필요하다. 1보다 큰 값은 사용되지 않아야 하는데, 이는 이 모델의 수렴이 힘들게 될 수도 있기 때문이다. 사실 일반적으로 사용되는 값들은 0.01과 0.1사이이다.

3. Two-fluid Model 두가지 유체 모델

이 모델은 증기 영역에서 모든 역학이 계산되는 것을 제외하고는 응축/기화 모델 (One Fluid with Thermal Bubbles)과 유사하다. 이 경우 압축 two-fluid 모델(비압축성 유체와 압축성 증기)은 경계면에서 발생하는 액체-증기 상변화가 가능하다. 순수 액체 지역에서의 핵 생성 또는 순수 증기 지역에서의 응축이 또한 가능하다. 유체 #1은 유체의 액상을 그리고 압축성 유체 #2(가스)는 증기를 기술한다. 표준 압축성 유동 모델에서와 같이 증기의 상태 방정식은 이상 기체 방정식, P = RF2 · ρ · T 이며 여기서.

  • RF2 는 증기의 기체상수
  • P 는 압력
  • ρ 는 기체 밀도
  • T 는 증기의 온도

two-fluid 상변화 모델은 Physics >Bubble and phase change models> Two-fluid phase change 에서 초기화되며, Fluids>Properties>Phase change 에서 양의 accommodation coefficient 를 필요로 한다. 상변화율은 직접적으로 accommodation coefficient 에 비례한다. 이 값은 절대적인 제한은 아니지만 일반적으로 0.01에서0.1사이이며 1.0을 넘지 말아야 한다. 증기 물성은 압축성 유체2의 물성으로 정의되며 증기 잠열과 포화곡선은 Fluids>Properties>Phase change 에서 정의된다. 포화 압력과 포화 온도로 정의되며 쌍으로 나타나는 압력-온도는 포화 곡선상의 한 점이어야 한다. T-P 곡선상의 지수는 온도-압력 포화관계의 지수이다. 디폴트 포화곡선은 압력 P 와 온도 T 간의 Clausius-Clapeyron 관련식이다.

여기서

  • PV 1 TV 1(위의 물성 목록에서 Saturation Pressure Saturation Temperature라고 쓰여있는)는 포화 곡선상의 한 점에서의 압력과 온도
  • TEXPExponent for T-P Curve 로써 입력된다; 이 값은 일반적으로 TV EXP = (γ − 1) CLHVCV 2 1
  •  Gamma 는 증기의 비열의 비율
  • CV 2 는 일정 체적시의 기체 비열
  • CLHV 1는 증기 잠열(단위질량당 에너지)

상변화는 유한 체적 내의 평균 유체 물성(밀도, 열에너지 그리고 액체분율)에 의존한다. 특히 액체와 증기의 온도는 한 요소에서 같다. 액체와 증기 경계면에서의 질량 전달율은 국부적 액체의 포화압력과 증기압사이의 차이에 의하여 계산된다.

Mass transfer rate

여기서

  • Pvap 는 증기압
  • Psat(T) 는 위에서 정의된 바와 같이 지역온도에서의 포화압력이다. 사용자가 필요에 따라 변경할 수 있는 subroutine PSAT.F에서 계산된다.
  • RSIZEAccommodation coefficient 이고 일반적으로 0.01과 0.1사이의 값이다.

액체와 증기경계에서 유체 질량의 단위면적당 상변화율이 계산되고, 후처리를 위해 Phase change mass flux 라고 불리는 공간변수로써 저장된다.
양의 값은 증발을 뜻한다:
음의 값은 응축.

액체 체적에서의 상변화는 Superheat temperature 를 지정함으로써 포화온도를 지나서까지 지연될 수 있다. 지역 포화온도보다 큰 Superheat temperature 의 값 때문에 증기 기포가 발생하기 전에 이 온도까지 유체 체적이 가열되는 것이 가능하다. 과열은 선택에따라 0이 아닌 벽의 거칠기를 사용함으로써 고체 벽 가까이에서 발생하지 않도록 할 수 있다.

