Fig. 2. Semi-Lagrangian cellwise advection. (a) Forward advection scheme, (b) Backward advection scheme.

3차원 셀별 보수 미분할 기하학적 VOF 체계

Raphaël Comminal, JonSpangenberg

Abstract

This work presents two unsplit geometric VOF schemes that extend the two-dimensional cellwise conservative unsplit (CCU) scheme [Comminal et al., J. Comput. Phys. 283 (2015) 582–608] to three dimensions. The novelty of the 3D-CCU schemes lies in the representation of the streaksurfaces of donating regions by polyhedral surfaces whose vertices are calculated with the 4th order Runge-Kutta scheme. Moreover, the advected liquid volumes are computed using a truncation algorithm [López et al., J. Comput. Phys. 392 (2019) 666–693] suited for arbitrary non-convex and self-intersecting polyhedra, which removes the need for tetrahedral decomposition. The 3D-CCU advection schemes were coupled to three interface reconstruction methods (Youngs’ method, the Mixed Youngs-Centered scheme, and the Least-Square Fit algorithm). The resulting VOF methods were tested in classical benchmark advection tests, including translation, rigid-body rotation, shear and deformation flows. The proposed 3D-CCU schemes conserve the liquid volume and maintain the physical boundedness of liquid volume fractions to the machine precision. The 3D-CCU schemes perform favorably compared to other unsplit geometric VOF schemes when coupled to Youngs’ interface reconstruction method. Moreover, the 3D-CCU schemes coupled to the Least-Square Fit algorithm are more accurate than most other VOF schemes that use a second-order accurate interface reconstruction, except those where a 3D extension of the Mosso-Swartz interface reconstruction is employed. The comparison of the different VOF schemes highlights the importance of coupling accurate interface reconstruction methods with accurate unsplit advection schemes.

이 연구는 2 차원 CCU (Cellwise Conservative Unsplit) 방식을 확장하는 두 가지 분할되지 않은 기하학적 VOF 방식을 제시합니다 [Comminal et al., J. Comput. Phys. 283 (2015) 582–608]을 3 차원으로 변경했습니다. 3D-CCU 체계의 참신함은 4 차 Runge-Kutta 체계로 정점이 계산되는 다면체 표면으로 기부 지역의 줄무늬 표면을 표현하는 데 있습니다.

더욱, 가변 액체 부피는 절단 알고리즘을 사용하여 계산됩니다 [López et al., J. Comput. Phys. 392 (2019) 666–693]은 임의의 볼록하지 않고 자기 교차하는 다면체에 적합하며, 이는 사면체 분해의 필요성을 제거합니다. 3D-CCU 이류 계획은 세 가지 인터페이스 재구성 방법 (Youngs의 방법, Mixed Youngs-Centered 계획 및 Least-Square Fit 알고리즘)과 결합되었습니다. 결과 VOF 방법은 평행 이동, 강체 회전, 전단 및 변형 흐름을 포함한 고전적인 벤치 마크 이류 테스트에서 테스트되었습니다.

제안된 3D-CCU 방식은 액체 부피를 보존하고 기계 정밀도에 대한 액체 부피 분율의 물리적 경계를 유지합니다. 3D-CCU 방식은 Youngs의 인터페이스 재구성 방식과 결합 할 때 다른 분할되지 않은 기하학적 VOF 방식에 비해 우수한 성능을 발휘합니다.

또한 Least-Square Fit 알고리즘과 결합 된 3D-CCU 체계는 Mosso-Swartz 인터페이스 재구성의 3D 확장이 사용되는 경우를 제외하고 2 차 정확한 인터페이스 재구성을 사용하는 대부분의 다른 VOF 체계보다 더 정확합니다. 서로 다른 VOF 체계의 비교는 정확한 인터페이스 재구성 방법과 정확한 분할되지 않은 이류 체계를 결합하는 것의 중요성을 강조합니다.