4. Two Fluids with Non-condensable Gas / 비 응축가스를 갖는 Two Fluids

 

보통, 응축/기화 모델(two-fluid 모델)은 유체 #2가 완전히 액체의 증기상으로 이루어진다고 가정한다. 가스가 증기와 비응축가스(즉, 공기중의 수증기)의 혼합물로 구성되어 있는 경우에 Physics>Bubble and phase change>Two-fluid phase change>Noncondensable gas model 를 선택한다. two-fluid vapor 모델의 추가는 증기와 비응축가스의 기체상수들의 밀도 가중 평균 혼합물의 기체상수의 계산을 포함한다:

여기서

  • ρvap 는 계산된 거시적 증기밀도
  • ρnc 는 계산된 거시적 비응축 기체 밀도
  • RF2는 증기의 기체상수
  • RF 는 평균기체상수

그러므로, 압력은 P = RFρT 로 계산된다. 증기의 포화압력은 상변화(Two-fluid Model), 를 갖는 표준 Two-fluid 모델에서와 같은 방법으로 계산되지만, 질량 유량은 전체 가스압력을 사용하는 것과는 달리 증기의 부분압력을 이용하여 계산된다.

Mass transfer rate

여기서

  • Pvap 는 가스성 유체의 증기의 부분압력
  • Psat(T) 는 사용자가 필요에 따라 변경할 수 있는 subroutine PSAT.F에서 정의되는 Clausius-Clapeyron 방정식으로부터 계산되는 국부 온도에서의 포화압력이다.
  • RSIZEAccommodation coefficient 이고 일반적으로 0.01과 0.1사이의 값이다.

Accommodation coefficient 가 1.0의 값을 가진다면 모델은 한 시간단계에서 평형에 도달하기에 충분한 상변화를 예측하려고 시도할 것이다. 이 속도는 너무 급속해 실제 물리적조건과 비교될 수가 없다. 액체와 가스의 경계면의 경계층 내의 역학은 규모가 너무 작아 이 모델에 포함할 수 없으므로 FLOW-3D 가 정확히 이 계수 없이 상변화율을 예측하는 것은 불가능하다. .

이 모델을 이용하기 위해 Physics>Bubble and phase change models>Non-condensable gas model 의 체크상자를 선택한다. Gas constant Specific heat of the non-condensable gas 를 위한 값을 입력한다. 가스가 영역 경계에서 들어오는 곳에 각 mesh block 경계 조건 입력창에 있는 Non-condensable gas fraction 의 비응축가스의 체적율(0 과 1사이)을 지정한다. 비응축가스를 포함하는 초기 유체지역을 정의하기 위해 Meshing & Geometry>Initial>Global 를 지정한다. 이 양은 또한 각각의 초기유체 영역과 특정 지점에서 지정될 수 있다.

5. Vaporization Residue / 증발 잔류량

MAIN VARIABLES: SCALAR: IRESID, RMXSC
XPUT: IPHCHG

액체용제가 기화할 때 이에 포함되어 있는 용질은 더 농축된다. 마찬가지로 스칼라 농도변수로 모델링 된 용질도 유체문제의 자유표면에서 증발로 인해 자동적으로 농축될 것이다. 표면요소에 액체가 반보다 적게 있을 경우 농축변화가 표면요소의 두께의 반에 해당하는 지역으로 퍼져나가는 크기로 스칼라의 농축이 바로 주위의 표면요소에서도 또한 발생할 것이다.

 증발이 충분히 발생하고 용질의 농도가 커지면 표면에서 발생할 수도 있고 용질이 완전히 증발하면 표면상에 이의 잔류가 생성될 수 있다. 잔류형성은 Physics Bubbles and phase change 에서 활성화되는 Constant pressure bubbles with vaporization, 및 Thermal bubbles with phase change 모델과 함께 시뮬레이션 되어야 한다. 잔류모델은 IRESID = 1로 지정하고 용질 스칼라 ns, RMXSC(ns)를 최대 packing 밀도를 정의함으로써 활성화된다. 일단 용질이 최대 packing 밀도까지 농축되면 더 이상의 농축은 고정(움직이지 않는)된 잔류를 초래한다. 하나 이상의 스칼라 용질이 존재하면 잔류는 모든 용질 전체 잔류를 기록한다.

Note: 용질농도는 Physics Scalars 로부터 FLOW-3D‘s Scalars 모델을 이용하여 입력된다.

FLOW-3D Features

The features in blue are newly-released in FLOW-3D v12.0.

Meshing & Geometry

  • Structured finite difference/control volume meshes for fluid and thermal solutions
  • Finite element meshes in Cartesian and cylindrical coordinates for structural analysis
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  • Closing gaps in geometry
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Flow Type Options

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  • Multiple scalar species
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  • Saturated & unsaturated porous media

Physical Modeling Options

  • Fluid structure interaction
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  • Surface tension
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  • Mass/momentum/energy sources
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  • Elastic membranes & walls
  • Evaporation residue
  • Electro-mechanical effects
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Flow Definition Options

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  • Restart from previous simulation
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  • Change mesh and modeling options
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Thermal Modeling Options

  • Natural convection
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  • Conduction in fluid & solid
  • Fluid-solid heat transfer
  • Distributed energy sources/sinks in fluids and solids
  • Radiation
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Numerical Modeling Options

  • TruVOF Volume-of-Fluid (VOF) method for fluid interfaces
  • Steady state accelerator for free-surface flows
  • First and second order advection
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  • Implicit & explicit numerical methods
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  • GMRES, point and line relaxation pressure solvers
  • User-defined variables, subroutines & output
  • Utilities for runtime interaction during execution

Fluid Modeling Options

  • One incompressible fluid – confined or with free surfaces
  • Two incompressible fluids – miscible or with sharp interfaces
  • Compressible fluid – subsonic, transonic, supersonic
  • Stratified fluid
  • Acoustic phenomena
  • Mass particles with variable density or diameter

Shallow Flow Models

  • General topography
  • Raster data interface
  • Subcomponent-specific surface roughness
  • Wind shear
  • Ground roughness effects
  • Manning’s roughness
  • Laminar & turbulent flow
  • Sediment transport and scour
  • Surface tension
  • Heat transfer
  • Wetting & drying

Turbulence Models

  • RNG model
  • Two-equation k-epsilon model
  • Two-equation k-omega model
  • Large eddy simulation

Advanced Physical Models

  • General Moving Object model with 6 DOF–prescribed and fully-coupled motion
  • Rotating/spinning objects
  • Collision model
  • Tethered moving objects (springs, ropes, breaking mooring lines)
  • Flexing membranes and walls
  • Porosity
  • Finite element based elastic-plastic deformation
  • Finite element based thermal stress evolution due to thermal changes in a solidifying fluid
  • Combusting solid components

Chemistry Models

  • Stiff equation solver for chemical rate equations
  • Stationary or advected species

Porous Media Models

  • Saturated and unsaturated flow
  • Variable porosity
  • Directional porosity
  • General flow losses (linear & quadratic)
  • Capillary pressure
  • Heat transfer in porous media
  • Van Genunchten model for unsaturated flow

Discrete Particle Models

  • Massless marker particles
  • Multi-species material particles of variable size and mass
  • Solid, fluid, gas particles
  • Void particles tracking collapsed void regions
  • Non-linear fluid-dynamic drag
  • Added mass effects
  • Monte-Carlo diffusion
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  • Point or volumetric particle sources
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  • Heat transfer with fluid
  • Evaporation and condensation
  • Solidification and melting
  • Coulomb and dielectric forces
  • Probe particles

Two-Phase & Two-Component Models

  • Liquid/liquid & gas/liquid interfaces
  • Variable density mixtures
  • Compressible fluid with a dispersed incompressible component
  • Drift flux with dynamic droplet size
  • Two-component, vapor/non-condensable gases
  • Phase transformations for gas-liquid & liquid-solid
  • Adiabatic bubbles
  • Bubbles with phase change
  • Continuum fluid with discrete particles
  • Scalar transport
  • Homogeneous bubbles
  • Super-cooling
  • Two-field temperature

Coupling with Other Programs

  • Geometry input from Stereolithography (STL) files – binary or ASCII
  • Direct interfaces with EnSight®, FieldView® & Tecplot® visualization software
  • Finite element solution import/export via Exodus-II file format
  • PLOT3D output
  • Neutral file output
  • Extensive customization possibilities
  • Solid Properties Materials Database

Data Processing Options

  • State-of-the-art post-processing tool, FlowSight™
  • Batch post-processing
  • Report generation
  • Automatic or custom results analysis
  • High-quality OpenGL-based graphics
  • Color or B/W vector, contour, 3D surface & particle plots
  • Moving and stationary probes
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  • Measurement baffles
  • Arbitrary sampling volumes
  • Force & moment output
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User Conveniences

  • Active simulation control (based on measurement of probes)
  • Mesh generators
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  • Tabular time-dependent input using external files
  • Automatic time-step control for accuracy & stability
  • Automatic convergence control
  • Mentor help to optimize efficiency
  • Units on all variables
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  • Moving particle sources
  • Change simulation parameters while solver runs
  • Launch and manage multiple simulations
  • Automatic simulation termination based on user-defined criteria
  • Run simulation on remote servers using remote solving
  • Copy boundary conditions to other mesh blocks

Multi-Processor Computing

  • Shared memory computers
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FlowSight

  • Particle visualization
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  • 2D, 3D and arbitrary clips
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  • Link multiple results
  • Multiple data views
  • Non-inertial reference frame
  • Spline clip