Keywords

Volume-of-fluid methodUnsplit geometric schemeCellwise advectionSemi-Lagrangian trackingVolume conservation

Fig. 1. Eulerian fluxwise advection. (a) Positive donating region with respect to the left cell; (b) Negative donating region; (c) Intersection of a donating region with the cell's face, yielding a positive and a negative region; (d) Temporally-consistent donating regions equivalent to a cellwise advection; (e) Temporal inconsistency of adjacent donating regions.
Fig. 1. Eulerian fluxwise advection. (a) Positive donating region with respect to the left cell; (b) Negative donating region; (c) Intersection of a donating region with the cell’s face, yielding a positive and a negative region; (d) Temporally-consistent donating regions equivalent to a cellwise advection; (e) Temporal inconsistency of adjacent donating regions.
Fig. 2. Semi-Lagrangian cellwise advection. (a) Forward advection scheme, (b) Backward advection scheme.
Fig. 2. Semi-Lagrangian cellwise advection. (a) Forward advection scheme, (b) Backward advection scheme.
Fig. 3. (a) Cartesian grid cell. (b) Images of the cell's vertices with ruled surfaces. (c) Polyhedral cell's image with triangulated faces.
Fig. 3. (a) Cartesian grid cell. (b) Images of the cell’s vertices with ruled surfaces. (c) Polyhedral cell’s image with triangulated faces.
Fig. 4. Construction of donating regions. (a) Streakline of a cell's vertex P0 represented by the 2-segment polygonal line P0–P1/2–P1. (b) Triangulated streaksurface of a cell's edge P0Q0. (c) Streaktube of a cell's face P0Q0R0S0. (d) Pyramidal volume flux correction  ⁎  capping the donating region of the face P0Q0R0S0.
Fig. 4. Construction of donating regions. (a) Streakline of a cell’s vertex P0 represented by the 2-segment polygonal line P0–P1/2–P1. (b) Triangulated streaksurface of a cell’s edge P0Q0. (c) Streaktube of a cell’s face P0Q0R0S0. (d) Pyramidal volume flux correction ⁎ capping the donating region of the face P0Q0R0S0.
Fig. 5. Interface reconstruction. (a) PLIC polygon in the grid cell, (b) Non-planar image of the PLIC polygon inside the cell's image by isomorphism, (c) Planar PLIC inside the cell's image by computation of the average normal vector. (Triangulation of the cell's image faces are omitted for clarity.)
Fig. 5. Interface reconstruction. (a) PLIC polygon in the grid cell, (b) Non-planar image of the PLIC polygon inside the cell’s image by isomorphism, (c) Planar PLIC inside the cell’s image by computation of the average normal vector. (Triangulation of the cell’s image faces are omitted for clarity.)
Fig. 6. Convergence of the geometric errors in the translation tests.
Fig. 6. Convergence of the geometric errors in the translation tests.
Fig. 7. Reconstructed PLIC polygons (in light blue) superimposed to the exact sphere position (in dark blue) at the end of the rotation tests for the LSF method and CFL = 1.
Fig. 7. Reconstructed PLIC polygons (in light blue) superimposed to the exact sphere position (in dark blue) at the end of the rotation tests for the LSF method and CFL = 1.
Fig. 8. Reconstructed PLIC polygons in the shear tests, at Tf/2 (top row) and Tf (bottom row). Blue polygons are computed with the LSF procedure; green polygons with centered column differences; red polygons with Youngs' method.
Fig. 8. Reconstructed PLIC polygons in the shear tests, at Tf/2 (top row) and Tf (bottom row). Blue polygons are computed with the LSF procedure; green polygons with centered column differences; red polygons with Youngs’ method.
Fig. 9. Reconstructed PLIC polygons in the deformation tests, at Tf/2 (top row) and Tf (bottom row). Blue polygons are computed with the LSF procedure; green polygons with centered column differences; red polygons with Youngs' method.
Fig. 9. Reconstructed PLIC polygons in the deformation tests, at Tf/2 (top row) and Tf (bottom row). Blue polygons are computed with the LSF procedure; green polygons with centered column differences; red polygons with Youngs’ method.

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1
This definition of the CFL number is different from the usual definition used in multi-dimensional algebraic advection schemes. However, the component-wise definition is more meaningful in the context of geometric VOF schemes, because it determines the number of layers of cells around the interfacial cells where the liquid volume fractions need to be updated.